web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu

These are the best pet care providers in NoVA, according to readers

Westlake Legal Group man-hugging-dog These are the best pet care providers in NoVA, according to readers reader poll pets pet-friendly locations pet care grooming dog walking best pet care list best pet care Animals
Photo by Eric Ward on Unsplash

Methodology
Northern Virginia Magazine ran an online reader poll to determine the 2019 list of Best Pet Care. We asked readers and pet owners to nominate their favorite services in a number of related categories. Although some winners choose to advertise in the magazine, no one can pay to be included on the list. The listing and advertising sections are separate entities.

This post originally appeared in our October 2019 issue. To subscribe to the magazine, click here.

Day Care and Boarding

A Dog’s Day Out
403-B Swann Ave., Alexandria; 703-739-2336
44642 Guilford Drive, Suite 101, Ashburn; 703-858-3647
6680 Fayette St., Haymarket; 703-596-3647
5425-B Port Royal Road, Springfield; 703-321-3647
4536 Eisenhower Ave., Alexandria; 571-312-7723
2800-A Gallows Road, Vienna; 703-698-3647

Affectionate Pet Care
3851 Pickett Road, Fairfax; 703-250-5233

Dogtopia
720 Jackson St., Herndon; 703-436-9162
10352 Balls Ford Road, Manassas; 703-278-2101

Fur-Get Me Not
4140 S. Four Mile Run Drive, Arlington; 703-933-1935

Healthy Hound Playground
45910 Transamerica Plaza, Suite 109, Sterling; 703-464-0056

Olde Towne Pet Resort
21460 Squire Court, Sterling; 888-475-3580
8101 Alban Road, Springfield; 888-475-3580

Dog Eaze Inn
13907 Telegraph Road, Woodbridge; 703-496-4392

Paws Awhile Pet Motel
7353 Woodlawn Lane, Warrenton; 540-347-4855

Pender Pet Retreat
4508 Upper Cub Run Drive, Chantilly; 703-631-9590

Whole Dogz
4748 Eisenhower Ave., Alexandria; 703-751-3649

Dog Park

Duke Street
Duke Street, Alexandria; 703-746-4774

Glencarlyn Park
301 S. Harrison St., Arlington; 703-228-6525

K-9 Gunner Dog Park
13000 Minnieville Road, Woodbridge; 703-792-6000

Baron Cameron Dog Park
11300 Baron Cameron Ave., Reston; 703-324-8785

Mason District
Intersection of Alpine Drive and Pinecrest Parkway, Annandale; 703-324-8702

Monticello Park
5315 Guinea Road, Burke; 703-324-8702

Shirlington Dog Park
2710 S. Oakland St., Arlington; 703-228-6525

South Riding Dog Park
25168 Elk Lick Road, South Riding; 703-327-4390

Vint Hill Dog Park
4263 Aiken Drive, Warrenton

Groomer

A Dog’s Day Out
Multiple locations, See Day Care and Boarding for addresses

Bark + Boarding
5818-C Seminary Road, Baileys Crossroads; 703-931-5057

Barks ‘n Bubbles
11725 Lee Highway, Suite A-17A, Fairfax; 703-352-9274

Belly Rubs and Suds
43330 Junction Plaza, Suite 178, Ashburn; 571-295-5516

Canine Carousel
422 Elden St., Herndon; 703-709-8746
43135 Broadland Center Plaza, Suite 129, Ashburn; 703-687-4626

Dog Krazy
307 William St., Fredericksburg; 540-373-4168

Dogma Gourmet Dog Bakery & Boutique
2772 S. Arlington Mill Drive, Arlington; 571-422-0370
11414 Washington Plaza W., Reston; 703-437-3429

Dogtopia
3850 Dulles S. Court, Suite D, Chantilly; 703-278-2021
720 Jackson St., Herndon; 703-436-9162

From Head to Tail Grooming Spa
430 Hume Ave., Alexandria; 571-312-7989

Groom n’ Glory
2339 Saint Germain Drive, Suite 14011-H, Centreville; 703-830-5574

Hairy Situations
1504 A Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria; 703-518-3030

Happy Grooming
3301 Lee Highway, Arlington; 703-528-7292 and 703-528-2689

Healthy Hound Playground
45910 Transamerica Plaza, Suite 109, Sterling; 703-464-0056

Kaiser Pet Care
Intersection of Prince William Parkway and Davis Ford Road, Woodbridge; 571-494-7279

Olde Towne Pet Resort
Multiple locations, See Day Care and Boarding for addresses; 888-475-3580

Woofie’s
44200 Waxpool Road, Suite 137, Ashburn; 571-426-6503

Lucky Dog Grooming
9439 Main St., Manassas; 703-895-4456

The Pet Spa at Barkley Square
105 N. Virginia Ave., Suite 101, Falls Church; 703-237-3650

The Polished Pooch Grooming Salon
6601 Jefferson St., Haymarket; 703-753-2400

Vienna Pet Spaw
101 Church St. NW, Suite A, Vienna; 703-319-7729

Mobile Pet Services

Lap of Love Veterinary Hospice
3136 Singleton Circle, Fairfax; 703-870-5489

Dog Sharp Mobile Pet Grooming
8320 Hilltop Ave., Vienna; 703-945-6767

Katie’s Mobile Pet Spaw
Multiple locations serviced; 571-758-3174

VIP Pet Elite
110 S. West St., Alexandria; 703-586-5976

Woofie’s
44200 Waxpool Road, Suite 137, Ashburn; 571-426-6503

Cherished Companion Mobile Veterinary Services
11160-C1 S. Lakes Drive, Suite 248, Reston; 571-533-4873

Companion Paws Mobile Vet Services
4090 Waterfowl Lane, Amissville; 571-261-4116

NOVA Mobile Vet
8352-H Terminal Road, Lorton; 866-946-7387

Pet-Friendly Drinking & Dining

Breaux Vineyards
36888 Breaux Vineyards Lane, Purcellville; 540-668-6299

2 Silos Brewing Company
9925 Discovery Blvd., Manassas; 703-420-2264

Barrel Oak Winery
3623 Grove Lane, Delaplane; 540-364-6402

Copperwood Tavern
20465 Exchange St., Ashburn; 703-724-4006
4021 Campbell Ave., Arlington; 703-552-8010

Dirt Farm Brewery
18701 Foggy Bottom Road, Bluemont; 540-554-2337

Lost Dog Café
808 N. Henry St., Alexandria; 571-970-6511
2729A Merrilee Drive, Fairfax; 703-205-9001
1690 Anderson Road, Suite A, McLean; 703-356-5678
5876 Washington Blvd., Arlington; 703-237-1552
2920 Columbia Pike, Arlington; 703-553-7770

Maggie Malick’s Wine Cave
12138 Harpers Ferry Road, Purcellville; 540-905-2921

Powers Farm & Brewery
9269 Redemption Way, Midland; 540-272-5060

Quattro Goombas Winery
22860 James Monroe Highway, Aldie; 703-327-6052

Stone Tower Winery
19925 Hogback Mountain Road, Leesburg; 703-777-2797

The Farm Brewery at Broad Run
16015 John Marshall Highway, Broad Run; 703-753-3548

Three Fox Vineyards
10100 Three Fox Lane, Delaplane; 540-364-6073

Vanish Farmwoods Brewery
42245 Black Hops Lane, Leesburg; 703-779-7407

Virtue Feed and Grain
106 S. Union St., Alexandria; 571-970-3669

Vola’s Dockside Grill
101 N. Union St., Alexandria; 703-935-8890

Whitlow’s on Wilson
2854 Wilson Blvd., Arlington; 703-276-9693

Pet Memorializing

In Memoriam Pet Services
4500 Upper Cub Run Drive, Chantilly; 703-537-7373

Rainbow Bridge Pet Services
39710 Rocky Lane, Lovettsville; 703-973-5088

Sunset Pet Services Inc.
5521 Vine St., Alexandria; 703-971-4120

The Pet Loss Center Chantilly
13929 Willard Road, Chantilly; 571-299-4791

Pet Sitters and Dog Walkers

All Friends Pet Care
Multiple locations serviced; 703-716-7387

Becky’s Pet Care Inc.
433-B Carlisle Drive, Herndon; 703-822-0933
7200 Fullerton Road, Suite B-200, Springfield; 703-822-0933
13478 Minnieville Road, Suite 203, Woodbridge; 703-822-0933

Doodlebug Dog Walker
Services available in Prince William and parts of Fairfax County; 571-969-5717

The Happy Paws Pet Nanny
Multiple locations serviced; 571-292-1766

KSR Pet Care
McLean; 703-945-5045

Make My Day Please, LLC
Multiple locations serviced; 703-624-3583

Meg’s Loving Pet Care
12997 Kyle Moor Place, Bristow; 703-338-3446

Passionately Pets
1 E. Bellafonte Ave., Alexandria; 571-438-2323

Paw Pals Pet Sitting
14001-C Saint Germain Drive, Suite 213, Centreville; 703-345-1695

Presidential Pet Care
Lorton; 571-730-7730

Villaridge Pet Sitters
11654 Plaza America Drive, Reston; 703-732-8242

Walking the Dogs, LLC
7481 Huntsman Blvd., Suite 210, Springfield; 703-473-9768

Woofie’s
44200 Waxpool Road, Suite 137, Ashburn; 571-426-6503

Your Dog Smiles Pet Services
44121 Harry Byrd Highway, Suite 240-F, Ashburn; 703-962-7222

Pet Supply Store

DogGone Natural
44031 Ashburn Village Shopping Plaza, Suite 287, Ashburn; 703-858-1112
21 Catoctin Circle NE, Leesburg; 571-291-3970

Dogma Gourmet Dog Bakery & Bakery Boutique
Multiple locations, See Groomer category for addresses and phone numbers

Felix & Oscar
6671-A Backlick Road, Springfield; 703-866-0222

Happy Hound
19352 Promenade Drive, Leesburg; 571-333-2171

Loyal Companion
3903-F Fair Ridge Drive, Fairfax; 703-830-5454

Nature’s Nibbles
2601 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria; 703-931-5241

Old Town School for Dogs
529 Oronoco St., Alexandria; 703-836-7643

The Dog Park
705 King St., Alexandria; 703-888-2818

Weber’s Pet Supermarket
11021 Lee Highway, Fairfax; 703-385-3766
2599 John Milton Drive, Herndon; 703-476-3536
14508-G Lee Road, Chantilly; 703-631-2738

Your Dog’s Best Friend – Weber’s Pet Supermarket
1323 Chain Bridge Road, McLean; 703-356-7437

Shelters and Rescue Centers

Animal Welfare League of Alexandria
4101 Eisenhower Ave., Alexandria; 703-746-4774

Animal Welfare League of Arlington
2650 S. Arlington Mill Drive, Arlington; 703-931-9241

Fairfax County Animal Shelter
4500 W. Ox Road, Fairfax; 703-830-1100

Fauquier SPCA
9350 Rogues Road, Midland; 540-788-9000

Friends of Homeless Animals
39710 Goodpuppy Lane, Aldie; 703-385-0224

Homeward Trails Adoption Center
11116 Fairfax Station Road, Fairfax; 703-249-5066

King Street Cats
25 S. Dove St., Alexandria; 703-231-7199

Lab Rescue LRCP
Annandale; 301-299-6756

Lost Dog & Cat Rescue Foundation
Arlington; 703-295-3647

Loudoun County Animal Services
39820 Charles Town Pike, Waterford; 703-777-0406

Paws for Seniors
Bealton; 540-748-8177

Wolf Trap Animal Rescue
Merrifield; 703-638-2531

Training and Behavior

Fur-Get Me Not
4140 S. Four Mile Run Drive, Arlington; 703-933-1935

Wholistic Hound Academy
18 Roth St., Alexandria; 703-962-6335

Woofs! Dog Training Center
4160 S. Four Mile Run Drive, Arlington; 703-536-7877
4241-A N. Pershing Drive, Arlington; 703-526-0218

Off Leash K9 Training
2627 Hanco Center Drive, Woodbridge; 571-252-5536

Pawsome Pups Dog Training
14878 Cider Mill Road, Hillsboro; 540-668-9095

Sit Means Sit Dog Training
9823 Godwin Drive, Manassas; 703-342-6164

Holistic Therapy

Pet Rehab
Treatment available in Fairfax, Great Falls and Springfield; 571-213-2624

Veterinary Holistic Center
7950 Woodruff Court, Suite 1, Springfield; 703-662-4494

Wholistic Paws Veterinary Services
20600 Gordon Park Square, Suite 170, Ashburn; 571-438-0339

Independent Hill Veterinary Clinic
13444 Dumfries Road, Manassas; 703-791-2083

Wholistic Hound Academy
18 Roth St., Alexandria; 703-962-6335

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lord Ashcroft: PTSD-suffering military veterans show long-term benefits from working with orphaned baby rhinos

 

Lord Ashcroft KCMG PC is an international businessman, philanthropist, author and pollster. For more information about his work, visit www.lordashcroft.com | www.lordashcroftwildlife.com | www.lordashcroftpolls.com.

In December last year, I travelled to a secret location just outside South Africa’s famous Kruger National Park to report on a unique project.

The location was, and still is, secret because it is where dozens of young rhinos, some only weeks or months old, are brought when they are found abandoned and orphaned: in almost all cases their mothers have been brutally shot and dehorned, sometimes while they are still alive, by poachers.

So if the evil poachers knew the location of the Care for Wild Rhino Sanctuary, they could go there in search of easy pickings: some of the older rhinos have well-established – and therefore valuable – horns.

I travelled to South Africa to report on first-ever Footprints of Hope project, which was organised by a British-based charity, Veterans for Wildlife. The intention of the programme was for humans and animals, both damaged by traumatic events in their lives, to benefit from the other’s existence through Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT).

In fact, I sponsored the first Footprints of Hope programme because of my dual interests in supporting military veterans (I was the Prime Minister’s Special Representative for Veterans Transition for six years until resigning last year) and protecting wildlife.

The programme’s aims were ambitious considering the trauma that its participants had encountered: “To equip and empower veterans with the tools and support they need to make immediate and long-term changes to their mental wellbeing, allowing them to lead happy and fulfilling civilian lives.”

Five British military veterans, all suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDSD) and some suffering from physical injuries too, spent two weeks at the orphanage caring for the baby rhinos. I wrote about this in a lengthy feature for The Daily Telegraph Magazine published on January 26 this year. The initial indications from the project were good: that the five veterans – three men and two women – had benefitted from their AAT programme. But were these gains only short rather than long term?

The only way to find out was to interview the veterans again and to discover from the programme organiser and clinical psychologist if they felt the veterans had made significant progress to their lives in the long run. This time the location for the interviews was less exotic: a first-floor room in Battersea, central London, where Veterans for Wildlife has its office. However, the positive feedback that the veterans recounted to me was equally encouraging to that I had received from them in South Africa many months earlier.

Pete Dunning, 34, a former Royal Marines Commando, was forced to leave the military after he lost both his legs and suffered other serious injuries when his Viking armoured vehicle was struck by an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province in May 2008.

He said of Footprints of Hope: “Being in South Africa and having the experience that we had out there has given us the tools to take back into every-day situations.” Pete observed his family and friends had commented, since his return from Africa, that he seemed to have a better and calmer approach to life. “I definitely feel more positive about the future. I have gone through peaks and troughs since South Africa but there have been more good times than bad. I feel better in myself and there are people out there [fellow veterans from the programme] that I can rely on if I need help.”

Pete, a divorced father of two, is now in a new relationship and working on a military study into the effect of battlefield injuries. He hopes one day to return to South Africa to see how the rhinos he was working with are progressing.

Chris Corbett, 32, served for eight years in the Army, becoming a corporal in the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment. He left the military after being injured by shrapnel during a tour of Iraq in May 2007. After suffering with aggression and depression, he was eventually diagnosed with complex PTSD. He currently works for a construction company.
Chris said of his Footprints of Hope experience: “It’s helped me absolute wonders…The main thing is how we have gelled together as a team, obviously [from] going out to Africa and doing a lot of work together and having to help each other out in physical and mental situations. We are still strong as a team, many months later. I have made friends for life.”

Chris said that speaking to two members of the group who had competed in the Invictus Games, an international event for wounded and sick military personnel and veterans, had encouraged him to get back into training with the aim of competing in power-lifting and rowing events. “It’s something I would probably never have done in the past: big crowds, a lot of people there. It’s just something that would have made me feel uncomfortable back in the past but it’s something I am really driven to go and do now,” he said.

Chris, who lives with his partner and their two daughters, has fond memories of his time working with the rhinos: “I fell in love with Africa when I went there,” he said. “It’s changed me in positive ways.”

Martin Bodley, 30, who left the Army in 2012 after seven years, was a craftsman in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and completed two tours of Afghanistan. He has since struggled with heavy drinking and depression and was diagnosed with PTSD. He currently works as a civilian investigator with Avon and Somerset Police.

“For me the long-term benefit has been the network…having such a close bond with the other veterans, being able to talk to them and realise that I am not alone,” he told me. “When first depression hits you and [then] anxiety and everything else flows into you, you very much feel isolated…Yet speaking to people [fellow programme members] who have common knowledge of what is going on is a big part of Footprints of Hope.”

Martin, who is divorced with a young daughter but now in a new relationship, said he feels more positive about the future because of his “absolutely incredible experience” in South Africa, working with the vulnerable young rhinos. “We all worked so well as a team,” he added. Footprints of Hope had introduced him to yoga and meditation, which he continues to do and which he says “helps me a lot”.

The other two veterans on the Footprints of Hope programme, Jennifer Jessey and Jennifer Yarwood, have also made significant progress as a result of being in South Africa but they find it more difficult to speak publicly about their experiences.

Wes Thomson, the London-based South African founder and chief executive of Veterans for Wildlife, and himself a veteran of the Royal Marines, said of the charity’s first Footprints of Hope programme: “It has been better than we ever anticipated. It’s been massively rewarding to see the progress of the veterans in terms of their mental health and well-being. We are delighted to have been able to play our small part in their journey towards recovery.

“Lots of lessons have been learnt – it was a hugely complicated project with many different moving parts. There are a few things that we will change going forward that will make the project better.” He said that in the future, providied the funding is in place, the charity hopes to arrange two Footprints of Hope projects each year.

Jovika Wiese, a South African-based clinical psychologist, who took the five veterans for group and individual sessions, recorded a significant decrease in PTSD symptoms for those who took part in the programme, and she noted that they related better to other people and felt better about their futures at the end of their treatment.

Her conclusion was: “It is clear from the assessment results that the FOH programme was able to achieve its aim of creating a catalyst for participants and start them on a journey where they could feel comfortable to facilitate elements of their own wellbeing and take a different path.”

All five participants in the Footprints of Hope project have told me that they would encourage other veterans with mental health and physical disabilities to apply for future programmes.

As Martin Bodley put it: “It’s done me the world of good, you [as a veteran] could be the next one to benefit. Go for it. For the five of us who went out there, it has very much changed our lives. It could change your life too.”

Pete Dunnett said that his message to other veterans was: “It’s the most unique course that you can imagine. There is nothing else out there like it. So why haven’t you applied yet?”

I feel privileged to have met all the five veterans in South Africa and to have met with most of them for a second time in London. I have found it a humbling experience to observe them at work in South Africa and then, months later, to hear them talk so enthusiastically about the benefits that their programme had given them.

Footprints of Hope has significantly improved the lives of five young veterans and I am confident that, in future, it will have a similar effect on many others who take up the challenge provided by the programme.

For more information on the Footprints of Hope programme, visit: www.veterans4wildlife.org/footprints-of-hope-veterans-wellness-retreat

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It.

BEIJING — Garlic was dead, and there was nothing Huang Yu could do. So on a cold winter day, he buried his cat’s body in a park close to his home.

Hours later, still heartbroken, the 22-year-old businessman recalled an article he had read on dog cloning in China. What if someday he could bring Garlic back to life?

“In my heart, Garlic is irreplaceable,” said Mr. Huang, who dug up his British shorthair and put the cat in his refrigerator in preparation for cloning him. “Garlic didn’t leave anything for future generations, so I could only choose to clone.”

That thought led him to Sinogene, a commercial pet-cloning company based in Beijing. Roughly $35,000 and seven months later, Sinogene produced what China’s official news media declared to be the country’s first cloned cat — and another sign of the country’s emergence as a power in cloning and genetics.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160086801_e6ee4775-0d22-4d10-88ff-c0e214ddbc2d-articleLarge His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It. Sinogene Research pets Genetics and Heredity Cloning China cats Animals Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare

Chen Benchi, head of Sinogene’s medical experiments team, weighing Garlic. The kitten will stay at the lab for another month before he is sent home to Huang Yu.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

It also suggests that China could turn pet cloning into a viable business. Duplicating dogs and cats has not really taken off in the United States and elsewhere, experts say. Pet-obsessed China might be different. The size of China’s domestic pet market is expected to reach $28.2 billion this year, up nearly one-fifth from 2018, according to Gouminwang, a pet consultancy in Beijing. The country already has 55 million pet dogs and 44 million pet cats, and demand for cats is accelerating.

Pet cloning is not confined to China — Barbra Streisand famously declared last year that two of her dogs are clones — and people have been cloning cats for years. But Garlic is the first cat cloned by China, solidifying its position among major cloning nations, which include the United States, Britain and South Korea.

Mi Jidong, Sinogene’s chief executive, said the company decided to start cloning pets in 2015 after conducting a survey of roughly 1,000 people that showed there was demand. The company has cloned more than 40 dogs, including schnauzers, Pomeranians and Malteses, at a cost of about $53,000 each, some as pets and others for medical research.

It charges more for dogs than cats because the window for harvesting a dog’s eggs is very small, according to Mr. Mi. He said more than 100 people had stored the DNA samples of their pets in anticipation of creating clones.

Mi Jidong, Sinogene’s chief executive.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

Sinogene’s yearlong effort to clone a cat was motivated by market research that showed that cats are becoming increasingly popular in China, said Mr. Mi, who has never owned a pet. (“Cats and dogs require too much care,” he said.)

China’s genetics know-how is growing rapidly. Ever since Chinese scientists cloned a female goat in 2000, they have succeeded in producing the world’s first primate clones, editing the embryos of monkeys to insert genes associated with autism and mental illness, and creating superstrong dogs by tinkering with their genes. Last year, the country stunned the world after a Chinese scientist announced that he had created the world’s first genetically edited babies.

Pet cloning is largely unregulated and controversial where it is done, but in China the barriers are especially low. Many Chinese people do not think that using animals for medical research or cosmetics testing is cruel, or that pet cloning is potentially problematic. There are also no laws against animal cruelty.

Barbra Streisand Cloned Her Dog. For $50,000, You Can Clone Yours.

Feb. 28, 2018

Westlake Legal Group 01xp-streisand2-threeByTwoSmallAt2X His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It. Sinogene Research pets Genetics and Heredity Cloning China cats Animals Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare
Barbra Streisand Explains: Why I Cloned My Dog

March 2, 2018

Westlake Legal Group 04STREISAND-clones-threeByTwoSmallAt2X His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It. Sinogene Research pets Genetics and Heredity Cloning China cats Animals Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare

“It satisfies the owner’s spiritual needs and increases happiness,” said Wang Chuduan, a professor at China Agricultural University in Beijing. “There is a market demand. So what’s the problem?”

Sinogene has bigger ambitions than cats and dogs. It is cloning a horse, and Mr. Mi said his next big goal was to clone endangered animals, including pandas and the South China tiger.

“I believe it will be quite difficult and we will need some more time,” Mr. Mi said in a conference room surrounded by framed pictures of his company’s cloning successes, like China’s first cloned police dog.

Critics contend that pet cloning is inefficient and inhumane. It is not clear what will happen to the resulting animals, or the impact when they mix with the broader gene pool. The money could be better spent on caring for existing animals, the critics say.

Jessica Pierce, a bioethicist at the University of Colorado Denver, cites the use of cats as surrogate mothers to produce clones, which she said was “similar to the harm that you would impose on a woman whose only purpose in life is to be a breeding machine for man.”

“The cat has no intrinsic value,” Dr. Pierce said. “It’s used as an object, as a means to somebody’s end.”

To clone Garlic, scientists implanted skin cells from Mr. Huang’s original cat into eggs harvested from other cats. After an electric or chemical shock, 40 cloned embryos were implanted into four surrogate mother cats. That produced three pregnancies, two of which were miscarriages, said Chen Benchi, head of Sinogene’s medical experiments team.

Mr. Huang’s deceased cat, Garlic.CreditHuang Yu Garlic’s clone, Garlic.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

“The harm is very small,” said Mr. Mi, Sinogene’s chief executive.

Scientists outside China have not yet inspected Garlic, who was born on July 21. But the company’s chief scientist, Lai Liangxue, was an assistant professor at the University of Missouri, and his cloning research has been published in the respected journals Nature and Science.

A visit to Sinogene’s laboratory on the outskirts of Beijing offered scenes out of something like a feline version of “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Garlic’s clone, a gray-and-white kitten, snoozed with his surrogate mother, a different breed from Garlic. He later played with a fur ball while three pregnant surrogate cats watched from cages. The new Garlic is scheduled to stay at Sinogene’s laboratory for another month for observation before he is sent to Mr. Huang.

Elsewhere, two lab workers in blue coats were focused on testing the paternity of horses. Tanks of liquid nitrogen held the cells of pets.

Mr. Huang was initially put off by the roughly $35,000 price. But in a telephone interview from the eastern city of Wenzhou, he said getting Garlic back was worth more than that, even though his parents disapproved. The original Garlic died in January from a urinary tract infection at age 2.

A researcher at a Sinogene lab. The company was motivated by market research that showed that cats are becoming increasingly popular in China.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

On the day Garlic died and was buried, Mr. Huang exhumed Garlic’s corpse, wrapped it carefully and placed it in his refrigerator. He then waited for a Sinogene employee to arrive from Beijing to extract skin cells from Garlic and bank them. Mr. Huang decided about a month after Garlic’s death to go through with the cloning.

In his first meeting with the new Garlic in August, Mr. Huang found that cloning had not produced an exact copy of his former pet. The clone is missing a patch of black fur that graced Garlic’s chin. Sinogene said that clones might show slight differences in fur or eye color and that an outside firm had proved the DNA matched.

“If I tell you I wasn’t disappointed, then I would be lying to you,” Mr. Huang said. “But I’m also willing to accept that there are certain situations in which there are limitations to the technology.”

At a news conference last month to unveil the cloned Garlic, Mr. Mi was quoted as saying that he was considering using artificial intelligence to transplant the memories of the original pet to the cloned one.

When asked about that statement, Mr. Mi said it was not something that his company would embark on but added that it was a possibility that the technology could provide.

“It’s a way to imagine the future,” he said.

Yiwei Wang and Elsie Chen contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It.

BEIJING — Garlic was dead, and there was nothing Huang Yu could do. So on a cold winter day, he buried his cat’s body in a park close to his home.

Hours later, still heartbroken, the 22-year-old businessman recalled an article he had read on dog cloning in China. What if someday he could bring Garlic back to life?

“In my heart, Garlic is irreplaceable,” said Mr. Huang, who dug up his British shorthair and put the cat in his refrigerator in preparation for cloning him. “Garlic didn’t leave anything for future generations, so I could only choose to clone.”

That thought led him to Sinogene, a commercial pet-cloning company based in Beijing. Roughly $35,000 and seven months later, Sinogene produced what China’s official news media declared to be the country’s first cloned cat — and another sign of the country’s emergence as a power in cloning and genetics.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160086801_e6ee4775-0d22-4d10-88ff-c0e214ddbc2d-articleLarge His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It. Sinogene Research pets Genetics and Heredity Cloning China cats Animals Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare

Chen Benchi, head of Sinogene’s medical experiments team, weighing Garlic. The kitten will stay at the lab for another month before he is sent home to Huang Yu.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

It also suggests that China could turn pet cloning into a viable business. Duplicating dogs and cats has not really taken off in the United States and elsewhere, experts say. Pet-obsessed China might be different. The size of China’s domestic pet market is expected to reach $28.2 billion this year, up nearly one-fifth from 2018, according to Gouminwang, a pet consultancy in Beijing. The country already has 55 million pet dogs and 44 million pet cats, and demand for cats is accelerating.

Pet cloning is not confined to China — Barbra Streisand famously declared last year that two of her dogs are clones — and people have been cloning cats for years. But Garlic is the first cat cloned by China, solidifying its position among major cloning nations, which include the United States, Britain and South Korea.

Mi Jidong, Sinogene’s chief executive, said the company decided to start cloning pets in 2015 after conducting a survey of roughly 1,000 people that showed there was demand. The company has cloned more than 40 dogs, including schnauzers, Pomeranians and Malteses, at a cost of about $53,000 each, some as pets and others for medical research.

It charges more for dogs than cats because the window for harvesting a dog’s eggs is very small, according to Mr. Mi. He said more than 100 people had stored the DNA samples of their pets in anticipation of creating clones.

Mi Jidong, Sinogene’s chief executive.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

Sinogene’s yearlong effort to clone a cat was motivated by market research that showed that cats are becoming increasingly popular in China, said Mr. Mi, who has never owned a pet. (“Cats and dogs require too much care,” he said.)

China’s genetics know-how is growing rapidly. Ever since Chinese scientists cloned a female goat in 2000, they have succeeded in producing the world’s first primate clones, editing the embryos of monkeys to insert genes associated with autism and mental illness, and creating superstrong dogs by tinkering with their genes. Last year, the country stunned the world after a Chinese scientist announced that he had created the world’s first genetically edited babies.

Pet cloning is largely unregulated and controversial where it is done, but in China the barriers are especially low. Many Chinese people do not think that using animals for medical research or cosmetics testing is cruel, or that pet cloning is potentially problematic. There are also no laws against animal cruelty.

Barbra Streisand Cloned Her Dog. For $50,000, You Can Clone Yours.

Feb. 28, 2018

Westlake Legal Group 01xp-streisand2-threeByTwoSmallAt2X His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It. Sinogene Research pets Genetics and Heredity Cloning China cats Animals Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare
Barbra Streisand Explains: Why I Cloned My Dog

March 2, 2018

Westlake Legal Group 04STREISAND-clones-threeByTwoSmallAt2X His Cat’s Death Left Him Heartbroken. So He Cloned It. Sinogene Research pets Genetics and Heredity Cloning China cats Animals Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare

“It satisfies the owner’s spiritual needs and increases happiness,” said Wang Chuduan, a professor at China Agricultural University in Beijing. “There is a market demand. So what’s the problem?”

Sinogene has bigger ambitions than cats and dogs. It is cloning a horse, and Mr. Mi said his next big goal was to clone endangered animals, including pandas and the South China tiger.

“I believe it will be quite difficult and we will need some more time,” Mr. Mi said in a conference room surrounded by framed pictures of his company’s cloning successes, like China’s first cloned police dog.

Critics contend that pet cloning is inefficient and inhumane. It is not clear what will happen to the resulting animals, or the impact when they mix with the broader gene pool. The money could be better spent on caring for existing animals, the critics say.

Jessica Pierce, a bioethicist at the University of Colorado Denver, cites the use of cats as surrogate mothers to produce clones, which she said was “similar to the harm that you would impose on a woman whose only purpose in life is to be a breeding machine for man.”

“The cat has no intrinsic value,” Dr. Pierce said. “It’s used as an object, as a means to somebody’s end.”

To clone Garlic, scientists implanted skin cells from Mr. Huang’s original cat into eggs harvested from other cats. After an electric or chemical shock, 40 cloned embryos were implanted into four surrogate mother cats. That produced three pregnancies, two of which were miscarriages, said Chen Benchi, head of Sinogene’s medical experiments team.

Mr. Huang’s deceased cat, Garlic.CreditHuang Yu Garlic’s clone, Garlic.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

“The harm is very small,” said Mr. Mi, Sinogene’s chief executive.

Scientists outside China have not yet inspected Garlic, who was born on July 21. But the company’s chief scientist, Lai Liangxue, was an assistant professor at the University of Missouri, and his cloning research has been published in the respected journals Nature and Science.

A visit to Sinogene’s laboratory on the outskirts of Beijing offered scenes out of something like a feline version of “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Garlic’s clone, a gray-and-white kitten, snoozed with his surrogate mother, a different breed from Garlic. He later played with a fur ball while three pregnant surrogate cats watched from cages. The new Garlic is scheduled to stay at Sinogene’s laboratory for another month for observation before he is sent to Mr. Huang.

Elsewhere, two lab workers in blue coats were focused on testing the paternity of horses. Tanks of liquid nitrogen held the cells of pets.

Mr. Huang was initially put off by the roughly $35,000 price. But in a telephone interview from the eastern city of Wenzhou, he said getting Garlic back was worth more than that, even though his parents disapproved. The original Garlic died in January from a urinary tract infection at age 2.

A researcher at a Sinogene lab. The company was motivated by market research that showed that cats are becoming increasingly popular in China.CreditYan Cong for The New York Times

On the day Garlic died and was buried, Mr. Huang exhumed Garlic’s corpse, wrapped it carefully and placed it in his refrigerator. He then waited for a Sinogene employee to arrive from Beijing to extract skin cells from Garlic and bank them. Mr. Huang decided about a month after Garlic’s death to go through with the cloning.

In his first meeting with the new Garlic in August, Mr. Huang found that cloning had not produced an exact copy of his former pet. The clone is missing a patch of black fur that graced Garlic’s chin. Sinogene said that clones might show slight differences in fur or eye color and that an outside firm had proved the DNA matched.

“If I tell you I wasn’t disappointed, then I would be lying to you,” Mr. Huang said. “But I’m also willing to accept that there are certain situations in which there are limitations to the technology.”

At a news conference last month to unveil the cloned Garlic, Mr. Mi was quoted as saying that he was considering using artificial intelligence to transplant the memories of the original pet to the cloned one.

When asked about that statement, Mr. Mi said it was not something that his company would embark on but added that it was a possibility that the technology could provide.

“It’s a way to imagine the future,” he said.

Yiwei Wang and Elsie Chen contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Washington International Horse Show returns to the District in October

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-86 Washington International Horse Show returns to the District in October Washington International Horse Show Things to Do Features Things to Do Sports olympic athletes international horse show horses Events DC events competition athletic athletes annual events Animals
President Cup winner Shawn McMillen at the 2017 Washington International Horse Show. (Photo courtesy of Washington International Horse Show)

For the past 61 years, equestrians from around the globe have come together for a full week of events in the nation’s capital, in celebration of one of the earliest, and most prestigious, sports in the world: equestrianism. 

Hosted in and around the Capital One Arena, the Washington International Horse Show, spanning from Tuesday, Oct. 22 to Sunday, Oct. 27, is far more than a competitive event. While each day will consist of amateur or professional competitions followed by award ceremonies, evening festivities include barn night, giving youngsters the chance to interact with horses, a commemoration of the military, pony races, vendor stations with boutique goods and more. 

“This is the one horse show where the horses really come to the people,” says nonprofit Washington International Horse Show Association, Ltd. president, Vicki Lowell. “We don’t really have the pleasure anymore of having horses out on the street all the time, so when we bring the horses to DC and set them up in the arena, they are right there for everyone to see. It’s a unique opportunity.”

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-78 Washington International Horse Show returns to the District in October Washington International Horse Show Things to Do Features Things to Do Sports olympic athletes international horse show horses Events DC events competition athletic athletes annual events Animals
Leading Pony Rider Gabrielle Sokolow kisses her competition partner at last year’s Washington International Horse Show. (Photo courtesy of Washington International Horse Show)

Lowell, who was once a competitor in the late ’90s, was working at Discovery Communications in the early 2000s when she was approached by then-president Juliet Reid about joining the team. She has led the event since 2008, bringing Olympic stars and talented horses to the arena for residents in the region to see first-hand.  

Preparing for the week-long event takes extensive planning, according to Lowell, as there is a short window of time to actually set up the space before the show begins. The team behind this one-of-a-kind event has to set up stalls on the street, put the footing (fiber mix flooring) into the arena, decorate and build the stands for vendors in just two days before exhibitors, competitors and fans alike arrive.

There are also about 100 stalls for horses to stay in, yet over 500 horses travel from across the world to compete, making each day a 24-hour operation, according to Lowell. Plus, if the hoses arrive late at night, they stay in the arena for hours in order to exercise and prepare for the full day ahead. 

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-68 Washington International Horse Show returns to the District in October Washington International Horse Show Things to Do Features Things to Do Sports olympic athletes international horse show horses Events DC events competition athletic athletes annual events Animals
Kent Farrington rides Creedance at last year’s Washington International Horse Show. (Photo courtesy of Washington International Horse Show)

But when it all comes together, the occasion brings thousands of people to one site for the celebration.

At this year’s show, guests can expect to see world-renowned talent, including Olympic show jumper McLain Ward, professional equestrian and owner of the team New York Empire Georgina Bloomberg, and last year’s champion of the International Open Jumper Section, Olympic athlete Beezie Madden. 

“There’s no other competition in the world where you can have Olympic-level horses right on the street for interaction with people,” says Lowell. “I’m a believer that horses do such good for people, and I love the thought that many people get their first experience with a horse at this show.”

For a full schedule and tickets to the week’s events, click here. // Capital One Arena: 601 F St. NW, Washington, DC; prices vary

To stay up to date with all the latest events coming to Northern Virginia and Washington, DC, subscribe to our Things to Do e-newsletter. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

We the Dogs DC to host annual Bipawtisan March this fall

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-310 We the Dogs DC to host annual Bipawtisan March this fall yappy hour we the dogs DC walk Things to Do pets outdoor event fundraiser Events donations dogs Celebration Animals
Pet owners march with their pooches at one of the past Bipawtisan Marches. (Photo by Hannele Lahti)

Animal lovers unite: the third annual Bipawtisan March is making its way back to the District on Sept. 7, for an evening of celebration, unity and entertainment for humans and furry friends alike. 

Since 2017, nonprofit organization We the Dogs DC has been hosting community events to raise money for local animal rescue organizations that need it most, and it all started with the Bipawtisan March. 

The passion project came to fruition with a simple direct message from founder Amber Duggan (via her pooch Izzy’s Instagram account) to other dog-focused Instagram pages from the Washington, DC area. The small group of dog owners decided to use their social influence for good. At that first march in 2017, about 300 people showed up at the Capitol, raising about $10,000 for the local charities. 

“We all come from different backgrounds to volunteer,” says Duggan of the founders, who each have full-time jobs ranging from government work to law, in Duggan’s case. “We are passionate about the animal community here and saw an opportunity to do something more.”

The Bipawtisan March brings hundreds of pet owners together, no matter their political or ideological differences, in an effort to raise money for local charities. This year’s recipients are Key to Lion’s Heart Rescue in Maryland, Dogs XL Rescue, NoVA’s own Wolf Trap Animal Rescue and also Friends of Homeless Animals in Loudoun County, which were chosen by the We the Dogs DC team. 

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-118 We the Dogs DC to host annual Bipawtisan March this fall yappy hour we the dogs DC walk Things to Do pets outdoor event fundraiser Events donations dogs Celebration Animals
Photo by Hannele Lahti

While in the past the event was held at the Capitol, the team decided to move the location to Yards Park in the Capitol Riverfront neighborhood, as there is more space for attendees and their dogs, too. 

The festivities will begin with the actual march at Yards Park and continue with a yappy hour event held at Dacha Navy Yard’s beer garden that can hold up to 700 guests. Following the glow theme, there will be a neon photo booth, a DIY bandana station, food and drinks for you and Fido, and more. 

To register for this one-of-a-kind event, click here.

Want more content surrounding your furry friend? Subscribe to our Pet e-newsletter. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A UK-US trade deal. Never mind the economics (at least for a moment). Feel the politics.

“While trade deals have taken on an important political and symbolic value in the context of Brexit,” Dominic Walsh of Open Europe wrote recently on this site, “their economic benefits are typically smaller and slower to materialise than many realise.” This is the place to start when considering a possible UK-US agreement on trade.  Boris Johnson’s enthusiasm for one is as much political as economic: a successful deal would show Britain, as it moves a bit further from the EU, also moving a bit closer to America.

Such a rebalancing is a strategic consequence of Brexit, at least in the eyes of many backers of leaving the EU.  Future trade deals were a Vote Leave EU referendum priority – though it may be significant that the United States was not one of the headline countries named.  Perhaps the reason was a wariness of anti-American sentiment among a section of the voting public.  None the less, the prospect of a trade agreement with the United States was mooted during the 2016 campaign: hence Barack Obama’s line, written for him by Team Cameron, of Britain being “at the back of the queue” for such a deal.

The obstacles to one are formidable.  For while the Prime Minister is bound to view it through the lens of politics, Donald Trump is more likely to do through that of economics – though the one admittedly tends to blur into the other.  America’s approach to such matters as food safety and animal welfare, environmental protection and intellectual property rights is different from ours in any event.  Never mind the red herring of chlorinated chickens – so to speak – or autopilot claims from Corbynistas about NHS selloffs. The real action is elsewhere.  The United States has long had a protectionist streak, and is resistant to opening up its financial services markets, for example.

The conventional view is that Trump is the biggest America Firster of all; that he would drive a hard bargain, that he has the muscle to do so – and that he wouldn’t be in control of an agreement anyway.  Congress could block one if it wished, and might well do so in the event of No Deal, since the Irish-American lobby is as well-entrenched as ever.  It has been a headache for British governments over Ireland-linked matters before: remember the McBride principles.  A different take is that politics may win out in the end, because both Trump and Congress will want a UK trade deal in order to put economic and political pressure on the EU: we will publish more about that later this week.

John Bolton, Trump’s National Security Adviser, is visiting Britain.  He said yesterday that the UK will be “first in line” for a trade agreement post-Brexit – a deliberate counter to Obama’s line.  Bolton will be dangling the prospect as an inducement.  He will want Johnson to take a more resistant line to Huawei than Theresa May did, and for the UK to move closer to America’s position on Iran.  But the possibility of early sector deals – or at least the exclusion of Britain from new pro-protection moves – seems to be real enough.  As with the NHS, policing, immigration and stop and search, so with trade.  Johnson wants progress towards a quick win as a possible election looms.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Indiana City Allows People to Pay Parking Tickets by Helping Shelter Cats

One city in Indiana is letting people pay off their parking tickets in a unique way- by helping local shelter cats. Every spring, the city of Muncie finds their shelters overwhelmed with kittens (earlier this month, they were already up to 350), and that means a lot of supplies are needed. Hundreds of kittens means a lot of food, litter, and paper towels for cleaning cages. So, the city decided to help the kitties out in a unique way- they let people pay off their parking tickets in cat supplies instead of cash.

A local Fox affiliate reported that the idea is simple- simply donate supplies that equal the dollar amount of your ticket, and the city will consider it paid. Have multiple tickets? No problem. Just bring in more supplies. If you can’t make it to the shelter, call the police station and they’ll even come pick up the supplies from you.

Take a look at their announcement on Facebook live:

Pay your parking tickets in cat food! The Muncie Animal Care & Services needs your help!

Posted by Muncie Police Department on Monday, July 15, 2019

The event was a huge success. As word spread, even people without parking tickets stepped up for Muncie’s kittens.

This isn’t the first time a city has foregone cash to get parking tickets paid off for a good cause. In the spring, Las Vegas allowed residents to pay off parking tickets with school supplies for children.

The post Indiana City Allows People to Pay Parking Tickets by Helping Shelter Cats appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group cat-on-back-300x200 Indiana City Allows People to Pay Parking Tickets by Helping Shelter Cats tickets shelter pet parking tickets Parking muncie kitten Indiana Front Page Stories Culture cat Animals animal Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

There’s a Hell On Earth, and the People Enforcing Facebook’s Moderation Rules Live In It

Westlake Legal Group AP_18094667693740-620x290 There’s a Hell On Earth, and the People Enforcing Facebook’s Moderation Rules Live In It Technology tampa bay Social Media Moderators Front Page Stories Florida filth Featured Story facebook Cognizant children Animals Allow Media Exception abuse

The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York’s Times Square, Thursday, March 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

WARNING: Some of the things you’ll read below are disturbing. It will contain confessions by staff about hellish working conditions, and some of the graphic things they’ve seen while moderating the most trafficked social network on the planet.

The Verge recently released a very disturbing article that gives us an inside look into how the moderation company Facebook uses to make sure its site stays clean. Needless to say, the physical and psychological torment suffered by what is described by its employees as a sweatshop is the realm of nightmares.

The story begins by introducing you to Coast Guard veteran Keith Utley who “loved to help.” After getting out of the military he became a Facebook moderator at a company called Cognizant based out of Tampa Bay, Florida. It was there that he protected Facebook’s users from posts of hate speech, murders, child pornography.

Utley’s manager describes the ever-changing rules at Facebook that leave the 800 or so workers in a constant state of uncertainty. Utley, like the rest of his fellow employees, were constantly scared of being fired due to the fact that the moderation requirements change, and they miss things. The pressure was enormous.

And then one day, Utley slumped over at his desk and began sliding out of his chair. He was dying. Fellow employees tried to save him, and the ambulance that was called couldn’t find the building. By the time they got there, Utley was turning blue. By the time they got him to the hospital, Utley was dead.

As the commotion happened, many workers ignored the problem and kept moderating Facebook. What’s more, the following day, managers attempted to downplay the incident by telling employees that nothing had happened, or didn’t discuss it at all. They did that, according to one employee, because they didn’t want Utley’s death discouraging other workers from doing their jobs.

All that came crashing down when Utley’s father showed up according to Verge:

“Everyone at leadership was telling people he was fine — ‘oh, he’ll be okay,’” one co-worker recalled. “They wanted to play it down. I think they were worried about people quitting with the emotional impact it would have.”

But the illusion shattered later that day, when Utley’s father, Ralph, came to the site to gather his belongings. He walked into the building and, according to a co-worker I spoke to, said: “My son died here.”

This was just the icing on the cake to the kind of conditions Cognizant employees are subjected to, and many of them came forward to The Verge, who interviewed them for a video. The employees described horrible conditions they worked under, but not only that, the nightmarish things they were forced to see.

Workers, like the kind at Cognizant, are a line that stands between some of the most horrific things you can imagine. Animal abuse, child abuse, and more are uploaded to Facebook on a daily basis and we never see it due to the fact that moderators are there making sure we don’t. The trouble, according to some, is that they were never warned what they would be seeing. Many went in with the idea that they’d never see things they did.

As Shawn Spiegel told The Verge, it was “traumatic.”

I’ll warn you again. Some of the things in the video being discussed are absolutely awful, and those who are easily troubled shouldn’t watch it.

I won’t go into detail for those who wish to avoid them, but I can summarize here.

Former moderators tell stories of animal and child abuses that they were forced to watch. Speigal says, after composing himself from breaking down in tears, that he remembers the animal abuse videos most of all. At one point Speigel is asked about the first video he remembers seeing.

After describing the video, he was told that the video didn’t violate Facebook’s policies, at least at the time of his employment. It was allowed to remain up on the site. Sadly, the video kept reappearing in Spiegel’s inbox. He was forced to see and hear it over and over again.

“I just think about that,” Spiegel told The Verge while holding himself together. “And we’re not helping the animals either. Not even humans. We’re not even helping humans.”

Spiegel describes things he’s horrific and violent things people do to children while wiping away a tear.

“And it stays. It’s always there, and you always have to look at it,” said Spiegel. “You always see death every single day. You see pain and suffering. ”

The moderators who come forward tell that they see some of the cruelest things imaginable and that it stays with you throughout the day. Moods soured, diets became erratic, and nightmares became prevalent. Spiegel was later diagnosed with PTSD by a doctor and given medication just so he could sleep.

One veteran who said he was used to seeing violence against people went home and cried while holding his dog in his arms after he had been forced to watch a video of puppies being abused.

To add to the psychological horror being forced on Cognizant employees, the working conditions were also nightmarish. Reported cases of untreated bed bugs existing in the building on multiple occasions, unsanitary restrooms, and physical fights breaking out were common.

One worker, Melynda Johnson, described the state of the sole bathroom employees used according to Verge:

Johnson was particularly disturbed by the site’s sole bathroom, which she regularly found in a state of disrepair. (The company says it has janitors available every shift in Tampa.) In the stalls, signs posted in response to employee misbehavior proliferated. Do not use your feet to flush the toilet. Do not flush more than five toilet seat covers at one time. Do not put any substances, natural or unnatural, on the walls.

“And obviously the signs are there for a reason, because people are doing this,” said Johnson, who worked at the site until March. “Every bit of that building was absolutely disgusting. You’d go in the bathroom and there would be period blood and poop all over the place. It smelled horrendous all the time.”

There were five shifts, all constantly rotating. Some workers would come back to find their workstation beyond unsanitary. It was only cleaned if Facebook representatives were coming to visit:

The work day in Tampa is divided into five shifts, and desks are shared between employees. Contractors I spoke with said they would frequently come to work and find their workstation for the day in dire condition — encountering boogers, fingernails, and pubic hairs, among other items. The desks would be cleaned whenever Facebook made one of its regular planned visits to the site. At other times, employees told me, the office was filthy.

KC Hopkinson, an attorney who represents former and current Cognizant employees, told The Verge that some employees make open death threats to those in the building.

“Every time I get an email or a phone call from my clients, I worry that there’s been a shooting — and I know that’s their worry as well,” she said. “They go in there every morning asking, ‘what am I going to see today? And am I going to make it home tonight?’”

“I wouldn’t want my worst enemy to work there,” Hopkinson said. “It’s a terrible, terrible environment.”

This is just a taste of the hellish conditions that Cognizant employees go through while moderating the most popular social media site in the world. The Verge article goes on and on detaling things that would be considered human rights violations in a just world. It’s the kind of nightmare you only see in horror movies.

 

The post There’s a Hell On Earth, and the People Enforcing Facebook’s Moderation Rules Live In It appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group AP_18094667693740-300x140 There’s a Hell On Earth, and the People Enforcing Facebook’s Moderation Rules Live In It Technology tampa bay Social Media Moderators Front Page Stories Florida filth Featured Story facebook Cognizant children Animals Allow Media Exception abuse   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com