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Westlake Legal Group > Appointments and Executive Changes

Planned Parenthood Ousts President, Seeking a More Political Approach

Westlake Legal Group 16plannedparenthood-facebookJumbo Planned Parenthood Ousts President, Seeking a More Political Approach Wen, Leana Planned Parenthood Federation of America Appointments and Executive Changes Abortion

Planned Parenthood on Tuesday removed its president after less than a year in the job, seeking new leadership at a time when abortion rights have come under increasing attack from statehouses and Republicans in Washington.

The sudden ouster reflected a widening disagreement between the president, Leana Wen, and the board of directors over her management style and which direction to steer one of the nation’s leading women’s reproductive rights groups.

Her departure followed a series of negotiations that appeared to end acrimoniously on Tuesday. In a Twitter post, Dr. Wen said her fate had been decided at a “secret meeting,” which the organization disputed. She later issued a statement saying she was “leaving because the new board chairs and I have philosophical differences over the direction and future of Planned Parenthood.”

The urgency of the abortion issue appeared to be at the heart of the disagreement. Dr. Wen, the first physician to lead the organization in decades, said that she believed “the best way to protect abortion care is to be clear that it is not a political issue but a health care one, and that we can expand support for reproductive rights.”

But four people familiar with the matter said the group’s board of directors felt it needed a more aggressive political leader to combat the current efforts to roll back access to abortions.

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Dr. Wen’s brief tenure — she took over last November — coincided with a particularly fraught moment for abortion-rights advocates. In recent months, Republican-controlled statehouses in Ohio, Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana and Missouri have moved decisively to restrict abortion access as they take aim at the protections enshrined in Roe v. Wade.

That has put abortion rights groups, including Planned Parenthood, on the defensive as they battle conservative messaging, much of it ominous and some of it false, such as claims about infanticide.

And in Washington this week, Planned Parenthood is confronting a new Trump administration rule stating that taxpayer-funded family planning clinics must stop referring women for abortions.

With health centers nationwide, Planned Parenthood receives close to $60 million each year through the federal family planning program, and the new edict is widely seen as being aimed at the organization. The Trump administration won a key victory last week as the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit declined to block it from enforcing the rule.

Anti-abortion groups were quick to respond to Dr. Wen’s ouster on Tuesday. Americans United for Life, a leading anti-abortion legal firm, said in a statement that Dr. Wen “has consistently traded on her training as a physician to perpetuate Planned Parenthood’s falsehood that ‘abortion is health care.’’’ It promised to pursue court victories “until we reach a post-Roe v. Wade era.’’

The conservative anti-abortion push gained momentum after Brett M. Kavanaugh replaced Anthony M. Kennedy on the Supreme Court, giving conservatives a possible fifth vote to uphold new limits on abortion.

Amanda Skinner, the president and chief executive of Planned Parenthood Southern New England, said the attacks from Republicans represented an “alarming” moment for abortion-rights supporters.

“This is a crisis time in terms of the impact on the patients we serve and the communities we serve,” she said, adding: “I think that Dr. Wen is obviously a very thoughtful leader in health care. I think what is critical for Planned Parenthood is how much we all have to really lean hard on all of the elements of our mission.” (Those elements are health care, education and advocacy.)

Planned Parenthood, a more than 100-year-old organization with 600 affiliated health centers nationwide, has simultaneously served as both a health care provider for millions — it provides cancer screenings, contraception, disease testing and abortion services — as well as one of the leading advocacy organizations for women’s reproductive rights.

The group’s board voted unanimously on Tuesday to appoint Alexis McGill Johnson, the co-founder of the Perception Institute, an anti-bias research group, to temporarily replace Dr. Wen. Ms. McGill Johnson will serve as acting president and chief executive of both Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the nonprofit that provide health care services, and Planned Parenthood Action Fund, its political arm.

In a joint statement, Aimee Cunningham and Jennie Rosenthal, the chairwomen of the two Planned Parenthood boards, said, “We thank Dr. Leana Wen for her service to Planned Parenthood in such a pivotal time and extend our best wishes for her continued success.”

A 36-year-old former health commissioner in Baltimore, Dr. Wen was among Time magazine’s 100 most influential people earlier this year. She replaced the group’s longtime leader, Cecile Richards, a former Democratic political aide and the daughter of the former Texas governor Ann Richards, who had been a forceful voice on the national stage for women in general and abortion rights in particular.

But inside Planned Parenthood, there had been significant turnover at the top of the organization since Dr. Wen’s arrival and disagreements over the group’s direction.

Multiple senior officials at Planned Parenthood have departed since Dr. Wen’s appointment, including Dawn Laguens, the former executive vice president; Deirdre Schifeling, the former executive director of the group’s political arm; and Wendi Wallace, the group’s former director of political outreach. A top official, Dana Singiser, was announced as the senior vice president for policy, advocacy and campaigns in January, but instead departed the organization months later. Another Planned Parenthood vice president announced taking a new job this week.

Dr. Wen arrived last fall at Planned Parenthood with a compelling life story, having grown up poor and on Medicaid in California after her family moved there from China.

“When I was 16 and I wanted information about birth control, Planned Parenthood was the first and only place that I could think of going for my health care and education,” she told The New York Times in May.

She would rise to serve as health commissioner in Baltimore, working to close racial disparities in health care outcomes there as she sued the Trump administration for cutting teen pregnancy funds.

But former Planned Parenthood officials said she was quickly seen as a poor fit as top talent departed. The board and Dr. Wen had been discussing her future at the organization for several weeks, according to two people familiar with the matter.

Earlier this month, Dr. Wen wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post disclosing her own recent miscarriage and how she was recovering over the Fourth of July weekend.

“I decided to write about my experience because I want to break the silence and shame that often come with pregnancy loss,” she wrote. “I also write because my miscarriage has made my commitment to women’s health even stronger.”

Dr. Wen’s replacement, Ms. McGill Johnson, has served on Planned Parenthood’s board for nearly a decade, including previously as its chairwoman.

“I am proud to step in to serve as acting president and facilitate a smooth leadership transition in this critical moment for Planned Parenthood and the patients and communities we serve,” Ms. McGill Johnson said in a statement. “I thank Dr. Wen for her service and her commitment to patients.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump’s New Top Labor Official Is Expected to Advance an Anti-Labor Agenda

Congressional Republicans, members of their staffs and conservative activists regularly flew first class to Saipan, an island just north of Guam in the Pacific Ocean. They slept at the beachfront Hyatt Regency, and dined on fresh Japanese cuisine.

The junkets in the late 1990s were organized by Patrick Pizzella. The Northern Mariana Islands, a commonwealth of the United States, had hired him to ensure that Congress did not impose federal minimum wage and immigration laws in a place where some workers earned less than $1 an hour.

Mr. Pizzella, a genial lobbyist and government official who has spent years advocating the interests of businesses, is set to become the top Trump administration official protecting workers’ rights when he takes over as acting labor secretary this week. He will fill the vacancy left when Alex Acosta resigned amid criticism of a plea deal he approved in 2008 with Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who has been accused of sex trafficking.

A longtime free-market evangelist, Mr. Pizzella, 65, has built a four-decade career in the conservative Republican mold, fighting regulation and organized labor.

His appointment is far more consequential than those of the many acting secretaries who have served in President Trump’s patchwork cabinet. The man he succeeds, Mr. Acosta, spent two years battling other White House officials who demanded that he push through a sweeping anti-union agenda and coordinate his actions with the president’s political team.

Mr. Pizzella, who is close to many of the conservatives allied with Mr. Trump’s acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, and on Vice President Mike Pence’s staff, is expected to be a significantly more cooperative partner in those efforts, according to administration and industry officials.

“Pat will be great — he is a movement conservative,” said Marc Short, Mr. Pence’s chief of staff and a friend of Mr. Pizzella’s for two decades. “I think it’s fair to say that while he will be focused on issues of workplace safety, he will also work to ensure that the workplace is not overly burdened with regulations.”

When he filled the lone Republican slot at the Federal Labor Relations Authority during the Obama administration, Mr. Pizzella compared union representatives to the mob-connected bosses from the Marlon Brando film “On the Waterfront.” He cheered a federal-court decision that struck down potential restrictions on investigating unions. As a Labor Department official during President George W. Bush’s administration in 2008, he bemoaned the “staggering costs” of paid work time that government employees used to conduct union business, which is authorized by labor law and union contracts.

Mr. Trump has sent mixed messages about his stance on organized labor. He has courted construction and law enforcement unions while taking a harder line against most government employees. But the conservatives who run his West Wing policy shop are less ambivalent, pushing hard to undermine unions’ ability to bargain collectively, raise dues and exert political power.

Those ambitions suffered when Mr. Trump’s first choice for labor secretary, the fast food executive Andrew Puzder, withdrew his nomination early in 2017 amid controversy over domestic abuse allegations. The administration turned instead to Mr. Acosta, a relatively moderate former prosecutor, who essentially inherited Mr. Pizzella as a deputy secretary already slated to work for Mr. Puzder.

Soon after Mr. Acosta took office, his aides were presented with a detailed to-do list by James Sherk, who coordinates labor policy for the White House’s Domestic Policy Council and joined the administration from the conservative Heritage Foundation.

The list, which was provided to The New York Times by a person who had obtained it from a former Trump administration official, included proposals to weaken collective bargaining rights and protections for workers on federally funded construction projects. The list also included a proposal that would have forced male actors in pornographic films to wear condoms.

Mr. Acosta rejected outright or dragged his feet on many of the plans, including the condom regulation, according to a person close to him and administration officials.

“We’re the Department of Labor, we’re not the Department of Commerce,” the secretary complained privately last year, the person close to him recalled.

Mr. Sherk gained a powerful new ally when Mr. Trump named Mr. Mulvaney acting chief of staff in January. Still, Mr. Acosta insisted that pursuing such a hard-line agenda would alienate the president’s blue-collar union supporters and make it more difficult to garner labor support for a new version of the North American Free Trade Agreement that is awaiting a vote by the Democratic-controlled House, according to a current administration official with direct knowledge of the situation.

Mr. Acosta also resisted efforts to involve the Labor Department in broader political fights. In April, the White House sent Mr. Acosta’s office a request from Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to the president, and other White House officials asking him to write an opinion column saying that a so-called Medicare-for-all proposal by Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont would hurt employers and workers, according to a copy of the request viewed by The Times.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157767363_9ad5d9aa-f086-4f43-bfdf-b07ce9904ba8-articleLarge Trump’s New Top Labor Official Is Expected to Advance an Anti-Labor Agenda United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Pizzella, Patrick Organized Labor Labor Department (US) Labor and Jobs Conservatism (US Politics) Appointments and Executive Changes

Alex Acosta, the secretary of labor, defended a plea deal he reached with Jeffrey Epstein in 2008 during a news conference last week.CreditErik S Lesser/EPA, via Shutterstock

Mr. Acosta refused after his legal advisers determined that the request raised “red flags” related to the Hatch Act, a federal law that prohibits the use of government resources for political activity, according to memos provided by a former administration official.

“It should be expected that the White House and cabinet agencies, including the Department of Labor, would have frequent conversations around potential policy ideas particularly as it relates to the president’s priority of deregulation,” said Judd Deere, a White House spokesman.

White House officials have good reason to expect more cooperation from Mr. Pizzella.

As an undergraduate student at the University of South Carolina, he wrote columns for the school newspaper, including one in 1972 in which he criticized Senator George McGovern, the recently defeated Democratic presidential nominee, for sending his daughter to an upscale suburban school near Washington.

“The hypocrisy continues as McGovern expresses the opinion that he represents the working man,” Mr. Pizzella wrote. “That’s similar to Hitler saying he represented the Jewish people in Germany during the 1930s.”

After college, Mr. Pizzella went on to work for Ronald Reagan in the 1976 Republican primaries, according to a 2001 profile in The New Republic. He subsequently held a series of government appointments, building a formidable list of conservative contacts.

In the mid-1990s, Mr. Pizzella joined the lobbying arm of the law firm Preston Gates, where Jack Abramoff, who was later convicted of defrauding clients, had set up a growing lobbying practice. One of the firm’s biggest clients in the late 1990s was the Northern Mariana Islands, which was exempt from federal minimum wage and immigration laws but could sell products under a “Made in the U.S.A.” label.

Large textile manufacturers set up production on the islands. Migrant workers, typically from China and the Philippines, worked long hours for low pay and lived in squalid, crowded dormitories. A 1997 federal government report concluded that nearly the entire private-sector labor force of the commonwealth consisted of “essentially indentured alien workers.”

The report said that foreign women were often coerced into prostitution, and that those who refused were sometimes raped or tortured.

It was Mr. Pizzella’s job to present a kinder, gentler image of the commonwealth to Republicans in Congress and their staffs, who controlled the House and Senate at the time. Allen Stayman, an Interior Department official involved in investigating conditions on the islands, said Mr. Pizzella “was in charge of showing the Potemkin village.”

One person on a trip to the commonwealth organized by Mr. Pizzella recalled meetings with senior officials of the local government in which the officials discussed their interest in making the commonwealth a laboratory for conservative policies like school vouchers. Mr. Pizzella also showed visitors factories and dormitories that were crowded but clean.

The lobbying efforts were effective. Legislation that would have applied the minimum wage and immigration laws to the commonwealth went nowhere in the House in the 1990s. At his 2017 confirmation hearings to become deputy labor secretary, Mr. Pizzella dismissed the reported abuses as “allegations” and said his job was strictly to lobby against the minimum wage.

Mr. Pizzella joined Mr. Bush’s administration in 2001, serving for nearly eight years as an assistant labor secretary for administration and management, but the Obama era gave him an even higher profile. As conservatives mobilized against Democratic policies, Mr. Pizzella joined the Conservative Action Project, which worked to establish alliances between socially and fiscally conservative organizations.

Mr. Pizzella convened meetings where conservative groups coordinated campaigns against Mr. Obama’s health care, climate change and labor policies, said Tim Phillips, the president of Americans for Prosperity, one such organization.

Among other things, Mr. Pizzella spread the word about bus tours meant to build opposition to the Affordable Care Act. “We would say: ‘Hey, Pat, we’re doing these bus tours in these states on these days. Could you let the rest of the movement know?’” Mr. Phillips recalled. “And they would.”

In 2013, Mr. Pizzella was nominated by the Obama administration to be the only Republican on the three-member Federal Labor Relations Authority, which adjudicates disputes between federal workers and the agencies that employ them.

In several cases, Mr. Pizzella used cutting language to describe employees and identified them by name in his opinions, breaking with the agency’s traditional approach of withholding names. The naming and disparaging of workers risked exposing them to harassment, said Carol Waller Pope, the agency’s chairwoman for most of Mr. Pizzella’s tenure. (The authority typically named only the union bringing the grievance.)

“It could discourage people from using the process to resolve disputes — that was our mission,” Ms. Pope said. “I viewed it as having an effect.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Planned Parenthood Removes Leana Wen as President

Westlake Legal Group 16plannedparenthood-facebookJumbo Planned Parenthood Removes Leana Wen as President Wen, Leana Planned Parenthood Federation of America Appointments and Executive Changes Abortion

Planned Parenthood on Tuesday removed its president after less than a year in the job, seeking new leadership at a time when abortion rights have come under increasing attack from statehouses and Republicans in Washington.

The move came after hours of negotiations Tuesday between the board of directors and the president, Leana Wen, according to two people familiar with the decision.

Dr. Wen had been the first physician to lead the organization in decades. The people familiar with the move said there had been internal strife over her management, and that the group felt it needed a more aggressive political leader to fight the efforts to roll back access to abortions.

The board voted unanimously on Tuesday to appoint Alexis McGill Johnson, the co-founder of the Perception Institute, an anti-bias research group, to temporarily replace Dr. Wen, the people said. Ms. McGill will serve as acting president and chief executive of both Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the nonprofit that provides health care services, and Planned Parenthood Action Fund, its political arm.

Dr. Wen, in a statement on Tuesday afternoon, said she believed that “the best way to protect abortion care is to be clear that it is not a political issue but a health care one, and that we can expand support for reproductive rights.”

“I am leaving because the new board chairs and I have philosophical differences over the direction and future of Planned Parenthood,” she said.

In a joint statement, Aimee Cunningham and Jennie Rosenthal, the chairwomen of the two Planned Parenthood boards, said, “We thank Dr. Leana Wen for her service to Planned Parenthood in such a pivotal time and extend our best wishes for her continued success.”

Ms. McGill Johnson has served on Planned Parenthood’s board for nearly a decade, including previously as its chairwoman.

“I am proud to step in to serve as acting president and facilitate a smooth leadership transition in this critical moment for Planned Parenthood and the patients and communities we serve,’’ Ms. McGill Johnson said in a statement. “I thank Dr. Wen for her service and her commitment to patients.”

Dr. Wen’s brief tenure — she was appointed last September — has coincided with a fraught moment for abortion rights advocates, as Republican-controlled statehouses in Ohio, Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana and Missouri have all advanced legislation to restrict abortion, and in some cases effectively ban the procedure altogether.

The legislative push gained momentum after Brett M. Kavanaugh replaced Anthony M. Kennedy on the Supreme Court, giving conservatives a possible fifth vote to uphold new limits on abortion. The efforts have alarmed abortion rights groups worried about a challenge to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that established federal protections for abortions.

Dr. Wen, a 36-year-old former health commissioner in Baltimore, was among Time magazine’s 100 most influential people earlier this year. But inside Planned Parenthood, there had been significant turnover at the top of the organization since her arrival.

She replaced the group’s longtime leader, Cecile Richards, who had been a forceful voice on the national stage for women in general and abortion rights in particular.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Julie Sweet to Run Accenture, Adding a Woman to the Ranks of Corporate C.E.O.s

Westlake Legal Group 11accenture-facebookJumbo Julie Sweet to Run Accenture, Adding a Woman to the Ranks of Corporate C.E.O.s Women and Girls Sweet, Julie Nanterme, Pierre (1959-2019) Hiring and Promotion Corporations Cloud Computing Appointments and Executive Changes Accenture Ltd

Julie Sweet will become the new chief executive of Accenture, the consulting firm announced on Thursday, adding another female leader to the senior-most ranks of the corporate world.

With Ms. Sweet’s appointment, 27 women will be leading companies in the S&P 500. That figure is up slightly from a year ago, but still means that just slightly more than 5 percent of the most valuable public companies in the United States are led by women.

Ms. Sweet, a former lawyer who is currently Accenture’s head of North America, will bring a measure of stability to the firm, which has been without a permanent leader for most of the year. In January, Pierre Nanterme stepped down as chief executive, citing poor health. Mr. Nanterme led the company for eight years, significantly enlarging Accenture’s market value, influence and head count.

Accenture’s chief financial officer at the time, David Rowland, was tapped to serve as interim chief executive while the board conducted a search for a full-time replacement. Mr. Nanterme died in January.

Mr. Rowland will become executive chairman of Accenture. KC McClure, who took over as chief financial officer from Mr. Rowland in January, will continue in her role, making Accenture the rare company to have women in both the chief financial officer and chief executive roles.

“On this day, I am focused on the fact that I am the fifth C.E.O. of Accenture since we became a public company,” Ms. Sweet said in an interview. “I represent all our employees, which includes over 200,000 women.”

A former lawyer at Cravath, Swaine & Moore, Ms. Sweet was recruited to become Accenture’s general counsel in 2010. After five years in that role, she became chief executive for North America, Accenture’s largest market, with annual revenues of $17.8 billion.

Accenture’s work increasingly focuses on helping large corporations adopt new technologies such as artificial intelligence and cloud computing. The firm works with most of the biggest companies in the United States, and Ms. Sweet’s clients include Marriott, Halliburton and the Golden State Warriors.

“Julie is the right person to lead Accenture into the future, given her strong command of our business and proven ability to drive results in our largest market,” Mr. Rowland said in a statement.

In an effort to expand its offerings and bolster its growing marketing division, Accenture bought the advertising agency Droga5 this year.

Though Accenture has grown rapidly in recent years, the consulting business remains unpredictable. The company has forecast strong full-year earnings, but last month, Accenture reported a 9 percent drop in quarterly bookings.

Ms. Sweet said that was the nature of the consulting business. “Bookings are lumpy quarter to quarter,” she said, noting that Accenture reaffirmed its guidance on Thursday.

Ms. Sweet, who grew up in Southern California, decided she wanted to be a lawyer in eighth grade. She attended Columbia Law School, then started working at Cravath, one of Wall Street’s most prestigious law firms.

She was only the ninth woman to be named partner at Cravath and developed a strong roster of corporate clients. But when a recruiter called her about the Accenture job, she decided to go for it, in part because her career had become somewhat predictable.

“I could see my future,” she said in an interview with The New York Times this year.

In addition to her duties running the business at Accenture, Ms. Sweet has emerged as a leading voice on diversity and inclusion in the workplace. She is pragmatic in her approach to developing more female leaders in the corporate world, and pushes for developing mentorship programs, setting goals and measuring progress to systematically expand the number of women and minorities in senior leadership roles.

“I have an unwavering commitment to inclusion and diversity,” she said this week. “We already have a very robust global program around inclusion and diversity. Wherever it’s legally available, we have benefits available for our L.G.B.T.Q. community.”

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In Firing Central Bank Chief, Turkey’s Leader Trades Credibility for Growth

Westlake Legal Group 06turkeybank-facebookJumbo In Firing Central Bank Chief, Turkey’s Leader Trades Credibility for Growth US Dollar (Currency) Turkey Politics and Government Interest Rates Inflation (Economics) Erdogan, Recep Tayyip Economic Conditions and Trends Currency Banking and Financial Institutions Appointments and Executive Changes

LONDON — Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, abruptly fired the central bank chief on Saturday, dealing a new blow to the institution’s credibility while threatening to intensify the nation’s wrenching economic crisis.

The move, made in the early hours of the day by presidential decree, was the latest evidence of Mr. Erdogan’s unequivocal dedication to economic expansion at any cost.

He has long expressed irritation over Turkey’s elevated interest rates — currently at 24 percent — which make money harder to borrow, constraining the breakneck development that has been his hallmark.

Most economists assert that interest rates ought to be higher still, given the perilous state of the Turkish economy and the weakness of its currency, the lira.

During the course of his 16-year tenure, Mr. Erdogan has pressured banks to lend aggressively in support of his signature infrastructure projects, including a grandiose new Istanbul airport and a kingdom’s worth of high-rise towers. In recent years, international investors have grown spooked by the resulting debts, pulling their money out of the country and sending the lira plummeting.

Over the last two years, the lira has surrendered some 40 percent of its value against the dollar, sending prices of imported goods soaring. Ordinary people are paying more for food and fuel. Businesses are stuck with higher costs for raw materials.

In the face of that crisis, the central bank has lifted interest rates to increase the returns for investors who keep their money inside Turkey, halting the plunge in the currency.

That has infuriated Mr. Erdogan. Assailing economic orthodoxy, he has claimed that high interest rates actually cause inflation, which is like blaming obesity on cutting too much sugar from the diet.

By firing Murat Cetinkaya — who has headed the central bank since April 2016 — and replacing him with his deputy, Murat Uysal, the president has effectively proclaimed that development will go on, with interest rates probably headed down.

In blaming his central bank for sabotaging his designs, Mr. Erdogan finds himself in powerful company. President Trump has intensified his attacks on his own central bank governor, Jerome H. Powell, asserting that high interest rates have made America less great than it could be.

India’s prime minister has attacked the independence of the central bank, prompting resignations, while undermining international faith in the veracity of official statistics.

For Turkish companies now confronting vast debts, lower interest rates should, in theory, shrink their debt burden, or at least make it cheaper to borrow more and defer any reckoning. Yet in reality, a great deal of Turkish debt is in dollars. Lower interest rates are likely to push down the value of the lira, which has the effect of magnifying dollar debts for companies that earn revenues in lira.

Mr. Erdogan has a penchant for decisive action, and these days are especially challenging for him. The economy fell into recession last year, resuming modest growth this year on the strength of spending unleashed by Mr. Erdogan ahead of national elections.

His stature was significantly weakened last month as his ruling party was thumped in a mayoral election in Istanbul. That result reflected voter anger over his imperious ways — especially his violent crackdown on dissent — as well as the growing perception that Turkey’s economy has drifted into danger.

That left Mr. Erdogan staring at two unpalatable options. He could accept higher interest rates to choke off inflation along with its attendant slowdown in growth, or stay true to form and keep the credit flowing. That would spur more economic expansion, but at the expense of Turkey’s credibility in the international marketplace, and further straining faith in the currency.

Most analysts assumed they knew how the story would go.

“I struggle to see how all of the sudden Turkish economic policymaking is going to turn more orthodox and transparent,” Nafez Zouk, chief emerging markets economist at Oxford Economics in London, said last month. “You just keep kicking the can down the road. We will see rate cuts this year.”

How much farther does this road go? That question is increasingly under discussion in Turkey’s power centers.

In Istanbul, Mr. Erdogan’s cronies in the construction business have been nourished by the president’s resolute devotion to growth. But in the rest of the business world, a sense of fatigue and dismay is increasingly palpable. Many accuse Mr. Erdogan of taking a sound economy — a nation of 80 million people, its population relatively young and skilled, its middle class growing — and turning it into a land avoided by global investors.

“There’s no more institutions,” said Can Akcay, managing partner of Les Partenaires Ottomans, a real estate development company in Istanbul. “They have been totally nullified by the president. Nobody’s going to invest here unless the system is reformed. But there’s no way to reform unless we get rid of this guy.”

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Buy Low-Tops, Sell High-Tops: StockX Sneaker Exchange Is Worth $1 Billion

Nic Wilkins started selling parts of his sneaker collection online two years ago as a way to make some extra cash in college. The hobby took off and this year, he expects to move 10,000 pairs of shoes. His anticipated take is a 25 percent profit from over $1 million in sales.

The main website enabling Mr. Wilkins’ now full-time business? StockX, a site that treats coveted consumer goods like sneakers as tradable commodities.

Sneaker collecting and trading “just keeps growing,” said Mr. Wilkins, a 24-year-old San Francisco resident who recently hired a business partner to manage his shoe inventory at a warehouse in upstate New York. “It is absolutely wild.”

StockX is part of a burgeoning group of online marketplaces that have turned resales of sneakers into a kind of currency — and an increasingly big business. Other sites like GOAT Group, Stadium Goods and Bump, which also resell sneakers, streetwear and other goods, have raised more than $200 million in venture capital funding. On Wednesday, StockX said it had hired a new chief executive to expand its business and garnered a fresh $110 million in financing that values it at more than $1 billion.

The rise of these online marketplaces is now pushing sneaker retailers and brands to rethink the potential of resale sites — once deemed a quirky niche for enthusiasts — as serious distribution channels. In February, Foot Locker invested $100 million in GOAT Group and said the companies would “combine efforts across digital and physical retail platforms.” And the luxury site Farfetch acquired the LVMH-backed Stadium Goods for $250 million in December.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156972759_4d93b789-280e-4077-ba8c-279a96e4b804-articleLarge Buy Low-Tops, Sell High-Tops: StockX Sneaker Exchange Is Worth $1 Billion Venture Capital StockX Sneakers Shopping and Retail Scott Cutler Luber, Josh E-Commerce Computers and the Internet Appointments and Executive Changes

StockX grew out of Campless, a website that tracked sneaker resale prices on eBay.CreditNick Hagen for The New York Times

The fervor for sneakers has been fueled by “sneakerheads” and others who regard the shoes as investment assets. All told, the market for resale sneakers and streetwear in North America is projected to reach $6 billion by 2025 from $2 billion today, according to Cowen, an investment bank.

“The internet and eBay made reselling into a cottage industry,” said Matt Powell, an analyst at NPD Group. “Platforms like StockX made it into a business.”

For sneaker brands like Nike and Adidas, sites like StockX add a twist to the ecosystem around their most desired shoes, like Jordans and Yeezys. So far, the companies have taken a hands-off stance to the online marketplaces, with Nike’s chief financial officer saying in March that the company was not focused on reselling and had no partnership plans or business strategy for it.

But while the sneaker brands are not capturing any resale revenue, they benefit indirectly because that market generates buzz for them. So they carefully — and secretively — manage the supply of their hottest items, leading to wild spikes in resale prices, said John Kernan, a research analyst at Cowen.

“Keeping Jordans or Yeezys in cool markets, with demand far outstripping supply, is making them more relevant in the mass market,” Mr. Kernan said.

A pair of customized sneakers made from the jerseys of the Chicago Bulls are part of Mr. Luber’s extensive sneaker collection.CreditBrittany Greeson for The New York Times

Nike teased the resale market last November when it released a pair of $160 Jordan 1s that bore a message: Their tongues said “WEAR ME,” their toeboxes said “PLEASE CREASE,” and their midsoles said “NOT FOR RESALE.” In a few cases, shop owners required buyers to wear the shoes out of the store, a move that damaged their resale potential since most of the resale sites sell unworn sneakers. But the attention only fueled demand: The Jordan 1s immediately appeared on StockX and have sold for prices as high as $1,000.

Nike declined to comment.

Scott Cutler, the new chief executive of StockX, said more brands would eventually have to pay attention to resellers. “Nike, Adidas, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Rolex, whatever it is, they’re certainly not ignoring marketplaces and are not naïve to the fact that their distribution channels are evolving,” he said.

StockX grew out of Campless, a website that Josh Luber, a former I.B.M. consultant, built in 2012 to track sneaker resale prices on eBay. After Mr. Luber delivered a popular TED Talk titled “Why sneakers are a great investment,” Dan Gilbert, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, and a co-founder, Greg Schwarz, acquired Campless.

Scott Cutler previously worked for eBay, StubHub and the New York Stock Exchange.CreditNick Hagen for The New York Times

Campless eventually transformed itself into StockX, a marketplace to buy and sell sneakers. From the beginning, it also positioned itself as a “stock market of things.”

On StockX, that played out with buyers bidding on items or purchasing them for the lowest asking price from sellers. Once a bid was accepted, sellers shipped their items to one of StockX’s four authentication centers, which makes sure the shoes are not fake brands and then sends them to the buyer. StockX makes money by charging sellers a transaction fee. The company said its revenue more than doubled in the last year, with gross product sales topping $100 million a month. It has expanded into streetwear and luxury goods like handbags and has more than 800 employees.

The site does not carry user profiles and ratings, but includes detailed sales and pricing history for each item, making it more like a stock market than eBay. In total, StockX has raised $160 million, with its newest investors including General Atlantic, DST Global and GGV Capital.

One customer has been Usman Hasib, a 32-year-old in Houston. A sneaker collector since he was 13, Mr. Hasib has used StockX to amass 56 pairs of shoes worth around $25,000, according to StockX’s “portfolio” tracker. He rarely sells his purchases.

“I try to wear a different one every day,” he said.

When Mr. Hasib recently was unable to score Nike’s Off-White Jordan 1 sneakers in retail stores, he paid around $1,050 for a pair on StockX. Prices later surged to nearly $3,000 on the site. “It literally is like playing a stock market,” he said.

A StockX executive showed sneakerheads and small-business owners a custom sneaker during a tour of the offices in April last year.CreditBrittany Greeson for The New York Times

Mr. Cutler, who previously worked at eBay, StubHub and the New York Stock Exchange, became an adviser to StockX in 2016. That was when he read about the company’s plans to create a Big Board for commerce and products, modeled after marketplaces like eBay and StubHub. So he decided to offer his help.

“I immediately reached out and said, ‘Interestingly enough, I am the one person on the Earth that knows all of those companies intimately well,’” he said.

He said StockX planned to use the new $110 million in capital to expand internationally and push into selling newly released products.

Mr. Luber, StockX’s founder, said he was stepping down as chief executive but would continue to be the company’s public face. In a phone call from Paris, where StockX was involved in Fashion Week, he said he now had an even bigger vision than dropping new Jordans on StockX: He wants to replace static retail prices — an “antiquated concept,” he said — with a stock market style of shopping. In this setup, shoppers place bids on new items and prices are determined entirely by supply and demand.

Mr. Luber said he recognized the concept might initially be a stretch. “To tell all these brands that our idea is to get rid of retail prices is crazy, but that’s the slow, big idea behind it,” he said.

Mr. Luber has installed a ticker tracking the value of different shoes within StockX’s ecosystem. CreditNick Hagen for The New York Times

StockX is already moving ahead with the notion. In January, it held an “I.P.O.” — that’s initial product offering — for a limited run of slide sandals created by Ben Baller, a celebrity jewelry designer. The company used a complicated Dutch auction to determine which bidders got to buy the sandals and at what price. It resulted in an average price of $210 a pair — three times as much as they would have cost at retail, but lower than the majority of the bids.

After the release, other brands inquired about similar deals. StockX now has half a dozen such releases in the works with other designers, Mr. Luber said. “It’s not going to be an overnight thing, but it is absolutely logical,” he said.

In the meantime, StockX is expanding further into secondhand sales of luxury goods such as handbags and watches, an area currently topped by The RealReal, a San Francisco start-up that plans to go public later this week.

Mr. Wilkins, the power seller of sneakers, said he doesn’t plan to trade the shoes forever, but “right now it’s awesome income.”

There is one drawback, he acknowledged. Once his hobby became a business, he lost interest in getting the hottest shoes for himself. “The more and more you sell shoes, the more and more you dislike shoes,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Buy Low-Tops, Sell High-Tops: A Sneaker Exchange Is Worth $1 Billion

Nic Wilkins started selling parts of his sneaker collection online two years ago as a way to make some extra cash in college. The hobby took off and this year, he expects to move 10,000 pairs of shoes. His anticipated take is a 25 percent profit from over $1 million in sales.

The main website enabling Mr. Wilkins’ now full-time business? StockX, a site that treats coveted consumer goods like sneakers as tradable commodities.

Sneaker collecting and trading “just keeps growing,” said Mr. Wilkins, a 24-year-old San Francisco resident who recently hired a business partner to manage his shoe inventory at a warehouse in upstate New York. “It is absolutely wild.”

StockX is part of a burgeoning group of online marketplaces that have turned resales of sneakers into a kind of currency — and an increasingly big business. Other sites like GOAT Group, Stadium Goods and Bump, which also resell sneakers, streetwear and other goods, have raised more than $200 million in venture capital funding. On Wednesday, StockX said it had hired a new chief executive to expand its business and garnered a fresh $110 million in financing that values it at more than $1 billion.

The rise of these online marketplaces is now pushing sneaker retailers and brands to rethink the potential of resale sites — once deemed a quirky niche for enthusiasts — as serious distribution channels. In February, Foot Locker invested $100 million in GOAT Group and said the companies would “combine efforts across digital and physical retail platforms.” And the luxury site Farfetch acquired the LVMH-backed Stadium Goods for $250 million in December.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156972759_4d93b789-280e-4077-ba8c-279a96e4b804-articleLarge Buy Low-Tops, Sell High-Tops: A Sneaker Exchange Is Worth $1 Billion Venture Capital StockX Sneakers Shopping and Retail Scott Cutler Luber, Josh E-Commerce Computers and the Internet Appointments and Executive Changes

StockX grew out of Campless, a website that tracked sneaker resale prices on eBay.CreditNick Hagen for The New York Times

The fervor for sneakers has been fueled by “sneakerheads” and others who regard the shoes as investment assets. All told, the market for resale sneakers and streetwear in North America is projected to reach $6 billion by 2025 from $2 billion today, according to Cowen, an investment bank.

“The internet and eBay made reselling into a cottage industry,” said Matt Powell, an analyst at NPD Group. “Platforms like StockX made it into a business.”

For sneaker brands like Nike and Adidas, sites like StockX add a twist to the ecosystem around their most desired shoes, like Jordans and Yeezys. So far, the companies have taken a hands-off stance to the online marketplaces, with Nike’s chief financial officer saying in March that the company was not focused on reselling and had no partnership plans or business strategy for it.

But while the sneaker brands are not capturing any resale revenue, they benefit indirectly because that market generates buzz for them. So they carefully — and secretively — manage the supply of their hottest items, leading to wild spikes in resale prices, said John Kernan, a research analyst at Cowen.

“Keeping Jordans or Yeezys in cool markets, with demand far outstripping supply, is making them more relevant in the mass market,” Mr. Kernan said.

A pair of customized sneakers made from the jerseys of the Chicago Bulls are part of Mr. Luber’s extensive sneaker collection.CreditBrittany Greeson for The New York Times

Nike teased the resale market last November when it released a pair of $160 Jordan 1s that bore a message: Their tongues said “WEAR ME,” their toeboxes said “PLEASE CREASE,” and their midsoles said “NOT FOR RESALE.” In a few cases, shop owners required buyers to wear the shoes out of the store, a move that damaged their resale potential since most of the resale sites sell unworn sneakers. But the attention only fueled demand: The Jordan 1s immediately appeared on StockX and have sold for prices as high as $1,000.

Nike declined to comment.

Scott Cutler, the new chief executive of StockX, said more brands would eventually have to pay attention to resellers. “Nike, Adidas, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Rolex, whatever it is, they’re certainly not ignoring marketplaces and are not naïve to the fact that their distribution channels are evolving,” he said.

StockX grew out of Campless, a website that Josh Luber, a former I.B.M. consultant, built in 2012 to track sneaker resale prices on eBay. After Mr. Luber delivered a popular TED Talk titled “Why sneakers are a great investment,” Dan Gilbert, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, and a co-founder, Greg Schwarz, acquired Campless.

Scott Cutler previously worked for eBay, StubHub and the New York Stock Exchange.CreditNick Hagen for The New York Times

Campless eventually transformed itself into StockX, a marketplace to buy and sell sneakers. From the beginning, it also positioned itself as a “stock market of things.”

On StockX, that played out with buyers bidding on items or purchasing them for the lowest asking price from sellers. Once a bid was accepted, sellers shipped their items to one of StockX’s four authentication centers, which makes sure the shoes are not fake brands and then sends them to the buyer. StockX makes money by charging sellers a transaction fee. The company said its revenue more than doubled in the last year, with gross product sales topping $100 million a month. It has expanded into streetwear and luxury goods like handbags and has more than 800 employees.

The site does not carry user profiles and ratings, but includes detailed sales and pricing history for each item, making it more like a stock market than eBay. In total, StockX has raised $160 million, with its newest investors including General Atlantic, DST Global and GGV Capital.

One customer has been Usman Hasib, a 32-year-old in Houston. A sneaker collector since he was 13, Mr. Hasib has used StockX to amass 56 pairs of shoes worth around $25,000, according to StockX’s “portfolio” tracker. He rarely sells his purchases.

“I try to wear a different one every day,” he said.

When Mr. Hasib recently was unable to score Nike’s Off-White Jordan 1 sneakers in retail stores, he paid around $1,050 for a pair on StockX. Prices later surged to nearly $3,000 on the site. “It literally is like playing a stock market,” he said.

A StockX executive showed sneakerheads and small-business owners a custom sneaker during a tour of the offices in April last year.CreditBrittany Greeson for The New York Times

Mr. Cutler, who previously worked at eBay, StubHub and the New York Stock Exchange, became an adviser to StockX in 2016. That was when he read about the company’s plans to create a Big Board for commerce and products, modeled after marketplaces like eBay and StubHub. So he decided to offer his help.

“I immediately reached out and said, ‘Interestingly enough, I am the one person on the Earth that knows all of those companies intimately well,’” he said.

He said StockX planned to use the new $110 million in capital to expand internationally and push into selling newly released products.

Mr. Luber, StockX’s founder, said he was stepping down as chief executive but would continue to be the company’s public face. In a phone call from Paris, where StockX was involved in Fashion Week, he said he now had an even bigger vision than dropping new Jordans on StockX: He wants to replace static retail prices — an “antiquated concept,” he said — with a stock market style of shopping. In this setup, shoppers place bids on new items and prices are determined entirely by supply and demand.

Mr. Luber said he recognized the concept might initially be a stretch. “To tell all these brands that our idea is to get rid of retail prices is crazy, but that’s the slow, big idea behind it,” he said.

Mr. Luber has installed a ticker tracking the value of different shoes within StockX’s ecosystem. CreditNick Hagen for The New York Times

StockX is already moving ahead with the notion. In January, it held an “I.P.O.” — that’s initial product offering — for a limited run of slide sandals created by Ben Baller, a celebrity jewelry designer. The company used a complicated Dutch auction to determine which bidders got to buy the sandals and at what price. It resulted in an average price of $210 a pair — three times as much as they would have cost at retail, but lower than the majority of the bids.

After the release, other brands inquired about similar deals. StockX now has half a dozen such releases in the works with other designers, Mr. Luber said. “It’s not going to be an overnight thing, but it is absolutely logical,” he said.

In the meantime, StockX is expanding further into secondhand sales of luxury goods such as handbags and watches, an area currently topped by The RealReal, a San Francisco start-up that plans to go public later this week.

Mr. Wilkins, the power seller of sneakers, said he doesn’t plan to trade the shoes forever, but “right now it’s awesome income.”

There is one drawback, he acknowledged. Once his hobby became a business, he lost interest in getting the hottest shoes for himself. “The more and more you sell shoes, the more and more you dislike shoes,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘We’re in a Dark Place’: Children Returned to Troubled Texas Border Facility

CLINT, Tex. — At the squat, sand-colored concrete border station in Texas that has become the center of debate over President Trump’s immigration policies, a chaotic shuffle of migrant children continued on Tuesday as more than 100 were moved back into a facility that days earlier had been emptied in the midst of criticism that young detainees there were hungry, crying and unwashed.

The transfer came just days after 249 children originally housed at the station in Clint, Tex., had been moved to other facilities to relieve overcrowding. The continuing movement of children and confusion over housing of the Border Patrol’s youngest detainees pointed to an increasingly disorganized situation along the southern border and an agency struggling to maintain minimal humanitarian standards amid an unprecedented influx of migrant families.

[Read here for the story behind a photo of two migrants found dead in the Rio Grande.]

“We’ve dipped far below the standard of care into the realms of just utter darkness,” said State Representative Terry Canales of Texas, a Democrat who contacted Border Patrol officials to ask what he and his staff could do to help. “We’re in a dark place as a nation, and it just breaks my heart.”

In Clint, a farm town about 20 miles southeast of El Paso with fewer than 1,000 residents, there was consternation and dismay among residents at reports from lawyers who visited the border station recently, who said they found that children as young as 5 months old had been housed with filthy clothes, dirty diapers and inadequate food.

“Almost like a concentration camp,” said Juan Martinez, who works at the Pride Fitness gym in Clint and heard about what was happening at the nearby station from news reports. “I mean, they’re not killing them, but they’re treating them like animals. They need basic hygiene.”

From across the country, donations of diapers and other supplies began flowing in — though Customs and Border Protection agents said they could not accept outside supplies and initially refused the growing stockpile. More than a dozen people drove into South Texas from as far away as the West Coast to deliver aid and launch protests.

“It’s about getting people aware and creating a space for people to be outraged,” said Kris Brockmann, who traveled 17 hours from Palo Alto, Calif., to protest outside a Border Patrol facility near Clint on Tuesday night.

The Clint facility houses only a fraction of the tens of thousands of migrants who have been crossing the border each month, mostly Central American families fleeing poverty and violence in their homelands. But the lawyers’ observations of the conditions there, shared with journalists last week, offered a rare view into a system that has been deteriorating for the most part out of sight of the public.

The Department of Homeland Security’s inspector general has recently reported on facilities that it found to be dangerously overcrowded, where there was standing room only, and where lights had been kept on 24 hours a day in rooms where people had been left to sleep on concrete floors. But reporters have rarely been allowed into the facilities to document the conditions first hand.

Mr. Trump refused to take responsibility for the conditions facing migrant children and families at border facilities. “You know, they were built by President Obama, they are really not designed so much for children,” Mr. Trump said in an interview in the Oval Office on Tuesday. “But you know, children can be there because we have no choice because of the laws, the laws are so bad.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156695199_14514b9b-6239-4e77-8a03-26884c5734ee-articleLarge ‘We’re in a Dark Place’: Children Returned to Troubled Texas Border Facility Texas Sanders, John P Immigration Detention Immigration and Emigration Customs and Border Protection (US) Clint (Tex) Children and Childhood Appointments and Executive Changes

John Sanders, the acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, left, is expected to step down in the coming weeks.CreditJ. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

Asked if his administration’s policies were to blame, Mr. Trump said the conditions existed because Democrats in Congress would not agree to policy changes that would stanch the flow of migrants across the border. “All I can say is that if they change the law, you wouldn’t have it,” Mr. Trump said. “The cartels are making the money, are they using children’s — it’s virtual slavery. And if we could get a change, a very simple change it would go so quickly, so easily with the Democrats, we would be able to solve that problem very easily.”

The station in Clint was built in 2012. It was meant to temporarily house adults, not children, and not for a month at a time, as has happened under the Trump administration.

Local Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday were demanding an immediate improvement to conditions for detainees along the border, with Representative Joaquin Castro, a Democrat from Texas who is chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, announcing that the caucus would lead an inspection of the facility at Clint next week.

Amid the outrage over the conditions at Clint, the acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, John Sanders, announced he would step down in early July as the government’s primary border enforcement executive, the latest in a series of personnel changes within the federal border enforcement agencies that have come down since April, when Mr. Trump asked Kirstjen Nielsen to resign from her position as homeland security secretary.

[Read more: Customs and Border Protection’s acting chief will step down.]

A C.B.P. spokesman said that the agency was able to return 100 children to Clint because the previous overcrowding had been alleviated, but he also said that no additional resources were being provided to them. He disputed the accounts of the lawyers, including some from the nation’s top law schools, who after a court-ordered visit to the facility earlier this month said they had observed children who had not been allowed to shower in nearly a month, and were so hungry that it had been hard for them to sleep through the night.

They found children as young as 8 caring for infants they didn’t know, and toddlers who had relieved themselves in their clothes because they had not been put in diapers.

[Read about the conditions migrant children were held in at Clint.

“I personally don’t believe these allegations,” the Customs and Border Protection official, who spoke on the condition he not be identified, told reporters.

Volunteers who began trying to deliver donated supplies to the facility in Clint starting over the weekend were originally turned away and told that outside donations would not be accepted. A C.B.P. spokesman on Tuesday followed up, telling reporters that the agency was reviewing its donations policy to see if it could legally accept any supplies from the outside — though he also disputed the idea that any needed supplies were running low.

Mr. Canales, the Democratic state representative, said his office had been contacted by more than 1,000 people in the last week who were looking for ways to help the children in Clint.

As evening approached on Tuesday, activists from places including California, New York and Washington, D.C., began their demonstration.

“I’ve become increasingly aware of the enormous pipeline from Central America and all of the things that make it unlivable there,” said Heather Hadlock, a professor of musicology at Stanford University in California. ”Those things are not trivial or optional.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Migrant Children Moved Back to Troubled Texas Border Facility

CLINT, Tex. — At the squat, sand-colored concrete border station in Texas that has become the center of debate over President Trump’s immigration policies, a chaotic shuffle of migrant children continued on Tuesday as more than 100 were moved back into a facility that days earlier had been emptied in the midst of criticism that young detainees there were hungry, crying and unwashed.

The station in Clint, Tex., sits in the middle of a farm town of fewer than 1,000 residents, framed by high fencing and a tall communications tower. In recent weeks, it has become a temporary home to hundreds of migrant children as the government has run out of space to place the large numbers of migrants continuing to flow into the country from Central America.

Lawyers who visited the facility said they found it stretched beyond its capacity, with hundreds of minor detainees having gone for weeks without access to showers, clean clothing or sufficient food.

But in a press call on Tuesday, a Customs and Border Protection official said that the agency was able to send about 100 children back to the station because overcrowding there had been alleviated. The official disputed the lawyers’ accounts of conditions at the facility, insisting that migrant detainees housed by the agency were given access to periodic showers and were offered unlimited snacks throughout the day.

The continuing movement of children and confusion over the situation at Clint demonstrated the increasingly disorganized situation along the southern border and the government’s struggle to maintain minimal humanitarian standards amid an unprecedented influx of migrant families that only recently has begun to show any signs of slowing.

The agency’s acting commissioner, John Sanders, will step down in early July as the government’s primary border enforcement executive, a federal official said Tuesday, a development that comes as the agency faces continuing public fury over the treatment of detained migrant children.

[Read more: Customs and Border Protection’s acting chief will step down.]

Mr. Sanders announced his resignation in an email to colleagues shortly after it was reported by journalists. He has led the agency since Mr. Trump tapped the former Customs and Border Protection commissioner, Kevin McAleenan, to replace Kirstjen Nielsen as homeland security secretary. Mr. Sanders specialized in developing technology for national security initiatives and previously served as the chief technology officer for the Transportation Security Administration.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156695199_14514b9b-6239-4e77-8a03-26884c5734ee-articleLarge Migrant Children Moved Back to Troubled Texas Border Facility Texas Sanders, John P Immigration Detention Immigration and Emigration Customs and Border Protection (US) Clint (Tex) Children and Childhood Appointments and Executive Changes

John Sanders, the acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, left, is expected to step down in the coming weeks.CreditJ. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

The official who confirmed his resignation, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter, said it was not clear whether the impending resignation was connected to recent criticism over the agency’s management of a large influx of migrant families along the border.

That assertion from Customs and Border Protection that children were being well cared for ran contrary to what the lawyers, from some of the nation’s top law schools, said they were told by children. During a court-ordered visit to the facility earlier this month, some children said they had not been allowed to shower in nearly a month, and were so hungry that it had been hard for them to sleep through the night.

[Read about the conditions migrant children were held in at Clint.

“I personally don’t believe these allegations,” the Customs and Border Protection official, who spoke on the condition he not be identified, told reporters.

The lawyers’ accounts prompted a significant public backlash, after which all but 30 of the roughly 300 children who were being housed in Clint were transferred elsewhere. Some 249 were placed in a shelter network for children run by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, while others were moved to a tent facility in El Paso run by Customs and Border Protection.

But on Tuesday, the C.B.P. official said that those moves had alleviated overcrowding in Clint, and allowed for the return of more than 100 children there. The spokesman said that no additional resources had been provided to the children who were sent back.

After the lawyers’ accounts about Clint were made public, volunteers from around the country began to mobilize, hoping to deliver supplies such as diapers, soap and food to the facility. But those who arrived there were not allowed in and their donations were not accepted, according to local media reports.

On the call with reporters on Tuesday, the Customs and Border Protection official said that the agency was reviewing its policy for accepting outside donations, but the official also disputed the idea that supplies were running low.

“We are looking at the possibility of using some of those donations going forward but those items, it’s important to note, are available now,” the official said.

Federal officials had previously told the office of Representative Terry Canales, a Democrat from Texas who requested a list of needed supplies, that the agency would not be able to accept outside donations, according to Curtis Smith, Mr. Canales’s chief of staff.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Migrant Children Moved Back to Troubled Border Facility in Texas

CLINT, Tex. — At the squat, sand-colored concrete border station in Texas that has become the center of debate over President Trump’s immigration policies, a chaotic shuffle of migrant children continued on Tuesday as more than 100 were moved back into a facility that days earlier had been emptied in the midst of criticism that young detainees there were hungry, crying and unwashed.

The station in Clint, Tex., sits in the middle of a farm town of fewer than 1,000 residents, framed by high fencing and a tall communications tower. In recent weeks, it has become a temporary home to hundreds of migrant children as the government has run out of space to place the large numbers of migrants continuing to flow into the country from Central America.

Lawyers who visited the facility said they found it stretched beyond its capacity, with hundreds of minor detainees having gone for weeks without access to showers, clean clothing or sufficient food.

But in a press call on Tuesday, a Customs and Border Protection official said that the agency was able to send about 100 children back to the station because overcrowding there had been alleviated. The official disputed the lawyers’ accounts of conditions at the facility, insisting that migrant detainees housed by the agency were given access to periodic showers and were offered unlimited snacks throughout the day.

The continuing movement of children and confusion over the situation at Clint demonstrated the increasingly disorganized situation along the southern border and the government’s struggle to maintain minimal humanitarian standards amid an unprecedented influx of migrant families that only recently has begun to show any signs of slowing.

The agency’s acting commissioner, John Sanders, will step down in early July as the government’s primary border enforcement executive, a federal official said Tuesday, a development that comes as the agency faces continuing public fury over the treatment of detained migrant children.

[Read more: Customs and Border Protection’s acting chief will step down.]

Mr. Sanders announced his resignation in an email to colleagues shortly after it was reported by journalists. He has led the agency since Mr. Trump tapped the former Customs and Border Protection commissioner, Kevin McAleenan, to replace Kirstjen Nielsen as homeland security secretary. Mr. Sanders specialized in developing technology for national security initiatives and previously served as the chief technology officer for the Transportation Security Administration.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156695199_14514b9b-6239-4e77-8a03-26884c5734ee-articleLarge Migrant Children Moved Back to Troubled Border Facility in Texas Texas Sanders, John P Immigration Detention Immigration and Emigration Customs and Border Protection (US) Clint (Tex) Children and Childhood Appointments and Executive Changes

John Sanders, the acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, left, is expected to step down in the coming weeks.CreditJ. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

The official who confirmed his resignation, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter, said it was not clear whether the impending resignation was connected to recent criticism over the agency’s management of a large influx of migrant families along the border.

That assertion from Customs and Border Protection that children were being well cared for ran contrary to what the lawyers, from some of the nation’s top law schools, said they were told by children. During a court-ordered visit to the facility earlier this month, some children said they had not been allowed to shower in nearly a month, and were so hungry that it had been hard for them to sleep through the night.

[Read about the conditions migrant children were held in at Clint.

“I personally don’t believe these allegations,” the Customs and Border Protection official, who spoke on the condition he not be identified, told reporters.

The lawyers’ accounts prompted a significant public backlash, after which all but 30 of the roughly 300 children who were being housed in Clint were transferred elsewhere. Some 249 were placed in a shelter network for children run by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, while others were moved to a tent facility in El Paso run by Customs and Border Protection.

But on Tuesday, the C.B.P. official said that those moves had alleviated overcrowding in Clint, and allowed for the return of more than 100 children there. The spokesman said that no additional resources had been provided to the children who were sent back.

After the lawyers’ accounts about Clint were made public, volunteers from around the country began to mobilize, hoping to deliver supplies such as diapers, soap and food to the facility. But those who arrived there were not allowed in and their donations were not accepted, according to local media reports.

On the call with reporters on Tuesday, the Customs and Border Protection official said that the agency was reviewing its policy for accepting outside donations, but the official also disputed the idea that supplies were running low.

“We are looking at the possibility of using some of those donations going forward but those items, it’s important to note, are available now,” the official said.

Federal officials had previously told the office of Representative Terry Canales, a Democrat from Texas who requested a list of needed supplies, that the agency would not be able to accept outside donations, according to Curtis Smith, Mr. Canales’s chief of staff.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com