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Westlake Legal Group > Appointments and Executive Changes (Page 8)

Trump Names Mark Morgan, Former Head of Border Patrol, to Lead ICE

Westlake Legal Group trump-names-mark-morgan-former-head-of-border-patrol-to-lead-ice Trump Names Mark Morgan, Former Head of Border Patrol, to Lead ICE United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A Immigration and Emigration Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Appointments and Executive Changes
Westlake Legal Group 05dc-ice-facebookJumbo Trump Names Mark Morgan, Former Head of Border Patrol, to Lead ICE United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A Immigration and Emigration Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Sunday named Mark Morgan, a former Obama administration official who has aligned himself with some of Mr. Trump’s hard-line positions on border security, as the head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Mr. Morgan served as the Border Patrol chief at the end of the Obama administration, and was also previously an F.B.I. agent. He will lead the agency that arrests, detains and deports people who are in the United States illegally, after Mr. Trump last month withdrew his previous nominee, Ronald D. Vitiello, saying he wanted the agency to go in a “tougher direction.”

“I am pleased to inform all of those that believe in a strong, fair and sound Immigration Policy that Mark Morgan will be joining the Trump Administration as the head of our hard working men and women of ICE,” Mr. Trump said in a tweet. “Mark is a true believer and American Patriot. He will do a great job!”

The move continues a leadership churn at the Department of Homeland Security as Mr. Trump seeks to overhaul the department. In recent weeks, the president has forced out multiple top officials, including former Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

Though Mr. Morgan served in the Obama administration, he has backed some of Mr. Trump’s tougher immigration positions.

In an interview on Fox News on April 15, Mr. Morgan said he supported Mr. Trump’s suggestion that he might send migrants crossing the border to so-called sanctuary cities that are defying a crackdown by ICE.

“I’ve been there. The Border Patrol, ICE, their facilities are overwhelmed, the faith-based organizations and other nongovernmental organizations are overwhelmed,” Mr. Morgan said in the interview. “They have no choice. They’re going to have to start pushing these individuals out. Shouldn’t we kind of share the burden throughout the country?”

Mr. Morgan also strongly backed Mr. Trump’s characterization of the problems at the border as a security crisis. Democrats have said the issues are far more humanitarian in nature.

“What the president is saying and what they’re trying to do as far as the policy goes, it’s based on reality and fact, and I know that because he’s listening to the experts,” Mr. Morgan said in the Fox interview. “Not political pundits, not talking heads, he is listening to experts. Anyone who says this a manufactured crisis is absolutely misleading the American people.”

A spokeswoman for ICE referred a request for comment to the White House. The White House did not immediately respond.

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Shake-Up Looms at CBS News, as a Celebrated New Boss Makes Her Mark

When Susan Zirinsky was named the new president of CBS’s troubled news division in January, she said she wanted to unite her team “both functionally and spiritually.”

She is about to put that mission to the test.

CBS News, whose Cronkite-and-Murrow tradition was shaken last year by a series of sex scandals, is set to make sweeping changes to its morning and evening anchor lineups in a roll of the programming dice that the network hopes can lure back a shrinking audience.

The moves would be Ms. Zirinsky’s first to put her imprint on the network where she has worked for nearly five decades — and whose fortunes fell after painful revelations of workplace misconduct felled the company’s chief executive, Leslie Moonves; its star morning-show host, Charlie Rose; and Jeff Fager, executive producer of its most popular and prestigious show, “60 Minutes.”

Ms. Zirinsky is expected to announce her shake-up as soon as Monday, ahead of the network’s annual presentation to advertisers on May 15. The latest round of changes and tensions at CBS News were described by several people granted anonymity to describe sensitive internal discussions.

Gayle King — who has had a string of successes in recent months, including an interview with R. Kelly that went viral on social media — would be the centerpiece of Ms. Zirinsky’s revamped “CBS This Morning.” John Dickerson, an anchor since 2018, would slide over to “60 Minutes,” according to four of the people familiar with the plans.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_154346778_76ed5ea9-39f2-4dab-ae2d-b9a56cc067c0-articleLarge Shake-Up Looms at CBS News, as a Celebrated New Boss Makes Her Mark Zirinsky, Susan Television O'Donnell, Norah News and News Media King, Gayle Hiring and Promotion Glor, Jeffrey T Dickerson, John CBS News CBS Corporation Appointments and Executive Changes

Susan Zirinsky was named the president of CBS News in January.CreditShannon Finney/Getty Images

Norah O’Donnell, Ms. King’s other co-anchor, is the likely contender to take over “CBS Evening News,” replacing Jeff Glor, who has been in the job for 18 months, the people said.

If Ms. O’Donnell ascends to the job, she would join a short but exalted list of women who have served as solo evening news anchors at the three major networks, including Katie Couric at CBS and Diane Sawyer at ABC. Ms. O’Donnell’s role remains under negotiation, and CBS declined to comment for this article.

The changes will bring a degree of certainty to a news operation that has been besieged by speculation about who’s in and who’s out.

It will also be a benchmark for Ms. Zirinsky, now 67, who had been reluctant in the past to accept the role of CBS News president, and in recent months has openly questioned if she should have accepted the role, two of the people said. Ms. Zirinsky told the journalist Yashar Ali, who previously reported her misgivings, that she had “ZERO regrets about taking this job.”

A legend within the news division — she was the inspiration for Holly Hunter’s character in the 1987 movie “Broadcast News” — Ms. Zirinsky is the first woman to serve as CBS News president, and her promotion was literally met with cheers. The longtime overseer of “48 Hours,” she was a trusted consigliere to the network rank-and-file. She said in an interview in January that she took the job because, “I felt at this moment in my life and my career this was the time to step up.”

But Ms. Zirinsky had little prior experience in the darker arts of managing a television news network: negotiating with rapacious agents, juggling multiple programs, weathering leaks to The New York Post.

John Dickerson, a star political interviewer, shifted from “Face the Nation” to “CBS This Morning” last year.CreditLexey Swall for The New York Times

Colleagues say they admire Ms. Zirinsky’s resolve and journalistic instinct, and her approachable management style of consulting with staff members at all levels on a range of topics. But they say that her approach — more closely resembling that of a producer than a traditional tight-lipped media executive — has allowed uncertainty and fear to fester among some anchors and crew members.

She has not been shy about discussing potential changes to the anchor lineup with a variety of staff members, two of the people said, and several complained that her decision-making process has stretched too long.

Ms. Zirinsky has also been adamant about not letting news reports dictate her decisions. But speculation about new roles for Ms. O’Donnell and Ms. King has floated in the news media for months. As recently as Thursday, The Post reported on Ms. Zirinsky’s ideas to change the morning show and the evening newscast.

The uncertainty has allowed other factions of the newsroom to assert themselves.

Within the last two months, some in the senior ranks lobbied for Scott Pelley to return to the anchor chair of “CBS Evening News,” according to two people familiar with internal conversations.

Mr. Pelley anchored the newscast from 2011 to 2017, before leaving for “60 Minutes” amid falling ratings and a somewhat strained relationship with David Rhodes, Ms. Zirinsky’s predecessor as CBS News president.

Ms. Zirinsky considered the Pelley idea before ultimately ruling it out, the people said.

Ms. O’Donnell’s move to the evening shift may be accompanied by a bigger change inside CBS: uprooting the “Evening News” from its longtime Manhattan home and relocating the broadcast to Washington. The change is a bold and expensive risk for an evening newscast that has been mired in third place among the broadcast networks. A Washington-based crew would need to be hired, and the cost of shuttling staff between the two cities could prove costly.

Jeff Glor has been the anchor of “CBS Evening News” for 18 months.CreditReuters

Still, Ms. Zirinsky’s changes to the morning show could be her most crucial bet.

“CBS This Morning,” which trails NBC’s “Today” and ABC’s “Good Morning America” by a wide margin in the ratings, is a significant source of revenue, bringing in $253 million last year, according to Kantar Media. Until 2017, the program had been lapping at the heels of rivals, powered by the interplay between Mr. Rose, Ms. King and Ms. O’Donnell.

But Mr. Rose’s firing set off a number of lineup changes that failed to resonate with viewers. Mr. Dickerson, a star political interviewer, was shifted from “Face the Nation,” but was an awkward fit for the saccharine world of morning TV. A fourth anchor, Bianna Golodryga, was added in October; by April, she had left the network.

Ms. Zirinsky is expected to pair Ms. King on “CBS This Morning” with Anthony Mason, who currently hosts the show’s Saturday edition, and Tony Dokoupil, a network correspondent who is married to the NBC News star Katy Tur.

Two of the people said that Mr. Glor, a relative unknown at the time he ascended to the anchor’s chair, would probably be offered another job at the network; Mr. Mason’s move to weekdays leaves open his Saturday morning slot. Although he landed two interviews with President Trump, Mr. Glor’s run may prove the limits to the theory that big name anchors are no longer necessary for an evening newscast.

For now, a tense environment remains inside the CBS News offices on West 57th Street. On Friday, however, the “CBS This Morning” broadcast seemed chirpy as ever.

“We are reading lots of things with great interest and we will address them on Monday when Gayle is back and John as well,” said Ms. O’Donnell, who had Mr. Mason on as a guest host.

“Excellent,” Mr. Mason replied.

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Trump Won’t Nominate Stephen Moore for Fed Board

Westlake Legal Group trump-wont-nominate-stephen-moore-for-fed-board Trump Won’t Nominate Stephen Moore for Fed Board Women and Girls United States Politics and Government United States Economy Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Moore, Stephen (1960- ) Federal Reserve System Ernst, Joni Cain, Herman Banking and Financial Institutions Appointments and Executive Changes
Westlake Legal Group 30dc-moore-facebookJumbo Trump Won’t Nominate Stephen Moore for Fed Board Women and Girls United States Politics and Government United States Economy Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Moore, Stephen (1960- ) Federal Reserve System Ernst, Joni Cain, Herman Banking and Financial Institutions Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — President Trump said he would not nominate Stephen Moore for a seat on the Federal Reserve board after several Republican lawmakers raised concerns about the conservative economist’s previous comments denigrating women.

Mr. Trump, in a tweet, said “Steve Moore, a great pro-growth economist and a truly fine person, has decided to withdraw from the Fed process.”

Mr. Trump added that Mr. Moore would “work with me toward future economic growth in our Country.”

Mr. Moore, who continued to insist as recently as Thursday that he retained Mr. Trump’s support, appeared unlikely to win Senate confirmation after Republican lawmakers criticized his past comments and financial issues stemming from a 2010 divorce.

This is the second time in recent weeks that one of Mr. Trump’s Fed picks was forced to withdraw over concerns about their views and attitudes toward women. Herman Cain, a former pizza magnate, bowed out as he battled previous accusations of sexual harassment that ended his 2012 presidential campaign.

Mr. Moore, a former editorial board member of The Wall Street Journal, had written a series of opinion articles suggesting that women should not earn as much as men, demeaning their athletic abilities and questioning their right to attend sporting events.

In 2013, a judge in Virginia held Mr. Moore in contempt of court for failing to pay more than $300,000 in child support and alimony to his former wife. The Internal Revenue Service placed a lien on his home after he failed to pay $75,000 in back taxes.

On Tuesday, Senator Joni Ernst, Republican of Iowa, said she had told the White House she was unlikely to support Mr. Moore, becoming the first senator in her party to be nearing an explicit disavowal of his nomination.

“I would vote no against him, should he come up for a vote,” Ms. Ernst told Bloomberg television on Wednesday. “I know there are a number of other colleagues that have spoken out as well.”

Other Republican senators expressing concerns over the nomination included Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Lindsey O. Graham of South Carolina, a staunch ally of Mr. Trump.

Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama, a key vote on the banking committee, said on Thursday that Mr. Moore was in “serious trouble.”

Democrats criticized both Mr. Moore and Mr. Cain as too partisan and loyal to Mr. Trump for the Fed, which is historically independent. Several prominent economists, including conservatives like N. Gregory Mankiw of Harvard University, said Mr. Moore was not qualified for the position.

But like Mr. Cain before him, questions about attitudes toward women seem to have soured Republican senators on Mr. Moore.

Mr. Cain ended his 2012 presidential campaign amid allegations of sexual harassment from multiple women, which returned after Mr. Trump indicated he would nominate Mr. Cain to the Fed.

Mr. Trump picked Mr. Moore after Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, showed the president an op-ed article co-authored by Mr. Moore in The Journal. That piece called for the Fed to cut interest rates and said the central bank posed the biggest risk to the American economy — views that the president shares.

But Mr. Moore’s long paper trail, dating back two decades, of previous writings revealing a pattern of demeaning women and their role in society ultimately helped sink his candidacy.

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Facebook Set to Create Privacy Positions as Part of F.T.C. Settlement

Westlake Legal Group 01Facebook-facebookJumbo Facebook Set to Create Privacy Positions as Part of F.T.C. Settlement Zuckerberg, Mark E Social Media Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Privacy Federal Trade Commission Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — The Federal Trade Commission is negotiating a settlement with Facebook that would create new positions at the company focused on strengthening its privacy practices, according to two people with knowledge of the talks.

Facebook has agreed to create a privacy committee to protect its users’ data, as well as an external assessor who would be appointed by the company and F.T.C., said the people, who declined to be named because they were not authorized to speak publicly. The social network will also appoint a head compliance officer, which could be the chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, to oversee privacy efforts, one of the people said.

The proposed commitments are part of negotiations between the agency and Facebook to settle privacy violations. Both have been talking for months over claims that Facebook violated a 2011 privacy consent decree. Last week, Facebook announced that it expected to be fined up to $5 billion by the agency, in what would be a record financial penalty by the United States against a technology company.

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Facebook declined to comment and the F.T.C. did not respond to requests for comment. The settlement details were earlier reported by Politico.

This is a developing story and will be updated.

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Moore’s Shot at the Fed Teeters as G.O.P. Senators Voice Concerns

Westlake Legal Group moores-shot-at-the-fed-teeters-as-g-o-p-senators-voice-concerns Moore’s Shot at the Fed Teeters as G.O.P. Senators Voice Concerns Women and Girls United States Politics and Government Moore, Stephen (1960- ) Federal Reserve System Ernst, Joni Collins, Susan M Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — The conservative commentator Stephen Moore’s chance at confirmation to the Federal Reserve Board teetered on Tuesday after one Republican senator said it was unlikely she would support him and multiple Republican senators began to publicly question whether the problematic favorite of President Trump would have enough votes if nominated.

Senator Joni Ernst, Republican of Iowa, said on Tuesday that she had told the White House she was unlikely to support Mr. Moore, becoming the first senator in her party to be nearing an explicit disavowal of his nomination even before Mr. Trump makes it official.

“Very unlikely that I would support that person,” Ms. Ernst told reporters, having earlier expressed a lack of enthusiasm for Mr. Moore amid criticism for a series of columns and speeches, stretching over two decades, that frequently demeaned women and occasionally trafficked in racism.

Asked if she believed Mr. Moore could garner the necessary votes, Ms. Ernst said, “at this point, no I don’t.”

Senator Tim Scott, Republican of South Carolina, said that “he’s not gaining momentum.”

“At least one or two are not there, so that only leaves one or two left to go,” Mr. Scott said, referring to the four Republican votes needed to sink the potential nomination along party lines.

Mr. Trump has publicly said he planned to nominate Mr. Moore for one of two open seats on the board, but Republican support has declined in recent days. Ms. Ernst, who disclosed this year that she was a survivor of sexual assault, was seen as a critical verdict on Mr. Moore’s chances of Senate approval and a harbinger of further erosion, especially among Republican women.

ImageWestlake Legal Group f20fc80565f34a209c8f304205098959-articleLarge Moore’s Shot at the Fed Teeters as G.O.P. Senators Voice Concerns Women and Girls United States Politics and Government Moore, Stephen (1960- ) Federal Reserve System Ernst, Joni Collins, Susan M Appointments and Executive Changes

Mr. Trump publicly said he planned to nominate Stephen Moore for one of two open seats on the board, but Republican support has declined in recent days.CreditTom Williams/CQ Roll Call, via Getty Images

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, has publicly declined to weigh in until the nomination is official, but he has quietly urged senators who oppose Mr. Moore to reach out directly to the president, as Ms. Ernst did.

Other senators publicly conveyed concerns to reporters on Tuesday and Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a staunch ally of the president, said the nomination “would be very problematic.”

Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, also expressed apprehension.

“Obviously some of his past writings are of concern,” she said. “Certainly, it appears that he has a lot of personal financial issues as well as troubling writings about women and our role in society, in sports — and also how he views the Federal Reserve.”

Senator Richard C. Shelby, Republican of Alabama and an influential former chairman of the Banking Committee, fretted on Tuesday in a closed-door Republican lunch that the issues bedeviling Mr. Moore could produce a volatile confirmation hearing.

“I hadn’t said I would vote for him or not vote for him,” Mr. Shelby said in a brief interview afterward. “But I raised these because these are troublesome issues that aren’t going to go away.”

Several White House officials privately acknowledged on Tuesday that Mr. Moore would most likely not be nominated — just over a week after Herman Cain, Mr. Trump’s other top pick for the board’s second open seat, withdrew from consideration after accusations of sexual harassment that had stopped his 2012 presidential campaign resurfaced.

But Larry Kudlow, the main benefactor behind Mr. Moore, told Mr. Trump as recently as Monday that Mr. Moore’s prospects were actually growing stronger.

Speaking on Sunday on ABC’s “This Week,” Mr. Moore expressed confidence that Republican senators would continue to back him despite the controversies. “I know most of the Republican senators,” he said. “I think they respect my economic expertise and my record.”

Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, joined the criticism: “Obviously some of his past writings are of concern,” she said.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

But Mr. Moore acknowledged that if he became a political liability to senators like Ms. Ernst, who are up for re-election in 2020, he would withdraw his nomination.

“I don’t think it’s going to come to that,” Mr. Moore said. “I think most fair-minded people think this has been kind of a sleaze campaign against me.”

The president latched onto Mr. Moore for the Fed shortly after reading an opinion column in which Mr. Moore criticized the central bank for raising interest rates last year and called for lower rates to stop what Mr. Moore called “deflation” in commodity prices. But at the time of the announcement, Mr. Moore had not been formally vetted, and Mr. Trump has been waiting for the vetting process to run its course before making a formal nomination.

Mr. Moore, for his part, has tried to keep the debate over his possible nomination focused on economics. But that has been frequently overshadowed by revelations from his past, including a $75,000 federal tax lien filed against him in Maryland and findings by a Virginia judge that he was in contempt of court for not paying more than $330,000 in alimony, child support and other payments to his former wife after their divorce was completed in 2011.

The controversy surrounding Mr. Moore’s impending nomination ballooned after his views, particularly those he shared in opinion pieces he wrote, surfaced this month. In the early 2000s, he said in a television interview that “the male needs to be the breadwinner” in America and blamed the “decline of the family” on the rising economic self-sufficiency of women. He expressed similar sentiments in a 2014 column, warning of possible social consequences if women were to earn more than men. Mr. Moore has also called, in what he says were humor columns, for women to be barred from announcing or officiating men’s college basketball games, unless they were as attractive as the sports reporter Bonnie Bernstein.

“Here’s the rule change I propose,” he wrote. “No more women refs, no women announcers, no women beer vendors, no women anything. There is, of course, an exception to this rule. Women are permitted to participate, if and only if, they look like Bonnie Bernstein.”

In 2016, shortly after Mr. Trump’s election, Mr. Moore paused in a policy speech to tell his audience about a racist illustration that depicted Mr. Trump and former President Barack Obama, which Mr. Moore said bore the headline “First Thing Donald Trump Does as President Is Kick a Black Family Out of Public Housing.”

“I just love that one,” Mr. Moore said.

A White House spokeswoman said Monday that the Trump administration was reviewing Mr. Moore’s writings.

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Guantánamo Bay Prison Commander Has Been Fired

Westlake Legal Group 28dc-gitmo1-facebookJumbo Guantánamo Bay Prison Commander Has Been Fired United States Southern Command United States Defense and Military Forces Ring, John C Guantanamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba) Detainees Appointments and Executive Changes

This article was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — The commander of the prison at Guantánamo Bay has been fired seven weeks before he was to leave the job.

Adm. Craig S. Faller relieved Rear Adm. John C. Ring for a “loss of confidence in his ability” to lead, the United States Southern Command said on Sunday in a brief statement. Admiral Ring’s deputy, Brig. Gen. John F. Hussey, is now the acting commander.

Col. Amanda Azubuike, a spokeswoman for the Southern Command, which oversees the prison, said the decision to remove Admiral Ring had nothing to do with a recent news media visit he hosted there. She said only that he was let go after a monthlong investigation that was opened in March.

Admiral Faller, the leader of the Southern Command, and Admiral Ring met on Saturday at the command’s headquarters in Doral, Fla., where Admiral Faller “personally informed” Admiral Ring that he was being fired. Admiral Ring “will be temporarily assigned duties elsewhere” in the Southern Command, Colonel Azubuike said.

Admiral Ring, a former commander of the aircraft carrier Nimitz, was the 18th leader of the prison operations that started in January 2002. He began that assignment in April 2018 and was due to be replaced in a routine rotation the week of June 11.

“The vast majority of commanders complete their assigned tours with distinction,” Colonel Azubuike said. “When they fall short, we hold our leaders accountable, which reflects the importance we place on the public’s trust and confidence in our military leaders.”

At Guantánamo, Admiral Ring was responsible for 40 detainees and a staff of 1,800 troops and civilian employees. Soon after taking charge, he became an outspoken advocate of the need to build a new prison for 15 men who had been held by the C.I.A. before their 2006 transfer to American military custody.

In 2013 and 2014, Gen. John F. Kelly, a former Southern Command leader who would become President Trump’s first homeland security secretary and second chief of staff, had unsuccessfully lobbied Congress for money to replace the prison.

Admiral Ring renewed that effort last June, telling reporters that the current top-secret prison where the military segregates high-value detainees, called Camp 7, would become inadequate as the prisoners aged. Camp 7 houses Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, and other men the C.I.A. previously held as leaders, deputies or foot soldiers of Al Qaeda or other extremist groups.

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As Herman Cain Bows Out of Fed Contention, Focus Shifts to Stephen Moore

Westlake Legal Group as-herman-cain-bows-out-of-fed-contention-focus-shifts-to-stephen-moore As Herman Cain Bows Out of Fed Contention, Focus Shifts to Stephen Moore Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Federal Reserve System Cain, Herman Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — President Trump announced Monday that Herman Cain, one of his two embattled picks for the Federal Reserve Board, had withdrawn his name from consideration, even as his second candidate came under new scrutiny over his attitudes toward women.

Mr. Cain, a former pizza chain executive, made his decision as he battled old accusations of sexual harassment that had halted his 2012 presidential campaign.

His withdrawal bows to political reality in a moment when Mr. Trump has faced mounting criticism for tapping loyalists to join the historically independent Fed. And it moved a spotlight to the other man Mr. Trump has said he wants to put on the Fed, his economic adviser Stephen Moore, who faced new objections on Monday because of a series of magazine columns that denigrated women, including his wife at the time.

Mr. Moore has called the writings jokes, but the criticism suggests that questions of harassment and sexism could prove more consequential for Mr. Trump’s nominees than interest rates and other policy issues. In his columns, published in the early 2000s by the conservative magazine National Review, some of which were first reported by CNN, he complained that women are “sooo malleable” because his wife at the time voted for a Democrat, based on a campaign commercial.

In other pieces, Mr. Moore said that female tennis players “want equal pay for inferior work” and called it a “travesty” that women wanted to play pickup basketball with men. He called for women to be banned from the N.C.A.A. men’s basketball tournament, unless they were as attractive as the CBS sports journalist Bonnie Bernstein, who, he wrote, “should wear a halter top.”

“Here’s the rule change I propose,” Mr. Moore wrote in 2002. “No more women refs, no women announcers, no women beer vendors, no women anything. There is, of course, an exception to this rule. Women are permitted to participate, if and only if, they look like Bonnie Bernstein. The fact that Bonnie knows nothing about basketball is entirely irrelevant.”

He lamented: “Is there no area in life where men can take vacation from women? What’s next? Women invited to bachelor parties?”

Ms. Bernstein replied on Twitter: “You want halter tops? Hit the club scene. You want hoops knowledge? Try actually listening.”

Mr. Moore, who has not been formally nominated for the Fed board, did not respond to a message seeking comment on the writings on Monday. Earlier in the day, he said in a text message that Mr. Trump would follow through on his nomination “when I get all the paperwork and financial disclosure done.”

Critics previously questioned Mr. Cain’s and Mr. Moore’s shifting views on interest rates, which both men said should be higher under President Barack Obama, when the nation was struggling to recover from the 2008 financial crisis, but now say should stay low under Mr. Trump, when the economy is growing. Both men have previously voiced support of a return to a gold standard, which the United States abandoned decades ago and few economists now support.

Congressional Republicans say those views are less likely to impede Mr. Moore’s confirmation prospects than concerns over his personal life and past statements.

White House officials have insisted in recent weeks that Mr. Moore’s nomination was on track, despite controversies over a $75,000 tax lien filed against him by the Internal Revenue Service and a judge finding him in contempt of court several years ago for failing to pay more than $300,000 in past-due child support and alimony.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 22dc-cain-articleLarge-v2 As Herman Cain Bows Out of Fed Contention, Focus Shifts to Stephen Moore Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Federal Reserve System Cain, Herman Appointments and Executive Changes

Herman Cain has withdrawn from consideration to be nominated to the Federal Reserve Board.CreditJustin Sullivan/Getty Images

They had been less certain about Mr. Cain, whose selection stoked bipartisan concern over his qualifications for the post and allegations of sexual harassment. At least four Republican senators had said they would oppose his confirmation, if Mr. Trump were to formally nominate him — effectively killing Mr. Cain’s chances in the Senate, where Republicans have 53 seats.

Mr. Cain said Monday afternoon on The Western Journal, a conservative website, that he had decided to withdraw after prayerful consideration, and after questioning whether a Fed seat was worth giving up his online commentary platform and various “business interests,” including paid speeches.

“Without getting too specific about how big a pay cut this would be,” Mr. Cain wrote, “let’s just say I’m pretty confident that if your boss told you to take a similar pay cut, you’d tell him where to go.”

The decision was an abrupt departure from last week, when Mr. Cain vowed to stay in the running, telling The Wall Street Journal he was “very committed” to being nominated. In an op-ed column in that newspaper, Mr. Cain criticized what he called “the professor standard” for Fed nominees under presidents dating to Bill Clinton in the 1990s, which he said had caused the central bank to lose sight of the importance of keeping the dollar strong and stable to support economic growth.

In his column on Monday, Mr. Cain said he had begun to question whether joining the Fed would be, in effect, a step down in influence from his perch writing conservative commentary. “I also started wondering if I’d be giving up too much influence to get a little bit of policy impact,” he wrote.

The president said Mr. Cain had asked him not to nominate him for the seat.

“I will respect his wishes,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter, calling Mr. Cain “a great American who truly loves our country.”

With the attention shifting to Mr. Moore on Monday, Democrats and women’s groups called his comments sexist and disqualifying.

“The report about Stephen Moore making sexist comments about women in sports is disturbing,” said Representative Carolyn B. Maloney of New York, the vice chairwoman of the Joint Economic Committee and a critic of Mr. Moore’s nomination, “and if true would be another reason why he shouldn’t be allowed on the Federal Reserve Board.”

It is unclear whether he, too, might face bipartisan opposition. Some Republicans said privately earlier this month that Mr. Cain’s struggles could help Mr. Moore, because Republican senators would be unlikely to vote against both of Mr. Trump’s nominees. They were more divided on Monday, saying Mr. Cain’s departure could open Mr. Moore to additional scrutiny and attacks.

A senior Republican aide on Capitol Hill said conservatives would be watching how Mr. Moore’s writings about women sat with Senators Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine, Republicans who are considered swing votes for his nomination. The aide said Mr. Moore’s chances could also depend on whether his ex-wife, Allison, speaks publicly about their difficult divorce and its aftermath.

Records of that divorce were unsealed this month in a Virginia courthouse, and they include allegations of infidelity and Mr. Moore’s failure to pay court-ordered support.

According to filings, in 2010 Mr. Moore started a sexual relationship with a woman he met through an online dating service. His wife found bills that showed Mr. Moore pumping gas in the morning near the home of the other woman and buying an airplane ticket in her name. At their son’s graduation ceremony, Mr. Moore said to his children, in earshot of Ms. Moore, “I have two women, and what’s really bad is when they fight over you.”

Before the divorce, Mr. Moore frequently teased his ex-wife in his National Review columns. In 2001, he wrote that “she’s been acting as if it’s her patriotic duty to single-handedly revive the American economy with her frenetic pace of consumer spending.” In 2003, he wrote that “Allison consumes but she still doesn’t produce.” In 2004, he wrote, “Here’s the best news of all: For once, Allison isn’t pregnant.”

Others columns criticized the notion of a “pay gap” between male and female athletes.

“Women tennis pros don’t really want equal pay for equal work. They want equal pay for inferior work,” Mr. Moore wrote in 2000. “If there is an injustice in tennis, it’s that women like Martina Hingis and Monica Seles make millions of dollars a year, even though there are hundreds of men at the collegiate level (assuming their schools haven’t dropped the sport) who could beat them handily.”

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With Herman Cain Out of Fed Contention, Focus Shifts to Stephen Moore

Westlake Legal Group with-herman-cain-out-of-fed-contention-focus-shifts-to-stephen-moore With Herman Cain Out of Fed Contention, Focus Shifts to Stephen Moore Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Federal Reserve System Cain, Herman Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Monday that one of his embattled picks for the Federal Reserve Board, Herman Cain, has withdrawn his name from consideration, as attention shifted from the two loyalists’ views on economics and monetary policy to their attitudes toward women.

The decision on Mr. Cain came as the former pizza chain executive battled old charges of sexual harassment that had halted his 2012 presidential campaign. His withdrawal bows to political reality in a moment when Mr. Trump has faced mounting criticism for tapping Trump partisans to join the historically independent Fed. And it moved a spotlight to the other man Mr. Trump has said he wants to put on the Fed, his economic adviser Stephen Moore, who faced scrutiny on Monday for a series of magazine columns that denigrated women, including his then-wife.

Mr. Moore has called the writings jokes, but the criticism suggests that questions of harassment and sexism could prove more consequential for Mr. Trump’s nominees than interest rates and other policy issues. Mr. Trump himself has faced down accusations of sexual assault and crude sexual commentary.

But unlike Mr. Moore and Mr. Cain, he did not face a Senate confirmation vote.

In Mr. Moore’s columns, published by the conservative magazine National Review, some of which were first reported by CNN, he complains that women are “sooo malleable” because his then-wife voted for a Democrat, based on a campaign commercial.

In other pieces, Mr. Moore says female tennis players “want equal pay for inferior work” and says it is a “travesty” that women want to play pickup basketball with men. He calls for women to be banned from the N.C.A.A. men’s basketball tournament, unless they are as attractive as the C.B.S. sports journalist Bonnie Bernstein, who, he writes, “should wear a halter top.”

“Here’s the rule change I propose,” Mr. Moore wrote in 2003. “No more women refs, no women announcers, no women beer vendors, no women anything. There is, of course, an exception to this rule. Women are permitted to participate, if and only if, they look like Bonnie Bernstein. The fact that Bonnie knows nothing about basketball is entirely irrelevant.”

He lamented, “Is there no area in life where men can take vacation from women? What’s next? Women invited to bachelor parties?”

Ms. Bernstein replied on Twitter, “You want halter tops? Hit the club scene. You want hoops knowledge? Try actually listening.”

Mr. Moore, who has not been formally nominated for the Fed board, did not respond to a message seeking comment on the writings on Monday. Earlier in the day, he said in a text message that Mr. Trump would follow through on his nomination “when I get all the paperwork and financial disclosure done.”

White House officials have insisted in recent weeks that Mr. Moore’s nomination was on track, despite controversies over a $75,000 tax lien filed against him by the Internal Revenue Service and a judge finding him in contempt of court several years ago for failing to pay more than $300,000 in past-due child support and alimony.

They had been less certain about Mr. Cain, whose selection stoked bipartisan concern over Mr. Cain’s qualifications for the post and allegations of sexual harassment. At least four Republican senators have already said they would oppose his confirmation, if Mr. Trump were to formally nominate him — effectively killing Mr. Cain’s chances in the Senate, where Republicans have 53 seats.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_152455779_b039e958-fb14-4912-aebe-10358f258965-articleLarge With Herman Cain Out of Fed Contention, Focus Shifts to Stephen Moore Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Federal Reserve System Cain, Herman Appointments and Executive Changes

Stephen Moore, one of President Trump’s outside economic advisers, is being considered for a nomination to the Federal Reserve Board.CreditTom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Mr. Cain said on the conservative website WesternJournal.com on Monday afternoon that he had decided to withdraw after prayerful consideration, and after questioning whether a Fed seat was worth giving up his online commentary platform and various “business interests,” including paid speeches.

“Without getting too specific about how big a pay cut this would be,” Mr. Cain wrote, “let’s just say I’m pretty confident that if your boss told you to take a similar pay cut, you’d tell him where to go.”

The decision was an abrupt departure from last week, when Mr. Cain vowed to stay in the running, telling The Wall Street Journal he was “very committed” to being nominated. In an op-ed column in that newspaper, Mr. Cain criticized what he called “the professor standard” for Fed nominees under presidents dating back to Bill Clinton in the 1990s, which he said had caused the central bank to lose sight of the importance of keeping the dollar strong and stable in order to support economic growth.

In his column on Monday, Mr. Cain said he had begun to question whether joining the Fed would be, in effect, a step down in influence from his perch writing conservative commentary. “I also started wondering if I’d be giving up too much influence to get a little bit of policy impact,” he wrote.

The president said Mr. Cain decided to stay put.

“I will respect his wishes,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter, calling Mr. Cain “a great American who truly loves our country.”

With the attention now on Mr. Moore, it is unclear whether he too might face bipartisan opposition. Some Republicans said privately earlier this month that Mr. Cain’s struggles could help Mr. Moore, because Republican senators would be unlikely to vote against both of Mr. Trump’s nominees. They were more divided on Monday, saying Mr. Cain’s departure could open Mr. Moore to additional scrutiny and attacks.

A senior Republican aide on Capitol Hill said conservatives will be watching how Mr. Moore’s writings about women sit with Republican Senators Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine, who are considered swing votes for his nomination. The aide said Mr. Moore’s chances could also depend on whether his ex-wife, Allison, chooses to speak publicly about their difficult divorce and its aftermath.

Records of that divorce were unsealed earlier this month in a Virginia courthouse, and they include allegations of infidelity and Mr. Moore’s failure to pay court-ordered support.

According to filing, in 2010 Mr. Moore started a sexual relationship with a woman he met through an online dating service. His wife found bills that showed Mr. Moore pumping gas in the morning near the home of the other woman and buying an airplane ticket in her name. At their son’s graduation ceremony, Mr. Moore said to his children, in earshot of Ms. Moore, “I have two women, and what’s really bad is when they fight over you.”

Before the divorce, Mr. Moore frequently teased his ex-wife in his National Review columns. In 2001, he wrote that “she’s been acting as if it’s her patriotic duty to single-handedly revive the American economy with her frenetic pace of consumer spending.” In 2003, he wrote that “Allison consumes but she still doesn’t produce.” In 2004, he wrote that “here’s the best news of all: for once Allison isn’t pregnant.”

Others columns criticized the notion of a “pay gap” between male and female athletes.

“Women tennis pros don’t really want equal pay for equal work. They want equal pay for inferior work,” Mr. Moore wrote in 2000. “If there is an injustice in tennis, it’s that women like Martina Hingis and Monica Seles make millions of dollars a year, even though there are hundreds of men at the collegiate level (assuming their schools haven’t dropped the sport) who could beat them handily.”

Democrats and women’s groups called the comments sexist and disqualifying.

“The report about Stephen Moore making sexist comments about women in sports is disturbing,” said Representative Carolyn B. Maloney of New York, the vice chair of the Joint Economic Committee and a critic of Mr. Moore’s nomination, “and if true would be another reason why he shouldn’t be allowed on the Federal Reserve Board.”

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Trump Will Not Nominate Herman Cain to Fed Board

Westlake Legal Group trump-will-not-nominate-herman-cain-to-fed-board Trump Will Not Nominate Herman Cain to Fed Board Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Federal Reserve System Cain, Herman Appointments and Executive Changes
Westlake Legal Group 22dc-cain-facebookJumbo Trump Will Not Nominate Herman Cain to Fed Board Trump, Donald J sexual harassment Federal Reserve System Cain, Herman Appointments and Executive Changes

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Monday that Herman Cain, a former pizza company executive and conservative presidential candidate, has withdrawn from consideration to be nominated to the Federal Reserve Board.

“My friend Herman Cain, a truly wonderful man, has asked me not to nominate him for a seat on the Federal Reserve Board,” Mr. Trump said in a post on Twitter.

Mr. Cain did not offer an immediate explanation for the withdrawal, though the move is a nod to political reality, and a victory for critics who warned Mr. Cain would act as a loyalist for Mr. Trump on the historically independent Fed board.

The president said earlier this month that he planned to nominate Mr. Cain, but the selection stoked bipartisan controversy over Mr. Cain’s qualifications for the post and the allegations of sexual harassment that derailed his 2012 bid for the Republican White House nomination.

At least four Republican senators have already said they would oppose his confirmation, if Mr. Trump were to formally nominate him — effectively killing Mr. Cain’s chances in the Senate, where Republicans have 53 seats.

“I will respect his wishes,” Mr. Trump said, calling Mr. Cain “a great American who truly loves our country.”

Mr. Cain’s decision was an abrupt departure from last week, when he vowed to stay in the running, telling The Wall Street Journal he was “very committed” to being nominated. In an op-ed column in that newspaper, Mr. Cain criticized what he called “the professor standard” for Fed nominees under presidents dating back to Bill Clinton in the 1990s, which he said had caused the central bank to lose sight of the importance of keeping the dollar strong and stable in order to support economic growth.

“The professor standard will not challenge itself — that much has been proved,” Mr. Cain wrote. “That’s why my voice is needed at the Fed.”

Mr. Cain is a former businessman and director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, an advisory position that largely involves linking the regional Fed bank to the business community. His presidential bid was notable for his “9-9-9” tax proposal, which coupled dramatically low 9-percent flat tax rates for businesses and individuals with a new 9 percent national sales tax, and for the harassment allegations that ended it.

Those allegations worried many Republicans in the Senate. Other critics questioned Mr. Cain’s qualifications for the Fed and his shifting views on interest rates, which Mr. Cain said should be higher under President Barack Obama, when the nation was struggling to recover from the 2008 financial crisis, but now says should stay low under Mr. Trump, when the economy is growing.

Many Fed analysts warned that Mr. Cain and a second potential Trump nominee, Stephen Moore, who is one of Mr. Trump’s outside economic advisers, would threaten the Fed’s history of independence from the White House. Neither Mr. Cain nor Mr. Moore had completed formal vetting procedures before Mr. Trump indicated he wanted to nominate them.

In recent years Mr. Cain has fashioned himself as a conservative commentator and staunch supporter of Mr. Trump. He posts frequent video columns on the website WesternJournal.com, including recent videos where he walked viewers through the process of being vetted for a Fed position. He also regularly links to the site’s stories on his Facebook page. Often, those stories are critiques of Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York, the freshman who has become a favorite target for conservatives.

On Monday, shortly after Mr. Trump announced Mr. Cain’s withdrawal, the most recent link on Mr. Cain’s page was a video of an eight-year-old girl doing an impression of Ms. Ocasio-Cortez. “Oh my goodness,” Mr. Cain wrote, “this is the best thing you’ll see all day.”

Mr. Moore said in a text message on Monday that Mr. Trump would follow through on his nomination “when I get all the paperwork and financial disclosure done.”

White House officials have insisted in recent weeks that Mr. Moore’s nomination was on track, despite controversies over a $75,000 tax lien filed against him by the Internal Revenue Service and a judge finding him in contempt of court several years ago for failing to pay more than $300,000 in past-due child support and alimony.

On Monday, CNN reported that Mr. Moore, in columns for National Review in the early 2000s, belittled female athletes and called for women to be disallowed from officiating, announcing or even selling beer at NCAA men’s basketball games. Mr. Moore said those columns were jokes.

It is unclear if Mr. Moore has the support he would need in the Senate to be confirmed. Some Republicans said privately earlier this month that Mr. Cain’s struggles could help Mr. Moore, because Republican senators would be unlikely to vote against both of Mr. Trump’s nominees. They were more divided on Monday, saying Mr. Cain’s departure could open Mr. Moore to additional scrutiny and attacks.

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How Michael Cohen Turned Against President Trump

Michael D. Cohen was at a breaking point. He told friends he was suicidal. He insisted to lawyers he would never go to jail. Most of all, he feared that President Trump, his longtime boss, had forsaken him.

“Basically he needs a little loving and respect booster,” one of Mr. Cohen’s legal advisers at the time, Robert J. Costello, wrote in a text message to Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s lead lawyer. “He is not thinking clearly because he feels abandoned.”

That was last June. The “booster” from Mr. Trump never arrived. And by August, Mr. Cohen’s relationship with him had gone from fraught to hostile, casting a shadow on the Trump presidency and helping drive multiple criminal investigations into the president’s inner circle, including some that continued after the special counsel’s work ended.

In the biggest blow to the president personally, federal prosecutors in Manhattan effectively characterized Mr. Trump as an unindicted co-conspirator in a criminal case against Mr. Cohen involving hush money payments to a pornographic film actress. Mr. Cohen, and evidence gathered by prosecutors, implicated the president.

Now, as Mr. Cohen prepares to head to prison in two weeks, dozens of previously unreported emails, text messages and other confidential documents reviewed by The New York Times suggest that his falling out with Mr. Trump may have been avoidable.

Missed cues, clashing egos, veiled threats and unaddressed money worries all contributed to Mr. Cohen’s halting decision to turn on a man he had long idolized and even once vowed to take a bullet for, according to the documents and interviews with people close to the events. Some of the documents have been turned over to the prosecutors in Manhattan, and a small number were mentioned in the special counsel’s report released on Thursday, which dealt extensively with Mr. Cohen and referred to him more than 800 times.

Mr. Cohen held out hope for a different outcome until the very end, when he pleaded guilty and confessed to paying the illegal hush money to avert a potential sex scandal during the presidential campaign. Just hours earlier, wracked with indecision, he was still seeking guidance, looking, as one informal adviser put it, “for another way out.”

Mr. Cohen’s anxiety, on display in the documents, played a role in the undoing of his relationship with Mr. Trump, as did Mr. Costello’s lack of success in serving as a bridge to the White House. But also looming large were Mr. Giuliani’s and Mr. Trump’s failures to understand the threat that Mr. Cohen posed, and their inability — or unwillingness — to put his financial and emotional insecurities to rest.

ImageWestlake Legal Group bd657fdbd62d4824ac150565c9d392fc-articleLarge How Michael Cohen Turned Against President Trump United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump Organization Giuliani, Rudolph W Costello, Robert J Cohen, Michael D (1966- ) Appointments and Executive Changes

Robert J. Costello, a lawyer who advised Mr. Cohen last year, tried to serve as a bridge to the White House.CreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times

After the Federal Bureau of Investigation raided Mr. Cohen’s home, office and hotel room last April, two of Mr. Cohen’s advisers explored whether the president might be open to a pardon, but Mr. Giuliani offered no assurances.

In June, Mr. Costello proposed that he and Mr. Giuliani, who have been friends for decades, meet urgently with Mr. Cohen to address his grievances and ease his anxieties. “Are we going to meet Thursday or Friday?” Mr. Costello texted Mr. Giuliani on a Monday. “I would like to get back to Michael with a response.”

But Mr. Giuliani did not respond. And when Mr. Costello followed up, “Can I get a response on the possible meeting?” Mr. Giuliani hesitated, replying, “Not yet because haven’t talked to President,” who was out of the country.

The next day, Mr. Cohen’s private admission to friends that he was open to cooperating with prosecutors suddenly appeared in the news. And Mr. Cohen relayed his growing displeasure with the Trump camp to Mr. Costello, sending the lawyer an article that suggested the president and his allies intended “to discredit Michael Cohen” and commenting in the email that “they are again on a bad path.” He also complained to Mr. Costello that the president had stopped covering his legal expenses.

Mr. Costello, who spoke with The Times after Mr. Cohen waived attorney-client privilege in February, said that without Mr. Cohen’s team and the president’s lawyers in sync, it was impossible to navigate the tumultuous relationship.

“What we had here was a failure to communicate,” said Mr. Costello, who was never formally retained by Mr. Cohen. “My mission was to get everyone tuned in to the same channel. My thought was a face-to-face meeting among all the lawyers together with Cohen would put everyone on the same channel. The meeting never happened, and the rest is history.”

Mr. Cohen declined to comment.

In an interview, Mr. Giuliani acknowledged that the Trump team had pulled back from Mr. Cohen, saying it did so because prosecutors might have viewed friendly overtures as witness tampering, and because Mr. Cohen’s legal problems extended beyond his relationship with the president.

“It seemed like an unfortunate but sensible decision,” he said of the Trump team’s reticence toward Mr. Cohen. “The more I look back at it, the more I wonder if it was inevitable that Michael was going to crack.”

When Rudolph W. Giuliani was hired as President Trump’s lead lawyer, he became a point of contact in the White House for Mr. Costello, a longtime friend.CreditAaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

After pleading guilty in August, and hoping to reduce his three-year prison sentence, Mr. Cohen told federal prosecutors about Mr. Trump’s role in the hush-money scheme, as well as other aspects of the president’s company, where he had worked for a decade. He also suggested Mr. Trump’s team had dangled a pardon to keep him loyal, a claim denied by Mr. Giuliani. In a recent meeting requested by the prosecutors, Mr. Costello said, he told them the pardon discussion was initiated by Mr. Cohen and rejected by Mr. Giuliani.

Unencumbered by the restraints on the investigation by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, the prosecutors are now scrutinizing a wider swath of the president’s associates. About a dozen investigations are underway, including an inquiry into the Trump inaugural committee, which Mr. Cohen had assisted. Mr. Cohen also delivered congressional testimony that accused Mr. Trump of being a racist and a “con man.”

The relationship between Mr. Cohen and Mr. Trump was looking up, at least for a brief period, last April.

Just days after F.B.I. agents searched his hotel room on Park Avenue, Mr. Cohen received a phone call from the president. “Stay strong,” Mr. Trump told him, according to the Mueller report and a person with knowledge of the call.

Mr. Cohen thanked Mr. Trump repeatedly, and later told people the message was clear: The president, who had a history of treating Mr. Cohen poorly, wanted to keep him on his team.

As federal prosecutors in Manhattan built a criminal case against Mr. Cohen, he set out to find a lawyer who had experience with the Manhattan United States attorney’s office, known as the Southern District of New York. That’s when an acquaintance at a local law firm emailed him to pitch the services of his colleague Mr. Costello. The firm was eager to become associated with such a high-profile case, and quickly embraced Mr. Cohen.

“I am really sorry to read about your troubles,” the acquaintance, Jeffrey Citron, wrote. “My partner Bob Costello was formerly the deputy chief of the criminal division of the U.S. Attorney’s office for the Southern District.” He said that if Mr. Cohen wanted to connect with Mr. Costello and obtain “his insight into your situation, it would be my pleasure to arrange.”

Mr. Cohen jumped at the offer: “I do. Can you connect me to him?”

Mr. Cohen met that day with Mr. Citron and Mr. Costello in a conference room at the Loews Regency Hotel, where he had been staying while his home underwent renovations. After drawing the curtains, Mr. Cohen revealed the depths of his despair.

Emails between Mr. Cohen and Jeffrey Citron, a lawyer who offered to introduce him to Mr. Costello.

“I was up on the roof. I was thinking of jumping,” Mr. Cohen told the two men, according to Mr. Costello.

Over the course of the two-hour meeting, Mr. Cohen and Mr. Costello discussed options for digging out of the mess, including possibly seeking immunity from prosecution in exchange for cooperation. They also talked about whether state prosecutors could charge Mr. Cohen even if the president pardoned him, Mr. Costello said. And they discussed, in passing, Mr. Costello’s friendship with Mr. Giuliani.

When Mr. Giuliani was hired by the president a few days later, Mr. Costello emailed Mr. Cohen: “I told you my relationship with Rudy which could be very very useful for you.”

“Great news,” Mr. Cohen replied.

The next day, after speaking to Mr. Giuliani by phone, Mr. Costello wrote in an email to Mr. Citron that the president’s lead lawyer had been “thrilled that I reached out to him about Cohen.” He added that Mr. Giuliani was “calling the president tonight.”

Mr. Costello also shared his upbeat assessment with Mr. Cohen. “I just spoke to Rudy Giuliani and told him I was on your team,” he wrote in an email sent late that night. “Rudy was thrilled and said this could not be a better situation for the president or you.” He continued, “He said thank you for opening this back channel of communication and asked me to keep in touch.”

Mr. Trump praised Mr. Cohen on Twitter the next day, calling him “a fine person” and predicting he would not flip. After another conversation with Mr. Giuliani, Mr. Costello sent Mr. Cohen an update: “They are in our corner,” he wrote in an email. “You have friends in high places.”

Mr. Cohen believed at the time that “he had the support of the White House if he continued to toe the party line,” according to the special counsel’s report. “He determined to stay on message and be part of the team.”

The glow faded quickly, however, as a series of developments stoked Mr. Cohen’s suspicions about Mr. Trump’s intentions toward him.

Mr. Costello told Mr. Cohen that his “relationship with Rudy” could be “very useful for you.”

First, later in April, Mr. Giuliani rebuffed Mr. Costello’s question about whether Mr. Trump might entertain the idea of a pardon, according to Mr. Costello. Mr. Cohen also asked his Washington-based lawyer, Stephen Ryan, to make a similar inquiry, and Mr. Giuliani was noncommittal. Mr. Ryan had been working at the time with the president’s legal team to prevent prosecutors from reviewing materials seized in the F.B.I. raids that were protected by attorney-client privilege.

Next, Mr. Trump called in to the television program “Fox & Friends” and tried to minimize the legal work that Mr. Cohen had performed for him — “a tiny, tiny little fraction,” he said. Those comments appeared to undermine Mr. Cohen’s argument that many of the seized materials might be privileged.

A week after that, in early May, it was a television appearance by Mr. Giuliani that upset Mr. Cohen.

Under an information-sharing agreement among the lawyers, Mr. Ryan had discussed with Mr. Giuliani that the Trumps had reimbursed Mr. Cohen for the hush money he paid to the pornographic film actress Stormy Daniels. Without notifying Mr. Cohen or his representatives, Mr. Giuliani then delivered the revelation on Fox News. Mr. Cohen became concerned that the Trump team was disseminating information about him gleaned from the agreement, and that it was being done with Mr. Trump’s knowledge.

As the president’s lead lawyer continued to publicly discuss the hush-money scheme in the days and weeks that followed, Mr. Cohen told associates that Mr. Giuliani was “blowing this whole thing.”

Days after Mr. Giuliani appeared on Fox News, Mr. Costello confided to Mr. Citron, his partner, about his mounting concerns that Mr. Cohen was stringing them along.

“There are simply too many facts that he is not sharing with us to give me a level of comfort,” Mr. Costello wrote to Mr. Citron. He suggested that Mr. Cohen’s distrust of Mr. Giuliani was also a factor. “I do not think that Rudy doing his Press Tour is helping us in our relationship with Michael Cohen,” he wrote.

Soon after, Mr. Cohen was dealt another blow when confidential financial records were leaked, showing that he had collected more than $1 million in consulting fees from major corporations and from a New York private equity firm tied to a Russian oligarch. With the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election, Mr. Cohen was suddenly back in the discussion about Mr. Trump’s ties to Russia.

An email about Michael Avenatti, who was representing Stormy Daniels, the pornographic film actress who claimed to have had an affair with Mr. Trump.

Mr. Costello emailed him words of encouragement — “keep on punching” — but Mr. Cohen did not reply. Mr. Costello doubled down, later emailing Mr. Cohen in all caps that Mr. Mueller had “REACHED THE CONCLUSION THAT THERE IS NO RUSSIAN ANGLE TO THE MICHAEL COHEN INVESTIGATION OTHERWISE HE WOULD HAVE KEPT THE CASE FOR HIMSELF.”

Mr. Costello made the same point in a text message to Mr. Giuliani, who “thought it was very important to get that message out there,” Mr. Costello recounted in an email to Mr. Citron. But, Mr. Costello said, Mr. Giuliani suggested he could not make that case himself, “because it will look like he is defending Michael Cohen.”

The challenge, Mr. Costello continued, was “to get Cohen on the right page without giving him the appearance that we are following instructions from Giuliani or the president.”

By mid-June, despite warning signs that Mr. Cohen might turn on the president, some members of Mr. Trump’s team concluded that he did not pose a real threat, interviews show. Mr. Giuliani never met with Mr. Cohen, though Mr. Costello had suggested it might help. And the same day that ABC News reported that Mr. Cohen was “likely to cooperate” with prosecutors, Mr. Giuliani appeared on Fox News and played down the possibility of Mr. Cohen’s flipping, saying he had “checked into this last night” and it was not true.

The next day, Mr. Costello sent Mr. Cohen a link to Mr. Giuliani’s interview. And when Mr. Cohen asked, “Why send this to me?” Mr. Costello explained, “You are under the impression that Trump and Giuliani are trying to discredit you.” He continued, “I think you are wrong because you are believing the narrative promoted by the left-wing media.”

Mr. Costello also texted Mr. Giuliani a note praising the interview, adding that he had sent a YouTube clip of it to Mr. Cohen in hopes that it would calm him down.

But later that month, any good will dissipated when The Times reported that the F.B.I. had seized in its raid a tape recording of Mr. Cohen and Mr. Trump from 2016. The two men were discussing hush money paid to another woman, Karen McDougal, who claimed to have had an affair with Mr. Trump.

Each side blamed the other for the explosive revelation, pushing the relationship to a near breaking point.

Mr. Cohen never formally retained Mr. Costello’s services. Guy Petrillo represented him in his plea agreement and sentencing.CreditAtilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency, via Getty Images

Later in June, Vanity Fair reported that Mr. Cohen had hired a new lawyer — not Mr. Costello, but Guy Petrillo, a former federal prosecutor who had worked in the Southern District alongside James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director and a Trump foil.

Mr. Costello raised concerns with Mr. Giuliani. “Does Cohen really want a friend of Comey as his lawyer?” he asked in a text message.

At the same time, Mr. Cohen’s concerns about money were reaching a crisis, according to court records. Mr. Trump’s business and campaign had paid about $1.7 million of Mr. Cohen’s legal bills, but stopped paying in June, around the time Mr. Ryan finished reviewing the documents seized in the F.B.I. raid and withdrew from the case. An official with Mr. Ryan’s firm declined to comment.

Mr. Cohen wanted the Trump Organization to also help pay Mr. Petrillo, which never happened.

In the interview with The Times, Mr. Giuliani said that he was new to the issue of the legal fees at the time, having just been hired by Mr. Trump a couple of months earlier. He said that the decision was made by the Trump Organization to pay for legal work only if it was expressly connected to Mr. Trump or the company.

A lawyer for the Trump Organization said Mr. Cohen’s criminal problems were of his own making. “He should quit lying and take responsibility for his actions,” said the lawyer, Marc L. Mukasey. “The idea that the Trump Organization should have paid his legal fees and expenses is a total crock.”

Distrust between the two sides only grew in June when the comedian Tom Arnold tweeted a selfie with Mr. Cohen and later claimed that they were teaming up to take down the president. Mr. Giuliani, sounding alarmed, phoned Mr. Costello while he was having lunch at Bobby Van’s Steakhouse — the president wanted to know what this was about.

After lunch, Mr. Costello tried to reach Mr. Cohen, who was slow to reply. “Is he totally nuts???” Mr. Costello wrote in frustration to his law partner. “He is playing with the most powerful man on the planet.”

When Mr. Cohen finally sent along a clarification from Mr. Arnold, Mr. Costello texted Mr. Giuliani. “Make sure your client knows this,” he wrote. “He will sleep better.”

Mr. Cohen is scheduled to begin serving a three-year prison sentence on May 6.CreditSarah Silbiger/The New York Times

Mr. Cohen then asked Mr. Costello to make things right with Mr. Giuliani, Mr. Costello recalled, and assure Mr. Trump that he remained loyal. So Mr. Costello had lunch in late June with Mr. Giuliani at the Grand Havana Room on the top floor of 666 Fifth Avenue. Afterward, he assured Mr. Cohen in an email that he had “conveyed all of your expressed concerns” to Mr. Giuliani “for transmission to his client” — the president. Mr. Cohen replied, thanking him for “speaking to your friend.”

Still, Mr. Cohen heard nothing from the Trump legal team, and no additional legal fees were paid by the Trump Organization.

By early July, Mr. Cohen was making overtly hostile moves toward the president. He appeared on ABC’s “Good Morning America” and declared, “My wife, my daughter and my son have my first loyalty and always will.” He deleted the line in his Twitter biography about working for Mr. Trump. And he hired Lanny Davis, a Democrat and a friend of the Clintons, as a spokesman.

A person who was familiar with Mr. Cohen’s decision-making at the time said the moves might have been a cry for help, but Mr. Costello and others saw them as evidence that he had “chosen a different path,” as Mr. Costello wrote to Mr. Cohen in an email.

“We will not be involved in that journey and therefore Jeff Citron asked me to let you know that he will be sending you a bill,” the email said.

Within weeks, Mr. Giuliani, who had previously referred to Mr. Cohen as “an honest, honorable lawyer,” was instead casting him as a “pathological liar.”

His bond with Mr. Trump all but broken, Mr. Cohen decided to cooperate with law enforcement officials. And so he traveled to Washington to meet on Aug. 7 with Mr. Mueller’s team for the first of many discussions.

The next week, his lawyer, Mr. Petrillo, arranged to talk with prosecutors in Manhattan, interviews show. The prosecutors had been putting him off but suddenly agreed to meet a couple of days later, on Friday, an indication that criminal charges against Mr. Cohen were imminent.

Mr. Petrillo asked for a deferred prosecution agreement relating to the hush money, a lighter punishment that might have spared Mr. Cohen from prison so long as he stayed out of trouble. That weekend the prosecutors signaled there would be no such deal, but they were willing to consider a guilty plea.

Over the next day, Mr. Cohen and his wife huddled in Mr. Petrillo’s office debating their options. And throughout the day on Monday, his lawyers went back and forth with prosecutors over the details of the plea to campaign finance, banking and tax crimes.

But that evening, Mr. Cohen was still unsure whether to plead guilty at all. He poured a glass of 12-year-old Glenlivet Scotch on the rocks and debated his future.

Early on Tuesday, he was still having second thoughts, but ultimately stuck to the plan. Standing at the defense table, Mr. Cohen said he had worked with Mr. Trump to cover up two potential sex scandals, including the one involving Ms. Daniels. He confessed that he had arranged the hush money “in coordination with, and at the direction of, a candidate for federal office,” implicating the president publicly for the first time in a federal campaign finance crime.

“Time and time again,” Mr. Cohen later told the judge at his sentencing, “I felt it was my duty to cover up his dirty deeds.”

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