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Video: Tom Cotton Calmly Exposes the “Radical Open Borders” Position of Democrats in Under 60 Seconds

Westlake Legal Group TomCottonFoxNews1-620x347 Video: Tom Cotton Calmly Exposes the “Radical Open Borders” Position of Democrats in Under 60 Seconds washington D.C. Tom Cotton republicans Politics North Carolina immigration Illegal Immigration Front Page Stories Front Page fox news Featured Story Featured Post democrats Culture Congress Chris Wallace border crisis Arkansas Allow Media Exception

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) speaks with Chris Wallace – 6/23/19. Screen grab via Fox News.

I’ve got to hand it to House and Senate Republicans – they are not sitting back and taking the left’s punches on the border crisis laying down.

Rep. Dan Crenshaw (TX) isn’t holding back. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (CA) isn’t backing down, and Rep. Liz Cheney (WY) has been unafraid to school funding denier Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) on the issue.

They are just a few of many examples.

The latest example comes from Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR), who appeared on “Fox News Sunday” with Chris Wallace yesterday to discuss the impasse between Democrats and Republicans on illegal immigration and the humanitarian issues that exist at the border.

CNS News reports on Wallace’s question to Cotton, and the Senator’s to-the-point response:

“President Trump has also delayed a roundup that was supposed to begin today of migrant families that have already been given their deportation orders. He said he’s giving Congress two weeks to work out and reform the asylum system, and otherwise, he’ll impose the roundup. I don’t have to tell you. You have a little bit of a look on your face. The likelihood – you talk about healthy skepticism — Congress isn’t going to reform the asylum system in two weeks sir,” host Chris Wallace said.

“So Chris, I was going to say healthy skepticism is warranted for dealing with Democrats when it comes to immigration,” Cotton responded. “Let’s just think about the Democrats position here, Chris. These are people who have claimed asylum in our country. They’ve had their day in court.

“They’ve had their claims rejected, and now they face a valid and final order of removal. If they can’t deport people like that, who can we deport? That’s why the Democrats’ position always comes back to, in essence, open borders,” he said.

Watch video of the segment below:

On Saturday, Cotton made the same point in addressing a tweet from Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), who claimed Trump and Republicans were just playing to their base had no plan to deal with the issue:

Not only is Cotton spot-on about the left’s open borders position, he’s also correct in how ICE has specifically been tasked to find and deport the illegal immigrants who have received their final order of removal:

ICE Acting Director Mark Morgan made clear in a call with reporters Wednesday that the ICE raids would target illegal aliens who have ignored court orders to leave the country.

“These individuals that are here, and they’ve received a final order of removal, I hope they’ll do what we tried to get them to do previously: Contact their local ICE office — bring their family together, contact their local ICE office and work with us to send them back to their home country,” Morgan said during the call.

Like Wallace, I’m skeptical Democrats and Republicans are going to be able to come up with a bipartisan solution on this issue in the next two weeks. Time will tell.

Related: Tom Cotton Provides A Necessary “History Lesson” After MSNBC Mislabels Segregationist Democratic Senators “Republicans”

—————–
—Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter.–

The post Video: Tom Cotton Calmly Exposes the “Radical Open Borders” Position of Democrats in Under 60 Seconds appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group TomCottonFoxNews1-300x168 Video: Tom Cotton Calmly Exposes the “Radical Open Borders” Position of Democrats in Under 60 Seconds washington D.C. Tom Cotton republicans Politics North Carolina immigration Illegal Immigration Front Page Stories Front Page fox news Featured Story Featured Post democrats Culture Congress Chris Wallace border crisis Arkansas Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tom Cotton Provides a Necessary “History Lesson” After MSNBC Mislabels Segregationist Democratic Senators “Republicans”

Westlake Legal Group tom-cotton-620x349 Tom Cotton Provides a Necessary “History Lesson” After MSNBC Mislabels Segregationist Democratic Senators “Republicans” washington D.C. Tom Cotton Social Media Politics North Carolina MSNBC Media journalism Joe Biden History Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats Culture Congress Campaigns Arkansas Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020

As Red State‘s Bonchie wrote yesterday, Joe Biden landed himself in hot water with fellow Democrats on Wednesday. The 2020 presidential contender spoke earlier this week on being able to work with segregationist Senators in the interest of “civility” long ago to get things done.

What Biden didn’t mention is the fact that the Senators in question were segregationists – and Democrats.

A brief recap, via CNN:

During a fundraising event in New York, the Democratic presidential candidate recounted being a member of the Senate in the 1970s with southern Democrats who opposed civil rights and desegregation. He specifically named Mississippi Sen. James Eastland and Georgia Sen. Herman Talmadge, who Biden called “one of the meanest guys I ever knew.”

“I was in a caucus with James O. Eastland. He never called me ‘boy,’ he always called me ‘son,’ ” Biden told donors.

“Well guess what? At least there was some civility. We got things done,” Biden said. “We didn’t agree on much of anything. We got things done. We got it finished.”

“But today, you look at the other side and you’re the enemy. Not the opposition, the enemy. We don’t talk to each other anymore,” he said.

The two Senators he mentioned were not exactly politicians you wanted to be bragging about getting along with, as Bonchie noted in his post. In response to Biden’s comments, a number of other presidential candidates, including Sens. Cory Booker (NJ), Kamala Harris (CA), and Elizabeth Warren (MA) blasted the Democratic front-runner.

During an MSNBC segment on the controversy, anchor Kasie Hunt mislabeled the two Senators as Republicans:

MSNBC Host Kasie Hunt called segregationist Democrats “Republicans” on Wednesday when referencing Joe Biden’s remarks about civility with segregationists in the Senate.

“Still to come, Joe Biden references his relationships with two former Republican colleagues at an event in New York City. The only problem? They were both segregationists,” Hunt said, referring to Herman Talmadge and James Eastland, who were both Democratic senators.

[…]

Hunt did not correct her comments when she returned from the break.

Watch the segment below:

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) got wind of the news of Hunt’s flub, and took to the Twitter machine to provide a quick but necessary history lesson:

Hunt later issued a correction, but it was long after the segment was over:

Sure. Like 24 hours after the damage has been done. But okay.

—————–
—Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter.–

The post Tom Cotton Provides a Necessary “History Lesson” After MSNBC Mislabels Segregationist Democratic Senators “Republicans” appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group tom-cotton-300x169 Tom Cotton Provides a Necessary “History Lesson” After MSNBC Mislabels Segregationist Democratic Senators “Republicans” washington D.C. Tom Cotton Social Media Politics North Carolina MSNBC Media journalism Joe Biden History Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats Culture Congress Campaigns Arkansas Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sarah Huckabee Sanders Leaving White House at the End of the Month

WASHINGTON — Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary who fiercely defended President Trump through one of the most tumultuous periods in American politics while presiding over the end of the iconic daily news briefing, will step down at the end of the month.

Mr. Trump announced her departure on Thursday on Twitter, the presidential tweet having supplanted the role that a White House press secretary played in previous administrations. He later praised her for her grit, her heart and her loyalty to him and his goals.

“We’ve been through a lot together. She’s tough and she’s good,” the president said as he brought Ms. Sanders onstage at an unrelated event in the East Room of the White House. “She’s a warrior,” he added, kissing her affectionately on the side of the head.

Ms. Sanders appeared emotional as she joined him unscheduled at the event, which was officially devoted to criminal justice policy, and she praised Mr. Trump and his team. “I’ve loved every minute, even the hard minutes,” she said. “I love the president. I love the team that I’ve had the opportunity to work for.”

Her resignation came on a typically head-spinning day in the Trump White House that would challenge any press secretary. The president was under fire for saying he would still accept derogatory information about a campaign opponent from Russia without necessarily calling the F.B.I. A government watchdog agency called on Mr. Trump to fire his counselor, Kellyanne Conway, for violating federal law on politics in the government workplace. And amid it all, Kim Kardashian West made an appearance with the president in the East Room.

While Ms. Sanders said she planned to spend more time with her three children, Mr. Trump urged her to run for governor of Arkansas, an ambition she has quietly nurtured for some time. Her father, Mike Huckabee, served as governor from 1996 to 2007. The current governor, Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, was just re-elected last year but cannot run again in 2022 because of term limits.

No successor was announced, but the next press secretary will take over just as Mr. Trump is heading into the thick of a re-election campaign that will determine the fate of his presidency. The job of communications director has been vacant since the departure of Bill Shine, who left in March.

Ms. Sanders’s confrontations with reporters escalated even beyond the norm. At one point, she suspended the White House pass of a CNN reporter, Jim Acosta, who angered the president, only to have a judge order it reinstated. The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, wrote in his report that Ms. Sanders had admitted it was untrue when she claimed the White House had heard from “countless” agents who complained about James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director fired by Mr. Trump.

But Mr. Trump admired her, concluding that she had the right disposition for the job, one senior administration official said on Thursday. The president liked that Ms. Sanders could be hard-hitting with reporters without in his view getting excessively personal.

“Sarah was successful because she knew her North Star was the president,” said Chris Ruddy, a longtime friend of Mr. Trump’s. “Her job was to defend and explain, and she did that almost flawlessly.”

Breaking with decades of tradition, Ms. Sanders effectively killed the daily briefing from the White House lectern that had been one of the most visible symbols of the American presidency. It has been 94 days since she held a formal briefing. Instead, she left the daily feeding of the media to Mr. Trump, who prefers to speak for himself and takes questions from reporters on a far more regular basis than most of his recent predecessors.

The move was widely criticized.

Katie Hill, a former assistant press secretary for President Barack Obama and now his post-presidential spokeswoman, said the daily briefing was not just for the benefit of the press. She said it served as an “organizing mechanism” for the administration, from the Treasury Department to the National Security Council, to understand and carry out the president’s priorities.

“It was one of the most powerful tools that the White House had to signal to the rest of the world what its message was and what its beliefs were,” Ms. Hill said.

Ms. Sanders, 36, rose from a campaign spokeswoman to one of Mr. Trump’s top lieutenants in three years, navigating an era of toxic media relations that shocked even the most seasoned Washington veterans. She ascended to the role of press secretary in mid-2017 at a time of staff turmoil and public spats between her predecessor, Sean Spicer, and Anthony Scaramucci, who briefly served as communications director.

Westlake Legal Group all-the-major-firings-and-resignations-in-trump-administration-promo-1530825933054-articleLarge Sarah Huckabee Sanders Leaving White House at the End of the Month Trump, Donald J Sanders, Sarah Huckabee Arkansas Appointments and Executive Changes

The Turnover at the Top of the Trump Administration

Since President Trump’s inauguration, White House staffers and cabinet officials have left in firings and resignations, one after the other.

She became one of the most recognizable faces of the administration, a popular figure on the right who was cheered at Mr. Trump’s rallies. But she was vilified by the left, once asked to leave a restaurant and skewered by a comic at last year’s White House Correspondents’ Association dinner who mocked her “smokey eye” makeup and compared her to “an Uncle Tom” for “white women.”

Ms. Sanders never gave an inch, pushing back against her critics and the president’s while declining to repudiate Mr. Trump’s description of the news media as the “enemy of the people.” Viewing performances like these, Mr. Trump grew to trust Ms. Sanders, appreciating her public loyalty to him, even if legions of critics said it came at the cost of her credibility.

But in the past several months, as the press briefing atrophied and then disappeared, a Washington mystery emerged: What was the press secretary doing all day if she was not briefing the press?

The four hours or so that previous secretaries dedicated to preparing for and holding formal briefings each day was time that Ms. Sanders had available to stay constantly near Mr. Trump, even as reporters complained that they were not getting questions on the day’s news answered in a formal fashion.

But for Ms. Sanders, the answer also seemed to be living her best life. During the president’s recent overseas trips, Ms. Sanders and other White House aides posted behind-the-scenes updates to Instagram.

In Tokyo, she took a sushi-making class. In London, she posted a Buckingham Palace selfie with the actress and cabinet wife Louise Linton. (In an undocumented interaction, she asked the Prince of Wales to sign her dinner menu. He did.) In Ireland, Ms. Sanders and her husband, Bryan, took a photo with a group of Trump loyalists at the president’s private golf club and visited a local pub.

“The best days for a press secretary are the days you don’t brief,” Ari Fleischer, who had the job during President George W. Bush’s administration, said in an interview before Ms. Sanders’s resignation was announced. “Sarah’s having a lot more best days than I ever had.”

Others who have had the job say a return to the more traditional briefing under Mr. Trump seems unlikely. It could well be up to the first press secretary under the next president to decide how — or whether — to approach the news media in a formalized way, said Josh Earnest, who served as press secretary for Mr. Obama.

“That person is going to have to make some fundamental decisions about how and whether to rebuild some of the norms that I and my predecessors in both parties worked really hard to protect,” Mr. Earnest said. “How important is it to tell the truth? How important is it to get the facts right? Is it necessary to be in the loop at the White House and accurately reflect the president’s thinking?”

At the White House this week, Ms. Sanders seemed to return to her old routine: arranging for reporters to interview Mr. Trump, sitting in on Oval Office meetings, answering questions from reporters piecemeal in the White House driveway and not holding formal briefings.

On Thursday, as Mr. Trump hosted reporters for nearly an hour for a working lunch with American governors, the heavy wooden door to Ms. Sanders’s West Wing office stayed closed. A bundle of newspapers addressed to her sat unread and still tied together with plastic.

Ms. Sanders informed her team of her departure around 3 p.m. At that time, several staff members had gathered in her office, and loud laughter could be heard behind the door.

Mick Mulvaney, the acting chief of staff, emerged just long enough to say that he thought it was wrong for reporters to stand in the hallway outside the press secretary’s office and possibly overhear conversations. (Mr. Mulvaney was reminded that the door was thick and that his comments were on the record.)

But on Thursday evening, she invited reporters into the office and said she did not regret not holding more briefings. She said she thought it had been more important to facilitate opportunities for the president to speak.

“No one elected me to anything,” Ms. Sanders said. “They elected the president.”

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Paralysis on America’s Rivers: There’s Too Much Water

VAN BUREN, Ark. — Marty Shell just wanted the lights back on.

Nineteen barges bound for nowhere were tied up along the swollen riverbank. Dark warehouses full of flooded fertilizer reeked with a sulfuric stench that made it painful to inhale. The river system, which for decades provided Mr. Shell a livelihood, now spreads only gelatinous mud and pungent debris and uncomfortable questions about the future.

The devastating flooding that has submerged large parts of the Midwest and South this spring has also brought barge traffic on many of the regions’ rivers to a near standstill. The water is too high and too fast to navigate. Shipments of grains, fertilizers and construction supplies are stranded. And riverfront ports, including the ones Mr. Shell oversees in Van Buren and Fort Smith, Ark., have been overtaken by the floods and severely damaged.

As Mr. Shell surveyed the wreckage last week, anything approaching normalcy remained months, or even a year, away. To start, he would be happy just to get the power restored.

“Before this happened, my mind-set was, ‘What am I doing in the next month or two?’ — trying to stay ahead,” said Mr. Shell, the president of Five Rivers Distribution, which sends products up and down rivers on barges. “Nowadays, I wake up with, ‘What am I going to do for today?’”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156057402_216a2ebd-9d4e-4aad-85bd-b2316c7a4e25-articleLarge Paralysis on America’s Rivers: There’s Too Much Water Van Buren (Ark) Ships and Shipping Shell, Marty Rivers Mississippi River Midwestern States (US) Fort Smith (Ark) Floods Arkansas River Arkansas Agriculture and Farming

Marty Shell, president of Five Rivers Distribution, talks to Wesley Daniel, a terminal manager, in a flood-damaged warehouse at a port the company manages.CreditJoseph Rushmore for The New York Times

Across the country’s flood-battered midsection, the farms, towns and homes consumed by the bloated waters have drawn much of the attention. But flooding has had another, less intuitive effect — crippling the nation’s essential river commerce. Water, the very thing that makes barge shipping possible in normal times, has been present in such alarming overabundance this spring that it has rendered river transportation impossible in much of the United States.

The Arkansas River has been closed to commercial traffic. So has the Illinois River, a key connection to Chicago and the Great Lakes. And so has part of the Mississippi River near St. Louis, where it crested on Sunday at its second-highest point on record, cutting off the river’s northern section from shippers to the south.

As a result, farmers already grappling with flooded fields and worries about the trade war with China have struggled to obtain fertilizer for their crops. Customers have seen their deliveries of construction materials and road salt get stuck midway to their destinations. And shippers have made drastic cuts to their operations with work at a standstill.

“It’s like when you’re driving on an interstate and there’s an accident in front of you and there’s nowhere to go,” said Jeff Webb, president of Cargill Marine and Terminal, which operates more than 1,400 barges, hundreds of which are now stuck in the Gulf of Mexico or lower Mississippi River because of closures to the north.

Barges are slower and less conspicuous than trains, planes and trucks, but they can be a much more economical way to move bulk goods, as they have done around this country for generations. One barge can haul as much as 70 semi-trucks’ worth of dry cargo. They are especially useful for farmers, who use them to send harvested grain to export markets and to receive fertilizer for their next crop. A majority of the country’s exported grain is shipped on the Mississippi and its tributaries.

“We’re feeding the world, basically,” said Deidre Smith, director of the Arkansas Waterways Commission, a state agency. “It’s going to impact that a lot. The farmers right now are going to be hurting.”

The breakdown in river transportation is just one more burden for farmers, who are also facing low commodity prices. Some held on to last year’s crop, hoping that tariff-depressed prices would bounce back this year; now they cannot even get their produce to market.

Outside Conway, Ark., Chris Schaefers’s corn sprouted last month and grew past his knees. It is all gone now, dead beneath several feet of swift-moving, latte-colored river water. A few days ago, Mr. Schaefers drove a motorboat through one of his hay barns.

Chris Schaefers, left, and his neighbor and fellow farmer, Jill Edwards, passed an irrigation system nearly covered by flood water in a swamped Arkansas crop field.CreditJoseph Rushmore for The New York Times

Facing the possibility of thousands of swamped acres with nothing planted, Mr. Schaefers said he would like to sell what he has left from last year’s rice and soybean harvest, but it is stuck in grain bins. The same river that killed this year’s crop is so swollen that barges cannot take last year’s to market.

Even farmers whose fields have remained dry have faced troubles. The halts in river traffic have been a constant headache this planting season for Mike Christenson, agronomy division manager at Countryside Cooperative, a grain elevator and storage facility in Wisconsin. When the barges that haul imported fertilizer up the Mississippi could not get through, Mr. Christenson scrambled for alternatives.

“It’s been ugly all spring,” said Mr. Christenson, who said that for the first time in a decade, he was going to the extra expense of getting fertilizer shipments delivered by truck and rail.

“It’s just going to cost more to put in the crop than normal,” said Travis Justice, the Arkansas Farm Bureau’s chief economist.

An idled barge in Van Buren, Ark. It may be weeks before the flooded Arkansas River is back within its banks and running slowly and predictably enough for barges to navigate it safely.CreditJoseph Rushmore for The New York Times

Even if the rivers reopen to barges in the next few weeks — and that is uncertain, with water levels still near record heights in some places — the effects on the economy could linger. Never has so much of the river system been closed for so long at such an important time of year.

“We thought it was as bad as it was going to get” weeks ago, said Debra Calhoun, a senior vice president at the Waterways Council, an industry group. “The forecast just continues to be horrid.”

With supply chains disrupted, warehouses overflowing and shippers turning to more expensive ways to move goods, consumers could see higher prices and shortages of some products in the summer and fall.

“I think most people take the river for granted — they just assume that the grain is going to get to market, the steel coils are going to show up to make the pipe, and peanuts are going to get here,” said Bryan Day, the executive director of the Little Rock Port Authority in Arkansas, where dozens of barges have been waiting in the harbor for the water to subside and the river to reopen.

Bryan Day, executive director of the Little Rock Port Authority, worked with barge captains to store their loaded barges in the port’s slack-water harbor to await safer river conditions.CreditHouston Cofield for The New York Times

Barges need water to operate, but not this much of it. Shippers depend on predictable channels and a steady pace of river flow. The huge amounts of water that have rushed through the system in recent months have sent rivers bursting from their banks and made them hazardous for travel.

As the climate changes, scientists warn that the Midwest and South will experience more periods of intense rain, which can contribute to floods. May was the second-wettest month on record in the 48 contiguous states, federal officials said.

The risks of overwhelmed rivers have already been seen. Two barges broke loose in Oklahoma last month and careened down the flooded Arkansas River, raising fears that they would smash into a dam and cause it to fail, with devastating consequences downstream. The barges did eventually strike a dam, but it was only slightly damaged. A few days earlier in St. Louis, water levels were so high that a towboat struck a bridge.

In Arkansas, Mr. Shell has been spending his days waiting for the water to finish receding at the ports he runs. Instead of loading barges and trucks, his employees have been cleaning off the mud, surveying the damage and hoping for federal help to rebuild. It could still be weeks before barges are moving on the rivers, and his company’s losses have already reached into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

But on a recent morning, as Mr. Shell idled his pickup truck in a cavernous warehouse still caked with river mud, there was one sign of a fresh start: The overhead lights came back on.

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Bernie Sanders went to Walmart, shareholders were not impressed

Westlake Legal Group BernieSanders Bernie Sanders went to Walmart, shareholders were not impressed Walmart The Blog shareholders meeting minimum wage Bernie Sanders Arkansas

On May 23 I wrote about Bernie Sanders’ invitation by the workers of Walmart to attend the annual shareholder meeting in Bentonville, Arkansas. Bernie accepted the invitation and made good on his commitment. He attended the June 5 meeting and he was given an opportunity to speak.

The workers of Walmart (that sounds like a potential reality show on Bravo) wanted a seat on the board. They had some normal demands of higher wages and paid sick leave. There was also mention of this jibberish – the workers were demanding a “more fair, inclusive and equitable corporate ecosystem that bridges differences.” I have no idea what they are saying there.

Speaking as a proxy for Walmart employees, Bernie delivered a resolution from the floor to put company workers on its board of directors and pay them a minimum wage of $15.00 per hour. Then Sanders lowered the boom. He was allowed three minutes to speak.

“Despite the incredible wealth of its owner, Walmart pays many of its employees starvation wages, wages that are so low that many of these employees are forced to rely on government programs like food stamps, Medicaid and public housing in order to survive,” Sanders said. “Further, Walmart should give a voice to its workers by allowing them seats on the board of directors. The concerns of workers, not just stockholders should be a part of board decisions.

The resolution failed to pass. Walmart CEO Doug McMillon was present and said: “We’re not perfect, but together we’re listening, we’re learning, and we’re changing.”

Though the top brass publicly welcomed Bernie’s visit, Dan Bartlett, Walmart’s executive vice president of corporate affairs used Twitter to distribute a prebuttal in anticipation of the millionaire socialist’s criticisms. That brought on a response from Bernie’s campaign manager.

“We welcome @BernieSanders on his campaign stop to Northwest Arkansas. Here are a few facts I’m fairly certain he won’t acknowledge while describing his outdated view of Walmart,” Bartlett wrote. “No other company in the U.S. is making debt-free college education accessible to more than a million people for about $1 a day. No other company has opened 200 training academies, providing enhanced workforce skill-building for hundreds of thousands just this past year. No other company has hired more than 225k veterans in the last 5 years. No other company in America has pledged to avoid emissions in the supply chain by 1 BILLION metric tons by 2030! Oh, and we’re one of the largest federal income tax payers, recently contributing nearly 2% of all corporate taxes!”

Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir fired back with his own tweet, writing: “No, Dan, it’s not Mission Accomplished for Walmart” and linking to a news story in which Bartlett, who worked as an adviser to President George W. Bush, took the blame for the decision to hang the infamous banner during a speech Bush gave on an aircraft carrier in May 2003, shortly after the US invasion of Iraq.

During Neal Cavuto’s afternoon show on Fox News Channel Wednesday, he pointed out some Walmart statistics of his own. He mentioned $793 million in bonuses to hourly workers; 215,000 associates promoted; 57% of promotions went to women, and 45% of those promotions went to people of color.

Though Walmart executives hoped that Bernie’s visit wouldn’t result in a campaign-style rally, the 2020 Democrat candidate did participate in an impromptu rally outside where he repeated his demand that Walmart workers be paid $15.00 per hour. Currently, the minimum wage at Walmart is $11.00 per hour, though it works out to be $17.50 for full-time employees when benefits are included.

Walmart has upgraded its pay structure twice since 2016. The corporation has defended its wages, saying it pays a total of $17.50 an hour to full-time employees when its various benefits are taken into account.

Sanders is adding names to his email list with the help of an online campaign to pressure Walmart to increase their workers’ pay. It’s all about his presidential campaign.

Walmart’s CEO urged Congress to raise the federal minimum wage during his remarks Wednesday morning. Sanders is holding out for $15.00 per hour.

Tuesday Walmart announced additional enticements for high school age workers with higher education goals. Walmart is offering free prep for the SAT and ACT tests and debt-free college benefits.

The nation’s largest private employer said Tuesday that its workers in high school may also take two to three free general education college classes through an educational startup. Walmart estimates about 25,000 people under the age of 18 work at its stores, a fraction of its 1.3 million person U.S. workforce.

The enticements are part of an expansion of a program Walmart launched last year offering affordable access to a college degree for full-time and part-time workers who have been with the company at least 90 days. Still, reaching out to high schoolers represents a challenge, given that fewer teens are entering the workforce than in previous decades due to academic pressures and an increase in summer school enrollment.

Bernie’s visit was a political stunt and not everyone was happy to see him.

In line for the meeting, Pat Copp, a shareholder for three decades and retired business administrator from Indiana, defended Walmart’s businesses practices and talked up the company’s recent moves to raise its minimum hourly wage. She called Sanders’ visit a political stunt and said she didn’t like “his philosophies or thoughts, whatever you want to call them. I disagree with him totally.”

Ms. Copp is, however, inclined to agree that worker representation on the board is a good idea.

“I don’t know how large the board is, but to have input from the workers in some way — I think that would be good,” she said. “A lot of time top management is so removed from the ground level, they really don’t know what’s going on.”

The post Bernie Sanders went to Walmart, shareholders were not impressed appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group BernieSanders-300x159 Bernie Sanders went to Walmart, shareholders were not impressed Walmart The Blog shareholders meeting minimum wage Bernie Sanders Arkansas   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tom Cotton: You’ll have to make some sacrifices for the trade war, but they’re minimal compared to the sacrifices of our military heroes

Westlake Legal Group t-4 Tom Cotton: You’ll have to make some sacrifices for the trade war, but they’re minimal compared to the sacrifices of our military heroes Trade War Tom Cotton The Blog Tariffs soybean China BEIJING Arkansas

This analogy reminds me of the part in “Spinal Tap” when they’re standing at Elvis’s grave: “It really puts perspective on things though, doesn’t it?” “Too much. There’s too much f***ing perspective now.”

It must be noted that literally any policy, up to and including the Green New Deal, could be justified in these terms. Imagine the Democratic tax-hike rationales: “Yes, you’ll be paying 15 percent more next year to fund Medicare for All but at least you’re not shipping out to Afghanistan to fight the Taliban.”

In trade war as in real war, some will be called on to sacrifice more than others:

America’s farmers are growing anxious. The establishment GOP narrative about the trade war with China is that this is all a means to an end: It’s a leverage play, plain and simple. We hit ’em with tariffs, choke off American demand for Chinese products, bring the Chinese economy to its knees, then China comes begging to us for unconditional surrender. We set the terms, they sign the new deal, and poof go the tariffs. Mission accomplished.

Hopefully that’s how it’ll work in practice but it’s not how the president tends to talk about the process. In Trump’s rhetoric, tariffs aren’t an unhappy means to a happy end, they’re good in and of themselves.

Trump, who once famously described himself as a “Tariff Man,” thinks tariffs can help revive American manufacturing by making American goods more competitive price-wise with Chinese alternatives. Never mind that that will mean American consumers paying more at the store whether they buy American or buy Chinese. By driving demand towards domestic goods, he’s hoping to drive a boom in domestic supply as well.

If he believes that, though, I’m not sure why he’d want a trade deal with China at all. Granted, ending the trade war would mean the end of Chinese tariffs on American goods, a boon to American farmers, but Trump’s already got a plan in lieu of that happening, per his tweets. Uncle Sam’s going to buy those American goods with its new tax revenue — which it’ll be collecting from American consumers, including farmers, not from China — and then donate them to countries in need. A reporter on the global agriculture beat at Reuters wonders how that would work:

You’d also need an expensive supply chain to ship all of those American goods to poor countries, notes Eric Boehm at Reason. Who’s paying for that? And what would this sudden influx of American goods due to domestic markets in those countries? Either way, he sounds pretty excited about this new arrangement. Is that tough talk to spook China by showing his commitment to a long trade war or is it how Tariff Man actually thinks?

Try to imagine the reaction among MAGA Nation to a scheme from Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez that involved (1) raising taxes, (2) a massive federal intervention in commodities markets, and (3) generous giveaways to third-world countries.

There’s also a recurring question of how well this trade war is being managed. In a real war, you pick your battles carefully and form alliances to multiply your strength. In a trade war, evidently you fight everyone at once:

The biggest importers of Chinese goods are the European Union, the United States, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, and India. These nations all share three qualities in respect to China: Wariness of Chinese growth, irritation by Chinese trade practices, and existing alliances with the United States. (In case of India, the alliance is under development, and the Trump administration has made efforts to grow it.)…

Which brings us to the president’s self-sabotage. Early into his administration, Trump pulled the plug on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Since then he has also put tariffs on European and Canadian goods and is now considering the addition of new tariffs. Canada and the E.U. are not America’s adversaries. They, along with Australia, are its most reliable allies—and we need their help if we are to win Trump’s trade war.

A smart strategy would be to lift these newly imposed tariffs on our allies, re-join both agreements, and then encourage India to either join the TPP or form a bilateral free trade agreement.

If if if the goal here really is to maximize pressure on China so that it capitulates and signs a new trade deal with greater benefits to the U.S., then a multilateral approach is wise. But what if it’s not? What if, again, Tariff Man thinks tariffs are good in and of themselves and sees them as a path to greater self-sufficiency for the U.S.? Remember, this is a guy who continues to insist that we’re “losing” because we’re running a trade deficit with China, which is like claiming that you “lost” at the grocery store because the grocer ended up with your money but you didn’t end up with his. Maybe Trump is willing, albeit reluctantly, to sign a trade deal with Beijing that would end tariffs but also perfectly willing and possibly eager to wage a long trade war in the belief that American manufacturing can only benefit from it long-term, never mind the economic wreckage short-term. The fact that Cotton’s reaching for analogies to military sacrifice suggests that he doesn’t think China’s surrender is coming soon, if at all. Gonna be a lot of fallen on the battlefield.

The post Tom Cotton: You’ll have to make some sacrifices for the trade war, but they’re minimal compared to the sacrifices of our military heroes appeared first on Hot Air.

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Hero: Woman’s Dad Reveals How an NFL Draft Pick Saved His Daughter From Sexual Assault

Westlake Legal Group hero-womans-dad-reveals-how-an-nfl-draft-pick-saved-his-daughter-from-sexual-assault Hero: Woman’s Dad Reveals How an NFL Draft Pick Saved His Daughter From Sexual Assault Sports Sexual Assault San Francisco 49ers North Carolina hero Good Deeds Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Culture California Arkansas Allow Media Exception
Westlake Legal Group DreGreenlaw Hero: Woman’s Dad Reveals How an NFL Draft Pick Saved His Daughter From Sexual Assault Sports Sexual Assault San Francisco 49ers North Carolina hero Good Deeds Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Culture California Arkansas Allow Media Exception

SF 49ers fifth-round draft pick Dre Greenlaw, a former linebacker for the Arkansas Razorbacks. Screen grab via Pig Trail Nation.

On the same day Arkansas Razorbacks linebacker Dre Greenlaw was picked in the fifth round by the San Francisco 49ers, a New York Giants fan logged on to Twitter to reveal something about the football player that few people knew about.

NBC Sports reports (note: the man’s name in the below report is actually Gerry Dales, not Daly):

It’s a call no parent ever hopes to receive. It’s the one that wakes them up in the wee hours, telling them one of their children is in the hospital.

It’s the call Gerry Daly and his wife received four years ago when their daughter was a freshman at the University of Arkansas.

[…]

Daly’s daughter had been taken to the emergency room, incapacitated and under the influence of what was believed to be alcohol. Tests, however, showed she had been drinking at the party she had attended, but she wasn’t drunk.

[…]

It took a few days for the Dalys to piece together what had happened to their daughter via text messages from her friends. All she could remember was talking with a guy at the party, and then waking up in the hospital with a few of her girlfriends around her. Eventually, the family came to the conclusion that the male had slipped something into her drink, causing her incapacitation.

Daly also discovered that the man tried to take his daughter from the party, but he was thwarted by a Razorbacks football player and his friend. If not for them, there’s no telling what might happened.

He found out the football player’s name: Dre Greenlaw.

Dales also told NBC Sports that he had tried to reach out to Greenlaw in the past to thank him but didn’t have any luck. He also said he resisted publicly posting about the incident in the past because he was concerned the circumstances surrounding the party might have gotten Greenlaw in trouble with the Razorbacks.

But now that he’s officially an NFL player, Dales took the opportunity to thank Greenlaw publicly for the first time in a series of tweets:

Congrats and thanks to Greenlaw indeed for doing the right thing.

Per Fox News, the newly-minted 49er retweeted a couple of Dales’s tweets but has not yet commented on the story.

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Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter.–

The post Hero: Woman’s Dad Reveals How an NFL Draft Pick Saved His Daughter From Sexual Assault appeared first on RedState.

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Ouch: Walmart One-Ups #FightFor15, Plans to Add ‘Thousands’ of New Robots to Their Stores

Westlake Legal Group seattle-minimum-wage-620x319 Ouch: Walmart One-Ups #FightFor15, Plans to Add ‘Thousands’ of New Robots to Their Stores Walmart Politics North Carolina New York jobs Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post Economy democrats Culture Capitalism Arkansas Allow Media Exception #FightFor15

The “Fight for $15” campaign may have had its share of victories in a handful of blue states like New York, but studies have shown that over time these “wins” are largely symbolic and ultimately end up hurting workers.

They hurt them in an number of ways, and one of them is in how companies – in response to these campaigns – start exploring different ways to save money to offset rising labor costs. Fast food chains and grocery stores have done this with self-serve kiosks and other self-checkout options.

One way Walmart is doing it by expanding their robot workforce:

The world’s largest retailer announced Tuesday that it is adding thousands of new robots to its stores. By next February, it expects to have autonomous floor scrubbers in 1,860 of its more than 4,700 US stores. Walmart will also have robots that scan shelf inventory at 350 stores. And there will be bots at 1,700 stores that automatically scan boxes as they come off delivery trucks and sort them by department onto conveyer belts.

Walmart says these “smart assistants” will reduce the amount of time workers spend on “repeatable, predictable and manual” tasks in stores and allow them to switch to selling merchandise to shoppers and other customer service roles.

[…]

Walmart has been testing out this technology in hundreds of stores over the past year.

Reducing the time their employees spend on “repeatable” tasks is not the only (and likely not the primary) reason they’re bringing on the bots:

Walmart is adding robots to help it manage rising costs, including for store labor. Unemployment is at its lowest level in decades, and Walmart and other retailers have increased wages and benefits to attract and keep workers.

Last year, the retailer raised its minimum wage to $11/hour in response to demands from the activist left to go higher, and they’ve been under increasing pressure from leftist groups like “Fight for $15” to raise it even more. 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has practically made forcing Walmart to raise their minimum wage to $15 his mission in life.

What will bringing in robotic labor mean for their human workers in the long run? If you guessed reduced hours and layoffs, you’d be right:

Walmart has said that it will reduce the hours it assigns workers to unloading boxes and mopping the floors. That will lead to some employee attrition over time, Walmart said.

“As we evolve, there are certain activities, certain jobs that’ll go away,” Walmart US CFO Michael Dastugue said at an analyst conference last month.

It’s almost as if this were predictable or something.

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Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter.–

The post Ouch: Walmart One-Ups #FightFor15, Plans to Add ‘Thousands’ of New Robots to Their Stores appeared first on RedState.

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