web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > article (Page 10)

Man convicted of murder at 13 pleads to exposure charge

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Man convicted of murder at 13 pleads to exposure charge PONTIAC, Mich. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 71f03a45-9b1c-58a3-9e50-827ccdf25888

A Detroit-area man convicted of murder at age 13 has pleaded guilty to an indecent exposure charge.

Thirty-three-year-old Nathaniel Abraham was sentenced last week to 30 days in jail, which he had already served. Last year, he was charged with resisting officers trying to arrest him on the exposure charge.

He was charged this year with several counts of possession with intent to deliver methamphetamine. Abraham remains jailed on those charges. Defense attorney James Galen said Friday that Abraham “was at best a street-level dealer” trying to make money for his son born a few months ago.

Abraham was 11 in 1997 when he was accused of fatally shooting a stranger in Pontiac. He was convicted in 1999.

Abraham was released in 2007, but pleaded guilty in 2008 in a drug case and was released from parole last year.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mississippi raises high-stakes reading bar for third graders

Westlake Legal Group mississippi-raises-high-stakes-reading-bar-for-third-graders Mississippi raises high-stakes reading bar for third graders JEFF AMY fox-news/us/education fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 1852c403-918d-5b7b-99cc-90df3369b03f
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Mississippi raises high-stakes reading bar for third graders JEFF AMY fox-news/us/education fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 1852c403-918d-5b7b-99cc-90df3369b03f

More than 35,000 Mississippi third graders sat down in front of computer this week to take reading tests, facing a state mandate to “level up” or not advance to fourth grade. But with the bar set higher this year, state and local officials expect more students will fail the initial test, even with efforts to improve teaching.

Mississippi is one of 16 states nationwide that demand third grade students pass a reading score threshold or flunk. Nevada and Michigan plan to impose such requirements in the next two years, and Alabama lawmakers are considering one.

The mandatory retention policy remains controversial nationwide. Experts agree students who flunk a grade are more likely to drop out. While third-grade reading policies typically call for intensive remedial work for students who are held back, one study found the boost helps for a while but eventually fades.

For students, parents and teachers, the high-stakes testing can bring butterflies, although Mississippi hasn’t seen the organized pushback against testing seen in many other states. Bernardytte Robinson, a fifth grade math teacher at Key Elementary in Jackson, said her daughter Ayden Harris, a third grader at the same school, has been sweating the exam since school began in August.

“She said ‘I don’t want to fail, mom,'” Robinson said Ayden told her on Monday, the first day of testing. “I said ‘You’re not going to fail.’ I said ‘You’ve got this.'”

When the Magnolia State implemented its requirement in 2015, students only had to reach the second, or basic, level on a state test scored in five tiers. This year, the state is raising the bar, saying students must reach the third level. That’s still one step short of proficiency, but state Superintendent Carey Wright and others say it’s important to raise expectations.

“We needed to do this, and we need to do this in increments, because we wanted to make sure that our students began moving more toward the proficient level and being more prepared for fourth grade,” said Kymona Burk, the state literacy director.

The Republican policymakers who adopted Mississippi’s plan from Florida support it, pointing to improvements in performance on a nationwide test. Mississippi is paying for literacy coaches to help improve instruction in 182 of 420 schools statewide with a third grade. The state has also provided training on teaching reading to 13,000 people, and provides extra money for summer schools for struggling readers.

Last year, 93% of Mississippi students passed at the basic level on their first attempt, but only 75% reached the third level. Burk said the share of students scoring three or above has been increasing, but she predicts only about 80% will pass. Schools will get scores in early May and students retest in mid-May. A second retest comes after summer school. About 3% of students were allowed to advance last year without passing for various reasons.

Mississippi has long flunked the largest proportion of young students nationwide, often students from poor households who enroll lacking groundwork for academics. Last year, Mississippi held back 9% of kindergartners, 8% of first graders and 6% of second graders.

Harvard University education Professor Martin West studied Florida, where then-Gov. Jeb Bush pioneered the third grade policy. The policy has been promoted in Mississippi and other states by the Foundation for Excellence in Education, which Bush chairs. West said his study finds students held back because of reading problems aren’t any more or less likely to drop out, compared to students who just barely pass. He said students who flunk and get intensive help in Florida get an academic boost for several years, but said it fades out.

Overall, West said he can’t prove third-grade retention policies work. He said states that appear successful “have used the requirement not primarily as a way to retain more students, but as a focal point to concentrate educators’ attention on improving literacy in early grades.”

Last year, all students at A.W. James Elementary in Drew passed on the first try, but Principal Barbara Akon isn’t so sure all her 39 third graders will clear the bar this time. Despite an average class size of 13 and intensive focus, Akon said pretests showed six students in danger of failing. She said the Mississippi Delta school set a pass-rate goal of 90%, or 35 students.

“We want 100%, but this being the first time they’ve had to score this high, we have some concerns,” Akon said.

Outcomes could be worse elsewhere. Adrian Hammitte, interim superintendent in Jefferson County, said he overhauled reading instruction when he took over this year, with help from outside consultants. But only 45% of Jefferson County’s third graders scored three or above last year, and 16% flunked third grade.

“With the new score needed, that level three, and how we performed last year, I’m a little nervous,” Hammitte said of his 110 students. “I feel good about what we put in place. Now we just wait and see.”

____

Follow Jeff Amy at: http://twitter.com/jeffamy .

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trey Gowdy: Mueller report release ‘resolved nothing;’ 2020 will deliver ‘verdict’

Westlake Legal Group trey-gowdy-mueller-report-release-resolved-nothing-2020-will-deliver-verdict Trey Gowdy: Mueller report release 'resolved nothing;' 2020 will deliver 'verdict' Victor Garcia fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc b9bb2de9-f0e4-542d-b66e-455e3d270831 article
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6028072866001_6028069920001-vs Trey Gowdy: Mueller report release 'resolved nothing;' 2020 will deliver 'verdict' Victor Garcia fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc b9bb2de9-f0e4-542d-b66e-455e3d270831 article

Former South Carolina congressman Trey Gowdy believes the release of the Mueller report has not resolved the partisan debate over the Trump campaign’s dealings with Russia in 2016, and that the real “verdict” on the situation will be rendered by the 2020 presidential election.

“I was within in a really smart universe of people that did not think this report should be made public. I didn’t think it was going to change anyone’s mind and resolve anything and for once in my life, I was right. It’s resolved nothing,” Gowdy said Friday on “Your World with Neil Cavuto.

TRUMP CAMPAIGN GOES ON POST-MUELLER ATTACK AGAINST ‘OBAMA-ERA DOJ AND FBI,’ WARNS ‘JUSTICE WILL BE SERVED’

“You’re going to have two more years of investigations. They’re not going to go forward with impeachment because that’s dicey. But they are going to go forward with investigations on four or five difference House committees. The verdict will be rendered in November of 2020.”

On Thursday, Attorney General William Barr released a version of the Mueller report with redactions that showed investigators did not find evidence of collusion between the 2016 Trump campaign and Russia. It did not come to a conclusion on the topic of obstruction of justice.

Gowdy was not surprised by any information that came to light from the report’s release and criticized Barr for sharing the report in the first place.

KELLYANNE CONWAY, AFTER MUELLER REPORT’S RELEASE, SAYS PRESS APOLOGIES ARE IN ORDER

“I was not surprised because this report was not written for the public. It was written for the attorney general and it was the attorney general and a whole bunch of my Republican former colleagues that thought it would be a neat idea to share an oppo (sic) research piece on someone who is not indicted. The department of justice doesn’t do research papers. They either issue indictments or they do not,” Gowdy told Cavuto.

“Clearly he didn’t have enough evidence on collusion and what I would say with respect to Mueller is if you have enough on obstruction, then charge him and let a jury of 12 decide whether or not your evidence carries the burden of persuasion.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6028072866001_6028069920001-vs Trey Gowdy: Mueller report release 'resolved nothing;' 2020 will deliver 'verdict' Victor Garcia fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc b9bb2de9-f0e4-542d-b66e-455e3d270831 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6028072866001_6028069920001-vs Trey Gowdy: Mueller report release 'resolved nothing;' 2020 will deliver 'verdict' Victor Garcia fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc b9bb2de9-f0e4-542d-b66e-455e3d270831 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Latest: Academy stands by decision to expel Polanski

Westlake Legal Group the-latest-academy-stands-by-decision-to-expel-polanski The Latest: Academy stands by decision to expel Polanski los angeles fox-news/us/education fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0de63245-7512-5ae8-9ab1-571b96f0d3bf

The Latest on Roman Polanski asking a court to reinstate his film academy membership (all times local):

3:45 p.m.

The film academy is standing behind its decision to expel director Roman Polanski, who has asked a court to reinstate him.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the organization behind the Oscars, said in a statement Friday that “the procedures taken to expel Mr. Polanski were fair and reasonable.”

Earlier Friday, lawyers for the 85-year-old Polanski filed papers in Los Angeles Superior Court asking that a judge restore his membership because he was not given a fair chance to make his case to the academy.

The Academy says it “stands behind its decision as appropriate.”

Polanski was expelled from the academy in May over sexual misconduct.

He fled the U.S. for Europe more than 40 years ago after pleading guilty to unlawful sex with a minor.

___

1:20 p.m.

Roman Polanski is asking a judge to restore his membership in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences after he was expelled for misconduct last year.

Lawyers for the 85-year-old director filed documents Friday requesting that a court compel the academy to make him a member in good standing again.

Nearly a year ago, the organization made the rare move of expelling Polanski and Bill Cosby. The academy then rejected Polanski’s appeal of the decision. Friday’s filing says that by not allowing Polanski and his lawyer to argue his case in person, the academy violated its own rules.

The academy didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

Polanski has been a fugitive for more than 40 years. He fled the U.S. after pleading guilty to unlawful sex with a minor.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-24d959200a6849f5a0dc4ffba3c84262 The Latest: Academy stands by decision to expel Polanski los angeles fox-news/us/education fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0de63245-7512-5ae8-9ab1-571b96f0d3bf   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-24d959200a6849f5a0dc4ffba3c84262 The Latest: Academy stands by decision to expel Polanski los angeles fox-news/us/education fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0de63245-7512-5ae8-9ab1-571b96f0d3bf

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Prosecutor: No charges against Arkansas officer in shooting

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Prosecutor: No charges against Arkansas officer in shooting Little Rock (Ark) fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article a92401f9-2847-56f6-ae2e-9f0d37422a18

Prosecutors have declined to file charges against a Little Rock police officer who fatally shot a man by firing at least 15 times into the windshield as the car was in motion.

Pulaski County Prosecutor Larry Jegley announced Friday that Officer Charles Starks won’t face charges in the Feb. 22 shooting of 30-year-old Bradley Blackshire, who was black. Police say Starks, who is white, was responding to a call after a detective confirmed the car Blackshire was driving was stolen.

In a video of the incident released last month, various angles showed Starks on the vehicle’s hood shooting at Blackshire through the windshield as the car continued to move.

Little Rock police say Starks is still being paid but not performing any departmental duties while they conduct an internal investigation.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life

Westlake Legal Group parents-who-starved-and-shackled-children-sentenced-to-life Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article

The eldest son and daughter of a couple who starved and shackled 12 of their children spoke publicly for  the first time Friday, alternately condemning and forgiving their parents before a judge sentenced the pair to up to life in prison.

Since being freed from their prison-like home more than a year ago, the two adult children of David and Louise Turpin described how they had gained control of lives and, despite receiving little education at home, were now enrolled in college and learning simple things, including how to ride a bike, swim and prepare a meal. They are still thin from years of malnutrition.

“I cannot describe in words what we went through growing up,” said the oldest son, now 27. “Sometimes I still have nightmares of things that have happened, such as my siblings being chained up or getting beaten. But that is the past and this is now. I love my parents and have forgiven them for a lot of the things that they did to us.”

The hearing put an end to a shocking case that had gone unnoticed until a 17-year-old girl escaped from the home in January 2018 and called 911. Investigators discovered a house of horrors hidden behind a veneer of suburban normalcy.

The children — ages 2 to 29 — had been chained to beds, forced to live in squalor, fed only once a day, allowed to shower only once a year and deprived of toys and games. They slept during the day and were active a few hours at night.

As her children spoke from a lectern, 50-year-old Louise Turpin sobbed and dabbed her eyes with tissues.

“I’m sorry for everything I’ve done to hurt my children,” she said. “I love my children so much.”

Her husband, who was shaking and could not initially read from a written statement, let his lawyer speak for him until he regained his composure. He did not apologize for the abuse but wished his children well in with their educations and future careers and hoped they would visit him. He then began sobbing.

Jack Osborn, a lawyer representing the seven adult Turpin children, said they understand the consequences of their parents’ actions and are working hard toward forgiving them. Some plan to talk with their parents eventually, but others want no contact with them for 10 years.

The one who called police was a hero for liberating her siblings, Osborn said.

“Maybe but for that we wouldn’t be here today,” he said.

The sentence of life with no chance of parole for 25 years was no surprise. It had been agreed to when the couple pleaded guilty in February to 14 counts each that included torture, cruelty and false imprisonment.

The courtroom fell hushed as the oldest daughter, now 30, entered wearing a blue cardigan over a white shirt, her dark hair in a ponytail. Her eyes were already red from crying when she began to speak in the voice of a little girl.

“My parents took my whole life from me, but now I’m taking my life back,” she said, as her mother’s lower lip quivered trying to hold back the tears. “Life may have been bad but it made me strong. I fought to become the person I am. I saw my dad change my mom. They almost changed me, but I realized what was happening. I immediately did what I could to not become like them.”

There was no explanation from the parents or lawyers about why the abuse occurred, but a letter from one of the children read by an attorney hinted at a home life that veered from birthday celebrations and trips to Disneyland and Las Vegas to severe punishment and disarray.

“Through the years, things became more and more overwhelming, but they kept trusting in God,” the girl wrote “I remember our mother sitting in her recliner and crying, saying she don’t know what to do.”

She said her parents did not know the children were malnourished because they thought the children inherited a gene from their mother, who was small.

From the outside, the home in a middle-class section of Perris, a small city about 60 miles (96 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles, appeared to be neatly kept, and neighbors rarely saw the kids outside, but nothing triggered suspicion.

But when deputies arrived, they were shocked to find a 22-year-old son chained to a bed and two girls who had just been set free from shackles. All but one of the 13 children were severely underweight and had not bathed for months. The house was filled with the stench of human waste.

The children said they were beaten, caged and shackled if they did not obey their parents. Investigators concluded that the couple’s youngest child, a toddler, was the only one who was not abused.

David Turpin, 57, had been an engineer for Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. Louise Turpin was listed as a housewife in a 2011 bankruptcy filing.

The teenage daughter who escaped jumped from a window. After a lifetime in isolation, the 17-year-old did not know her address, the month of the year or what the word “medication” meant.

But she knew enough to punch 911 into a barely workable cellphone and began describing years of abuse to a police dispatcher.

Although the couple filed paperwork with the state to homeschool their children, learning was limited. The oldest daughter only completed third grade.

Referring to the restraints, the oldest daughter’s statement said her mother “didn’t want to use rope or chain but she was afraid her children were taking in too much sugar and caffeine.”

Life got more difficult after her mother’s parents died in 2016.

Her parents tried their best, “and they wanted to give us a good life,” she said. “They believed everything they did was to protect us.”

___

Associated Press writers Amanda Lee Myers and Michael R. Blood in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-8eb46d8cc3604bd48d22feb39cb034b4 Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-8eb46d8cc3604bd48d22feb39cb034b4 Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Obama team didn’t do ‘enough’ to combat Russian meddling: Democratic strategist

Westlake Legal Group obama-team-didnt-do-enough-to-combat-russian-meddling-democratic-strategist Obama team didn't do 'enough' to combat Russian meddling: Democratic strategist Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc article 38025d44-65e5-53a1-8c26-a31737df8ca1
Westlake Legal Group vladimir-Putin-Barack-Obama-Reuters Obama team didn't do 'enough' to combat Russian meddling: Democratic strategist Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc article 38025d44-65e5-53a1-8c26-a31737df8ca1

Former President Barack Obama should have done more to combat Russian meddling, even if Senate leadership refused to cooperate, Democratic strategist Mary Anne Marsh said on Friday’s broadcast of “The Daily Briefing.”

Marsh, who served as a senior adviser to former Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., told Fox News host Dana Perino that she didn’t “believe the Obama team and President Obama did enough.”

Her comments came just after the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian attempts to interfere during the 2016 elections. The report brought a renewed focus on how the Obama administration confronted meddling, an issue President Trump highlighted on Thursday.

“Anything the Russians did concerning the 2016 Election was done while Obama was President,” Trump tweeted. “He was told about it and did nothing! Most importantly, the vote was not affected.”

Earlier on “The Daily Briefing,” former interim Democratic National Committee chair Donna Brazile defended the former president. Obama, she said, could only do so much, given that additional efforts on his part could have been seen as attempts to help former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during the election.

TRUMP RAILS AGAINST ASSOCIATES WHO SPOKE TO MUELLER, CLAIMS ‘TOTAL BULL—T’

The former administration also tried getting Congress to release a bipartisan statement on Russian interference in September of 2016 but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., rejected the opportunity, saying he doubted the intelligence behind that claim.

For Marsh, however, that didn’t excuse the former president from taking further action. “Just because Mitch McConnell refused to sign into a statement — ultimately, any president is the commander in chief and you have to protect our country and our national security,” she said.

“To have Russia, a foreign country, interfere in our election — possibly hacking machines — is unacceptable. You can’t care what anybody thinks about [why] you’re doing it,” Marsh added.

The Obama administration did attempt to address Russian interference when it surveilled the Trump campaign during the election.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

That earned the administration intense criticism from conservatives, although Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., one of the leading figures in Congress’ Russia investigation, told Fox News earlier that the Obama team shouldn’t apologize.

Swalwell pointed to the Mueller report which he said “certainly” showed evidence of collusion and “laid out a multiplicity of contacts between the Trump campaign and Russians.”

Westlake Legal Group vladimir-Putin-Barack-Obama-Reuters Obama team didn't do 'enough' to combat Russian meddling: Democratic strategist Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc article 38025d44-65e5-53a1-8c26-a31737df8ca1   Westlake Legal Group vladimir-Putin-Barack-Obama-Reuters Obama team didn't do 'enough' to combat Russian meddling: Democratic strategist Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/barack-obama fox news fnc/politics fnc article 38025d44-65e5-53a1-8c26-a31737df8ca1

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Warren urges House to begin impeachment proceedings on heels of Mueller report

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Trump Warren urges House to begin impeachment proceedings on heels of Mueller report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 658c5ab4-a44f-5f22-8b03-da4054fad67d

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., on Friday urged Congress to begin impeachment proceedings against President Trump, suggesting that the newly released Mueller report had laid out the groundwork for Congress to act.

In a series of tweets, the presidential hopeful cited the report as evidence of obstruction of justice and collusion, adding that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had “put the next step in the hands of Congress.”

That next step? She says it’s impeachment.

“The Mueller report lays out facts showing that a hostile foreign government attacked our 2016 election to help Donald Trump and Donald Trump welcomed that help,” she said in one tweet. “Once elected, Donald Trump obstructed the investigation into that attack.”

Warren went on to cite the report, which was released in full, with redactions, on Thursday. In it, Mueller says that “Congress has the authority to prohibit a president’s corrupt use of his authority.”

ROMNEY SAYS MUELLER REPORT LEFT HIM ‘SICKENED AT THE EXTENT AND PERVASIVENESS OF DISHONESTY AND MISDIRECTION’

“The correct process for exercising that authority is impeachment,” she declared.

Mueller’s report was released into Washington’s partisan scrum Thursday morning. It showed investigators did not find evidence of collusion between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia – a conclusion reiterated by Attorney General Bill Barr last month and again in the run-up to the document release.

But the report did lay out an array of actions taken by the president that were examined as part of the investigation’s obstruction inquiry.

Democrats continue to insist that Barr’s summary last month misled the American people, and that the fuller report, even with its multitude of redactions, told a very different story.

The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., slammed Barr for what he said was an attempt “to put a positive spin for the president on the special counsel’s findings.”

“If the special counsel, as he made clear, had found evidence exonerating the president, he would have said so. He did not. He left that issue to the Congress of the United States, and we will need to consider it,” Schiff said at a press conference Thursday.

Warren went a step further on Friday with her insistence that congressmen “do their constitutional duty.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the President of the United States.”

She feared that ignoring a president’s “repeated efforts to obstruct” justice would inflict “lasting damage” on American politics.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Trump Warren urges House to begin impeachment proceedings on heels of Mueller report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 658c5ab4-a44f-5f22-8b03-da4054fad67d   Westlake Legal Group Warren-Trump Warren urges House to begin impeachment proceedings on heels of Mueller report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 658c5ab4-a44f-5f22-8b03-da4054fad67d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Pretty Little Liars’ star Tyler Blackburn comes out as bisexual: ‘I felt the pressure from all sides’

Pretty Little Liars” actor Tyler Blackburn is opening up about his sexuality.

“I’m queer,” the 32-year-old revealed to The Advocate magazine. “I’ve identified as bisexual since a teenager. I just want to feel powerful in my own skin, and my own mind, and in my own heart.”

Blackburn continued, “I heard so many things from within the queer community about bisexuality being a cop-out or bullshit or the easy way out or something, and that always stuck with me because I felt the pressure from all sides to have [my sexuality] figured out and I think for the longest time, I suppressed more of my attraction to men. It wasn’t until my late 20s, towards the end of ‘Pretty Little Liars,’ that I really allowed myself to go there and not just wonder about it or lust over it, but experience that vulnerability and experience the emotional aspect of what it is to be bisexual.”

‘PRETTY LITTLE LIARS’ STAR SHAY MITCHELL REVEALS SHE SUFFERED A MISCARRIAGE

Westlake Legal Group Tyler-Blackburn-Getty ‘Pretty Little Liars’ star Tyler Blackburn comes out as bisexual: ‘I felt the pressure from all sides’ New York Post Lindsey Kupfer fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc article 85146a9d-636d-5c87-b8c4-2871fa21af63

LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 26: Tyler Blackburn attends the Entertainment Weekly Pre-SAG Party Arrivals at Chateau Marmont on January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David Crotty/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images) (Getty)

On his current show, “Roswell, New Mexico,” a CW reboot of the late ’90s show, Blackburn plays Alex Manes, a gay war veteran and amputee.

“I knew this guy in and out,” he told the magazine. “I understood feeling oppressed. I understood having issues with my father [wanting to feel] accepted by him. I understood wanting something but being afraid to have it. I understood self-doubt.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The actor said he’s tired of caring what people think.

“I just want to live my truth and feel OK with experiencing love and experiencing self-love,” he said, adding, “Yes, there is an element of, I want to feel like it’s OK to hold my boyfriend’s hand as I’m walking down the street, and not worry. Is someone going to look and be like, ‘Whoa, is that guy from that show? I didn’t know that [he was queer.]’ I want to own my space now.”

This article originally appeared in Page Six.

Westlake Legal Group Tyler-Blackburn-Getty ‘Pretty Little Liars’ star Tyler Blackburn comes out as bisexual: ‘I felt the pressure from all sides’ New York Post Lindsey Kupfer fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc article 85146a9d-636d-5c87-b8c4-2871fa21af63   Westlake Legal Group Tyler-Blackburn-Getty ‘Pretty Little Liars’ star Tyler Blackburn comes out as bisexual: ‘I felt the pressure from all sides’ New York Post Lindsey Kupfer fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fnc/entertainment fnc article 85146a9d-636d-5c87-b8c4-2871fa21af63

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life

The eldest son and daughter of a couple who starved and shackled 12 of their children spoke publicly for  the first time Friday, alternately condemning and forgiving their parents before a judge sentenced the pair to up to life in prison.

Since being freed from their prison-like home more than a year ago, the two adult children of David and Louise Turpin described how they had gained control of lives and, despite receiving little education at home, were now enrolled in college and learning simple things, including how to ride a bike, swim and prepare a meal. They are still thin from years of malnutrition.

“I cannot describe in words what we went through growing up,” said the oldest son, now 27. “Sometimes I still have nightmares of things that have happened, such as my siblings being chained up or getting beaten. But that is the past and this is now. I love my parents and have forgiven them for a lot of the things that they did to us.”

The hearing put an end to a shocking case that had gone unnoticed until a 17-year-old girl escaped from the home in January 2018 and called 911. Investigators discovered a house of horrors hidden behind a veneer of suburban normalcy.

The children — ages 2 to 29 — had been chained to beds, forced to live in squalor, fed only once a day, allowed to shower only once a year and deprived of toys and games. They slept during the day and were active a few hours at night.

As her children spoke from a lectern, 50-year-old Louise Turpin sobbed and dabbed her eyes with tissues.

“I’m sorry for everything I’ve done to hurt my children,” she said. “I love my children so much.”

Her husband, who was shaking and could not initially read from a written statement, let his lawyer speak for him until he regained his composure. He did not apologize for the abuse but wished his children well in with their educations and future careers and hoped they would visit him. He then began sobbing.

Jack Osborn, a lawyer representing the seven adult Turpin children, said they understand the consequences of their parents’ actions and are working hard toward forgiving them. Some plan to talk with their parents eventually, but others want no contact with them for 10 years.

The one who called police was a hero for liberating her siblings, Osborn said.

“Maybe but for that we wouldn’t be here today,” he said.

The sentence of life with no chance of parole for 25 years was no surprise. It had been agreed to when the couple pleaded guilty in February to 14 counts each that included torture, cruelty and false imprisonment.

The courtroom fell hushed as the oldest daughter, now 30, entered wearing a blue cardigan over a white shirt, her dark hair in a ponytail. Her eyes were already red from crying when she began to speak in the voice of a little girl.

“My parents took my whole life from me, but now I’m taking my life back,” she said, as her mother’s lower lip quivered trying to hold back the tears. “Life may have been bad but it made me strong. I fought to become the person I am. I saw my dad change my mom. They almost changed me, but I realized what was happening. I immediately did what I could to not become like them.”

There was no explanation from the parents or lawyers about why the abuse occurred, but a letter from one of the children read by an attorney hinted at a home life that veered from birthday celebrations and trips to Disneyland and Las Vegas to severe punishment and disarray.

“Through the years, things became more and more overwhelming, but they kept trusting in God,” the girl wrote “I remember our mother sitting in her recliner and crying, saying she don’t know what to do.”

She said her parents did not know the children were malnourished because they thought the children inherited a gene from their mother, who was small.

From the outside, the home in a middle-class section of Perris, a small city about 60 miles (96 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles, appeared to be neatly kept, and neighbors rarely saw the kids outside, but nothing triggered suspicion.

But when deputies arrived, they were shocked to find a 22-year-old son chained to a bed and two girls who had just been set free from shackles. All but one of the 13 children were severely underweight and had not bathed for months. The house was filled with the stench of human waste.

The children said they were beaten, caged and shackled if they did not obey their parents. Investigators concluded that the couple’s youngest child, a toddler, was the only one who was not abused.

David Turpin, 57, had been an engineer for Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. Louise Turpin was listed as a housewife in a 2011 bankruptcy filing.

The teenage daughter who escaped jumped from a window. After a lifetime in isolation, the 17-year-old did not know her address, the month of the year or what the word “medication” meant.

But she knew enough to punch 911 into a barely workable cellphone and began describing years of abuse to a police dispatcher.

Although the couple filed paperwork with the state to homeschool their children, learning was limited. The oldest daughter only completed third grade.

Referring to the restraints, the oldest daughter’s statement said her mother “didn’t want to use rope or chain but she was afraid her children were taking in too much sugar and caffeine.”

Life got more difficult after her mother’s parents died in 2016.

Her parents tried their best, “and they wanted to give us a good life,” she said. “They believed everything they did was to protect us.”

___

Associated Press writers Amanda Lee Myers and Michael R. Blood in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-8eb46d8cc3604bd48d22feb39cb034b4 Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-8eb46d8cc3604bd48d22feb39cb034b4 Parents who starved and shackled children sentenced to life fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com