web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > article (Page 104)

What is a nor’easter? The classic East Coast storms explained

For residents along the East Coast, the term “nor’easter” conjures up thoughts of plowable snow, wind and heavy rain.

According to the National Severe Storms Laboratory, the official definition of a nor’easter is a strong low-pressure system that impacts the Mid-Atlantic and New England states. The storm systems can form over the land of the eastern U.S. or over the coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

“These winter events are notorious for producing heavy snow, rain, and tremendous waves that crash onto Atlantic beaches, often causing beach erosion and structural damage,” according to the NSSL. “Wind gusts associated with these storms can exceed hurricane force in intensity.”

LAKE EFFECT SNOW: HERE’S HOW IT IMPACTS THE GREAT LAKES

The storms get their names from the continuously strong northeasterly winds blowing in from the ocean ahead of the storm and over the coastal areas.

Westlake Legal Group NOAA-GOES-East What is a nor'easter? The classic East Coast storms explained Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/disasters/nor-easter fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d94c29c-4505-58f4-8c2f-1ec6d49d141d

A powerful nor’easter can be seen in January 2018 impacting the Northeast states. (NOAA)

“What makes them so strong is the warm and moist air from the Atlantic that feeds the storm, causing it to grow explosively,” according to the NSSL.

The National Weather Service says that nor’easters usually develop in the latitudes between Georgia and New Jersey, within 100 miles east or west of the East Coast. The storms may occur at any time of the year but are more frequent and violent between September and April.

The East Coast of the U.S. provides an “ideal breeding ground for the storms,” according to forecasters.

WINTER STORM WARNING VS. WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY: HERE’S THE DIFFERENCE

The polar jet stream in winter transports cold Arctic air southward across the plains of Canada and the U.S., then eastward toward the Atlantic Ocean. At the same time, warm air from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic tries to move northward.

Westlake Legal Group Weather-Evergreen-1 What is a nor'easter? The classic East Coast storms explained Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/disasters/nor-easter fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d94c29c-4505-58f4-8c2f-1ec6d49d141d

Nor’easters are responsible for the biggest snowstorms on record from the Mid-Atlantic to New England. (Fox News)

“The warm waters of the Gulf Stream help keep the coastal waters relatively mild during the winter, which in turn helps warm the cold winter air over the water,” the NWS states. “This difference in temperature between the warm air over the water and cold Arctic air over the land is the fuel that feeds nor’easters.”

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

Depending on the amount of cold air available and how closely the storms move up the East Coast, nor’easters can produce impressive amounts of snow and are responsible for the biggest snowstorms on record from the Mid-Atlantic to New England, according to Fox News meteorologist Brandon Noriega.

The track of the storms near Gulf Stream and the ocean off the East Coast allows ample moisture for “intense” rain and, or snow. Total snowfall of one to three feet is common with the most intense nor’easters.

“Past nor’easters have been responsible for billions of dollars in damage, severe economic, transportation and human disruption, and in some cases, disastrous coastal flooding,” according to the NWS. “Damage from the worst storms can exceed a billion dollars.”

Westlake Legal Group NOAA-GOES-East What is a nor'easter? The classic East Coast storms explained Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/disasters/nor-easter fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d94c29c-4505-58f4-8c2f-1ec6d49d141d   Westlake Legal Group NOAA-GOES-East What is a nor'easter? The classic East Coast storms explained Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/us/disasters/nor-easter fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc article 0d94c29c-4505-58f4-8c2f-1ec6d49d141d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Renee Zellweger pays tribute to ‘courageous men and women in uniform’ during Oscar speech

Renee Zellweger made sure American military service members weren’t forgotten during her acceptance speech at the 92nd Academy Awards on Sunday night.

The 50-year-old won best actress for her performance as the late Hollywood icon Judy Garland in the biopic “Judy.” During her speech, Zellweger thanked the American military for their service.

“I have to say that this past year of conversations celebrating Judy Garland across genders and … I’m sorry, it’s across generations and across cultures has been a really cool reminder that our heroes unite us. No, the best among us who inspire us to find the best in ourselves,” said Zellweger.

“They unite us,” she continued. “When we look to our heroes, we agree, and that matters. Neil Armstrong, Sally Ride, Dolores Huerta, Venus and Serena and Selena, Bob Dylan, Scorsese, Fred Rogers, Harriet Tubman. We agree on our teachers, and we agree on our courageous men and women in uniform who serve. We agree on our first responders and firefighters. When we celebrate our heroes, we’re reminded of who we are as one people united.”

BRAD PITT JABS GOP IN OSCARS ACCEPTANCE SPEECH, JOAQUIN PHOENIX TALKS ANIMAL RIGHTS

LUKE PERRY, CAMERON BOYCE, TIM CONWAY MISSING FROM OSCARS 2020 IN MEMORIAM SEGMENT

The actress also paid tribute to Garland, who passed away in 1969 at age 47 from a barbiturate overdose.

“No, Judy Garland did not receive this honor in her time,” noted the star. “I am certain that this moment is an extension of the celebration of her legacy that began on our film set. It’s also representative of the fact that her legacy of unique exceptionalism and inclusivity and generosity of spirit, it transcends any one artistic achievement. Miss Garland, you are certainly among the heroes who unite and define us, and this is certainly for you. I am so grateful.”

Zellweger also thanked her “immigrant folks,” who inspired her to pursue the American dream. She previously told People magazine her mother endured a difficult childhood in Norway during World War II. The outlet also noted her father immigrated from Switzerland.

“My immigrant folks who came here with nothing but each other and a belief in the American dream. How about this?” said Zellweger while holding her Oscar.

OSCARS 2020: JOAQUIN PHOENIX GIVES LENGTHY, EMOTIONAL BEST ACTOR ACCEPTANCE SPEECH ABOUT THE STATE OF HUMANITY

Westlake Legal Group judy Renee Zellweger pays tribute to ‘courageous men and women in uniform’ during Oscar speech Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/oscars fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 10bfc926-3d34-53e3-8771-c2b19754b630

Renee Zellweger stars as the late Hollywood icon in the biopic ‘Judy.’ (Official Teaser Trailer | Roadside Attractions)

OSCARS 2020: CHRIS ROCK, STEVE MARTIN OPEN WITH JABS AT HOLLYWOOD’S BIGGEST STARS, ‘PARASITE’ MAKES HISTORY

Before her Oscar win, Zellweger recalled her mother’s tumultuous upbringing before arriving in America.

“She was a tiny girl in World War II,” she explained to People magazine. “There’s a World War II museum in New Orleans, it’s an extraordinary experience. We walked it all and we were looking in the glass cases and my mom’s like, ‘Oh,’ and she pointed at a series of hand grenades. There were a bunch of hand grenades in the case and she said, ‘We used to play with those ones. Not those ones, not those ones, but those ones. We used to play with those!’“

“She was living in an occupied country and there were bullets falling from the sky and you had to run inside because that was part of your day. And you’d find one every now and then,” Zellweger continued. “It was a real treat apparently. ‘Don’t pull the pin! You better run!’ And when you think about that being your reality as a child, can you imagine the value system that you establish? And my brother and I have been the beneficiaries of that. She’s cool.”

Westlake Legal Group Renee-Zellweger-oscars-2 Renee Zellweger pays tribute to ‘courageous men and women in uniform’ during Oscar speech Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/oscars fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 10bfc926-3d34-53e3-8771-c2b19754b630   Westlake Legal Group Renee-Zellweger-oscars-2 Renee Zellweger pays tribute to ‘courageous men and women in uniform’ during Oscar speech Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/events/oscars fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 10bfc926-3d34-53e3-8771-c2b19754b630

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What would the Iowa recanvass process look like?

With uncertainty still swirling around the results of the Iowa caucuses, the campaign for Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., indicated Sunday night that it will ask the party to recanvass parts of the state’s results, triggering a process many are unfamiliar with.

Less than an hour after the results posted Sunday, the Sanders campaign announced that it would seek a partial recanvass of some precincts in which there were apparent irregularities, Fox News has confirmed. The Iowa Democratic Party (IDP) has allowed campaigns to call for a recanvass until Monday at 1 p.m. ET. The results released by the IDP show Sanders trailing Buttigieg by a small margin.

But what would a recanvass look like in Iowa? And how is it different from a recount?

Westlake Legal Group AP20035661572403 What would the Iowa recanvass process look like? Tyler Olson fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 061f8227-951f-52f0-a3b9-87bb4400118c

Precinct captain Carl Voss, of Des Moines, Iowa, holds his iPhone that shows the Iowa Democratic Party’s caucus reporting app icon on Tuesday in Des Moines, Iowa. The app’s failure contributed to the confusion and irregularities in reporting caucus results. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

IOWA DEMOCRATIC PARTY AWARDS BUTTIGIEG 14 DELEGATES, SANDERS 12 AFTER CAUCUS MELTDOWN

A recanvass involves simply checking the math used to tabulate the results from each caucus location. The IDP provides “Mathematics Worksheets” to caucus sites that would be consulted in the recount process, according to its delegate selection plan.

damning analysis by The New York Times last week found that the Iowa Democratic Party’s figures were full of apparent errors, in which vote numbers from several precincts did not match totals provided by the party, and in which numerous precincts seemingly didn’t follow caucus rules.

The recanvass requested by the Sanders campaign would likely focus on precincts where such irregularities have been reported rather than the entire state, as the campaign did confirm it would request a “partial” recanvass. The state party would provide the location for the recanvass and observers from the presidential campaigns or the public would be allowed in the room, according to the Des Moines Register.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

A recount, however, would involve going through each individual vote once again and tabulating the results of the caucus independent from the previous count. The party’s Delegate Selection Plan provides for the “Presidential Preference Cards” that record who each voter caucused for in both the first round and second round of the caucus to be preserved for this purpose, but they would not be used in a recanvass.

The Des Moines Register reported that a manual for the recanvass requires candidates to provide evidence of which precincts have irregularities. That should not be difficult for the Sanders campaign, which has already pointed out 14 precincts with results it questioned. It would also have to provide evidence in its request due Monday that the error or errors could have affected how many delegates the candidates will receive to the national convention this summer, the Register reported.

Currently, Buttigieg is slated to get 14 delegates and Sanders 12.

Fox News’ Gregg Re and Andrew Craft contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group image What would the Iowa recanvass process look like? Tyler Olson fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 061f8227-951f-52f0-a3b9-87bb4400118c   Westlake Legal Group image What would the Iowa recanvass process look like? Tyler Olson fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc article 061f8227-951f-52f0-a3b9-87bb4400118c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

XFL Week 1 recap: Rebooted football league returns to national spotlight

Westlake Legal Group Matt-McGloin XFL Week 1 recap: Rebooted football league returns to national spotlight Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/xfl/tampa-bay-vipers fox-news/sports/xfl/st-louis-battlehawks fox-news/sports/xfl/seattle-dragons fox-news/sports/xfl/new-york-guardians fox-news/sports/xfl/los-angeles-wildcats fox-news/sports/xfl/houston-roughnecks fox-news/sports/xfl/dc-defenders fox-news/sports/xfl/dallas-renegades fox-news/sports/xfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 3a855c6b-e4f6-5312-9c94-64b0c6aab434

The XFL made its return to the national spotlight over the weekend and received some positive reviews about the quality of play, unconventional rule changes and other things.

All of the teams were in action as several familiar faces took the field including, Matt McGloin for the New York Guardians, Cardale Jones for the DC Defenders and Matt Jones for the St. Louis BattleHawks. Bob Stoops, of the Dallas Renegades, and Jerry Glanville, of the Tampa Bay Vipers, also returned to the sidelines to coach their respective teams.

NEW XFL KICKS OFF WITH ENTERTAINING DEBUT BETWEEN DC DEFENDERS, SEATTLE DRAGONS

Here were the scores from the weekend in the XFL.

DEFENDERS 31, DRAGONS 19

ROUGHNECKS 37, WILDCATS 17

GUARDIANS 23, VIPERS 3

BATTLEHAWKS 15, RENEGADES 9

Here are some moments you may have missed.

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE XFL COVERAGE

FIRST XFL TOUCHDOWN: The Seattle Dragons put the first XFL touchdown on the board against the DC Defenders. Quarterback Brandon Silvers found Austin Proehl for a 14-yard touchdown pass. Proehl is the son of former NFL wide receiver Ricky Proehl – who was a two-time Super Bowl champion.

NICK HOLLEY BACK ON A FIELD: Nick Holley made his debut with the Houston Roughnecks on Saturday. He never found longevity in the NFL because of injuries. But after three torn ACLs and a broken back, he told FOX Sports’ Brock Huard why he keeps playing the game. He had four catches for 50 yards in the Roughnecks’ win.

DC DEFENDERS BLOCKED PUNT: The Defenders showed off their special teams’ prowess against the Dragons. In the second quarter, Defenders player Jonathan Celestin recovered a blocked punt and scored a touchdown. The score was a part of a high-scoring affair for DC.

FIRST XFL EJECTION: While the XFL had a bunch of firsts in its opening weekend, nobody probably saw the league’s first ejection happening. Tampa Bay Vipers defensive tackle Ricky Walker became the first player to get ejected when he threw a punch at New York Guardians center Ian Silberman.

FANS GET WEIRD: Guardians fans packed the lower bowl of MetLife Stadium for the first game of the season. There was one moment where fans were spotted eating cheese straight out of the plastic wrapping and looking directly into the camera. It caught even the broadcasters off guard.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Here is the schedule for Week 2 of the XFL.

FEB 15: Guardians @ Defenders

FEB 15: Vipers @ Dragons

FEB 16: Renegades @ BattleHawks

FEB 16: Defenders @ Wildcats

Westlake Legal Group Matt-McGloin XFL Week 1 recap: Rebooted football league returns to national spotlight Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/xfl/tampa-bay-vipers fox-news/sports/xfl/st-louis-battlehawks fox-news/sports/xfl/seattle-dragons fox-news/sports/xfl/new-york-guardians fox-news/sports/xfl/los-angeles-wildcats fox-news/sports/xfl/houston-roughnecks fox-news/sports/xfl/dc-defenders fox-news/sports/xfl/dallas-renegades fox-news/sports/xfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 3a855c6b-e4f6-5312-9c94-64b0c6aab434   Westlake Legal Group Matt-McGloin XFL Week 1 recap: Rebooted football league returns to national spotlight Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/xfl/tampa-bay-vipers fox-news/sports/xfl/st-louis-battlehawks fox-news/sports/xfl/seattle-dragons fox-news/sports/xfl/new-york-guardians fox-news/sports/xfl/los-angeles-wildcats fox-news/sports/xfl/houston-roughnecks fox-news/sports/xfl/dc-defenders fox-news/sports/xfl/dallas-renegades fox-news/sports/xfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 3a855c6b-e4f6-5312-9c94-64b0c6aab434

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Who was the first to live in the White House?

As the country gets set to commemorate Presidents Day, it’s time to reflect on the most famous address in the world: 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington.

That’s the White House — the president’s official residence in the nation’s capital.

The first president, George Washington, chose the location in 1791, but never lived there.

John Adams and his wife, Abigail, were the first occupants of the President’s House, moving into the unfinished structure in 1800.

Fourteen years later, British troops burned it to the ground during the War of 1812.

Westlake Legal Group White-House-iStock Who was the first to live in the White House? Robert Gearty fox-news/us/presidents-day fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/us fnc article 12ab0606-2b1d-5b41-83d8-9df593231df3

George Washington chose the location for the White House, but he never lived there. (iStock)

IMPEACHMENT WITNESS VINDMAN FIRED, ESCORTED OUT OF WHITE HOUSE AFTER TRUMP ACQUITTAL

The original architect, Irish-born James Hoban, was appointed to rebuild the house, and President James Monroe and his wife, Dolley, took residence in 1817.

The building’s South Portico was constructed during Monroe’s administration in 1824.

The North Portico was built in 1829 under President Andrew Jackson.

Construction of the Oval Office — the president’s work quarters — took place in 1909 when Howard Taft was president as part of a project to expand the executive wing.

TRUMP HONORS WASHINGTON NATIONALS’ WORLD SERIES VICTORY AT WHITE HOUSE

In 1913, President Woodrow Wilson’s wife, Ellen, planted the outdoor White House Rose Garden, the backdrop for press conferences, bill signings and special ceremonies.

The White House Residence comprises 132 rooms and 35 bathrooms, and has six levels. Additionally, there are 412 doors, 147 windows, 28 fireplaces, eight staircases and three elevators.

Painters need 570 gallons of paint to cover the outside surfaces.

President Theodore Roosevelt officially gave the White House its current name in 1901 on his presidential stationery.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

It remains the only private residence of a head of state open to public visitors without an admission charge.

Westlake Legal Group White-House-iStock Who was the first to live in the White House? Robert Gearty fox-news/us/presidents-day fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/us fnc article 12ab0606-2b1d-5b41-83d8-9df593231df3   Westlake Legal Group White-House-iStock Who was the first to live in the White House? Robert Gearty fox-news/us/presidents-day fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/us fnc article 12ab0606-2b1d-5b41-83d8-9df593231df3

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jim Daly: Valentine’s Day — What dads want

Valentine’s Day is traditionally reserved for romantic dinners, flowers, chocolate and clothing the world in red. It’s a time to express devotion and appreciation to our significant other.

But parenthood often changes us in ways big and small, readjusting our values and priorities, even on a holiday set aside for amorous fun.

The origin of Valentine’s Day is one of those traditions enshrouded in mystery – part history and part legend. Some people believe the Catholic Church reimagined the pagan fertility festival of Lupercalia, which was held each February 15th – and instead refocused attention on Saint Valentine, a martyred priest who defied the emperor’s orders and married lovers in secret.

KRISTINA HERNANDEZ: VALENTINE’S DAY – HERE’S WHAT MOMS WANT

Regardless of where the facts end and the fiction begins, Valentine’s Day has become big business. According to the National Retail Federation, Americans will spend $27.4 billion this year – up from just over $20 billion in 2019.

That’s a lot of chocolate and red roses!

Westlake Legal Group Father-2 Jim Daly: Valentine's Day -- What dads want Jim Daly fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 1e617c55-b453-5417-97f8-65afc12a336c /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

Cute little girl celebrating Valentine’s day with parents, family and herself, holding heart shape decorations, home interior.

But what do men really want for Valentine’s Day – especially fathers?

More than anything, men want to be loved and respected by their wives – and loved by their children, to the point their kids enjoy spending time with them.

Society often depicts fathers as bumbling fools, but being a dad is hard work. The demands they feel are very real – there’s the boss at the office and the bills that never stop.

Just when you think you’re getting ahead, the hot water heater blows out or the car breaks down. After a long day of work, you have to referee squabbles at home, taxi kids to practices and spend your Saturday mornings down at the ballfield.

More than anything, men want to be loved and respected by their wives – and loved by their children, to the point their kids enjoy spending time with them.

And if you don’t work, the kids won’t eat and the mortgage will be foreclosed on – so, no pressure.

But the parenting season is so brief and so quick that it’s only the short-sighted father who doesn’t try to maximize time with his kids. So, good dads keep trying to find points of connection with the family.

Westlake Legal Group father-3 Jim Daly: Valentine's Day -- What dads want Jim Daly fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 1e617c55-b453-5417-97f8-65afc12a336c /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

As someone who grew up in a dysfunctional home – my father was abusive to my mother and abandoned us when I was five – I’m acutely aware of what kids want because I know what I missed.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

So, I parent out of my pain. I’m eager to spend time with my sons, Trent and Troy, doing the things they love and the things we love doing together.

We love to camp, ride our ATVs, ski and go to ballgames. We have special memories of hunting and fishing in Colorado’s aspen and pine forests or up in Big Sky Country in Montana.

Both of my boys are in their late teens now, and if I could, I would turn back the clock and relive highlights of the past.

But I can’t. None of us can.

More from Opinion

Time is the world’s most precious and yet fleeting commodity. We all get the same amount of it each day, yet we sometimes seem to think everybody else has more of it than we do.

I don’t know where you’re at this Valentine’s Day week. Gallup recently suggested the majority of people are happy with their economic status – but what about life at home with your family?

Westlake Legal Group father-1 Jim Daly: Valentine's Day -- What dads want Jim Daly fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 1e617c55-b453-5417-97f8-65afc12a336c /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

Maybe you’re struggling with your spouse or wishing you could spend more time with your kids. Healing wounds is never easy – but it’s always worth the time and effort.

As a Christian father, I want my boys to love God and have a personal relationship with the Creator and Savior of the world.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I have no greater joy than to hear that my children are walking in the truth,” the apostle John wrote.

What does this father want this year? To say thank you and happy Valentine’s day to my beautiful wife, Jean. She has been there for me and our boys through good times and bad. I want to thank her for her love and bask in her love reflected back at me. THAT is the best Valentine’s gift of all.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM JIM DALY

Westlake Legal Group father-3 Jim Daly: Valentine's Day -- What dads want Jim Daly fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 1e617c55-b453-5417-97f8-65afc12a336c /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday   Westlake Legal Group father-3 Jim Daly: Valentine's Day -- What dads want Jim Daly fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 1e617c55-b453-5417-97f8-65afc12a336c /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break ‘Medicare-for-all’ — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks

Westlake Legal Group image Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break 'Medicare-for-all' — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks Sally Pipes fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 839e3ce0-0b26-58fd-ba95-55ad3a30efb2

On Jan. 31, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, the head of the president’s Task Force on the Novel Coronavirus, declared a public health emergency in response to the global outbreak of the pathogen. The coronavirus has claimed more than 600 lives around the world so far, including that of Dr. Li Wenliang, the Chinese doctor who first warned of its potential dangers.

There are more than 31,000 reported coronavirus cases worldwide, including 12 in the United States. Though the pathogen has reached our shores, U.S. health officials have told Americans they don’t need to worry.

Countries with single-payer health care may have a more difficult time. In the not-too-distant past, Canada and the United Kingdom have struggled to handle outbreaks of everything from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) to the seasonal flu.

DIAMOND PRINCESS PASSENGER TWEETS FOOD REVIEWS DURING CORONAVIRUS QUARANTINE

That’s largely because these countries’ government-run, “Medicare-for-all”-style systems lack enough health care personnel, hospital beds and other resources to meet the needs of their populations even in good times. A public health threat like a pandemic can stretch single-payer health care to its breaking point.

First identified in Wuhan, China, the novel coronavirus causes a potentially deadly form of viral pneumonia. The pathogen belongs to the same family as SARS, which caused a global pandemic nearly two decades ago.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Containing pathogens like the novel coronavirus requires fast action and close coordination among physicians, hospitals and public health officials. That’s tough to do when there aren’t enough doctors or hospital beds to accommodate the sick.

During the first six months of 2019, nearly half of the Canadian province of Ontario’s acute care hospitals were over 100 percent capacity, according to an analysis conducted by CBC News. Almost one-fourth of the province’s hospitals averaged 100 percent capacity — or more — over that period.

As the CBC reported last month, “Overcrowding has become so common in Ontario hospitals that patient beds are now placed in hallways and conference rooms not only at times of peak demand, but routinely day after day.”

More from Opinion

That kind of crowding could make quarantining patients difficult, if not impossible, in the midst of an outbreak. Leaving someone with coronavirus in a hallway could expose countless patients and staff to the highly contagious pathogen.

Canada has experienced this kind of thing firsthand, during the SARS pandemic of 2002-2003. Nearly 375 people contracted SARS in Ontario, 44 of whom died. For context, SARS infected just 27 people in the United States — and killed none.

According to the final report of the Canadian government’s SARS Commission, 72 percent of Canadians infected with SARS contracted the disease “in a health care setting.” Forty-five percent of that group were health care workers.

The report laid the blame squarely on Canada’s “public health and emergency infrastructures,” which “were in a sorry state of decay.” Another government report concurred, saying the Canadian health care system “lacked adequate resources, was professionally impoverished and was generally incapable of fulfilling its mandate.”

Single-payer systems don’t just struggle with pandemics. Every year, the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) struggles to treat patients during flu season.

Single-payer systems don’t just struggle with pandemics. Every year, the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) struggles to treat patients during flu season. The British press calls this perennial disaster “the winter crisis.”

During the 2018-2019 winter, one in four patients waited more than four hours in major emergency departments. That year those departments were so crowded that over 11 percent of ambulances carrying patients were kept waiting outside hospitals for more than 30 minutes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In January 2018, the NHS postponed some 55,000 operations because of an outbreak of seasonal illnesses like the flu. One doctor in central England apologized for what he called “third-world conditions,” including 12-hour waits and patients being treated in corridors at his hospital. Another physician likened the scene in his London hospital to “battlefield medicine.”

The Canadian and British health care systems show just how hard it can be to battle an outbreak under single-payer. Let’s not replicate their experiences by adopting “Medicare-for-all.”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY SALLY PIPES

Westlake Legal Group image Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break 'Medicare-for-all' — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks Sally Pipes fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 839e3ce0-0b26-58fd-ba95-55ad3a30efb2   Westlake Legal Group image Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break 'Medicare-for-all' — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks Sally Pipes fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 839e3ce0-0b26-58fd-ba95-55ad3a30efb2

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break ‘Medicare-for-all’ — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks

Westlake Legal Group image Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break 'Medicare-for-all' — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks Sally Pipes fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 839e3ce0-0b26-58fd-ba95-55ad3a30efb2

On Jan. 31, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, the head of the president’s Task Force on the Novel Coronavirus, declared a public health emergency in response to the global outbreak of the pathogen. The coronavirus has claimed more than 600 lives around the world so far, including that of Dr. Li Wenliang, the Chinese doctor who first warned of its potential dangers.

There are more than 31,000 reported coronavirus cases worldwide, including 12 in the United States. Though the pathogen has reached our shores, U.S. health officials have told Americans they don’t need to worry.

Countries with single-payer health care may have a more difficult time. In the not-too-distant past, Canada and the United Kingdom have struggled to handle outbreaks of everything from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) to the seasonal flu.

DIAMOND PRINCESS PASSENGER TWEETS FOOD REVIEWS DURING CORONAVIRUS QUARANTINE

That’s largely because these countries’ government-run, “Medicare-for-all”-style systems lack enough health care personnel, hospital beds and other resources to meet the needs of their populations even in good times. A public health threat like a pandemic can stretch single-payer health care to its breaking point.

First identified in Wuhan, China, the novel coronavirus causes a potentially deadly form of viral pneumonia. The pathogen belongs to the same family as SARS, which caused a global pandemic nearly two decades ago.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Containing pathogens like the novel coronavirus requires fast action and close coordination among physicians, hospitals and public health officials. That’s tough to do when there aren’t enough doctors or hospital beds to accommodate the sick.

During the first six months of 2019, nearly half of the Canadian province of Ontario’s acute care hospitals were over 100 percent capacity, according to an analysis conducted by CBC News. Almost one-fourth of the province’s hospitals averaged 100 percent capacity — or more — over that period.

As the CBC reported last month, “Overcrowding has become so common in Ontario hospitals that patient beds are now placed in hallways and conference rooms not only at times of peak demand, but routinely day after day.”

More from Opinion

That kind of crowding could make quarantining patients difficult, if not impossible, in the midst of an outbreak. Leaving someone with coronavirus in a hallway could expose countless patients and staff to the highly contagious pathogen.

Canada has experienced this kind of thing firsthand, during the SARS pandemic of 2002-2003. Nearly 375 people contracted SARS in Ontario, 44 of whom died. For context, SARS infected just 27 people in the United States — and killed none.

According to the final report of the Canadian government’s SARS Commission, 72 percent of Canadians infected with SARS contracted the disease “in a health care setting.” Forty-five percent of that group were health care workers.

The report laid the blame squarely on Canada’s “public health and emergency infrastructures,” which “were in a sorry state of decay.” Another government report concurred, saying the Canadian health care system “lacked adequate resources, was professionally impoverished and was generally incapable of fulfilling its mandate.”

Single-payer systems don’t just struggle with pandemics. Every year, the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) struggles to treat patients during flu season.

Single-payer systems don’t just struggle with pandemics. Every year, the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) struggles to treat patients during flu season. The British press calls this perennial disaster “the winter crisis.”

During the 2018-2019 winter, one in four patients waited more than four hours in major emergency departments. That year those departments were so crowded that over 11 percent of ambulances carrying patients were kept waiting outside hospitals for more than 30 minutes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In January 2018, the NHS postponed some 55,000 operations because of an outbreak of seasonal illnesses like the flu. One doctor in central England apologized for what he called “third-world conditions,” including 12-hour waits and patients being treated in corridors at his hospital. Another physician likened the scene in his London hospital to “battlefield medicine.”

The Canadian and British health care systems show just how hard it can be to battle an outbreak under single-payer. Let’s not replicate their experiences by adopting “Medicare-for-all.”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY SALLY PIPES

Westlake Legal Group image Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break 'Medicare-for-all' — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks Sally Pipes fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 839e3ce0-0b26-58fd-ba95-55ad3a30efb2   Westlake Legal Group image Sally Pipes: Coronavirus could break 'Medicare-for-all' — single-payer systems struggle with outbreaks Sally Pipes fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 839e3ce0-0b26-58fd-ba95-55ad3a30efb2

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dana Perino: Democrats are in a ‘world of hurt’ as New Hampshire primary draws near

Westlake Legal Group perino Dana Perino: Democrats are in a 'world of hurt' as New Hampshire primary draws near Yael Halon fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc ea63ca55-939b-5bc7-8508-83410a621304 article

“Daily Briefing” host Dana Perino sat down with Fox News Radio’s Gurnal Scott ahead of Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary to break down the 2020 race following the chaos that surrounded last week’s Iowa caucuses.

“I feel like the Democrats are really in a world of hurt right now,” Perino said on Monday’s “Fox News Rundown” podcast.

“The Democrats are really in a world of hurt right now.”

— Dana Perino

“We are in the middle of a period where the Democrats are in some disarray. Iowa was unsettled and in fact, that Iowa Democrats are still looking at 95 precincts where they saw some irregularities,” she added.

SUBSCRIBE AND DOWNLOAD THE FOX NEWS RUNDOWN

Just a day before New Hampshire holds the first primary in the race for the White House, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders appeared to be the leader with 28 percent support among likely Democratic presidential primary voters, according to a University of New Hampshire tracking poll for CNN.

Sanders’ appeal has stemmed from his ability to rally up his base, but he will not satisfy Democrats looking to “return to normalcy” after President Trump, Perino explained.

“You do not get a return to normalcy with Bernie Sanders. You get a revolution.”

— Dana Perino

“They want a return to normalcy and somebody who can beat Trump. You do not get a return to normalcy with Bernie Sanders. You get a revolution. Americans are not out there in mass asking for a revolution,” she explained.

JUAN WILLIAMS: BIDEN MUST WIN NEVADA, SC TO SURVIVE IN DEM RACE

“However, I think from a communications standpoint, Bernie Sanders is arguably their very best communicator,” “The Five” co-host continued.  “He punches. He doesn’t care about being polite. And, I also believe that the Trump campaign is eyeing Bernie as the nominee more warily than they might suggest publicly, sort of aware of the threat he poses to their base of disaffected blue-collar voters that are hungry for a change.”

Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg appeared to be a close second, at 21 percent support, while former Vice President Joe Biden registered at only 12 percent in the survey, which was conducted Wednesday through Saturday.

BRIT HUME SAYS BIDEN LOOKS ‘WOBBLY ON THE LEDGE OF A HIGH BUILDING’

“You’re starting to see things come together,” Perino said, “and I think the most interesting thing is that the growing consensus in the feel up here in New Hampshire is that Joe Biden’s campaign is on its last legs.”

“The growing consensus… is that Joe Biden’s campaign is on its last legs.”

— Dana Perino

As far as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who finished third in last week’s Iowa caucuses, Perino said it may be time for the candidate to call it quits.

“Nobody wants the bronze,” she said, “and if you’re the first or the second in Iowa, then everyone’s talking about you going into New Hampshire. She’s likely to be third here in New Hampshire as well. She’s probably going to be third in Nevada, probably third and South Carolina and third doesn’t get you to the nomination.”

One candidate notably absent from Iowa was former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has chosen to skip the early-state nominating contests and focus instead on the states awarding their delegates on March 3, Super Tuesday.

“He aims to really make this very difficult for President Trump to win reelection, but he’s also kind of giving some heartburn to some Democrats,” she explained. “I mean, I find it hard to imagine, but maybe it’s true that the eyes of the lonely Democratic Party will settle on Mike Bloomberg, a former Republican who supported George W. Bush and John McCain, who is an unabashed capitalist, doesn’t really seem to fit the moment.”

Bloomberg recently has made waves for shelling out over $300 million of his own money on TV ads alone, but his excessive spending can’t buy the “love” that Trump, Sanders and Buttigieg have earned, Perino said.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I can understand buying the infrastructure, but he can’t buy love,” she concluded, “and President Trump and frankly, Bernie Sanders and I would say Mayor Pete, they have love amongst their ranks.”

To hear the full interview, subscribe and download The FOX News Rundown on your favorite podcast player.

The FOX NEWS RUNDOWN is a news-based daily morning podcast delivering a deep dive into the major and controversial stories of the day.

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group perino Dana Perino: Democrats are in a 'world of hurt' as New Hampshire primary draws near Yael Halon fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc ea63ca55-939b-5bc7-8508-83410a621304 article   Westlake Legal Group perino Dana Perino: Democrats are in a 'world of hurt' as New Hampshire primary draws near Yael Halon fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc ea63ca55-939b-5bc7-8508-83410a621304 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

David Avella: Sanders vs. Bloomberg — Democrats’ choice is a socialist win or a billionaire coup

Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Sanders-AP David Avella: Sanders vs. Bloomberg — Democrats' choice is a socialist win or a billionaire coup fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Avella article 8280bd0f-263d-54c1-85ef-922830146ddf

Self-proclaimed Democratic Socialist vs Billionaire. What better symbolizes the fight for the soul of the Democratic Party?

There are more than 44 million Democrats in the United States yet, as New Hampshire voters prepare to cast their ballots, the Democrats are on course to nominate the former Republican mayor of New York City or the longtime Independent from Vermont.

It’s down to Bernie Sanders vs. Mike Bloomberg. Never mind that the only time either has appeared on any ballot as a Democrat is as a presidential candidate.

ARNON MISHKIN: NH AND IOWA MATTER – HERE’S WHY THEY’RE WORTH KEEPING BUT COULD BE ENDANGERED

In case there was any doubt of Sanders’ front-runner status, Hillary Clinton cleared it up by doubling down on her criticism of him. As an aside, while the media portrays President Trump as one who can’t pass up airing his grievances, no one holds a grudge like Clinton.

Actually, she continues to be the gift to Republicans that just never stops giving, as it was her former campaign staffers who developed the app that caused the Iowa Caucuses to be a disaster.

More from Opinion

The irony does not end there. At a time when the Democrats are demanding to get rid of the Electoral College, they used a complicated math equation in Iowa to award delegates. The result, as of this writing, has Sanders getting more actual votes (a.k.a. popular vote) than Pete Buttigieg, but the former mayor receiving more delegates (a.k.a. Electoral College electors).

Regardless of the embarrassment for Democrats from the Iowa fiasco, one conclusion it did help reach was that you can put a fork in Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar. They are done.

Pundits and media pollsters must finally accept that Biden’s national numbers have simply been a reflection of name identification and voters not focusing on their choice. Every place where the vote gets closer to occurring, his support dwindles as Democrats make their final decision. This was the case in Iowa, and it will be the case in New Hampshire plus everywhere else moving forward.

Is Bloomberg being given special treatment because he has pledged that his entire billion-dollar operation will be left in place until November whether he is the nominee or not? 

Assuming they are capable of counting the votes in New Hampshire, Sanders is still likely to win and no re-vote will be recommended. As to Mayor Pete, even if he overperforms he will join the rest of the field staring at primaries and caucuses in states where they are resource challenged, have little momentum or both. Further, it seems unlikely a candidate who polls so low with voters of color and millennials could sustain success in the primary long enough to win the nomination.

The only person left to credibly challenge Sanders is Bloomberg.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

Bloomberg is spending money at a level that dwarfs what anyone else has ever done. He’s already spent more than $250 million on his campaign, and has suggested he’d be willing to cross the billion-dollar threshold. This is about the distance in size and scope between Whole Foods and the local farmer’s market.

It should not be lost on Democratic voters that when other presidential hopefuls, such as New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, came just shy of meeting the standards established by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) to qualify for the debates, they were told the rules were etched in stone and could not be modified. Yet, somehow those rules were recently changed and Bloomberg is now able to join the debates.

It does raise the question, is Bloomberg being given special treatment because he has pledged that his entire billion-dollar operation will be left in place until November whether he is the nominee or not?  The Democrats become the Bloomocrats.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When New Hampshire is done, what will play out next is the fight between Occupy Wall Street and Democratic Party Inc. On one side, you have the Squad, environmentalists and every Democrat who wants to be very liberal on all things great and small. On the other side, you have folks such as former President Obama, former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Clinton surrogate James Carville, who warn that it would be a mistake to put forward a radical candidate who will scare away too many voters.

Put down a bet on who wins at your own peril, but one thing is certain: Sanders needs to win it outright because the Democratic Party elites will maliciously deploy convention rules and super-delegates in second-round balloting to keep him from becoming the nominee.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FROM DAVID AVELLA

Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Sanders-AP David Avella: Sanders vs. Bloomberg — Democrats' choice is a socialist win or a billionaire coup fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Avella article 8280bd0f-263d-54c1-85ef-922830146ddf   Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Sanders-AP David Avella: Sanders vs. Bloomberg — Democrats' choice is a socialist win or a billionaire coup fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Avella article 8280bd0f-263d-54c1-85ef-922830146ddf

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com