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Westlake Legal Group > article (Page 25)

Missing hiker’s body found at Zion National Park, reports say

Westlake Legal Group missing-hikers-body-found-at-zion-national-park-reports-say Missing hiker’s body found at Zion National Park, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/travel/general/national-parks fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox news fnc/us fnc article 6736f60c-4c7e-50a6-80b4-93daa1ca0b05

Zion National Park Rangers on Thursday morning discovered the body of a 35-year-old hiker who had gone missing earlier this week, reports said.

Pradeep Beryl Solomon, of northern Utah, was reported missing Wednesday after he failed to return from a planned hike at Angels Landing a day earlier, FOX13 Salt Lake City reported.

HIKER WHO GOT STUCK IN QUICKSAND AT ZION NATIONAL PARK FOR 10 HOURS SAYS HE THOUGHT HE WAS GOING TO LOSE LEG

Investigators on Thursday evening confirmed the body was Solomon’s, the station reported, citing a news release from the park. His injuries were consistent with a long fall.

While the park hadn’t received any recent reports of a man falling, rainfall earlier in the week likely made the trail slick, the Salt Lake Tribune reported, citing the release. The trail can ascend some 1,500 feet above the southern Utah park’s red-rock cliffs.

Last year, a 13-year-old girl fell to her death while hiking with her family on the Angels Landing trail. There have been eight fatalities from falling on Angels Landing since the park opened in 1919, according to Zion’s website.

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“Our deepest condolences go out to the Solomon family and friends,” park superintendent Jeff Bradybaugh said in a statement. “We are all deeply saddened by this outcome.”

Westlake Legal Group Zion-Sign-iStock Missing hiker’s body found at Zion National Park, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/travel/general/national-parks fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox news fnc/us fnc article 6736f60c-4c7e-50a6-80b4-93daa1ca0b05   Westlake Legal Group Zion-Sign-iStock Missing hiker’s body found at Zion National Park, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/travel/general/national-parks fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox news fnc/us fnc article 6736f60c-4c7e-50a6-80b4-93daa1ca0b05

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Giuliani on Mueller release: ‘It’s over, they just don’t know it yet’

Westlake Legal Group giuliani-on-mueller-release-its-over-they-just-dont-know-it-yet Giuliani on Mueller release: 'It's over, they just don't know it yet' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 94625ad6-8c42-5426-a3a0-9a627da1ae51
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027818541001_6027817036001-vs Giuliani on Mueller release: 'It's over, they just don't know it yet' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 94625ad6-8c42-5426-a3a0-9a627da1ae51

President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani appeared on the “Ingraham Angle” Thursday and spoke about his main issues with the Mueller investigation and declared the Russia collusion narrative “over.”

“I think the report really displays the fact that this is over,” Giuliani told host Laura Ingraham.

MUELLER REPORT SHOWS PROBE DID NOT FIND COLLUSION EVIDENCE, REVEALS TRUMP EFFORTS TO SIDELINE KEY PLAYERS

“It’s not over. They are going to run on this for 2020,” Ingraham interjected.

“It’s over. They don’t know it yet,” Giuliani said.

GEORGE CONWAY CALLS TRUMP A CANCER

After two years, a redacted version of Mueller’s report was released Thursday showing investigators did not find proof of collusion between the 2016 Trump campaign and Russia. But the report did reveal an array of controversial actions by the president that were examined as part of the investigation’s obstruction probe.

Democrats criticized Barr and demanded an unredacted version of the report while Republicans demanded an investigation into how the Russia collusion narrative began.

Giuliani said that his biggest problem with Mueller was the staff he picked to work on the investigation.

“I think, the people he hired. I will never understand how you hire a completely partisan, biased staff of people, one of whom was the counsel to the Clinton Foundation, to investigate President Trump. If I was investigating Hillary Clinton, I hired the head of the Trump Foundation, I think we’d be in a lot of trouble,” Giuliani said.

GIULIANI: THIS PRESIDENT HAS BEEN TREATED UNFAIRLY

The former mayor also took exception to how President Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen was portrayed in the report.

“The complete deception of trying to present the facts from Cohen as if they are true,” Giuliani said.

“I can tell you many of the things I have personal knowledge about on the report from Cohen are complete lies. To take him and put them there as if we are going to take his credibility over the president of United States is totally warped.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027818541001_6027817036001-vs Giuliani on Mueller release: 'It's over, they just don't know it yet' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 94625ad6-8c42-5426-a3a0-9a627da1ae51   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027818541001_6027817036001-vs Giuliani on Mueller release: 'It's over, they just don't know it yet' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/robert-mueller fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 94625ad6-8c42-5426-a3a0-9a627da1ae51

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Rob Gronkowski’s girlfriend Camille Kostek goes ‘wild & free’ in Instagram photo

Westlake Legal Group rob-gronkowskis-girlfriend-camille-kostek-goes-wild-free-in-instagram-photo Rob Gronkowski's girlfriend Camille Kostek goes ‘wild & free’ in Instagram photo Stephen Sorace fox-news/person/camille-kostek fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6b8fbc15-4ed5-5e73-bd41-3b2c9ac8c259

Sports Illustrated model Camille Kostek lit up Instagram on Wednesday with a topless photo after recently addressing body-shamers who left cruel comments on a bikini selfie with longtime boyfriend Rob Gronkowski.

Kostek, 27, is wearing only jeans as she faces away from the camera and lifts a sunhat skyward in what appears to be the desert. “Wild & free” captions the photo.

GRONKOWSKI’S GIRLFRIEND POSTS LOVING MESSAGE AFTER RETIREMENT ANNOUNCEMENT

Reaction to the sexy snap was largely positive, with some comments reading, “You are amazing” and “perfection.” But just last month Kostek had a run-in with body-shamers and addressed the cruel comments in an online post.

“I can’t begin to explain how many rude comments I got after I posted this photo about my body. But for the women who I was able to help love who they are more from it, I post without hesitation for myself and for YOU,” Kostek posted on Instagram at the time.

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Kostek recently had some fun with Gronkowski, who retired from the NFL in March following the New England Patriots’ Super Bowl victory earlier this year, taking to social media to share a video of her doing a sexy movie-parody photo shoot of a scene from Martin Scorsese’s 2013 film “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6013013511001_6013012300001-vs Rob Gronkowski's girlfriend Camille Kostek goes ‘wild & free’ in Instagram photo Stephen Sorace fox-news/person/camille-kostek fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6b8fbc15-4ed5-5e73-bd41-3b2c9ac8c259   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6013013511001_6013012300001-vs Rob Gronkowski's girlfriend Camille Kostek goes ‘wild & free’ in Instagram photo Stephen Sorace fox-news/person/camille-kostek fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6b8fbc15-4ed5-5e73-bd41-3b2c9ac8c259

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California man sets self on fire in Target parking lot: officials

Westlake Legal Group california-man-sets-self-on-fire-in-target-parking-lot-officials California man sets self on fire in Target parking lot: officials fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz bd4c7abb-5225-50c2-9003-35f1d659135e article

A California man on Wednesday suffered third-degree burns to the front half of his body after he used a lighter to melt a gasoline-filled jug, fire officials said.

The unintended immolation took place in a Target parking lot in Modesto, about 100 miles east of San Francisco. The man, who was not identified, had melted the mouth of the jug to make pouring gasoline into his car easier, his girlfriend told investigators.

The jug exploded into flames, setting the man and another vehicle on fire, The Sacramento Bee reported. Dustin Bruley, a supervisor of the Stanislaus Regional Fire Investigation Unit, told The Bee that the man was burned from his face to his feet and his shoes were melted.

MAN SETS HIMSELF ABLAZE ON PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, AND NORTH LAWN IS CLEARED

“He ran from the car and several citizens assisted him to the ground and helped put out the fire,” Bruley said. A Target employee put out the car fire with a fire extinguisher, Fox 40 reported.

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The man was airlifted to UC Davis Medical Center’s burn unit in Sacramento. Officials are reviewing surveillance footage.

Westlake Legal Group Gas-can-burn California man sets self on fire in Target parking lot: officials fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz bd4c7abb-5225-50c2-9003-35f1d659135e article   Westlake Legal Group Gas-can-burn California man sets self on fire in Target parking lot: officials fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz bd4c7abb-5225-50c2-9003-35f1d659135e article

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Clapper: Mueller couldn’t find ‘active collusion’ but there was ‘passive collusion’

Westlake Legal Group clapper-mueller-couldnt-find-active-collusion-but-there-was-passive-collusion Clapper: Mueller couldn’t find ‘active collusion’ but there was ‘passive collusion’ Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/newsedge/politics fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 71722b8e-f135-585f-adec-c18a5ef73d60

Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper on Thursday said that there was “passive collusion” between the Trump campaign and Russia despite Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s findings that conclude there was no conspiracy.

Clapper began by defending the foundation of the Russia probe, telling CNN anchor Anderson Cooper that there was “good reason” for intelligence agencies and law enforcement “to be concerned about whether or not there was some kind of conspiracy between the Trump campaign and the Russians.”

GEORGE CONWAY CALLS TRUMP A CANCER THAT NEEDS TO BE REMOVED IN BLISTERING OP-ED

The top Obama official blasted President Trump for claiming that President Obama “did nothing” to prevent Russia’s interference during the 2016 election, saying his former boss “directly confronted Putin” and “asked him to stop the interference.”

He claimed that Russia’s social media campaign “turned the election in Trump’s favor” in targeted states like Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania, adding that the Mueller Report “substantiates that.”

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“If there wasn’t active collusion proven, then I think what we have here is a case of passive collusion where in some cases, unwittingly, to include candidate Trump himself, who retweeted messages that had been planted by the Russians in social media,” the CNN national security analyst told Cooper. “That’s a small, but important, example of how members of the campaign were used and manipulated by the Russians.”

Westlake Legal Group 9c8ec3162e80445f929b630b10d42aa3 Clapper: Mueller couldn’t find ‘active collusion’ but there was ‘passive collusion’ Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/newsedge/politics fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 71722b8e-f135-585f-adec-c18a5ef73d60   Westlake Legal Group 9c8ec3162e80445f929b630b10d42aa3 Clapper: Mueller couldn’t find ‘active collusion’ but there was ‘passive collusion’ Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/newsedge/politics fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 71722b8e-f135-585f-adec-c18a5ef73d60

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Hoyer appears to backtrack on earlier impeachment ‘not worthwhile’ comment

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD.) appeared to reverse course Thursday tweeting that Congress must obtain the “full” Mueller Report in order to “determine what actions may be necessary” shortly after telling CNN that “impeachment is not worthwhile at this point.”

MUELLER REPORT SPARKS NEW DC WAR OVER RUSSIA PROBE: SUBPOENAS, PAYBACK AND MORE

Hoyer said in a press release that Mueller’s report did not exonerate the president of obstruction and said Congress must make a determination on the issue.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y. said the report provided “disturbing evidence” that Trump had obstructed justice.

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The Justice Department announced Thursday evening that a less redacted version of the report will be available to Congress next week.

The nearly two-year investigation, which resulted in the 448-page report, concluded there was not sufficient evidence that the Trump campaign conspired with Russia but did not make a conclusion about obstruction of justice.

Westlake Legal Group 78c06c04-hoyer Hoyer appears to backtrack on earlier impeachment ‘not worthwhile’ comment fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 5b34992b-e84b-56b9-89e0-c90fd114cc45   Westlake Legal Group 78c06c04-hoyer Hoyer appears to backtrack on earlier impeachment ‘not worthwhile’ comment fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article 5b34992b-e84b-56b9-89e0-c90fd114cc45

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Cooking grease theft now $75 million a year industry: report

Westlake Legal Group cooking-grease-theft-now-75-million-a-year-industry-report Cooking grease theft now $75 million a year industry: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 95c86699-5c7d-5a35-901a-2354c81b4d15

Black market thieves are stealing more than $75 million in old cooking grease each year, according to a new report.

A man was caught earlier this month siphoning about 150 gallons of grease from a dumpster behind a Burger King in northern Virginia, the Washington Post reported.

TEXAS WOMAN GETS 15 YEARS IN JAIL FOR STEALING $1.3M FROM RODEO

Law enforcement officers told The Post that a hike in biodiesel prices is helping to spur the fast food grease thefts.

Rendering companies normally pay restaurants a fee to remove the grease and sell it for things like biofuel or animal feed, The Post reported.

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Corporate lawyer Charles Gittins said his rendering company lost $5 million in grease thefts in 2015, the last year. “You can make $10,000 in a night,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group dumpster Cooking grease theft now $75 million a year industry: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 95c86699-5c7d-5a35-901a-2354c81b4d15   Westlake Legal Group dumpster Cooking grease theft now $75 million a year industry: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 95c86699-5c7d-5a35-901a-2354c81b4d15

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San Francisco sees ‘brownout’ amid spike in public pooping, reports say

Westlake Legal Group san-francisco-sees-brownout-amid-spike-in-public-pooping-reports-say San Francisco sees ‘brownout’ amid spike in public pooping, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/us fnc bfa7e4fe-a493-561d-a67d-37462a2e16b3 article
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5822477957001_5822475920001-vs San Francisco sees ‘brownout’ amid spike in public pooping, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/us fnc bfa7e4fe-a493-561d-a67d-37462a2e16b3 article

The Golden City appears to be turning a shade of brown.

San Francisco’s streets have long had a problem with human waste, but new reports show that the Bay Area’s public bowel movements are worse than ever.

SAN FRANCISCO DUBBED ‘DOO-DOO CAPITAL’ OF THE COUNTRY, AMID SPIKE IN WASTE COMPLAINTS

The poop-data was released by Open the Books, a nonprofit government watchdog, which includes all cases closed by the San Francisco Department of Public Works since 2011, Business Insider reported.

There were over 5,000 documented cases in 2011, according to the data. In 2018, that number rose more than fivefold to over 28,000 reported cases.

The so-called Bay Area “brownout” has been attributed to the city’s large homeless population. Out of the 7,499 homeless people recorded in 2017, about 58 percent, or 4,353 people, were marked as unsheltered. The other 3,146 were designated sheltered.

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San Francisco’s politicians have attempted to address the problem, forming a “Poop Patrol” tasked with scouring the city streets, cleansing them of fecal matter.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5822477957001_5822475920001-vs San Francisco sees ‘brownout’ amid spike in public pooping, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/us fnc bfa7e4fe-a493-561d-a67d-37462a2e16b3 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5822477957001_5822475920001-vs San Francisco sees ‘brownout’ amid spike in public pooping, reports say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/san-francisco fox news fnc/us fnc bfa7e4fe-a493-561d-a67d-37462a2e16b3 article

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Georgia man set foreclosed mansion on fire, cops say

Westlake Legal Group georgia-man-set-foreclosed-mansion-on-fire-cops-say Georgia man set foreclosed mansion on fire, cops say Louis Casiano fox-news/entertainment/genres/crime fox news fnc/us fnc db7117ae-0a41-58d4-95a7-239a849f0805 article

A Georgia man allegedly set his former mansion on fire months after the residence went into foreclosure, authorities said Thursday.

Stanley Stephens, with help from Donald Luallen, set fire to the 5,900-square-foot home in the northern town of Rome on Feb. 10, police said. No one was hurt in the fire. Both are charged with first-degree arson.

Investigators from local, state and federal agencies spent more than 300 hours looking into the blaze, Fox News affiliate WAGA-TV reported.

“We guesstimate approximately $2.5 million are involved in this case,” Floyd County Fire Marshal Mary Catherine Chewning said during a Thursday news conference. “This is one of the largest arson cases I am aware of in Floyd County at this time.”

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Stephens was arrested Monday in Daytona Beach, Fla., and Luallen was taken into custody Thursday in Oxford, Alabama. Both are expected to be extradited to Georgia. More charges against the pair are pending, Chewning said.

Westlake Legal Group mugs_sbs Georgia man set foreclosed mansion on fire, cops say Louis Casiano fox-news/entertainment/genres/crime fox news fnc/us fnc db7117ae-0a41-58d4-95a7-239a849f0805 article   Westlake Legal Group mugs_sbs Georgia man set foreclosed mansion on fire, cops say Louis Casiano fox-news/entertainment/genres/crime fox news fnc/us fnc db7117ae-0a41-58d4-95a7-239a849f0805 article

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AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine

Westlake Legal Group ap-was-there-teen-boys-unleashed-terror-chaos-at-columbine AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine LITTLETON, Colo. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 34e35bfd-effe-5bf4-b60e-fad1644cfd7f

On April 20, 1999, two teenage boys dressed in black trench coats went on a killing rampage at Columbine High School in suburban Denver. They shot and killed 12 classmates and a teacher and wounded two dozen others before taking their own lives.

Twenty years later, The Associated Press is republishing this story about the attack, the product of reporting from more than a dozen AP journalists who conducted interviews in the hours after it happened. The article first appeared on April 22, 1999.

___

A moment of surprise, then hours of terror

By TED ANTHONY

AP National Writer

LITTLETON, Colo. — Her favorite lunchtime meal was ready — “my only meal,” jokes Sarah DeBoer. So, nachos in hand, she headed toward the commons area of the Columbine High School cafeteria.

It was a sunny Tuesday morning, maybe 60 degrees, only 17 school days before graduation, and a spring mentality was afoot — the kind that says summer is on the horizon.

Outside, two disaffected young men knew something their classmates didn’t. Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris had endgame in mind.

Ms. DeBoer, who knew the pair in passing, had talked to them Friday. True, they liked to bluster about guns and vengeance and Adolf Hitler. But they seemed — for them, at least — fine.

Upstairs in the school library, four dozen students were studying their way through the lunch period.

Down the hall, Dave Sanders, a popular instructor and coach, was teaching a science class. Nearby, Stephanie Williams, 16, a junior, was in the choir room singing.

Then, at about 11:15 a.m., a sound from outside: pop-pop-pop-BANG.

In the cafeteria, they thought it was a lunchtime prank. Whatever it was, it was getting closer.

Sarah DeBoer, a 16-year-old sophomore, hit the floor with her lunch companions. As realization washed over her, she uttered one thing. Whether it was aloud or just to herself, she doesn’t quite remember.

“I think that I’m going to die.”

___

In moments of chaos and hours of confusion, memories can cloud. But, through myriad interviews and briefings, an intelligible if still imprecise portrait emerges of what unfolded behind a suburban school’s pale brown walls.

Just after lunch period begins, two young men in black trench coats open fire in the parking lot. Senior Wade Frank, 18, outside in the parking lot next to a picnic area, hears popping sounds and sees a girl lying against a curb, shot in the leg. As he watches, another youth is shot in the back and falls forward.

Then one gunman throws a bomb into the parking lot and heads inside.

“He was just casually walking. He wasn’t in any hurry,” says Frank.

Sophomore Denny Rowe, 15, is outside having lunch with friends. “These guys opened fire on everything that looked human,” says Rowe. Bullets are bouncing everywhere.

“One boy was running and suddenly his ankle just puffed up in blood,” says sophomore Don Arnold, 16. “A girl was running and her head popped open.”

As the gunmen walk into the school, two students lie dead outside. Still shooting, the two walk to the cafeteria, where food server Karen Nielsen hears someone yell, “Get down!”

Klebold, 17, and Harris, 18, are heavily armed — an assault rifle, sawed-off shotguns, handguns. In the cafeteria, one removes his trench coat to reveal home-made grenades. He tosses a pipe bomb.

Gunshots echo. Students fall. One gets up to run and others follow.

Word spreads: The “Trenchcoat Mafia” has gone nuts. Many of the 900 students in the building duck into closets and bathrooms, under tables and chairs. A couple call 911 with cellular phones. Dozens flee the building and hide in brush around the school.

Senior Nick Foss, 18, and a friend push two teachers, a cook and another woman into a bathroom. “I heard people praying for their husbands and their children,” says Foss. The attackers bang on doors, yelling: “We know you’re in there.”

Casey Brackley, 15, is in the gym when an administrator herds kids into the equipment room.

“I hit my knees and prayed,” Ms. Brackley says. They stay for 15 minutes before the administrator directs them outside.

Neil Gardner, the Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy assigned to the school full-time, hears shots and spots one of the gunmen in a first-floor hallway. He radios for backup and returns fire as bullets ricochet off lockers. Within minutes, seven officers arrive and begin pulling students, including a few shooting victims, from the building.

In the choir room, above the commons, Stephanie Williams and her classmates hear the sounds.

Someone comes to the door and, with a thumb-forefinger gesture, gives them a warning: gun.

Her teacher tells everyone to sit. But in moments, the school’s two-level auditorium next door seems a safer place, so some go; then, after about 10 minutes, they run into the main hall.

“The group I was in headed straight for the door. He was shooting at us,” Stephanie says. “All we knew was to run.”

As they flee, a door behind them explodes in gunfire.

Sarah DeBoer, separated from her friend who had run into the weight room, lies on the cafeteria floor until she hears a car explode outside. Then she runs into the auditorium and lies down between seats.

There she stays for some time. Fellow students — 15, maybe 20 — cry softly. Teachers warn them to be silent. In the distance, they hear sharp reports and dull explosions. Finally, a janitor enters and tells them: Go!

They run, and gunfire follows.

“I turned, and I saw Dylan was the one who turned and shot at me,” Sarah says. “He didn’t know it was me; we were just running out of the auditorium.”

The gunmen head upstairs toward the library.

___

“All jocks stand up! We’re going to kill every one of you,” one gunman yells in the library.

Student Aaron Cohn, a ballplayer, is spared because a girl leaps onto his back while he lies on the floor, covering the baseball slogan on his shirt.

“They were laughing after they shot,” Cohn says. “It was like they were having the time of their life.”

Some students are slain at their desks, one with pencil still in hand. The gunmen play “peek-a-boo” with others, finding them cowering under desks and opening fire. Isaiah Shoels, who is black and has tangled with the gunmen before, is one of those to fall.

Says one assailant: “Oh, my God. Look at this black kid’s brain. Awesome, man!”

Some kids play dead. By the time it is over, 12 aren’t playing.

Klebold and Harris leave behind shattered windows, bloody floors and a quiet unlike any the library has ever heard. Elsewhere upstairs, Sanders, the teacher, has been shot twice in the chest but manages to get students down a hallway away from danger. He stumbles into a science room, bleeding and coughing blood.

Outside, the first SWAT team is on the scene 20 minutes after the first 911 calls, joining the sheriff’s deputies. It finds several explosive devices around the school and treads cautiously.

“We had initial people there right away, but we couldn’t get in,” Jefferson County Sheriff John Stone says. “We were way outgunned.”

About 45 minutes after the shooting begins, at noon, ambulances take the first wounded students — the ones who managed to run outside — to hospitals. Bomb teams, firetrucks, more SWAT units and paramedics arrive.

Nick Foss and other students manage to crawl into a space between the ceiling and acoustic tiles. Foss falls through a tile, crashing onto the floor of the teacher’s lounge. He runs.

Kammi Vest, 18, hides in the choir-room closet with up to 60 other students. Others try to crawl through heating vents to safety.

In the science room, Dave Sanders is dying. Students cover the 47-year-old teacher with their shirts and a blanket and keep him talking. But his pulse slows, and he grows cold.

Shots are heard until almost 12:30. About that time, in the library, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris turn their guns on themselves, though no one will be sure of this for hours.

As 12:30 passes, after no shots echo for several minutes, SWAT teams begin sweeping the building room by room. It is, quite literally, a minefield: Dropped backpacks are everywhere, each a potential bomb. In the coming days, bombs will turn up in various shapes and sizes. They include two 35-pound propane bombs hidden in the school’s kitchen.

At about 2:30, SWAT teams begin freeing those in hiding. In small groups, hands behind their heads, they run from the school to a holding area. They are frisked, questioned, offered medical care and bused to Leawood Elementary School to be reunited with parents.

By now, the world is seeing it all on TV. Escaped students cling to each other. Tears flow freely for some; for others, it will take time. Even the tough guys, the ones with the backward baseball caps and the baggy camo pants, cry.

At 4:30, with the gunmen’s bodies found, authorities declare the school under control. In goes Dr. Chris Colwell, summoned for a medical synopsis. In the sun-dappled, silent library is the worst sight he has ever seen.

“You walk in there with that hope that there might be somebody who’s still alive and still salvageable,” Colwell says. “It didn’t take long to see that wasn’t the case.”

He pronounces them all dead — 10 students and two alienated schoolmates who let their anger consume them.

The bodies will stay there for an entire day, until the known bombs are cleared.

___

By the following afternoon, nearby Clement Park has become a place of mourning. Students and teachers and gawkers, they come to commiserate, to speak of faith and perseverance, to see the spectacle and talk to the press.

Among the pilgrims: Sarah DeBoer, wearing her Columbine football jersey, and Stephanie Williams, accompanied by a friend to comfort her. They stand together, yards from the scene of their lives’ greatest terror, and they try to process the scenes running through their mind.

“Yesterday I was so scared,” Ms. DeBoer says, her voice falling.

“They ruined the school, but I think we should definitely go back,” she says. “If you don’t go back, they’ll win.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-016ce8bd39a842629a82af6e923018f3 AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine LITTLETON, Colo. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 34e35bfd-effe-5bf4-b60e-fad1644cfd7f   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-016ce8bd39a842629a82af6e923018f3 AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine LITTLETON, Colo. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 34e35bfd-effe-5bf4-b60e-fad1644cfd7f

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