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Westlake Legal Group > article (Page 26)

Pilot killed in plane crash at Southern California airport: report

Westlake Legal Group pilot-killed-in-plane-crash-at-southern-california-airport-report Pilot killed in plane crash at Southern California airport: report fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/travel fnc Bradford Betz article 4bdbbfda-2a79-5e3e-b9e7-5babfa98b496
Westlake Legal Group fullerton Pilot killed in plane crash at Southern California airport: report fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/travel fnc Bradford Betz article 4bdbbfda-2a79-5e3e-b9e7-5babfa98b496

A pilot was killed Thursday evening after a small twin-engine airplane crashed shortly after taking off the runway of a small municipal airport in Southern California, according to reports.

The FAA said the pilot was the only one onboard the plane. The crash occurred shortly before 8 p.m. the Fullerton Municipal Airport, which is about 20 miles south of Los Angeles, Fox 11 reported.

NEW YORK MEN SURVIVE PLANE CRASH AFTER AIRCRAFT GETS TANGLED UP IN POWER LINES

Footage showed the plane engulfed in flames. Firefighters arrived on the scene and extinguished the flames, according to officials.

The plane had been destined for Heber City, Utah, KTTV reported. No additional details were released.

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In February, another twin-engine plane that had taken off from the same airport crashed into a nearby residential home, killing five people – including the pilot – and injuring two others.

Westlake Legal Group fullerton Pilot killed in plane crash at Southern California airport: report fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/travel fnc Bradford Betz article 4bdbbfda-2a79-5e3e-b9e7-5babfa98b496   Westlake Legal Group fullerton Pilot killed in plane crash at Southern California airport: report fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/travel fnc Bradford Betz article 4bdbbfda-2a79-5e3e-b9e7-5babfa98b496

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

George Conway calls Trump a cancer that needs to be removed in blistering op-ed

Westlake Legal Group george-conway-calls-trump-a-cancer-that-needs-to-be-removed-in-blistering-op-ed George Conway calls Trump a cancer that needs to be removed in blistering op-ed fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6f7f5825-3a44-514c-90dc-ee3aee187b13
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6013859140001_6013867544001-vs George Conway calls Trump a cancer that needs to be removed in blistering op-ed fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6f7f5825-3a44-514c-90dc-ee3aee187b13

George Conway, the husband of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway and a fierce critic of President Trump, penned an op-ed in The Washington Post that calls Trump a “cancer on the presidency” and urged Congress to take action to remove him from office.

After 22 months, a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia interference report was made available to the public. The report showed no evidence that Trump’s team “coordinated or conspired” with Russia, but many Democrats pointed out that Mueller identified 10 times where there was potential obstruction, and essentially left the next steps up to Congress.

Mueller wrote that Trump’s efforts to obstruct “were often carried out through one-on-one meetings in which the President sought to use his official power outside of usual channels.”

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He continued, “The President’s efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests.”

Trump’s team late Thursday appeared to take a wait-and-see approach on how the public absorbed the findings. Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s lawyer, seemed to be in no particular hurry to release a 45-page rebuttal when asked about it on CNN.  The White House claimed total victory and vindication for the president

Conway, who has clashed publically with the president before and questioned his mental fitness, barely touches collusion in his piece but highlighted the obstruction argument.

“Mueller couldn’t say, with any “confidence,” that the president of the United States is not a criminal. He said, stunningly, that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.” Mueller did not so state,” Conway wrote.

He pointed out that even if Trump did not reach the threshold of criminality, he could still be impeached based on earlier precedent. He called on Congress to act to “excise” the cancer in the White House “without delay.”

There is no love lost between Trump and Conway. Trump has called Conway a “stone cold LOSER & husband from hell.”

MUELLER REPORT THE ‘BEGINNING OF THE BEGINNING’: AXIOS EDTIOR

“George Conway, often referred to as Mr. Kellyanne Conway by those who know him, is VERY jealous of his wife’s success & angry that I, with her help, didn’t give him the job he so desperately wanted. I barely know him but just take a look, a stone cold LOSER & husband from hell!” Trump tweeted in March.

Andrew McCarthy, a former federal prosecutor, wrote in the New York Post that Trump could have simply shut down the investigation and assert executive privilege to “deny the special counsel access to key White House witnesses,” but he didn’t.

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“Most important, the special counsel found that there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, and that the president’s frustration wasn’t over fear of guilt — the typical motivation for obstruction — but that the investigation was undermining his ability to govern the country,” McCarthy wrote.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6013859140001_6013867544001-vs George Conway calls Trump a cancer that needs to be removed in blistering op-ed fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6f7f5825-3a44-514c-90dc-ee3aee187b13   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6013859140001_6013867544001-vs George Conway calls Trump a cancer that needs to be removed in blistering op-ed fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6f7f5825-3a44-514c-90dc-ee3aee187b13

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Ambassador Grenell: Mayor Buttigieg pushing ‘Jussie Smollett’ hate hoax against Pence

Westlake Legal Group ambassador-grenell-mayor-buttigieg-pushing-jussie-smollett-hate-hoax-against-pence Ambassador Grenell: Mayor Buttigieg pushing 'Jussie Smollett' hate hoax against Pence Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3932b306-a4da-55ca-952b-af1cb6f9f24c
Westlake Legal Group Pence-Buttigieg Ambassador Grenell: Mayor Buttigieg pushing 'Jussie Smollett' hate hoax against Pence Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3932b306-a4da-55ca-952b-af1cb6f9f24c

The U.S. ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, defended Vice President Mike Pence against accusations of homophobia alleged by Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg and compared the claims to a “hate hoax along the lines of Jussie Smollett.”

“Mayor Pete has been pushing this hate hoax along the lines of Jussie Smollett for a very long time now, several weeks,” Grenell, who is openly gay, said Thursday on “The Story with Martha MacCallum.”

Smollett, an actor, is accused of faking a hate crime and is currently being sued by the city of Chicago.

ROB SMITH: I’M GAY AND SUPPORT MIKE PENCE — DON’T BELIEVE PETE BUTTIGIEG’S CLAIM THAT PENCE IS ANTI-GAY

Buttigieg, who is openly gay and was once cordial with Pence, has boosted criticism of the vice president calling him anti-gay.

“This is someone who was against ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ who felt it was too pro-gay.  He wanted to make sure even closeted of couldn’t serve,” Buttigieg said Tuesday about Pence on CNN.

Grenell, who called Pence a friend, accused the mayor of South Bend of drumming up accusations to boost fundraising and asked why he didn’t speak up while Pence was the governor of Indiana.

“It’s ironic that right about now when he’s starting his fund-raising apparatus to run for president that he comes up with this… idea and this attack,” Grenell said.

The ambassador defended Pence and his wife and cited their Christianity and said the couple “accepted” Grendell and his partner.

“Mike and Karen are great people, they’re godly people, they’re followers of Christ.  They don’t have hate in their heart for anyone. They know my partner, they have accepted us. You asked me do we agree philosophically on every single issue? No,” Grendell said adding that he disagrees with other people he respects.

BUTTIGIEG, ONCE CORDIAL TO PENCE, NOW CRITICAL AMID CAMPAIGN

Grendell chastised the gay community for shifting from a group about tolerance to a group that demands “we all think alike” before noting that Pence has always supported Buttigieg.

“When Mayor Pete came out, the vice president complimented him and said he holds him in high regard. The vice president or then governor has said nothing but positive things about Mayor Pete. I think this is a total hate hoax and I think it’s outrageous,” Grenell said.

Westlake Legal Group Pence-Buttigieg Ambassador Grenell: Mayor Buttigieg pushing 'Jussie Smollett' hate hoax against Pence Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3932b306-a4da-55ca-952b-af1cb6f9f24c   Westlake Legal Group Pence-Buttigieg Ambassador Grenell: Mayor Buttigieg pushing 'Jussie Smollett' hate hoax against Pence Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3932b306-a4da-55ca-952b-af1cb6f9f24c

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AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine

On April 20, 1999, two teenage boys dressed in black trench coats went on a killing rampage at Columbine High School in suburban Denver. They shot and killed 12 classmates and a teacher and wounded two dozen others before taking their own lives.

Twenty years later, The Associated Press is republishing this story about the attack, the product of reporting from more than a dozen AP journalists who conducted interviews in the hours after it happened. The article first appeared on April 22, 1999.

___

A moment of surprise, then hours of terror

By TED ANTHONY

AP National Writer

LITTLETON, Colo. — Her favorite lunchtime meal was ready — “my only meal,” jokes Sarah DeBoer. So, nachos in hand, she headed toward the commons area of the Columbine High School cafeteria.

It was a sunny Tuesday morning, maybe 60 degrees, only 17 school days before graduation, and a spring mentality was afoot — the kind that says summer is on the horizon.

Outside, two disaffected young men knew something their classmates didn’t. Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris had endgame in mind.

Ms. DeBoer, who knew the pair in passing, had talked to them Friday. True, they liked to bluster about guns and vengeance and Adolf Hitler. But they seemed — for them, at least — fine.

Upstairs in the school library, four dozen students were studying their way through the lunch period.

Down the hall, Dave Sanders, a popular instructor and coach, was teaching a science class. Nearby, Stephanie Williams, 16, a junior, was in the choir room singing.

Then, at about 11:15 a.m., a sound from outside: pop-pop-pop-BANG.

In the cafeteria, they thought it was a lunchtime prank. Whatever it was, it was getting closer.

Sarah DeBoer, a 16-year-old sophomore, hit the floor with her lunch companions. As realization washed over her, she uttered one thing. Whether it was aloud or just to herself, she doesn’t quite remember.

“I think that I’m going to die.”

___

In moments of chaos and hours of confusion, memories can cloud. But, through myriad interviews and briefings, an intelligible if still imprecise portrait emerges of what unfolded behind a suburban school’s pale brown walls.

Just after lunch period begins, two young men in black trench coats open fire in the parking lot. Senior Wade Frank, 18, outside in the parking lot next to a picnic area, hears popping sounds and sees a girl lying against a curb, shot in the leg. As he watches, another youth is shot in the back and falls forward.

Then one gunman throws a bomb into the parking lot and heads inside.

“He was just casually walking. He wasn’t in any hurry,” says Frank.

Sophomore Denny Rowe, 15, is outside having lunch with friends. “These guys opened fire on everything that looked human,” says Rowe. Bullets are bouncing everywhere.

“One boy was running and suddenly his ankle just puffed up in blood,” says sophomore Don Arnold, 16. “A girl was running and her head popped open.”

As the gunmen walk into the school, two students lie dead outside. Still shooting, the two walk to the cafeteria, where food server Karen Nielsen hears someone yell, “Get down!”

Klebold, 17, and Harris, 18, are heavily armed — an assault rifle, sawed-off shotguns, handguns. In the cafeteria, one removes his trench coat to reveal home-made grenades. He tosses a pipe bomb.

Gunshots echo. Students fall. One gets up to run and others follow.

Word spreads: The “Trenchcoat Mafia” has gone nuts. Many of the 900 students in the building duck into closets and bathrooms, under tables and chairs. A couple call 911 with cellular phones. Dozens flee the building and hide in brush around the school.

Senior Nick Foss, 18, and a friend push two teachers, a cook and another woman into a bathroom. “I heard people praying for their husbands and their children,” says Foss. The attackers bang on doors, yelling: “We know you’re in there.”

Casey Brackley, 15, is in the gym when an administrator herds kids into the equipment room.

“I hit my knees and prayed,” Ms. Brackley says. They stay for 15 minutes before the administrator directs them outside.

Neil Gardner, the Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy assigned to the school full-time, hears shots and spots one of the gunmen in a first-floor hallway. He radios for backup and returns fire as bullets ricochet off lockers. Within minutes, seven officers arrive and begin pulling students, including a few shooting victims, from the building.

In the choir room, above the commons, Stephanie Williams and her classmates hear the sounds.

Someone comes to the door and, with a thumb-forefinger gesture, gives them a warning: gun.

Her teacher tells everyone to sit. But in moments, the school’s two-level auditorium next door seems a safer place, so some go; then, after about 10 minutes, they run into the main hall.

“The group I was in headed straight for the door. He was shooting at us,” Stephanie says. “All we knew was to run.”

As they flee, a door behind them explodes in gunfire.

Sarah DeBoer, separated from her friend who had run into the weight room, lies on the cafeteria floor until she hears a car explode outside. Then she runs into the auditorium and lies down between seats.

There she stays for some time. Fellow students — 15, maybe 20 — cry softly. Teachers warn them to be silent. In the distance, they hear sharp reports and dull explosions. Finally, a janitor enters and tells them: Go!

They run, and gunfire follows.

“I turned, and I saw Dylan was the one who turned and shot at me,” Sarah says. “He didn’t know it was me; we were just running out of the auditorium.”

The gunmen head upstairs toward the library.

___

“All jocks stand up! We’re going to kill every one of you,” one gunman yells in the library.

Student Aaron Cohn, a ballplayer, is spared because a girl leaps onto his back while he lies on the floor, covering the baseball slogan on his shirt.

“They were laughing after they shot,” Cohn says. “It was like they were having the time of their life.”

Some students are slain at their desks, one with pencil still in hand. The gunmen play “peek-a-boo” with others, finding them cowering under desks and opening fire. Isaiah Shoels, who is black and has tangled with the gunmen before, is one of those to fall.

Says one assailant: “Oh, my God. Look at this black kid’s brain. Awesome, man!”

Some kids play dead. By the time it is over, 12 aren’t playing.

Klebold and Harris leave behind shattered windows, bloody floors and a quiet unlike any the library has ever heard. Elsewhere upstairs, Sanders, the teacher, has been shot twice in the chest but manages to get students down a hallway away from danger. He stumbles into a science room, bleeding and coughing blood.

Outside, the first SWAT team is on the scene 20 minutes after the first 911 calls, joining the sheriff’s deputies. It finds several explosive devices around the school and treads cautiously.

“We had initial people there right away, but we couldn’t get in,” Jefferson County Sheriff John Stone says. “We were way outgunned.”

About 45 minutes after the shooting begins, at noon, ambulances take the first wounded students — the ones who managed to run outside — to hospitals. Bomb teams, firetrucks, more SWAT units and paramedics arrive.

Nick Foss and other students manage to crawl into a space between the ceiling and acoustic tiles. Foss falls through a tile, crashing onto the floor of the teacher’s lounge. He runs.

Kammi Vest, 18, hides in the choir-room closet with up to 60 other students. Others try to crawl through heating vents to safety.

In the science room, Dave Sanders is dying. Students cover the 47-year-old teacher with their shirts and a blanket and keep him talking. But his pulse slows, and he grows cold.

Shots are heard until almost 12:30. About that time, in the library, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris turn their guns on themselves, though no one will be sure of this for hours.

As 12:30 passes, after no shots echo for several minutes, SWAT teams begin sweeping the building room by room. It is, quite literally, a minefield: Dropped backpacks are everywhere, each a potential bomb. In the coming days, bombs will turn up in various shapes and sizes. They include two 35-pound propane bombs hidden in the school’s kitchen.

At about 2:30, SWAT teams begin freeing those in hiding. In small groups, hands behind their heads, they run from the school to a holding area. They are frisked, questioned, offered medical care and bused to Leawood Elementary School to be reunited with parents.

By now, the world is seeing it all on TV. Escaped students cling to each other. Tears flow freely for some; for others, it will take time. Even the tough guys, the ones with the backward baseball caps and the baggy camo pants, cry.

At 4:30, with the gunmen’s bodies found, authorities declare the school under control. In goes Dr. Chris Colwell, summoned for a medical synopsis. In the sun-dappled, silent library is the worst sight he has ever seen.

“You walk in there with that hope that there might be somebody who’s still alive and still salvageable,” Colwell says. “It didn’t take long to see that wasn’t the case.”

He pronounces them all dead — 10 students and two alienated schoolmates who let their anger consume them.

The bodies will stay there for an entire day, until the known bombs are cleared.

___

By the following afternoon, nearby Clement Park has become a place of mourning. Students and teachers and gawkers, they come to commiserate, to speak of faith and perseverance, to see the spectacle and talk to the press.

Among the pilgrims: Sarah DeBoer, wearing her Columbine football jersey, and Stephanie Williams, accompanied by a friend to comfort her. They stand together, yards from the scene of their lives’ greatest terror, and they try to process the scenes running through their mind.

“Yesterday I was so scared,” Ms. DeBoer says, her voice falling.

“They ruined the school, but I think we should definitely go back,” she says. “If you don’t go back, they’ll win.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-016ce8bd39a842629a82af6e923018f3 AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine LITTLETON, Colo. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 34e35bfd-effe-5bf4-b60e-fad1644cfd7f   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-016ce8bd39a842629a82af6e923018f3 AP Was There: Teen boys unleashed terror, chaos at Columbine LITTLETON, Colo. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 34e35bfd-effe-5bf4-b60e-fad1644cfd7f

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Journalist who covered Columbine wonders about lives unlived

Daniel. Rachel. Isaiah.

“You can’t prove a negative,” our teachers and parents sometimes tell us when we’re young.

Yet when I look back upon my time in Colorado covering the almost-adults who were killed in the Columbine High School attack 20 years ago this week, all I can see are the negatives: the people who aren’t there anymore. I think of their names — names I typed and said and thought of, over and over, for a time.

Corey. Kyle. Kelly.

Nearly half my life later, when I think of Columbine, it isn’t what actually happened that occupies my mind. Instead, my brain goes to what’s no longer there. It goes to the undefined, usually unnoticed holes in the fabric of today — the spaces where people I never met are missing from the world for longer than they were here. To the long, silent aftermaths where lives used to be. To the names that fleetingly became part of my moment-to-moment life and then, as for so many, receded and faded.

Cassie. Steve. Daniel again.

So often now, Americans find themselves confronting days in which shots are fired, children fall and futures are stolen. In moments of gunfire, worlds of possibilities are wiped away. Millions of things that would have happened melt into nothingness.

John. Matt. Lauren. Coach Dave.

Covering Columbine, I witnessed that feeling of unthinkable school-day chaos up close for the first time. Looking back, I realize now: It was, really, a preview for an entire era of tears yet to be shed, of unwelcome gaps yet to be created. Of negatives yet to be proven.

I’ve chronicled tragedy for all of my adult life, from rural Pennsylvania to urban China, from Afghanistan to Iraq. During my first job as a police reporter right after college, after I returned from a particularly harrowing murder scene, one of my mentors said to me: “You’ll get used to it.” That turned out to be wrong.

It was never the details of tragedies that lingered with me. It was the quiet aftermaths, the times when families and friends began to let in that a life had ended, that a future so many loved ones had counted on was no longer potential but had become, purely and simply, fiction.

Would one of them have discovered a cure for cancer? Become an NBA star? Traveled the world and learned from its people? Raised a family, been part of a community, paid a mortgage, shopped for groceries on the weekend, coached a youth sports team?

Made the world better, smarter, kinder?

These days, one of the things I sometimes do at work is called a “gap analysis.” It’s corporate jargon for an exercise in identifying the places in a business where things are lacking, or needed, and it’s the first step toward figuring out how to make them whole.

Twenty years later, I still find myself doing a mental gap analysis of Columbine, though nothing can ever make anything whole. What I always come back to, which makes me dizzy, is contemplating what the world is lacking because these 12 young people and this teacher were abruptly removed from humanity’s equation one April morning as the last millennium’s final days waned. All because of two young men who decided that violence would be their final path forward.

I’d like to say that I understand things a bit better now. I’ve written hundreds of stories since then about all corners of the world. I’ve seen parts of the planet I never thought I’d see. And now I have kids in schools that do emergency drills as a matter of routine. It is the background hum of a world that, to them, has always been this way.

I’d like to say those things have helped me make sense of Columbine when I look at it over my shoulder from two decades on. I’d like to say that, but I’d be lying to you. I’m still trying, though. Not as a journalist, necessarily, but as an American.

In daily journalism, the job is often to cover what has just happened, and it is frequently very loud. But more than you’d think, the quieter stories — the more important stories, even — are the ones that didn’t happen. Those are the more complex ones, too. And in the cacophony, they’re harder and harder to find.

But my profession is, at its heart, a quest not only for fact but for context. And that may be where we can actually help.

What we can do is look back on the traumatic things we’ve covered, revisit them, study them to hone and sharpen what we do. We can understand that even as we show the world the facts and the stories behind them, we also can create unintended consequences by amplifying people and actions that can be held up by ailing minds as accomplishments to be replicated. And we can use this information to do it all better the next time.

Coach Dave. Lauren. Matt. John.

“You can’t prove a negative,” they say. Maybe not. But you can notice one, and keep noticing it.

Daniel. Steve. Cassie.

You can remember, as a journalist, the people from the stories you covered who are no longer here. You can wonder about their lives, and the people they left behind, and the ruthlessness of continuity that allows the world to fill in the gaps they left and move on to other spectacles, other triumphs, other tragedies and losses.

Kelly. Kyle. Corey.

And now and then, on a milestone anniversary that is no cause for celebration, you can sit in a quiet room and say, out loud, the names of people you never knew and hear them echo in a world that no longer contains them.

Isaiah. Rachel. Daniel. Again.

___

Ted Anthony, director of digital innovation for The Associated Press, covered the Columbine High School shootings and their aftermath in 1999. Follow him on Twitter at @anthonyted

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-eedbb47a77e24780ba87e6df9e165f80 Journalist who covered Columbine wonders about lives unlived TED ANTHONY fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0d3b1abc-a85f-54fa-ae7d-13a68b34ba3c   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-eedbb47a77e24780ba87e6df9e165f80 Journalist who covered Columbine wonders about lives unlived TED ANTHONY fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0d3b1abc-a85f-54fa-ae7d-13a68b34ba3c

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Charges to remain against Texas driver who dodged paying over $5G in tolls with ‘license plate flipper’: cops

Westlake Legal Group charges-to-remain-against-texas-driver-who-dodged-paying-over-5g-in-tolls-with-license-plate-flipper-cops Charges to remain against Texas driver who dodged paying over $5G in tolls with ‘license plate flipper’: cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 387e1d62-6a0d-59d5-b8d3-1caad1783ed6

A Houston motorist was not quite free to drive off into the sunset on Thursday after a judge found “no probable cause” for the man’s arrest for allegedly using an illegal “license plate flipper” to avoid paying nearly $5,500 in tolls, authorities said.

The Harris County District Attorney’s Office has yet to dismiss the case against Preston Cody Talbot, 27, who was arrested last week for avoiding a toll on the Sam Houston Expressway and charged with a misdemeanor, Harris County officials said. Earlier reports had incorrectly indicated that the judge had dismissed the case, police said.

MOTORIST DODGED PAYING NEARLY $5,500 IN HOUSTON TOLLS WITH ‘LICENSE PLATE FLIPPER,’ POLICE SAY

“The judge found no (probable cause) but the charge remains in place,” an official with the District Attorney’s Office told KHOU-TV in a statement. “The DA Office must file a dismissal for a case to be dismissed, but we have not done yet so as the case remains under investigation, including points of law and developing evidence.”

Talbot is accused of installing a device in his car that puts a flipper down in front of his license plate so that cameras at toll plazas can’t read his plates. Police said he owes $5,473 in unpaid tolls.

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“The case remains active,” Harris County Constable Mark Herman wrote on Facebook, following reports that the case was dismissed. “The District Attorney’s Office will continue to review this case in order to determine how they will proceed.”

Westlake Legal Group preston-talbot-car-split Charges to remain against Texas driver who dodged paying over $5G in tolls with ‘license plate flipper’: cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 387e1d62-6a0d-59d5-b8d3-1caad1783ed6   Westlake Legal Group preston-talbot-car-split Charges to remain against Texas driver who dodged paying over $5G in tolls with ‘license plate flipper’: cops Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 387e1d62-6a0d-59d5-b8d3-1caad1783ed6

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Paramedics: Dad saved toddler from dingo attack in Australia

Westlake Legal Group paramedics-dad-saved-toddler-from-dingo-attack-in-australia Paramedics: Dad saved toddler from dingo attack in Australia SYDNEY fox-news/world/world-regions/pacific fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 2272e166-50cc-557b-9d01-91eeb5f1f6a9
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Paramedics: Dad saved toddler from dingo attack in Australia SYDNEY fox-news/world/world-regions/pacific fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 2272e166-50cc-557b-9d01-91eeb5f1f6a9

Paramedics say a father saved his 14-month-old son from dingoes that dragged the boy from a campsite on an Australian island.

Paramedic Ben Du Toit says the boy had deep cuts on his head from the attack on Fraser Island in Queensland state.

The family was sleeping when a dingo entered their campervan. Du Toit says the parents awoke to their son’s cries, the sound fading as he was dragged away.

The father ran outside and fought off several dingoes to rescue his son.

Frank Bertoli, a pilot for RACQ Life Flight, told Australian Broadcasting Corporation that the parents’ “quick thinking” probably saved the boy from more severe injuries.

The boy was airlifted to a hospital early Friday.

Bertoli says it’s the third dingo attack on Fraser Island this year.

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California couple who shackled children face life in prison

Westlake Legal Group california-couple-who-shackled-children-face-life-in-prison California couple who shackled children face life in prison fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article

The desperate cry for help came from a girl who had lived in such isolation for 17 years that she didn’t know her address, the month of the year or what the word medication meant.

But after jumping out a window from the filthy home where she lived with her parents and 12 siblings, she knew enough to punch the digits 9-1-1 into a barely workable cellphone and then began describing years of horrific abuse to a police dispatcher.

The brave girl’s call that freed her siblings — some who had been chained to their beds — led to the opposite fate for their parents, David and Louise Turpin, who face 25 years to life in prison when sentenced Friday.

The couple pleaded guilty in Riverside County Superior Court in February to torture and other abuse and neglect so severe it stunted their children’s growth, led to muscle wasting and left two girls unable to bear children.

Before the 17-year-old escaped from the home in a middle-class section of the city of Perris, about 60 miles (96 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles, the Turpins had lived largely out of view.

David Turpin, 57, had been an engineer for Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. Louise Turpin, 50, was listed as a housewife in a 2011 bankruptcy filing.

Their home was neatly kept and neighbors rarely saw the kids outside the home.

When deputies arrived, they were shocked by what they discovered. A 22-year-old son was chained to a bed and two girls had just been set free from their shackles. The house was covered in filth and the stench of human waste was overwhelming.

Deputies testified that the children said they were only allowed to shower once a year. They were mainly kept in their rooms except for meals, which had been reduced from three to one per day, a combination of lunch and dinner. The 17-year-old complained that she could no longer stomach peanut butter sandwiches — they made her gag.

The Turpin offspring weren’t allowed to play like normal children. Other than an occasional family trip to Las Vegas or Disneyland, they rarely left the home. They slept during the day and were active a few hours at night.

Although the couple filed paperwork with the state to homeschool their children, learning was limited. The oldest daughter only completed third grade.

“We don’t really do school. I haven’t finished first grade,” the 17-year-old said, according to Deputy Manuel Campos.

Children said they were beaten, caged and shackled to beds if they didn’t obey their parents.

Investigators found that the toddler had not been abused, but all of the children were hospitalized after they were discovered.

The seven adult children were living together and attending school in February when their parents pleaded guilty. Attorney Jack Osborn, who represents them, declined to comment on them Thursday.

It’s not clear if any children will attend the sentencing, but they will be offered a chance to speak or can offer written statements to be read in court.

Defense attorneys would not say if their clients will address the court.

The couple pleaded guilty to 14 criminal charges. Prosecutors said the deal would likely keep them in prison for the rest of their lives and spare the children from testifying.

“The defendants ruined lives, so I think it’s just and fair that the sentence be equivalent to first-degree murder,” District Attorney Mike Hestrin said at the time of the plea.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-9b50c47c327642a0a4eec556300f8b58 California couple who shackled children face life in prison fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-9b50c47c327642a0a4eec556300f8b58 California couple who shackled children face life in prison fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc ccd80fbf-6659-557f-bf50-3275f578374d BRIAN MELLEY Associated Press article

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Russian news anchor robot sparks ‘propaganda’ controversy: report

Westlake Legal Group russian-news-anchor-robot-sparks-propaganda-controversy-report Russian news anchor robot sparks 'propaganda' controversy: report fox-news/health/orthopedics/technology fox news fnc/tech fnc Brie Stimson article 65202159-c802-5c05-b883-c9f5e3155bca

A Russian news channel has reportedly started using a robot to anchor some of its newscast – but not everyone is impressed.

‘Alex,’ has started reporting stories on Rossiya 24 about agriculture and nuclear technology among other topics. The robot can only move its head and facial features, but when it’s finished it will be able to move its limbs as well, according to BBC News.

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Alex has caused some controversy with some viewers saying it spouts “propaganda” and is a “fake news generator.” Others have mocked its slightly odd-looking appearance.

The channel says Alex is completely Russian made – it reportedly cost more than one million rubles, roughly $15,600 – and most viewers believe it’s a stunt to promote Russian-made technology. Alex’s production began in 2017 and is expected to finish later this year, BBC reported.

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“It is for TV viewers to decide how he performed. Could robots replace journalists?” Rossiya 24 asked on its website.

Westlake Legal Group 106507987_robot123 Russian news anchor robot sparks 'propaganda' controversy: report fox-news/health/orthopedics/technology fox news fnc/tech fnc Brie Stimson article 65202159-c802-5c05-b883-c9f5e3155bca   Westlake Legal Group 106507987_robot123 Russian news anchor robot sparks 'propaganda' controversy: report fox-news/health/orthopedics/technology fox news fnc/tech fnc Brie Stimson article 65202159-c802-5c05-b883-c9f5e3155bca

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Viral video shows 76ers in a moment of alleged post-flatulence

Westlake Legal Group viral-video-shows-76ers-in-a-moment-of-alleged-post-flatulence Viral video shows 76ers in a moment of alleged post-flatulence fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox news fnc/sports fnc article 57a70e60-c47a-5f51-a733-07da1074cbed
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Viral video shows 76ers in a moment of alleged post-flatulence fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox news fnc/sports fnc article 57a70e60-c47a-5f51-a733-07da1074cbed

A video from the sidelines of Thursday’s 76ers-Nets game, showed Philadelphia players comically reacting to what appeared to have been flatulence.

The video showed 76ers’ Joel Embiid sitting next to his teammates as they covered their noses and looked around for the perpetrator.

Twitter users offered their theories as to who may have been the culprit.

“Had to be Amir. Unaffected. Looking around inconspicuously. No cell phone allowed. His rebellion” wrote one. Another user agreed, writing: “Definitely Amir.”

“Or Jared Dudley jumper,” wrote another.

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The 76ers eventually beat the Nets 131-115.

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