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Westlake Legal Group > article (Page 52)

Esper: Reports claiming additional US troops being sent to Middle East are ‘false’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113963556001_6113963703001-vs Esper: Reports claiming additional US troops being sent to Middle East are 'false' Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/secretary-of-defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 57d39c77-aa1c-5930-984b-7e2aabf82aa2

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said Saturday that reports saying as many as 14,000 additional troops would be heading to the Middle East to counter Iran are “false.”

Esper sat down with Fox News’ Bret Baier at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, to discuss threats from the Middle East, China, North Korea and other parts of the world, and the U.S. military’s readiness to tackle such threats.

“Those are false reports,” Esper said of the media’s coverage this week that the U.S. was considering sending up to 14,000 more troops to the Middle East. “I don’t know where they came from.”

“We’ve deployed 14,000 troops since May of this year. But right now, I’m not looking at any major deployments coming up in the region,” Esper said when Baier asked if additional troops would be sent to the Middle East.

“That said, on a day-to-day basis, we monitor what’s happening in the Middle East, on the Korean Peninsula, in the European theater, all over the world. And we make adjustments to our forces up or down based on what the needs of the commander are. And that happens again, routinely. That’s just what we do,” Esper continued.

IRAN DEMANDING FAMILIES PAY FOR BULLETS USED TO KILL PROTESTERS, RIGHTS GROUP SAYS

Esper said that the14,000 troops deployed since May came just before Iranians were seizing or trying to disable ships in the Strait of Hormuz, when Iran allegedly bombed Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities, and when the U.S. had to shoot down an Iranian drone. He said he deployed some additional forces a month or so later, but since that time “we haven’t seen that level of activity.”

However, Esper did concede that the threat from Iran to the U.S. is increasing.

“Given what’s happening in the streets of Iran these days, you see a regime under stress. It’s a good thing that the Iranian people are also seeking the prosperity, the liberty, the freedoms that we enjoy in this country, “ Esper said.

“So, you see a regime increasingly under stress. I think we need to be prepared for any contingency,” he said.

Two defense officials told Fox News this week that the Pentagon is considering a plan to add up to 7,000 additional forces to the Middle East to counter an increasing threat from Iran.

IRANIAN FORCES MAY HAVE KILLED MORE THAN 1,000 IN RECENT PROTESTS, OFFICIAL SAYS 

Recent reports have found that Iranian forces may have killed more than 1,000 protesters. The demonstrations began after the government, amidst economic discontent, raised the price of gasoline by 50 percent.

Baier asked Esper if he saw any evidence of missiles going into Iraq from Iran, which could threaten U.S. troops stationed in Iraq.

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Esper said he would not comment on anything “in terms of intelligence,” but there had been reports about rockets being fired at American forces on bases in Iraq.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113963556001_6113963703001-vs Esper: Reports claiming additional US troops being sent to Middle East are 'false' Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/secretary-of-defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 57d39c77-aa1c-5930-984b-7e2aabf82aa2   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113963556001_6113963703001-vs Esper: Reports claiming additional US troops being sent to Middle East are 'false' Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/secretary-of-defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 57d39c77-aa1c-5930-984b-7e2aabf82aa2

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Cabot Phillips: Opposition to Pledge of Allegiance by ‘social justice warriors’ signals alarming trend

Westlake Legal Group saratoga-honor-guard-flag Cabot Phillips: Opposition to Pledge of Allegiance by ‘social justice warriors’ signals alarming trend fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/education fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Cabot Phillips article 8c280da0-c56e-5cce-825c-ce64bad3b261

Grand Valley State University’s student government became the latest in a growing list of groups to stop reciting the Pledge of Allegiance at meetings because the pledge isn’t “inclusive” enough. Though the vote at the Michigan university in early November was reversed a week later after a national backlash, student senators still maintained that offering an oath of loyalty to a nation that “oppresses” its own people is unacceptable.

While these college students sitting in taxpayer-funded classrooms wallowed in their “oppression,” students at Hong Kong’s Polytechnic University were under siege from the Chinese military for daring to stand up for human rights.

The juxtaposition between real and imagined oppression w`ent unnoticed — or was intentionally ignored — as Grand Valley’s students claimed anyone failing to see mass oppression in America is blinded by privilege.

Ironically, the same students accusing others of being blinded by privilege fail to observe the glaringly obvious privilege they themselves enjoy: American Privilege. That is, the unique privilege of living in a country that actively protects the rights of its people to criticize their government without fear of repercussions.

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE RECITATION REMOVED FROM, THEN RESTORED TO MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY’S STUDENT GOVERNMENT MEETINGS

The growing idea that America is a land of oppression rather than freedom is the symptom of a culture that incentivizes victimhood by bowing down to anyone claiming to be disadvantaged. Having spent the past half-decade following trends on college campuses, I’ve seen first-hand the environment this type of culture has fostered.

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Most college freshmen arrive on campus as 18-year-olds, eager to fit in. They observe the social hierarchy and quickly note that those at the top are the individuals who can lay claim to being the most oppressed.

That victim status offers immunity from foes, praise from peers, and garners special treatment from those in authority, namely school administrators. Oppression is the currency in today’s social economy, and business is booming.

However, the ultimate praise on campus is reserved for those who can claim oppression while simultaneously combating it themselves. The role of “social justice warrior” is now a tantalizing one for a young student looking to fit in.

The only thing missing is often the social injustice itself. Thankfully for these self-identified warriors, the actual presence of oppression and injustice isn’t necessary to receive validation — all that’s needed is the claim that it exists.

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Every superhero needs a villain, and upon hearing each day in class that the United States is a genocidal country with a predominant legacy of racism and bigotry, it’s easy for these young, passionate minds to settle on America itself as their foe of choice.

Soon the idea of being proud of such a country, let alone pledging allegiance to it, becomes unconscionable.

Such melodramatic views would be comical it they didn’t harbor dangerous repercussions for the future of the United States.

While the problems these students claim to face are often fictitious, their proposed solutions are very real, and pose a serious threat to our society as a whole. Freedoms we assume to be unassailable – like freedom of speech, assembly, and religion – are now under attack.

This year alone, we’ve seen students demand their freedoms be taken away, all in the name of inclusivity and social justice. Whether it’s the implementation of restrictive speech codes and bias response teams, or mass protests against student newspapers for daring to reach out for comment from both sides of the political aisle, students increasingly view freedom not as a privilege, but as a burden to carry.

These students are OK sacrificing their rights in exchange for the perceived feeling of emotional safety this offers.

We cannot stand idly by while the next generation carves away at our freedoms in the name of social justice. At the crux of this alarming trend is academia at all levels.

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We need to educate young people on what our flag truly represents – liberty and justice for all – and help them to see the privilege they enjoy living in the United States. Only then can we hope that they channel their passion towards protecting the principles that have made us the freest, most equitable nation in human history.

Members of the next generation won’t preserve our freedom for the future and carry on our aspirational creed if they don’t think it’s anything worth preserving.

Westlake Legal Group saratoga-honor-guard-flag Cabot Phillips: Opposition to Pledge of Allegiance by ‘social justice warriors’ signals alarming trend fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/education fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Cabot Phillips article 8c280da0-c56e-5cce-825c-ce64bad3b261   Westlake Legal Group saratoga-honor-guard-flag Cabot Phillips: Opposition to Pledge of Allegiance by ‘social justice warriors’ signals alarming trend fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/education fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Cabot Phillips article 8c280da0-c56e-5cce-825c-ce64bad3b261

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9 out of 10 drivers think everyone else can’t drive in winter

Nine in 10 Americans don’t trust other drivers to stay safe on the road in the winter, according to new research.

Westlake Legal Group 6d238588-snow 9 out of 10 drivers think everyone else can't drive in winter SWNS Marie Haaland fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fnc/auto fnc article 16275938-9dbb-58da-ac9f-ee1c56876c40

(Joe Mahoney/Getty Images)

A survey of 2,000 Americans who drive regularly found 91 percent don’t have faith in other drivers as the temperature drops and the roads get slick.

That extends to our loved ones, too: Almost a quarter (23 percent) avoid riding with a friend or family member during the winter because they don’t trust their driving.

Commissioned by Discount Tire and conducted by OnePoll, the results found that respondents are fairly confident in their own abilities, as 64 percent believe they’re a safe driver throughout the season.

Still, 59 percent admitted to being less confident in their winter driving abilities than their skills during the rest of the year, and results found driver confidence varies by the weather.

The vast majority — more than 90 percent — are confident driving in the rain, while three-quarters feel safe in sleet or snow (76 percent, each); but only 55 percent are comfortable driving with ice on the roads.

That’s likely why many people avoid driving during the winter. Forty-eight percent have avoided running errands in order to stay off the road, while others have avoided taking a long drive (44 percent) or avoided traveling somewhere due to weather concerns (42 percent).

More than a fifth of respondents (22 percent) have been in an accident as a result of winter weather and slippery roads, which might explain part of the hesitancy to drive.

Westlake Legal Group snow2 9 out of 10 drivers think everyone else can't drive in winter SWNS Marie Haaland fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fnc/auto fnc article 16275938-9dbb-58da-ac9f-ee1c56876c40

(JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images)

“At 45 degrees and below, all-season tires start to lose traction and grip on the road — that’s when we recommend using winter tires,” said Tom Williams, senior vice president of customer experience at Discount Tire. “The tread rubber of an all-season tire stiffens in extreme cold and becomes less able to provide sufficient traction, whereas winter tires have softer rubber and thousands of extra traction edges to maintain contact with the road.

“Winter tires deliver as much as a 25–50 percent increase in traction, which could be the margin you need to stop in time with cold-weather conditions,” he added.

But, at times, it can be difficult to avoid driving during the winter — results found that 65 percent of respondents plan to drive for the holidays, with their longest trip averaging three and a half hours.

In good news for those traveling during the holidays, 92 percent of respondents feel knowledgeable about driving in winter weather — but results showed they might not know as much as they think.

Some drivers are unaware they should avoid stopping on hills when roads are icy (35 percent), while others don’t know cruise control should be avoided on slippery roads (30 percent) or that it’s important to accelerate and decelerate more slowly in the presence of snow or ice (24 percent).

Interestingly enough, 79 percent of drivers surveyed know the temperature outside affects tire pressure. And 54 percent are aware of the correlation — for every 10-degree drop in temperature, tires lose one pound of air pressure.

“Regardless of where you live, drivers need to take extra precautions with their tires during the winter months,” Williams said. “As outside temperatures drop, so does the air pressure of your tires. We recommend checking your tire pressure at least once a month to decrease the dangerous risk of poor handling and excessive wear.”

It’s best to be prepared — and one way to do so is making sure your vehicle is ready for winter weather, something seven in 10 respondents do.

Of those who prep for winter, the most common step they take is checking their vehicle’s tire pressure (85 percent), followed by checking their wiper blades (80 percent) and checking the tread on their tires (79 percent).

An even safer way to prepare is by having your tires checked by a professional before the colder weather starts, something 53 percent of respondents plan to do. And half have used winter tires on their vehicle in the past, which is another step to be prepared for the season.

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Westlake Legal Group 6d238588-snow 9 out of 10 drivers think everyone else can't drive in winter SWNS Marie Haaland fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fnc/auto fnc article 16275938-9dbb-58da-ac9f-ee1c56876c40   Westlake Legal Group 6d238588-snow 9 out of 10 drivers think everyone else can't drive in winter SWNS Marie Haaland fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fnc/auto fnc article 16275938-9dbb-58da-ac9f-ee1c56876c40

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Trump will ‘temporarily hold off’ designating Mexican cartels as terror groups

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump will 'temporarily hold off' designating Mexican cartels as terror groups Vandana Rambaran Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 91c66232-e7eb-50ae-90ee-3d95082263a6

President Trump announced Friday that he will hold off on officially designating Mexican cartels as terrorist organizations while he works with the Mexican president “to deal decisively” with the issue.

“All necessary work has been completed to declare Mexican Cartels terrorist organizations,” Trump tweeted Friday. “Statutorily we are ready to do so. However, at the request of a man who I like and respect, and has worked so well with us, President Andres Manuel @lopezobrador_ we will temporarily hold off this designation and step up our joint efforts to deal decisively with these vicious and ever-growing organizations!”

Mexico’s foreign minister Marcelo Ebrard thanked Trump on Twitter for his decision.

“I appreciate President Donald Trump’s decision to postpone the designation of organizations as terrorists at the request of President López Obrador, who also respects and appreciates him,” Ebrard said.

Obrador praised Trump’s decision at an event Friday in his home state of Tabasco.

“I celebrate that he has taken our opinion into account,” the Mexican president said, according to The New York Times. “There has to be cooperation with respect for our sovereignties, cooperation without interventionism. And I think it was a very good decision that he took today.”

Designating cartels as foreign terrorist organizations (FTOs) could lead to tougher financial penalties and legal ramifications for those involved who are tried in the U.S. Once a group is designated a terrorist organization, known members are prohibited from entering the country and it is illegal for those in the U.S. to intentionally provide support. Financial institutions are barred from doing any type of business with the organization or its members. This could mean that an American selling drugs that originated south of the border could be prosecuted under anti-terrorism laws, and could possibly be given a life sentence.

THE IMPACT OF DESIGNATING MEXICAN CARTELS A ‘FOREIGN TERRORIST ORGANIZATION’ 

Dozens of cartels are known to be operating across Mexico, but it’s unclear which ones will receive the FTO label.

Mexican drug cartels are currently classified as drug trafficking organizations, but their criminal activity spans far beyond illegal drug trade, involving everything from murder, fraud, gun trafficking, bribery, money laundering and counterfeit smuggling, to human trafficking and extortion.

ALLEGED DOMINICAN DRUG KINGPIN LINKED TO DAVID ORTIZ SHOOTING ARRESTED IN COLUMBIA 

Amb. David Johnson, vice president of the International Narcotics Control Board, said the key difference between drug cartels and terror groups such as the Islamic State (ISIS) is a profit motive versus a political motive.

“Terrorists use violence to expand a political goal. These criminals are interested in money, not politics. They don’t want the responsibility and headaches that come with political control since it could interfere with their profit-maximizing goals,” he explained. “The key reason for not labeling them terrorists is because that is not what they are. They are in it for the money. Period.”

Critics said the move could shake up bilateral relations between the U.S. and Mexico and hurt trade.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Clamping down on illegal migrants flowing across the U.S. southern border with Mexico, which Trump claims has contributed to an influx of drugs and violent crime in border states, has been a part of his agenda since the beginning of his administration. Efforts have been ramped up after the brutal killings of six children and three women with dual Mexican and American citizenship in the Mormon community of La Mora on Nov. 4. At the time, Trump called on Mexico to “wage war” on the cartels.

Fox News’ Hollie McKay contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump will 'temporarily hold off' designating Mexican cartels as terror groups Vandana Rambaran Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 91c66232-e7eb-50ae-90ee-3d95082263a6   Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump will 'temporarily hold off' designating Mexican cartels as terror groups Vandana Rambaran Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/immigration/mexico fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 91c66232-e7eb-50ae-90ee-3d95082263a6

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Saudi Arabia ‘will be involved in taking care’ of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says

Westlake Legal Group Joshua-Kaleb-Watson-thumb-US-NAVY Saudi Arabia 'will be involved in taking care' of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 57c1ddfd-958c-5b47-a084-43893750a5c4

The leaders of Saudi Arabia are devastated by the deadly attack at the Pensacola naval base in Florida and intend to “help out” the families of those murdered, President Trump announced Saturday.

“The king will be involved in taking care of families and loved ones,” Trump said after speaking to Saudi Arabia’s King Salman by phone. “He feels very strongly. He’s very, very devastated by what happened and what took place. Likewise the Crown Prince (Mohammed bin Salman).”

The suspected shooter is a Saudi Air Force aviation officer who was training at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola.

SAUDI STUDENT WATCHED MASS SHOOTING VIDEOS DURING DINNER PARTY BEFORE FLORIDA NAVAL BASE ATTACK: REPORT

Trump said the Saudi leaders “are devastated by what took place in Pensacola. I think they are going to help out the families very greatly.”

The announcement of potential assistance comes after Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Saudi Arabia owed a debt to the families.

“Obviously, the government … needs to make things better for these victims. I think they’re going to owe a debt here, given that this was one of their individuals,” DeSantis said at a news conference Friday.

The attack unfolded Friday morning at the waterfront base when the shooter opened fire with a handgun in a training classroom. The attack prompted a massive law enforcement response and put the base on lockdown.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper confirmed to Fox News that three of the victims were Americans. Family members identified one of them as Joshua Watson, a 23-year-old recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy who is credited with taking life-saving actions in his final moments of life after being shot five times by the Saudi national.

HERO NAVAL ACADEMY GRAD SHOT 5 TIMES AT NAVAL AIR STATION RELAYED CRUCIAL INFORMATION BEFORE SUCCUMBING TO INJURIES

Both Esper and Trump have declined to call the attack an act of terror.

“I can’t say it’s terrorism at this time,” Esper told Fox News’ Bret Baier on Saturday, saying that the FBI and investigators must do their work.

The suspected shooter, who was killed by a sheriff’s deputy, was in the United States for military training. The U.S. has a long-standing program to teach foreign nationals how to operate American-made military equipment purchased by their governments.

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Trump said the U.S. would “immediately” conduct a review of the training procedures and pledged to “get to the bottom” of what happened.

He signaled that investigators are trying to determine whether the shooter acted alone or planned the attack with others.

“We are finding out what took place,” Trump said, “whether it’s one person or a number of people.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Joshua-Kaleb-Watson-thumb-US-NAVY Saudi Arabia 'will be involved in taking care' of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 57c1ddfd-958c-5b47-a084-43893750a5c4   Westlake Legal Group Joshua-Kaleb-Watson-thumb-US-NAVY Saudi Arabia 'will be involved in taking care' of Pensacola shooting victims’ families, Trump says Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 57c1ddfd-958c-5b47-a084-43893750a5c4

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Bernie Sanders’ sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a ‘basic human right’

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders Bernie Sanders' sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a 'basic human right'

“The internet in this country costs too damn much,” according to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who released a plan on Friday to spend $150 billion on high-speed universal internet service.

Sanders’ sweeping plan dubs high-speed internet service a “basic human right” that should be handled like the New Deal treated electricity at the beginning of the 20th Century.

“High-speed internet service must be treated as the new electricity — a public utility that everyone deserves as a basic human right,” according to the 2020 candidate’s plan. “And getting online at home, at school, or at work shouldn’t involve long waits, frustrating phone calls, and complex contracts and fees meant to trap and trick consumers.”

Similar to his campaign rhetoric, Sanders’ plan blasts telecom companies for their alleged “greed” and calls for breaking up “internet service provider and cable monopolies.” His plan would also block service providers from providing content.

SANDERS, AOC UNVEIL ‘GREEN NEW DEAL FOR PUBLIC HOUSING’ TO FUND SOLAR PANELS, ‘COMMUNITY GARDENS’

“With no incentive to innovate or invest, these conglomerates charge sky-high internet prices to reap profits from consumers, and they collect government subsidies to provide service to rural households while still leaving millions of Americans unconnected,” his plan reads.

Other major reforms include eliminating data caps and throttling, instructing the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to force companies to provide affordable rates, working with Congress to codify net neutrality, and requiring that internet service providers offer a minimum standard of broadband speed.

Friday’s proposal was just the latest large-scale guarantee that Sanders promised through sweeping government action. Since announcing his candidacy, Sanders has pledged to provide universal health care, jobs, college tuition, housing and cancellation of medical debt.

Critics have pointed out the large price tags for these plans. Conservatives, in particular, compare Sanders’ government intervention to socialist countries.

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Sanders’ plan, however, vows to “dramatically lower costs.”

“The internet was invented in America,” his plan reads. “We should be the world leader in providing fast, affordable service. We must also invest in digital adoption and literacy, ensuring when affordable service is provided, all can fully utilize the benefits.”

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders Bernie Sanders' sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a 'basic human right'   Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders Bernie Sanders' sweeping broadband plan dubs high-speed internet a 'basic human right'

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‘E.T.’ star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police

Henry Thomas, known for his role in “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” tried to fake out the police after he was arrested for DUI in Oregon, according to a report.

The “The Haunting of Hill House” actor allegedly tried to use toilet water instead of a urine sample in the hopes of passing his blood-alcohol test.

According to the Tualatin Police Department report obtained by TMZ, he refused to complete his breathalyzer and field sobriety tests when pulled over in October, so he was taken to the station.

‘E.T.’ STAR HENRY THOMAS UNDER DUI ARREST IN OREGON

The 48-year-old was put in a holding cell and asked for a urine sample. Thomas requested to use the toilet, police say, and then attempted to swap the water for urine when the officer turned his back.

The report described the sample as “not warm, clear and filled to the brim,” and said Thomas denied tampering with the sample.

Westlake Legal Group AP19295646186459 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177

This image provided by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office shows booking photos of actor Henry Thomas. Authorities say Thomas, the actor who starred as a child in “E.T. the Extra Terrestrial,” was arrested for driving under the influence in Oregon. The 48-year-old was booked into the Washington County Jail and faces the misdemeanor charge after police said they found him Monday in a stationary car.  (Washington County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

In late October, the Tualatin Police Department in Oregon confirmed to Fox News that officers received a 911 call about a suspicious vehicle parked in a lane for travel. When police arrived at the scene, they found Thomas passed out behind the wheel of the motionless vehicle.

‘E.T.’ STAR HENRY THOMAS ADDRESSES REBOOT RUMORS, REVEALS LIFE AFTER ICONIC FILM

The officers reportedly had to wake him up. They quickly noticed signs of intoxication and promptly took him to Washington County Jail, where he was charged with a misdemeanor DUI, according to the department’s public information officer, Jennifer Massey.

Westlake Legal Group Getty_HenryThomasElliott 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177

Henry Thomas, who starred in 1982’s “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” attended a special screening of Netflix’s “The Haunting of Hill House” at The Welsh Chapel on October 2, 2018 in London, England. (Getty)

In November, he reportedly accepted a plea deal that will allow him to avoid jail time following his DUI arrest.

Thomas pleaded no contest to driving under the influence and reckless driving after he was arrested in Oregon on Oct. 21. Rather than serve any time, though, the star accepted a rather plea deal with some strings attached.

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TMZ reported at the time that Thomas will enter a diversion program for one year in addition to paying a $500 fine. He’ll also have to attend a one-time victim impact panel, as well as have his vehicle outfitted with an ignition interlock device to prevent further incidents of driving under the influence.

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19295646186459 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177   Westlake Legal Group AP19295646186459 'E.T.' star Henry Thomas tried to fake urine sample after DUI arrest: police Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/arrest fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 732567d7-3054-56e7-b73b-eed57829f177

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Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies

A baby giraffe that became unlikely best friends with a dog after being abandoned in the wild has died, the “heartbroken” South African animal orphanage announced Friday on Facebook.

Jazz collapsed on Thursday at the Rhino Orphanage from hyphema coupled with brain hemorrhaging due to either a genetic defect or an under-developed value system, the orphanage said.

“He couldn’t regulate blood pressure to his brain and therefore bleeding between the ventricles occurred,” the orphanage wrote. “All our efforts were in vain.”

CALIFORNIA WOMAN PUNCHES MOUNTAIN LION IN ATTEMPT TO SAVE HER DOG

Westlake Legal Group AP19340479359803 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a

In this Friday Nov 22, 2019 file photo, Hunter, a young Belgian Malinois, keeps an eye on Jazz, a nine-day-old giraffe at the Rhino orphanage in the Limpopo province of South Africa. Jazz, who was brought in after being abandoned by his mother at birth, died of brain hemorrhaging and hyphema it was announced Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

When he arrived at the orphanage at just 3 days old, Jazz befriended Hunter, a Belgian Malinois, who started looking after the newcomer.

A video posted on Nov. 22 showed Jazz licking the fur of Hunter before the pair are wrapped in their own adorable animal embraces.

“Just when we thought it couldn’t get any cuter, sweeter and more heart-warming, this happened,” the video caption read. “The bond and understanding between Jazz the giraffe and Hunter our […] Belgian Malinois is astonishing.”

As Jazz’s health began to deteriorate, the animal orphanage said Hunter knew something was wrong.

“[Hunter] suddenly stayed by the giraffe’s side again not going outside,” they said on Facebook. “Jazz took his last breath with Hunter and all his human mommies by his side.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19340480358440 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a

Janie Van Heerden fed Jazz, a 9-day-old giraffe at the Rhino orphanage in the Limpopo province of South Africa. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

The pup reportedly sat in front of the empty room for hours before going to its caretakers “for comfort.”

Over the past couple of weeks, the orphanage had continued to give progress udpates on Jazz, who arrived weak and dehydrated after being found in the wild.

A final photo after Jazz’s passing showed Hunter in front of the closed door of the room where they used to play.

MASSIVE ANIMALS IN AUSTRALIA DIED FROM HUMANS AND CLIMATE CHANGE, STUDY SAYS

It received thousands of views and hundreds of comments expressing sadness for the giraffe’s passing and concern for how Hunter would handle the loss of his friend.

In its post, the orphanage paid tribute to Hunter’s loyalty.

“He stayed till the end and said his goodbyes,” it said. “Such a good boy,” adding that Hunter was doing well and would continue training to be a tracking dog.

In its farewell to the giraffe, the orphanage said: “You have taught us so much in the last three weeks and we will remember you fondly.”

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Jazz was buried close to the orphanage, said Arrie van Deventer, the orphanage’s founder.

The Associated Press contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group AP19340479359803 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a   Westlake Legal Group AP19340479359803 Abandoned baby giraffe in South Africa, who pics went viral after befriending dog, dies fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 45206fe1-d8cf-5b46-816b-09e62a531f5a

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Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony

A somber ceremony was held Saturday at the Pearl Harbor Visitors Center to mark the 78th anniversary of the surprise Japanese attack on the Hawaii naval base.

The event was attended by more than 2,000 people, including about a dozen men in their 90s who survived the Dec. 7, 1941, attack that led to the entry of the U.S. into World War II.

“It makes you think of all the servicemen who have passed ahead of me,” said Herb Elfring, 97, of Jackson, Mich. He’s the last of his old regiment who is still alive.

Westlake Legal Group Pearl-Harbor-Ceremony-AP-1 Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6

Marine Cpl. Zachariah Jeavons, 22, of Binghamton, N.Y., meets Pearl Harbor survivor Lou Conter, 98, who was aboard the USS Arizona when the Japanese attacked in 1941, Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019 at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the 78th anniversary of the attack. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

Elfring was in the Army, assigned to the 251st Coast Artillery, part of the California National Guard. The unit’s job was to protect airfields, but they weren’t expecting an attack that morning.

NAVY VET’S ASHES DESTINED FOR SUNKEN PEARL HARBOR BATTLESHIP

Elfring was standing at the edge of his barracks at Camp Malakole a few miles down the coast from Pearl Harbor, reading a bulletin board when Japanese Zero planes flew over.

“I could hear it coming but didn’t pay attention to it until the strafing bullets were hitting the pavement about 15 feet away from me,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group Pearl-Harbor-Ceremony-AP-2 Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6

Herb Elfring, 97, of Jackson, Mich. attends the ceremonies at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019. Elfring survived the attack on Pearl Harbor as a soldier in the California National Guard’s 251st Coast Artillery. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)

The ceremony featured a moment of silence at 7:55 a.m. — the same minute of the beginning of the attack.

The silence was broken by a flyover of U.S. Air Force fighter jets in missing man formation.

PEARL HARBOR SAILORS LAID TO REST ON SAME DAY IN NJ, KANSAS 78 YEARS AFTER 1941 ATTACK

More than 2,300 members of the U.S. military were killed in the attack. Nearly half — or 1,177 — were Marines and sailors serving on the USS Arizona, a battleship moored in the harbor. The vessel sank within 9 minutes of being hit, taking most of its crew down with it.

Westlake Legal Group USS-Arizona-AP Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6

FILE – In this Dec. 7, 1941, file photo, smoke rises from the battleship USS Arizona as it sinks during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (AP Photo, File)

Three USS Arizona survivors are still alive, and Lou Conter, 98, was the only one who attended Saturday’s ceremony.

Conter was sick last year and couldn’t come. He said he likes to attend to remember those who lost their lives.

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“It’s always good to come back and pay respect to them and give them the top honors that they deserve,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Pearl-Harbor-Ceremony-AP-1 Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6   Westlake Legal Group Pearl-Harbor-Ceremony-AP-1 Pearl Harbor attack remembered in somber 78th anniversary ceremony Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 82b0b662-9e6f-5819-bc1e-6b84d2b57ae6

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Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article

President Trump named U.S. Secret Service Deputy Assistant Director Anthony Ornato as his new Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations on Saturday.

“I have worked with Tony for 3 years – he will do a fantastic job!,” the president tweeted. “Thank you to Dan Walsh for his great service, and congratulations to Tony!”

While serving as Special Agent in Charge, Ornato accompanied the president to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in North Korea to meet with the country’s leader Kim Jong Un in June. False reports had circulated that Trump walked into North Korea without Secret Service protection.

RUTH BADER GINSBURG TEMPORARILY BLOCKS RELEASE OF TRUMP’S FINANCIAL RECORDS

The White House said last month that Walsh would leave the office of operations, which plans foreign trips for the Trump administration and allocates resources for White House aides.

The role is one of three White House Deputy Chief of Staff positions and serves just under the White House Chief of Staff. The other two positions are Principal Deputy Chief of Staff, a role filled by Emma Doyle, and Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy Coordination, currently Chris Liddell.

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Walsh was one of the few current White House officials who had served the Trump administration since its inception; he had been a government employee for nearly three decades. Walsh has now accepted a job in the private sector, according to The Washington Post.

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article   Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article

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