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Hong Kong Protesters Are Targeting Starbucks. Apple Could Be Next.

Westlake Legal Group 15hk-boycott-1-facebookJumbo Hong Kong Protesters Are Targeting Starbucks. Apple Could Be Next. Starbucks Corporation Politics and Government McDonald's Corporation Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Cathay Pacific Airways Boycotts Beijing (China) Activision Blizzard Inc

HONG KONG — One company is the world’s largest coffee chain. Another runs a Japanese restaurant empire. A third makes some of the most popular online games on the planet.

The global businesses — Starbucks, Yoshinoya and Activision Blizzard — would seem far removed from the political discontent in Hong Kong. But to some of the pro-democracy protesters there, and a growing number of their global allies, the companies are seen, rightly or wrongly, as sympathizers with the authoritarian Chinese Communist Party in Beijing, and as legitimate targets for boycotts or even vandalism.

Protesters are documenting what they see as the companies’ ties to China, then circulating the information on mobile apps and websites — sometimes based on mere rumor, or on comments made by executives or their family members. Starbucks and Yoshinoya have been repeatedly targeted because of the owner of their Hong Kong franchises, while Activision Blizzard, the maker of World of Warcraft, has been subject to boycotts for attempting to censor a pro-democracy player in Hong Kong.

The monthslong protests and their fraught politics are rippling overseas, ensnaring an ever wider range of corporations and executives, no matter their nationality. All have spent years cultivating their brands, but now find their reputations in jeopardy over any suggestion that they don’t support the protesters.

Some companies are in the awkward position of trying to dodge questions about the issue, to avoid offending either China, with its vast market, or Hong Kong activists, who have fervent support among Westerners and Taiwanese. After a single recent tweet, the N.B.A. found itself caught between both sides.

“All corporations here are walking on eggshells when it comes to what they say, whether it’s about Hong Kong or about the mainland,” said David Webb, a shareholder activist in Hong Kong.

The companies’ vulnerabilities are growing, as activists turn increasingly to vandalism and to boycotts. And Hong Kong’s reputation as a hub of freewheeling capitalism, with one of the world’s most business-friendly environments, is already suffering. These days, workers regularly sweep up glass from shops with broken windows, as shuttered storefronts with graffiti sit in the shadows of gleaming skyscrapers.

Last weekend, protesters called for rallies in shopping malls and a boycott of allegedly pro-China restaurants and stores — with a small, hard-core contingent encouraging the “renovating” (smashing) or “decorating” (spray-painting graffiti) of those locations.

At a Starbucks branch in the Tseung Kwan O district, a few protesters used hammers and a fire extinguisher to smash glass shelves, while others threw plates and trays on the ground. “The heavens will destroy the Communist Party” was spray-painted on a counter.

Some protesters attacked subway stations, including with Molotov cocktails. Many believe the MTR Corporation, the company that operates the subway, has been working with local officials to undermine protests by shutting down some stations, ending service early and, once, closing the entire system.

“The outbreak of vandalism or violence in an operating station will endanger the safety of other passengers and MTR staff,” the company said in explaining the closures.

“When I see people destroying public facilities and stores, I feel pained because you still need money to repair it,” said Michelle Tang, a 40-year-old sales worker. “I want it to be peaceful and free again,” she said of Hong Kong. “Now I wouldn’t dare say anything if people were smashing glass around me.”

As the movement settles into a prolonged campaign, activists are systematically pushing for broader boycotts.

One group developed an app, WhatsGap, that tells residents which restaurants to patronize and which ones to avoid. The ones considered friendly to the protests appear on a map of Hong Kong marked in yellow, while those considered hostile have a black marker. The developers plan to add shops.

“For a lot of people not on the front line, these are things they can do,” said Alison Yung, 36, an events planner, who backs the protests. “They can support the movement this way.”

At universities, students are handing out cards with lists of businesses to boycott and staging sit-ins at establishments on campus. Twice last month, people occupied the cafeteria of S.H. Ho College at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

The cafeteria’s caterer is Maxim’s Group, which is also the franchise owner of Starbucks in Hong Kong. Maxim’s has drawn the ire of activists because the founder’s daughter, Annie Wu Suk-ching, said last month in a speech to the United Nations Human Rights Council that the protesters were “rioters” who did not represent Hong Kong.

Maxim’s released a statement saying that Ms. Wu had no position at the company, and that it hoped “all parties” in the ongoing political conflict “will resolve their differences.”

Starbucks did not answer an email request for comment.

Yoshinoya also got the attention of activists when its Hong Kong executives fired an advertising agency that created a post on the restaurant’s Facebook page mocking the police. Hop Hing Group, which operates Yoshinoya in Hong Kong, did not return a call seeking comment.

The chief executive of Best Mart 360, a local convenience store chain, was accused of having ties to gangs from Fujian Province in mainland China that have clashed with protesters. (Best Mart 360 has denied any such ties.)

McDonald’s presents a dilemma for the movement. The chain is ubiquitous in Hong Kong (and open 24 hours), and some people have shown their support for the protesters by buying them McDonald’s coupons, to keep them going through the long demonstrations. But some activists have pointed out that McDonald’s sold an 80 percent stake in its China and Hong Kong business in 2017 to a private equity group comprised of Citic, a Chinese state-owned conglomerate, and the Carlyle Group, based in New York.

International support for the protests has made the issue harder for companies to navigate.

Last week, the Chinese government punished the N.B.A. after Daryl Morey, general manager of the Houston Rockets, posted a tweet in support of the protests. After the league distanced itself from Mr. Morey, some Americans began showing up at games with “Free Hong Kong” posters and banners, and members of Congress chastised the N.B.A.

Activision Blizzard faced a similar backlash after it suspended an e-sports player in Hong Kong, Chung Ng Wai, for voicing support for the movement during a live broadcast. It forced the player, who goes by the name Blitzchung, to forfeit a reported $10,000 in prize money. Many gamers called for a boycott of the company; dozens of Blizzard employees staged a walkout in protest at the company’s California headquarters; and members of Congress spoke up, too.

Blizzard said last Friday it would restore the prize money to Mr. Chung and reduce his suspension to six months, while asserting that the company’s relationship with China had not played a role in the original decision.

Whether the backlash against global brands will result in financial damage is unclear. Some actions taken by the protesters may not have much effect by themselves.

For example, protesters have been calling for a boycott of Cathay Pacific because the airline, under pressure from Beijing, has fired or punished employees who are part of the movement. But for anyone who wants to fly directly from Hong Kong to a Chinese city, it is impossible in most cases to avoid taking either Cathay or a Chinese state-owned airline. Flights between Hong Kong and mainland China are emptier than usual these days not because of a boycott, but because many Chinese want to avoid the protests.

Some activists have made mistakes in choosing which businesses to target. That was the case with Shanghai Commercial Bank. Activists vandalized at least one branch, apparently thinking the chain was based in mainland China.

But the bank is based in Hong Kong. Its motto is “serving the community.”

Tiffany May contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hong Kong Protesters Are Targeting Starbucks. McDonalds Could Be Next.

Westlake Legal Group 15hk-boycott-1-facebookJumbo Hong Kong Protesters Are Targeting Starbucks. McDonalds Could Be Next. Starbucks Corporation Politics and Government McDonald's Corporation Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Cathay Pacific Airways Boycotts Beijing (China) Activision Blizzard Inc

HONG KONG — One company is the world’s largest coffee chain. Another runs a Japanese restaurant empire. A third makes some of the most popular online games on the planet.

The global businesses — Starbucks, Yoshinoya and Activision Blizzard — would seem far removed from the political discontent in Hong Kong. But to some of the pro-democracy protesters there, and a growing number of their global allies, the companies are seen, rightly or wrongly, as sympathizers with the authoritarian Chinese Communist Party in Beijing, and as legitimate targets for boycotts or even vandalism.

Protesters are documenting what they see as the companies’ ties to China, then circulating the information on mobile apps and websites — sometimes based on mere rumor, or on comments made by executives or their family members. Starbucks and Yoshinoya have been repeatedly targeted because of the owner of their Hong Kong franchises, while Activision Blizzard, the maker of World of Warcraft, has been subject to boycotts for attempting to censor a pro-democracy player in Hong Kong.

The monthslong protests and their fraught politics are rippling overseas, ensnaring an ever wider range of corporations and executives, no matter their nationality. All have spent years cultivating their brands, but now find their reputations in jeopardy over any suggestion that they don’t support the protesters.

Some companies are in the awkward position of trying to dodge questions about the issue, to avoid offending either China, with its vast market, or Hong Kong activists, who have fervent support among Westerners and Taiwanese. After a single recent tweet, the N.B.A. found itself caught between both sides.

“All corporations here are walking on eggshells when it comes to what they say, whether it’s about Hong Kong or about the mainland,” said David Webb, a shareholder activist in Hong Kong.

The companies’ vulnerabilities are growing, as activists turn increasingly to vandalism and to boycotts. And Hong Kong’s reputation as a hub of freewheeling capitalism, with one of the world’s most business-friendly environments, is already suffering. These days, workers regularly sweep up glass from shops with broken windows, as shuttered storefronts with graffiti sit in the shadows of gleaming skyscrapers.

Last weekend, protesters called for rallies in shopping malls and a boycott of allegedly pro-China restaurants and stores — with a small, hard-core contingent encouraging the “renovating” (smashing) or “decorating” (spray-painting graffiti) of those locations.

At a Starbucks branch in the Tseung Kwan O district, a few protesters used hammers and a fire extinguisher to smash glass shelves, while others threw plates and trays on the ground. “The heavens will destroy the Communist Party” was spray-painted on a counter.

Some protesters attacked subway stations, including with Molotov cocktails. Many believe the MTR Corporation, the company that operates the subway, has been working with local officials to undermine protests by shutting down some stations, ending service early and, once, closing the entire system.

“The outbreak of vandalism or violence in an operating station will endanger the safety of other passengers and MTR staff,” the company said in explaining the closures.

“When I see people destroying public facilities and stores, I feel pained because you still need money to repair it,” said Michelle Tang, a 40-year-old sales worker. “I want it to be peaceful and free again,” she said of Hong Kong. “Now I wouldn’t dare say anything if people were smashing glass around me.”

As the movement settles into a prolonged campaign, activists are systematically pushing for broader boycotts.

One group developed an app, WhatsGap, that tells residents which restaurants to patronize and which ones to avoid. The ones considered friendly to the protests appear on a map of Hong Kong marked in yellow, while those considered hostile have a black marker. The developers plan to add shops.

“For a lot of people not on the front line, these are things they can do,” said Alison Yung, 36, an events planner, who backs the protests. “They can support the movement this way.”

At universities, students are handing out cards with lists of businesses to boycott and staging sit-ins at establishments on campus. Twice last month, people occupied the cafeteria of S.H. Ho College at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

The cafeteria’s caterer is Maxim’s Group, which is also the franchise owner of Starbucks in Hong Kong. Maxim’s has drawn the ire of activists because the founder’s daughter, Annie Wu Suk-ching, said last month in a speech to the United Nations Human Rights Council that the protesters were “rioters” who did not represent Hong Kong.

Maxim’s released a statement saying that Ms. Wu had no position at the company, and that it hoped “all parties” in the ongoing political conflict “will resolve their differences.”

Starbucks did not answer an email request for comment.

Yoshinoya also got the attention of activists when its Hong Kong executives fired an advertising agency that created a post on the restaurant’s Facebook page mocking the police. Hop Hing Group, which operates Yoshinoya in Hong Kong, did not return a call seeking comment.

The chief executive of Best Mart 360, a local convenience store chain, was accused having ties to gangs from Fujian Province in mainland China that have clashed with protesters. (Best Mart 360 has denied any such ties.)

McDonald’s presents a dilemma for the movement. The chain is ubiquitous in Hong Kong (and open 24 hours), and some people have shown their support for the protesters by buying them McDonald’s coupons, to keep them going through the long demonstrations. But some activists have pointed out that McDonald’s sold an 80 percent stake in its China and Hong Kong business in 2017 to a private equity group comprised of Citic, a Chinese state-owned conglomerate, and the Carlyle Group, based in New York.

International support for the protests has made the issue harder for companies to navigate.

Last week, the Chinese government punished the N.B.A. after Daryl Morey, general manager of the Houston Rockets, posted a tweet in support of the protests. After the league distanced itself from Mr. Morey, some Americans began showing up at games with “Free Hong Kong” posters and banners, and members of Congress chastised the N.B.A.

Activision Blizzard faced a similar backlash after it suspended an e-sports player in Hong Kong, Chung Ng Wai, for voicing support for the movement during a live broadcast. It forced the player, who goes by the name Blitzchung, to forfeit a reported $10,000 in prize money. Many gamers called for a boycott of the company; dozens of Blizzard employees staged a walkout in protest at the company’s California headquarters; and members of Congress spoke up, too.

Blizzard said last Friday it would restore the prize money to Mr. Chung and reduce his suspension to six months, while asserting that the company’s relationship with China had not played a role in the original decision.

Whether the backlash against global brands will deliver a financial hit remains to be seen. Some actions being contemplated by the protesters are not likely to have much effect.

Whether the backlash against global brands will result in financial damage is unclear. Some actions taken by the protesters may not have much effect by themselves.

For example, protesters have been calling for a boycott of Cathay Pacific because the airline, under pressure from Beijing, has fired or punished employees who are part of the movement. But for anyone who wants to fly directly from Hong Kong to a Chinese city, it is impossible in most cases to avoid taking either Cathay or a Chinese state-owned airline. Flights between Hong Kong and mainland China are emptier than usual these days not because of a boycott, but because many Chinese want to avoid the protests.

Some activists have made mistakes in choosing which businesses to target. That was the case with Shanghai Commercial Bank. Activists vandalized at least one branch, apparently thinking the chain was based in mainland China.

But the bank is based in Hong Kong. Its motto is “serving the community.”

Tiffany May contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Watch: Chick-fil-A Toronto Protest Video Shows Engaged Gay Customers Talking About “Foolishness” of Protests

Westlake Legal Group ChickfilaTorontoprotest Watch: Chick-fil-A Toronto Protest Video Shows Engaged Gay Customers Talking About “Foolishness” of Protests transgender Toronto Social Media Politics North Carolina Media LGBTQ LGBT gay rights Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post democrats culture wars Culture & Faith Culture Chick-Fil-A Canada Boycotts Allow Media Exception

Screen grab from the 9/6/19 Chick-fil-A Toronto protest via News Talk 1010.

On Friday, I wrote about the opening of the first Chick-fil-A restaurant in Toronto, Canada, which was met with long lines of excited customers waiting to get in and unhinged protesters trying to shame them into leaving.

Here’s a brief recap, via Fox News:

The grand opening of Chick-fil-A’s first international location in Toronto was met by a grand protest Friday by LGBTQ activists, who argued that the chicken-centric chain owner’s historically antigay policies will clash with the culture of Canada’s largest city.

Protestors caused a commotion as soon as the restaurant opened its doors at 10:30 a.m., chanting “shame” and “cluck you,” CBC News reports.

“Hey hey, ho ho, Homophobia’s got to go,” activists can be heard shouting in video shared to Twitter by BlogTo.

[…]

Fans of the fried chicken chain, meanwhile, were said to have lined up as early as 6:30 a.m. to await the grand opening, CTV News Toronto reports.

As I noted in my original post, a “die-in” was also staged during the protest, and towards the end of the video clip below you can see unfazed customers stepping over those laying on the ground in order to enter the store:

Rebel News interviewed customers on the day of the protest to get their thoughts, including black customers who contradicted claims by protesters that they were “racist” along with gay customers who talked about the “foolishness” of the protests:

Here’s video of an Asian man in a “Make America Great Again” hat who told Rebel News that he was just there for the food:

Toronto’s NewsTalk 1010 also captured numerous videos from other angles, which show customers unapologetically ignoring marchers and other protesters while entering and exiting the store.

This video shows the doors being opened that morning to customers who had lined up to sample some delicious chicken and waffle fries. Note how the employees inside are standing, applauding, and cheering as those who had waited for hours entered the store:

This video shows the cast of marchers as they walked back and forth in an effort to get the attention of customers waiting in line nearby. Most customers simply ignored them:

The below video shows one customer who did engage with a protester, noting to the angry man that it was silly for them to be protesting chicken sandwiches:

This video shows a couple of customers who exited the store with their purchases. One of them waves a hand in the air triumphantly:

Here’s another video of the die-in from a different angle. Note that the customers are stepping over or around the people laying on the ground while entering the restaurant:

Chick-fil-A is planning to open 15 more locations in the greater Toronto area in the near future, which once again just goes to show that no matter how “woke” protesters think they are, they can’t keep a good fast food chicken sandwich chain down.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Watch: Chick-fil-A Toronto Protest Video Shows Engaged Gay Customers Talking About “Foolishness” of Protests appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group ChickfilaTorontoprotest-300x171 Watch: Chick-fil-A Toronto Protest Video Shows Engaged Gay Customers Talking About “Foolishness” of Protests transgender Toronto Social Media Politics North Carolina Media LGBTQ LGBT gay rights Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post democrats culture wars Culture & Faith Culture Chick-Fil-A Canada Boycotts Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Video: Unhinged ‘Die-In’ Held at Toronto Chick-Fil-A Interrupted by Hungry Customers Stepping Over Protesters

Westlake Legal Group ChickfilaApimage-620x317 Video: Unhinged ‘Die-In’ Held at Toronto Chick-Fil-A Interrupted by Hungry Customers Stepping Over Protesters Toronto Social Media Politics North Carolina Media LGBTQ LGBT It Is Okay To Laugh gay rights Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post democrats culture wars Culture & Faith Culture Chick-Fil-A Canada Boycotts Allow Media Exception

FILE – This Thursday, July 19, 2012 file photo shows a Chick-fil-A fast food restaurant in Atlanta. Earlier this month, Chick-fil-A set off a furor opposing same-sex unions. Other companies are brushing off fears that support for gay marriage could hurt their bottom line. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart, File)

The popular fast food chicken chain Chick-fil-A opened their first Toronto location today to long lines of excited customers and a crowd of unhinged protesters.

Fox News reports:

The grand opening of Chick-fil-A’s first international location in Toronto was met by a grand protest Friday by LGBTQ activists, who argued that the chicken-centric chain owner’s historically antigay policies will clash with the culture of Canada’s largest city.

Protestors caused a commotion as soon as the restaurant opened its doors at 10:30 a.m., chanting “shame” and “cluck you,” CBC News reports.

“Hey hey, ho ho, Homophobia’s got to go,” activists can be heard shouting in video shared to Twitter by BlogTo.

[…]

Fans of the fried chicken chain, meanwhile, were said to have lined up as early as 6:30 a.m. to await the grand opening, CTV News Toronto reports.

Global Toronto’s Mark Carcasole was on the scene to report on the story and posted photos and videos of what took place:

Some of the protesters even staged a ‘die-in’:

But as this short video from “blogTO” shows, customers ignored those laying on the ground and stepped over them to get into the restaurant (watch towards the end):

Heh.

Video from Carcasole also confirmed that the protests did not stop customers from stopping by to enjoy some delicious chicken sandwiches and waffle fries:

It just goes to show you that in Canada, just like here in the United States, cravings for good food and spectacular service will not be denied.

(Hat tip: Twitchy)

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Video: Unhinged ‘Die-In’ Held at Toronto Chick-Fil-A Interrupted by Hungry Customers Stepping Over Protesters appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group ChickfilaApimage-300x153 Video: Unhinged ‘Die-In’ Held at Toronto Chick-Fil-A Interrupted by Hungry Customers Stepping Over Protesters Toronto Social Media Politics North Carolina Media LGBTQ LGBT It Is Okay To Laugh gay rights Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post democrats culture wars Culture & Faith Culture Chick-Fil-A Canada Boycotts Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

“This is insane”: Leftists begin blacklist in Pittsburgh to get Trump-supporters’ businesses “closed down”

Westlake Legal Group kdka-boycott “This is insane”: Leftists begin blacklist in Pittsburgh to get Trump-supporters’ businesses “closed down” The Blog John O'Hurley debra messing Boycotts blacklist

Debra Messing would be proud, eh? The effort to destroy the livelihoods of those who do not accept The Approved Groupthink has expanded outside of Hollywood all the way to Pittsburgh. Either oppose Donald Trump in 2020 or get run out of town on a rail, small business owners!

To quote Steely Dan, ironically — What a glorious time to be free:

Local social media is abuzz over efforts in Pittsburgh to identify and boycott businesses owned by supporters of President Donald Trump.

“I think it’s important because people have a right to know where their money is going,” Pittsburgh blogger Brian Broome told KDKA political editor Jon Delano on Tuesday. …

“If there is a specific ideology that you don’t support, you are well within your rights not to hand that money to someone who supports that ideology,” says Broome. “Trump supporters have boycotted everything from Keurig to Nike, so I don’t know why, quote-unquote, the other side can’t decide not to give their money to businesses as well.”

Except that it’s not just a boycott, even by the terms of the now-suspended Facebook post. The boycotts that Broome cites are a withholding of personal custom, aimed at large corporations. This effort takes aim at small businesses, and it’s not to deprive the businesses of personal patronage. They want to chase these people out of business altogether:

The new website promises to include, “a database of Trump-supporter owned businesses in the Pittsburgh area, as well as tips for how to get those specific businesses closed down.”

That’s not a boycott. It’s a manifesto for street action against political opponents, no matter what the cost. Too bad about all the lost jobs, I suppose, but ya gotta crack a few eggs to make a socially acceptable omelette, people.

The local Republican Party chair has a word for this, or actually a few of them. Fascist, absurd, dangerous — take your pick, although Sam DeMarco probably should have stopped at those:

“They want to cost people their livelihoods just because you don’t agree with them politically?” asks Allegheny County councilman Sam DeMarco, who also chairs the county’s Republican Party.

“It’s not just absurd, but I believe it’s dangerous.” …

“Look at what they’re trying to do. People who they just don’t agree with, they want to take and punish. I absolutely believe this is a fascist behavior, and I totally reject it,” says the GOP chairman.

DeMarco’s parallel to the Nazis’ labeling of Jewish-owned businesses is over the top. That was a government-based effort, made even more clear with the Nuremberg Laws that followed shortly thereafter. However, it’s not anywhere near as benign as Broome would have it, either. This effort wants to destroy the livelihood of Americans over their political differences, rather than just having a debate over politics. That’s dangerous in its own way without tripping over Godwin’s Law to explain why.

Let’s give Hollywood conservative John O’Hurley the last word in explaining this phenomenon. O’Hurley is focused on Messing’s “lunacy” and its aim at purging Hollywood of conservative thought. “It underscores the fact that we aren’t receptive to a diversity of thought, which is the exact opposite of what you feel the liberal way would be,” O’Hurley says, “and I find that obscene.” It’s obscene in Pittsburgh, too.

The post “This is insane”: Leftists begin blacklist in Pittsburgh to get Trump-supporters’ businesses “closed down” appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group kdka-boycott-300x162 “This is insane”: Leftists begin blacklist in Pittsburgh to get Trump-supporters’ businesses “closed down” The Blog John O'Hurley debra messing Boycotts blacklist   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Olive Garden: No, we didn’t donate to Trump’s campaign

Westlake Legal Group 3fc5d2bf-d74b-496d-a0f5-ca9c31b7cd2c Olive Garden: No, we didn’t donate to Trump’s campaign twitter The Blog President Trump Olive Garden federal election commission campaign contributions Boycotts

Don’t worry, America. Your endless breadsticks and salad lunch at Olive Garden is served to you without the extra flavor of politics. The rumor is false and the Trump haters can call off the boycott now.

The hashtag #BoycottOliveGarden took off on Twitter last weekend and no one really knows why that happened. What we do know is that the Italian food restaurant chain quickly scrambled to stop the damage after tweets calling for a boycott began showing up. The rumor that set off the Twitter outrage mob is that Olive Garden’s parent company, Darden Restaurants, contributed to President Trump’s re-election campaign. The company denies it.

The Olive Garden Twitter account team was busy responding over and over again to tweets promoting a boycott.

We don’t know where this information came from, but it is incorrect,” Olive Garden tweeted late Sunday. “Our company does not donate to presidential candidates.”

Perhaps this is the answer to the origin of the boycott campaign:

College Fix reports that the original tweet was posted by a Palo Verde College professor, Dennese Lilley-Edgerton, and her information was inaccurate. The professor is peddling fake news. This is my shocked face. I will not link to her bio page in the college directory, as the article does.

Olive Garden also responded to a question about political donations from the parent company.

Calls for boycotts are nothing new. During this political cycle, in Trump’s America, the outrage mob is easily triggered. It is against federal law for a corporation to donate to a campaign. Employees can contribute as individuals and that is probably where the confusion comes in.

A quick search on OpenSecrets.org, the Center for Responsive Politics database that tracks campaign contributions, shows that neither Darden nor its employees have made donations for the 2020 campaign. But in the 2016 elections, OpenSecrets shows that Darden Restaurants “PACs” contributed $101,000 to candidates. An additional $30,969 came from Darden employees.

At least six contributions went to presidential candidates in 2016, though it’s not clear whether those contributions came from employees or a Darden political action committee. For what it’s worth, the candidate with the most cash from Darden employees and/or PACs was Hillary Clinton with $8,407. Then-candidate Donald Trump received $886.

You’ll note there that it was Hillary Clinton that Darden’s employees favored, not Donald Trump in 2016. Trump only received a paltry $886 compared to Hillary’s $8,407.

Darden dissolved it’s last PAC in 2015 – before the 2016 election and wasn’t active in the 2018 election cycle.

At the same time, Jeffers said that Darden’s lone political action committee was dissolved in 2015, ahead of the last presidential election. That would appear to be true, based on OpenSecrets.org data. There were no Darden PAC contributions during the 2018 midterm elections.

The spokesman said Darden employs 185,000 people. By law, both political campaigns and PACs must provide the name, address, occupation and employer for donors who contribute more than $200.

“It stands to reason that there are employees who have given political donations on both sides of the aisle,” Jeffers said.

There do indeed appear to be donations reported to both sides of the aisle from the company’s associates.

During the 2018 election cycle, donations from those associated with Darden went to both Republicans and Democrats, Open Secrets reports. The top three donation recipients were GOPAC, a Republican group; Republican Senator Rick Scott of Florida; and the Democratic Lieutenant Governors Association.

During the 2016 election cycle, contributions from the company’s associates were also diverse. The top donation recipient was the DNC Services Corp., a Democratic Party entity; followed by GOPAC and the National Republican Congressional Committee.

It shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone that establishments have employees who donate to both sides of the aisle. We are a divided nation of politically interested people free to donate to any candidate they wish to support. In this case, if you want to boycott Olive Garden, you will have to do it for a different reason than the company allegedly supporting the re-election of President Trump.

The post Olive Garden: No, we didn’t donate to Trump’s campaign appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group 3fc5d2bf-d74b-496d-a0f5-ca9c31b7cd2c-300x153 Olive Garden: No, we didn’t donate to Trump’s campaign twitter The Blog President Trump Olive Garden federal election commission campaign contributions Boycotts   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tucker Carlson’s Fox News Show Loses More Advertisers

In keeping with a monthslong trend, the exodus of advertisers from Tucker Carlson’s prime-time Fox News program continued this month.

Over the last year, dozens of advertisers, including Pacific Life, Farmers Insurance and SodaStream, have distanced themselves from Mr. Carlson, the host who caused an uproar with his recent on-air comments on white supremacy days after the mass shooting in El Paso. In the past two weeks, smaller companies, like the meditation app Calm and the online lending start-up SoFi, joined them.

The first wave of desertions came in December, when dozens of companies, including IHOP, Ancestry.com and TD Ameritrade, said they would stop advertising on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” after he said that the arrival of certain immigrants “makes our own country poorer and dirtier and more divided.”

More companies removed their ads from the show in March, when Media Matters for America, a liberal advocacy group, published years-old excerpts from the “Bubba the Love Sponge” shock-jock radio show featuring Mr. Carlson making offensive comments about women.

The Monday episode of “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” the host’s first since he left the airwaves for what Fox News said was a planned vacation two days after making the remarks on white supremacy, had fewer commercials than usual.

There were spots for turmeric drink mixes, ear wash systems and cup-holder mounts for smartphones, as well as ads for Dyson, Raymour & Flanigan and USAA, but none for products from SoFi, Calm or SteinMart. Those companies advertised on the program earlier this summer but said in statements in recent days that their commercials would not appear during Mr. Carlson’s nightly hour.

A Monday night episode from one year ago, the broadcast of “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Aug. 20, 2018, had 16 minutes of ads, with 38 commercials that aired across the nation, according to iSpot.tv, the television ads measurement company. The Monday night episode this week, by contrast, had 13.5 minutes of commercials, with 23 nationally aired spots. Eight of the 23 were promotions for other Fox properties.

Mr. Carlson still attracts a large audience. He drew 3.1 million viewers on Monday night, the second-largest audience in all of cable that night. That number put him close behind his Fox News colleague Sean Hannity, according to Nielsen. But that has not been enough for the show to hang on to many advertisers.

Westlake Legal Group tucker-carlson-ads-300 Tucker Carlson’s Fox News Show Loses More Advertisers Television Political Advertising News and News Media Immigration and Emigration Fox News Channel Carlson, Tucker Cable Television Boycotts

Number of ads that aired on

“Tucker Carlson Tonight”

Weekdays; includes Fox

Network promotions

Westlake Legal Group tucker-carlson-ads-335 Tucker Carlson’s Fox News Show Loses More Advertisers Television Political Advertising News and News Media Immigration and Emigration Fox News Channel Carlson, Tucker Cable Television Boycotts

Number of ads that aired on

“Tucker Carlson Tonight”

Weekdays; includes Fox

Network promotions

Westlake Legal Group tucker-carlson-ads-600 Tucker Carlson’s Fox News Show Loses More Advertisers Television Political Advertising News and News Media Immigration and Emigration Fox News Channel Carlson, Tucker Cable Television Boycotts

Number of ads that aired on

“Tucker Carlson Tonight”

Weekdays; includes Fox

Network promotions

Source: iSpot.tv

By The New York Times

A total of 218 companies had commercials during episodes of “Tucker Carlson Tonight” during last year’s second quarter, a group that included Liberty Mutual, Capital One and Subaru, according to the ad-tracking firm Kantar Media. For the same time period this year, the number of companies whose ads ran during the show was down to 107. The average amount of paid commercial time during episodes of “Tucker Carlson Tonight” has also declined.

Last summer, “Tucker Carlson Tonight” generated nearly 18 percent of Fox News’ advertising revenue, according to iSpot.tv. A year later, the show accounts for 13 percent of advertising revenue.

In recent months, as the host’s statements about women, immigrants and race have prompted calls from activists for advertiser boycotts, the total time allotted to commercials has grown even shorter as the show has pulled in a smaller portion of advertising revenue for Fox News, according to iSpot.tv. But many of the companies that have pulled their ads from “Tucker Carlson Tonight” have stuck with the network, citing long-term contracts and advertising strategies meant to be apolitical.

On his Aug. 6 episode, Mr. Carlson said that white supremacy was “actually not a real problem in America” and likened it to a “hoax” and a “conspiracy theory used to divide the country and keep a hold on power.”

A few days earlier, a white Texas man killed 22 people and wounded dozens more at a Walmart in El Paso. An online screed posted by the suspect, who has confessed to the crime, according to the authorities, echoed language used by Mr. Carlson and other right-wing media personalities who have described the arrival of immigrants at the southern border of the United States as an “invasion.” When Mr. Carlson returned to his show on Monday after more than a week off, he did not address the reaction to his comments.

MyPillow, a pillow manufacturer based in Minnesota, represents nearly a third of advertising spending on “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” according to iSpot.tv, and it has spent more than $28 million advertising on the show in the past year. Over the same period, Sandals Resort has spent over $2 million on ads that appeared on the show.

Fox News expects record levels of ad revenue this year, Jeff Collins, the network’s executive vice president for advertising sales, said in a statement.

Companies tend to buy blocks of television advertising time long before their commercials are broadcast, locking themselves into contracts. Companies that ask to pull their commercials from certain shows, such as “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” are moved to other Fox News programs.

Mike Lindell, MyPillow’s chief executive and a frequent champion of President Trump, said over email that he advertised on most major cable and national news networks. “When it comes to national cable news programs, you just never know what someone is going to say,” he said. “If I pulled my advertising every time a host on any network said something I or others didn’t agree with, there would be no place to advertise.”

Last year, companies including Hulu and Wayfair removed advertisements from Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show after she ridiculed David Hogg, a student survivor of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting. Since then, the percentage of advertising revenue from her show has increased.

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Tlaib Renounces Trip to West Bank Under Israel’s Conditions

JERUSALEM — Israel relented slightly on Friday after barring Representative Rashida Tlaib under pressure from President Trump, and said she could visit her 90-year-old grandmother, who lives in the occupied West Bank.

Israel acted after Ms. Tlaib, an outspoken Palestinian-American in her first term, agreed in writing not to promote boycotts against Israel during the trip. But Ms. Tlaib, facing criticism by Palestinians and other opponents of the Israeli occupation, quickly reversed course herself, saying she could not make the trip under “these oppressive conditions.”

“Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me,” she said of her grandmother in a Twitter post. “It would kill a piece of me.”

The day’s switchbacks and recriminations appeared to lock in the political effects, in Israel and abroad, of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s decision Thursday to bar the planned official visit by Ms. Tlaib, of Michigan, and another Democratic lawmaker, Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, citing their support for the anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement.

Israelis concerned about the health of the relationship with the United States worried aloud on Friday that by barring members of Congress at all, let alone because of their political views, the Netanyahu government had gravely jeopardized Israel’s bipartisan support in Washington.

“The damage has been done to Israel’s standing in the Democratic Party, and in enhancing the stature of B.D.S. — and I don’t know if it’s over,” said Michael Oren, a former deputy minister under Mr. Netanyahu and former ambassador to the United States.

Those rooting for Mr. Netanyahu to capture a fifth term in September’s election lamented that the episode could play into the hands of detractors on the left and center who have long warned that Mr. Trump’s showering of the prime minister with political gifts — an embassy in Jerusalem, an endorsement of Israel’s claim on the Golan Heights — would eventually come at a price.

Mr. Netanyahu has posted billboards portraying him as Mr. Trump’s peer and declaring that he is in a “different league” from other Israeli leaders.

But by having appeared to knuckle under to Mr. Trump’s public pressure, including a tweet saying that allowing the congresswomen into Israel would “show great weakness,” Mr. Netanyahu suddenly looked, in American terms, more like a red-state candidate who might have to swallow an embarrassment or two for the sake of a coveted Trump endorsement.

The Israeli-American relationship already has become a particularly divisive campaign issue in both the 2020 presidential race in the United States and the Sept. 17 election in Israel, where Mr. Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud party is in a neck-and-neck race with its closest rival, the center-left Blue and White alliance.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159315168_ac047d12-e0c4-47b6-a878-b39a2fac4ed7-articleLarge Tlaib Renounces Trip to West Bank Under Israel’s Conditions West Bank visas United States International Relations Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Omar, Ilhan Israel House of Representatives Boycotts Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS)

President Trump had privately lobbied the Israeli prime minister to bar two Democratic lawmakers.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Under Israel’s parliamentary system, any migration of support from Likud to further-right parties could threaten Mr. Netanyahu’s ability to retain the premiership.

But Mr. Netanyahu’s allies to the right generally approved of his decision, saying Israel owed its adversaries nothing, regardless of their prominence or high office. And analysts said Likud voters would look past any bowing and scraping because they believed Mr. Trump’s usefulness to Israel was worth it.

Even Blue and White’s candidate, Benny Gantz, faulted Mr. Netanyahu for “zigzagging” on Ms. Tlaib’s visit, and said it had “caused damage internationally,” but said nothing about the prime minister’s fealty to Mr. Trump, who is overwhelmingly popular in Israel, including with the right-of-center voters Mr. Gantz’s party is trying to peel away from Likud.

About the only interested party appearing to have emerged in better shape was the B.D.S. movement itself, which declared that “attempts by Israel’s far-right regime to humiliate @RashidaTlaib failed.”

To reinforce its critique of Israel, the movement circulated an old news clipping reporting on South Africa’s rejection of a visit by a congressman to that country over his outspoken opposition to apartheid.

Yousef Munayyer, executive director of the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights, said the decision forced upon Ms. Tlaib was “just the smallest microcosm of the daily humiliations that Palestinians face at the hands of Israeli policies every day, when they are forced to choose between their dignity and their basic rights.”

Because of Ms. Tlaib, he said, “Americans have now had the opportunity to witness it through the eyes of a member of Congress.”

Experts on the Israeli-American relationship said the episode underscored how bipartisan consensus support for Israel’s security and for a two-state solution to the Palestinian conflict were under strain now from the right and the left.

“It’s being threatened by people like the president, who care nothing about two states and are prepared to watch Israel annex the West Bank, create a binational state, and to weaponize support for Israel in America’s partisan political wars,” said Daniel Shapiro, who was President Barack Obama’s ambassador to Israel and is now an analyst at a Tel Aviv research group.

“It’s being challenged by those on the left who care nothing for Israel’s legitimacy and are also willing to forgo two states and to weaken the U.S.-Israel bond, as Israel drifts toward a binational state,” Mr. Shapiro added. The effect, he said, would “ leave those who hew to the traditional positions clinging to narrower ground.”

The Israeli Interior Ministry had initially approved a planned official visit by Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar. But after a public objection by President Trump, it blocked them on Thursday, citing their support for the B.D.S. movement.

Pressure from the White House forced Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel to choose between ignoring Mr. Trump or angering Democratic leaders in Congress.CreditPool photo by Oded Balilty

Overnight, Ms. Tlaib appealed to the Israeli interior minister, Aryeh Deri, to be allowed to see her relatives, particularly her grandmother, who lives in Beit Ur al-Fouqa, a small Palestinian village west of Ramallah.

“This could be my last opportunity to see her,” Ms. Tlaib wrote on congressional letterhead. “I will respect any restrictions and will not promote boycotts against Israel during my visit.”

“In light of that,” Mr. Deri’s office said on Friday, the minister decided to allow her into Israel and “expressed hope that she would keep her commitment and that the visit would truly be solely for humanitarian purposes.”

Late Friday, after Ms. Tlaib said she would cancel her trip, Mr. Deri said this showed that her intentions were “provocative” and “aimed at bashing the State of Israel.”

“Apparently her hate for Israel overcomes her love for her grandmother,” Mr. Deri wrote on Twitter.

Ms. Tlaib’s quick initial acceptance of Israel’s conditions for a personal visit raised concerns among some opponents of the Israeli occupation that she had unwittingly set back the cause.

“What is truly upsetting is that @RashidaTlaib fell in this trap and accepted to demean herself and grovel,” Nour Odeh, a political analyst based in Ramallah and a former Palestinian Authority spokeswoman, wrote on Twitter.

Beyond mere appearances, if Ms. Tlaib had held to her promise to refrain from promoting boycotts, it could have been a setback for opponents of an Israeli law that allows the country to deny entry to foreign supporters of the boycott campaign.

When Israel tried last year to use that law to bar an American student, Lara Alqasem, from studying in Jerusalem because she had belonged to a group that supports B.D.S., Israeli officials tried to get her to renounce the campaign and promise not to promote it while in the country.

She refused, despite spending weeks in jail, and instead took the case to the Israeli Supreme Court. Ultimately, Ms. Alqasem was granted a visa that allows the country to eject her if she promotes B.D.S., but she made no promises not to do so, said her lawyer, Leora Bechor.

Ms. Bechor warned that Ms. Tlaib, by having promised in writing not to promote boycotts during her planned visit, had likely given Israel ammunition to demand similar commitments from other Americans who support a boycott of Israel — even those who are married to Israelis or Palestinians and live in the country or on the West Bank.

“She’s creating a situation where families who are not here for a one-week visit, but are living here permanently, are not going to be able to enter unless they renounce all of their activities,” said Ms. Bechor, who said she handles many family reunification cases. “Israel will take advantage of this and say, `If you don’t renounce, you can’t live here anymore.’ ”

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In Tlaib’s Ancestral Village, Grandmother Weathers a Global Political Storm

BEIT UR AL-FAUQA, West Bank — In a small stone house on the edge of a sleepy Palestinian village near Ramallah, an elderly woman ran a string of wooden worry beads through her gnarled fingers on Friday, silently reciting the 99 names of Allah, almost oblivious to the maelstrom of world politics swirling around her and her granddaughter, Representative Rashida Tlaib.

On Thursday, anticipation in the West Bank had turned suddenly to disappointment and anger, when the Israeli government decided it would block Ms. Tlaib and another member of Congress after earlier indicating it would allow their visit. The turnabout, urged by President Trump, caused an intercontinental uproar.

The dizzying twists continued on Friday, when the Israeli government said Ms. Tlaib could visit her 90-year-old grandmother, Muftiya Tlaib, on humanitarian grounds. She later changed her mind, citing Israeli restrictions.

Israel’s interior minister, Aryeh Deri, had announced earlier Friday morning that the congresswoman would be allowed to enter for a family visit, after she wrote to him saying that it might be her last chance to see her grandmother and pledging to “respect any restrictions” and to “not promote boycotts” during her stay.

“I’m happy that Rashida will come,” Muftiya Tlaib said, barely an hour after the interior minister’s announcement. Dressed in a colorful, intricately embroidered traditional Palestinian thobe, she added, “But I hear they won’t let her.”

Her son, Bassam Tlaib, 53, an electrician and the first-term lawmaker’s uncle, explained her confusion: The relatives had not explicitly told the suddenly famous grandmother that Mr. Deri’s announcement had raised their hopes again.

“We don’t want any more unpleasant surprises. Yesterday mother was shocked and upset,” he said.

“Yesterday she was rejected, today they approved her,” he said of his niece. “We wonder why. We lost our trust.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159298890_acb8e217-fee6-4104-9487-550f263e6c1a-articleLarge In Tlaib’s Ancestral Village, Grandmother Weathers a Global Political Storm West Bank Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Palestinians Omar, Ilhan Israel Boycotts

Ms. Tlaib had planned a traditional feast for her granddaughter.CreditAbbas Momani/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

As it turned out, the family’s hesitation proved prescient.

A storm of Palestinian criticism on social media denounced Ms. Tlaib for selling out the cause in exchange for a glimpse of her grandmother, and a few hours after gaining Israeli approval, she announced that she would not come after all.

“Visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in,” she wrote on Twitter.

“Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me,” Ms. Tlaib said of “my sity,” using an Arabic term for grandmother. “It would kill a piece of me.”

On Thursday, President Trump tweeted that it “would show great weakness” for Israel to allow the planned West Bank visit of Ms. Tlaib, of Michigan, and Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, both Democrats. Hours later, the Israeli authorities, who control all access to the occupied territory, denied them entry, citing their vocal support for boycotts against Israel.

Late on Thursday, Ms. Tlaib appealed for an exception on humanitarian grounds, promising, in effect, to make the trip purely personal, not political.

After Mr. Deri consented on Friday morning, Mr. Tlaib and other family members here had misgivings about the visit because of the conditions imposed by Israel, though they said they would welcome the congresswoman under any circumstances.

“Rashida has the natural right to visit all of Palestine,” said Mr. Tlaib, the uncle. “In my personal opinion,” Mr. Tlaib said. “I say it is preferable not to come based on these conditions.”

The family sent her messages, but it was still early morning in the United States, and they did not immediately hear back from her. Then came the news that Ms. Tlaib had decided not to come.

Ms. Tlaib’s grandmother, apparently still unaware of the latest reversals, said she had originally planned to welcome her returning granddaughter by slaughtering a sheep for a traditional Palestinian feast. Asked where the sheep was on Friday, she laughed wryly, gestured out the window and said it was still with the flock.

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In Tlaib’s Ancestral Village, a Grandmother Weathers a Global Political Storm

BEIT UR AL-FAUQA, West Bank — In a small stone house on the edge of a sleepy Palestinian village near Ramallah, an elderly woman ran a string of wooden worry beads through her gnarled fingers on Friday, silently reciting the 99 names of Allah, almost oblivious to the maelstrom of world politics swirling around her and her granddaughter, Representative Rashida Tlaib.

On Thursday, anticipation in the West Bank had turned suddenly to disappointment and anger, when the Israeli government decided it would block Ms. Tlaib and another member of Congress after earlier indicating it would allow their visit. The turnabout, urged by President Trump, caused an intercontinental uproar.

The dizzying twists continued on Friday, when the Israeli government said Ms. Tlaib could visit her 90-year-old grandmother, Muftiya Tlaib, on humanitarian grounds. She later changed her mind, citing Israeli restrictions.

Israel’s interior minister, Aryeh Deri, had announced earlier Friday morning that the congresswoman would be allowed to enter for a family visit, after she wrote to him saying that it might be her last chance to see her grandmother and pledging to “respect any restrictions” and to “not promote boycotts” during her stay.

“I’m happy that Rashida will come,” Muftiya Tlaib said, barely an hour after the interior minister’s announcement. Dressed in a colorful, intricately embroidered traditional Palestinian thobe, she added, “But I hear they won’t let her.”

Her son, Bassam Tlaib, 53, an electrician and the first-term lawmaker’s uncle, explained her confusion: The relatives had not explicitly told the suddenly famous grandmother that Mr. Deri’s announcement had raised their hopes again.

“We don’t want any more unpleasant surprises. Yesterday mother was shocked and upset,” he said.

“Yesterday she was rejected, today they approved her,” he said of his niece. “We wonder why. We lost our trust.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159298890_acb8e217-fee6-4104-9487-550f263e6c1a-articleLarge In Tlaib’s Ancestral Village, a Grandmother Weathers a Global Political Storm West Bank Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Palestinians Omar, Ilhan Israel Boycotts

Ms. Tlaib had planned a traditional feast for her granddaughter.CreditAbbas Momani/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

As it turned out, the family’s hesitation proved prescient.

A storm of Palestinian criticism on social media denounced Ms. Tlaib for selling out the cause in exchange for a glimpse of her grandmother, and a few hours after gaining Israeli approval, she announced that she would not come after all.

“Visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in,” she wrote on Twitter.

“Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me,” Ms. Tlaib said of “my sity,” using an Arabic term for grandmother. “It would kill a piece of me.”

On Thursday, President Trump tweeted that it “would show great weakness” for Israel to allow the planned West Bank visit of Ms. Tlaib, of Michigan, and Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, both Democrats. Hours later, the Israeli authorities, who control all access to the occupied territory, denied them entry, citing their vocal support for boycotts against Israel.

Late on Thursday, Ms. Tlaib appealed for an exception on humanitarian grounds, promising, in effect, to make the trip purely personal, not political.

After Mr. Deri consented on Friday morning, Mr. Tlaib and other family members here had misgivings about the visit because of the conditions imposed by Israel, though they said they would welcome the congresswoman under any circumstances.

“Rashida has the natural right to visit all of Palestine,” said Mr. Tlaib, the uncle. “In my personal opinion,” Mr. Tlaib said. “I say it is preferable not to come based on these conditions.”

The family sent her messages, but it was still early morning in the United States, and they did not immediately hear back from her. Then came the news that Ms. Tlaib had decided not to come.

Ms. Tlaib’s grandmother, apparently still unaware of the latest reversals, said she had originally planned to welcome her returning granddaughter by slaughtering a sheep for a traditional Palestinian feast. Asked where the sheep was on Friday, she laughed wryly, gestured out the window and said it was still with the flock.

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