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Westlake Legal Group > Child Abuse and Neglect

Bill Gates Met With Jeffrey Epstein Many Times, Despite His Past

Westlake Legal Group 00epgates1-facebookJumbo-v3 Bill Gates Met With Jeffrey Epstein Many Times, Despite His Past Summers, Lawrence H Sex Crimes Philanthropy Microsoft Corp JPMorgan Chase&Company Gates, Bill and Melinda, Foundation Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Andrew, Duke of York

Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who committed suicide in prison, managed to lure an astonishing array of rich, powerful and famous men into his orbit.

There were billionaires (Leslie Wexner and Leon Black), politicians (Bill Clinton and Bill Richardson), Nobel laureates (Murray Gell-Mann and Frank Wilczek) and even royals (Prince Andrew).

Few, though, compared in prestige and power to the world’s second-richest person, a brilliant and intensely private luminary: Bill Gates. And unlike many others, Mr. Gates started the relationship after Mr. Epstein was convicted of sex crimes.

Mr. Gates, the Microsoft co-founder, whose $100 billion-plus fortune has endowed the world’s largest charitable organization, has done his best to minimize his connections to Mr. Epstein. “I didn’t have any business relationship or friendship with him,” he told The Wall Street Journal last month.

In fact, beginning in 2011, Mr. Gates met with Mr. Epstein on numerous occasions — including at least three times at Mr. Epstein’s palatial Manhattan townhouse, and at least once staying late into the night, according to interviews with more than a dozen people familiar with the relationship, as well as documents reviewed by The New York Times.

Employees of Mr. Gates’s foundation also paid multiple visits to Mr. Epstein’s mansion. And Mr. Epstein spoke with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and JPMorgan Chase about a proposed multibillion-dollar charitable fund — an arrangement that had the potential to generate enormous fees for Mr. Epstein.

“His lifestyle is very different and kind of intriguing although it would not work for me,” Mr. Gates emailed colleagues in 2011, after his first get-together with Mr. Epstein.

Bridgitt Arnold, a spokeswoman for Mr. Gates, said he “was referring only to the unique décor of the Epstein residence — and Epstein’s habit of spontaneously bringing acquaintances in to meet Mr. Gates.”

“It was in no way meant to convey a sense of interest or approval,” she said.

Over and over, Mr. Epstein managed to cultivate close relationships with some of the world’s most powerful men. He lured them with the whiff of money and the proximity to other powerful, famous or wealthy people — so much so that many looked past his reputation for sexual misconduct. And the more people he drew into his circle, the easier it was for him to attract others.

Mr. Gates and the $51 billion Gates Foundation have championed the well-being of young girls. By the time Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein first met, Mr. Epstein had served jail time for soliciting prostitution from a minor and was required to register as a sex offender.

Ms. Arnold said that “high-profile people” had introduced Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein and that they had met multiple times to discuss philanthropy.

“Bill Gates regrets ever meeting with Epstein and recognizes it was an error in judgment to do so,” Ms. Arnold said. “Gates recognizes that entertaining Epstein’s ideas related to philanthropy gave Epstein an undeserved platform that was at odds with Gates’s personal values and the values of his foundation.”

Two members of Mr. Gates’s inner circle — Boris Nikolic and Melanie Walker — were close to Mr. Epstein and at times functioned as intermediaries between the two men.

Ms. Walker met Mr. Epstein in 1992, six months after graduating from the University of Texas. Mr. Epstein, who was an adviser to Mr. Wexner, the owner of Victoria’s Secret, told Ms. Walker that he could land her an audition for a modeling job there, according to Ms. Walker. She later moved to New York and stayed in a Manhattan apartment building that Mr. Epstein owned. After she graduated from medical school, she said, Mr. Epstein hired her as a science adviser in 1998.

Ms. Walker later met Steven Sinofsky, a senior executive at Microsoft who became president of its Windows division, and moved to Seattle to be with him. In 2006, she joined the Gates Foundation with the title of senior program officer.

At the foundation, Ms. Walker met and befriended Mr. Nikolic, a native of what is now Croatia and a former fellow at Harvard Medical School who was the foundation’s science adviser. Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates frequently traveled and socialized together.

Ms. Walker, who had remained in close touch with Mr. Epstein, introduced him to Mr. Nikolic, and the men became friendly.

Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates first met face to face on the evening of Jan. 31, 2011, at Mr. Epstein’s townhouse on the Upper East Side. They were joined by Dr. Eva Andersson-Dubin, a former Miss Sweden whom Mr. Epstein had once dated, and her 15-year-old daughter. (Dr. Andersson-Dubin’s husband, the hedge fund billionaire Glenn Dubin, was a friend and business associate of Mr. Epstein’s. The Dubins declined to comment.)

The gathering started at 8 and lasted several hours, according to Ms. Arnold, Mr. Gates’s spokeswoman. Mr. Epstein subsequently boasted about the meeting in emails to friends and associates. “Bill’s great,” he wrote in one, reviewed by The Times.

Mr. Gates, in turn, praised Mr. Epstein’s charm and intelligence. Emailing colleagues the next day, he said: “A very attractive Swedish woman and her daughter dropped by and I ended up staying there quite late.”

Mr. Gates soon saw Mr. Epstein again. At a TED conference in Long Beach, Calif., attendees spotted the two men engaged in private conversation.

Later that spring, on May 3, 2011, Mr. Gates again visited Mr. Epstein at his New York mansion, according to emails about the meeting and a photograph reviewed by The Times.

The photo, taken in Mr. Epstein’s marble-clad entrance hall, shows a beaming Mr. Epstein — in blue-and-gold slippers and a fleece decorated with an American flag — flanked by luminaries. On his right: James E. Staley, at the time a senior JPMorgan executive, and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. On his left: Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates, smiling and wearing gray slacks and a navy sweater.

Around that time, the Gates Foundation and JPMorgan were teaming up to create the Global Health Investment Fund. Its goal was to provide “individual and institutional investors the opportunity to finance late-stage global health technologies that have the potential to save millions of lives in low-income countries.”

As the details of the fund were being hammered out, Mr. Staley told his JPMorgan colleagues that Mr. Epstein wanted to be brought into the discussions, according to two people familiar with the talks. Mr. Epstein was an important JPMorgan customer, holding millions of dollars in accounts at the bank and referring a procession of wealthy individuals to become clients of the company.

Mr. Epstein pitched an idea for a separate charitable fund to JPMorgan officials, including Mr. Staley, and to Mr. Gates’s adviser Mr. Nikolic. He envisioned a vast fund, seeded with the Gates Foundation’s money, that would focus on health projects around the world, according to five people involved in or briefed on the talks, including current and former Gates Foundation and JPMorgan employees. In addition to the Gates money, Mr. Epstein planned to round up donations from his wealthy friends and, hopefully, from JPMorgan’s richest clients.

Mr. Epstein thought he could personally benefit. He circulated a four-page proposal that included a suggestion that he be paid 0.3 percent of whatever money he raised, according to one person who saw the proposal. If Mr. Epstein had raised $10 billion, for example, that would have amounted to $30 million in fees.

Ms. Arnold said Mr. Gates and the foundation had been unaware that Mr. Epstein had been seeking any fee. She said Mr. Epstein “did propose to Bill Gates and then foundation officials ideas that he promised would unleash hundreds of billions for global health-related work.”

In late 2011, at Mr. Gates’s instruction, the foundation sent a team to Mr. Epstein’s townhouse to have a preliminary talk about philanthropic fund-raising, according to three people who were there. Mr. Epstein told his guests that if they searched his name on the internet they might conclude he was a bad person but that what he had done — soliciting prostitution from an underage girl — was no worse than “stealing a bagel,” two of the people said.

Some of the Gates Foundation employees said they had been unaware of Mr. Epstein’s criminal record and had been shocked to learn that the foundation was working with a sex offender. They worried that it could seriously damage the foundation’s reputation.

In early 2012, another Gates Foundation team met Mr. Epstein at his mansion. He claimed that he had access to trillions of dollars of his clients’ money that he could put in the proposed charitable fund — a figure so preposterous that it left his visitors doubting Mr. Epstein’s credibility.

Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein kept seeing each other. Ms. Arnold would not say how many times the two had met.

In March 2013, Mr. Gates flew on Mr. Epstein’s Gulfstream plane from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey to Palm Beach, Fla., according to a flight manifest. Ms. Arnold said Mr. Gates — who has his own $40 million jet — hadn’t been aware it was Mr. Epstein’s plane.

Six months later, Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates were in New York for a meeting related to Schrödinger, a pharmaceutical software company in which Mr. Gates had a large investment. On that trip, Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates met for dinner and discussed the Gates Foundation and philanthropy, Ms. Arnold said.

And in October 2014, Mr. Gates donated $2 million to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab. University officials described the gift in internal emails as having been “directed” by Mr. Epstein. Ms. Arnold said, “There was no intention, nor explicit ask, for the funding to be controlled in any manner by Epstein.”

Soon after, the relationship between Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates appears to have cooled. The charitable fund that had been discussed with the Gates Foundation never materialized. Mr. Epstein complained to an acquaintance at the end of 2014 that Mr. Gates had stopped talking to him, according to a person familiar with the discussion.

The relationship, however, wasn’t entirely severed. At least two senior Gates Foundation officials maintained contacts with Mr. Epstein until late 2017, according to former foundation employees.

Ms. Arnold said the foundation was not aware of any such contact. “Over time, Gates and his team realized Epstein’s capabilities and ideas were not legitimate and all contact with Epstein was discontinued,” she said.

Days before Mr. Epstein hanged himself in a Manhattan jail cell on Aug. 10, he amended his will and named Mr. Nikolic as a fallback executor in the event that one of the two primary executors was unable to serve. (Mr. Nikolic has declined in court proceedings to serve as executor.)

Mr. Nikolic, who is now running a venture capital firm with Mr. Gates as one of his investors, said he was “shocked” to be named in Mr. Epstein’s will. He said in a statement to The Times: “I deeply regret ever meeting Mr. Epstein.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bill Gates Met With Jeffrey Epstein Many Times, Despite His Past

Westlake Legal Group 00epgates1-facebookJumbo-v3 Bill Gates Met With Jeffrey Epstein Many Times, Despite His Past Summers, Lawrence H Sex Crimes Philanthropy Microsoft Corp JPMorgan Chase&Company Gates, Bill and Melinda, Foundation Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Andrew, Duke of York

Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who committed suicide in prison, managed to lure an astonishing array of rich, powerful and famous men into his orbit.

There were billionaires (Leslie Wexner and Leon Black), politicians (Bill Clinton and Bill Richardson), Nobel laureates (Murray Gell-Mann and Frank Wilczek) and even royals (Prince Andrew).

Few, though, compared in prestige and power to the world’s second-richest person, a brilliant and intensely private luminary: Bill Gates. And unlike many others, Mr. Gates started the relationship after Mr. Epstein was convicted of sex crimes.

Mr. Gates, the Microsoft co-founder, whose $100 billion-plus fortune has endowed the world’s largest charitable organization, has done his best to minimize his connections to Mr. Epstein. “I didn’t have any business relationship or friendship with him,” he told The Wall Street Journal last month.

In fact, beginning in 2011, Mr. Gates met with Mr. Epstein on numerous occasions — including at least three times at Mr. Epstein’s palatial Manhattan townhouse, and at least once staying late into the night, according to interviews with more than a dozen people familiar with the relationship, as well as documents reviewed by The New York Times.

Employees of Mr. Gates’s foundation also paid multiple visits to Mr. Epstein’s mansion. And Mr. Epstein spoke with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and JPMorgan Chase about a proposed multibillion-dollar charitable fund — an arrangement that had the potential to generate enormous fees for Mr. Epstein.

“His lifestyle is very different and kind of intriguing although it would not work for me,” Mr. Gates emailed colleagues in 2011, after his first get-together with Mr. Epstein.

Bridgitt Arnold, a spokeswoman for Mr. Gates, said he “was referring only to the unique décor of the Epstein residence — and Epstein’s habit of spontaneously bringing acquaintances in to meet Mr. Gates.”

“It was in no way meant to convey a sense of interest or approval,” she said.

Over and over, Mr. Epstein managed to cultivate close relationships with some of the world’s most powerful men. He lured them with the whiff of money and the proximity to other powerful, famous or wealthy people — so much so that many looked past his reputation for sexual misconduct. And the more people he drew into his circle, the easier it was for him to attract others.

Mr. Gates and the $51 billion Gates Foundation have championed the well-being of young girls. By the time Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein first met, Mr. Epstein had served jail time for soliciting prostitution from a minor and was required to register as a sex offender.

Ms. Arnold said that “high-profile people” had introduced Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein and that they had met multiple times to discuss philanthropy.

“Bill Gates regrets ever meeting with Epstein and recognizes it was an error in judgment to do so,” Ms. Arnold said. “Gates recognizes that entertaining Epstein’s ideas related to philanthropy gave Epstein an undeserved platform that was at odds with Gates’s personal values and the values of his foundation.”

Two members of Mr. Gates’s inner circle — Boris Nikolic and Melanie Walker — were close to Mr. Epstein and at times functioned as intermediaries between the two men.

Ms. Walker met Mr. Epstein in 1992, six months after graduating from the University of Texas. Mr. Epstein, who was an adviser to Mr. Wexner, the owner of Victoria’s Secret, told Ms. Walker that he could land her an audition for a modeling job there, according to Ms. Walker. She later moved to New York and stayed in a Manhattan apartment building that Mr. Epstein owned. After she graduated from medical school, she said, Mr. Epstein hired her as a science adviser in 1998.

Ms. Walker later met Steven Sinofsky, a senior executive at Microsoft who became president of its Windows division, and moved to Seattle to be with him. In 2006, she joined the Gates Foundation with the title of senior program officer.

At the foundation, Ms. Walker met and befriended Mr. Nikolic, a native of what is now Croatia and a former fellow at Harvard Medical School who was the foundation’s science adviser. Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates frequently traveled and socialized together.

Ms. Walker, who had remained in close touch with Mr. Epstein, introduced him to Mr. Nikolic, and the men became friendly.

Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates first met face to face on the evening of Jan. 31, 2011, at Mr. Epstein’s townhouse on the Upper East Side. They were joined by Dr. Eva Andersson-Dubin, a former Miss Sweden whom Mr. Epstein had once dated, and her 15-year-old daughter. (Dr. Andersson-Dubin’s husband, the hedge fund billionaire Glenn Dubin, was a friend and business associate of Mr. Epstein’s. The Dubins declined to comment.)

The gathering started at 8 and lasted several hours, according to Ms. Arnold, Mr. Gates’s spokeswoman. Mr. Epstein subsequently boasted about the meeting in emails to friends and associates. “Bill’s great,” he wrote in one, reviewed by The Times.

Mr. Gates, in turn, praised Mr. Epstein’s charm and intelligence. Emailing colleagues the next day, he said: “A very attractive Swedish woman and her daughter dropped by and I ended up staying there quite late.”

Mr. Gates soon saw Mr. Epstein again. At a TED conference in Long Beach, Calif., attendees spotted the two men engaged in private conversation.

Later that spring, on May 3, 2011, Mr. Gates again visited Mr. Epstein at his New York mansion, according to emails about the meeting and a photograph reviewed by The Times.

The photo, taken in Mr. Epstein’s marble-clad entrance hall, shows a beaming Mr. Epstein — in blue-and-gold slippers and a fleece decorated with an American flag — flanked by luminaries. On his right: James E. Staley, at the time a senior JPMorgan executive, and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. On his left: Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates, smiling and wearing gray slacks and a navy sweater.

Around that time, the Gates Foundation and JPMorgan were teaming up to create the Global Health Investment Fund. Its goal was to provide “individual and institutional investors the opportunity to finance late-stage global health technologies that have the potential to save millions of lives in low-income countries.”

As the details of the fund were being hammered out, Mr. Staley told his JPMorgan colleagues that Mr. Epstein wanted to be brought into the discussions, according to two people familiar with the talks. Mr. Epstein was an important JPMorgan customer, holding millions of dollars in accounts at the bank and referring a procession of wealthy individuals to become clients of the company.

Mr. Epstein pitched an idea for a separate charitable fund to JPMorgan officials, including Mr. Staley, and to Mr. Gates’s adviser Mr. Nikolic. He envisioned a vast fund, seeded with the Gates Foundation’s money, that would focus on health projects around the world, according to five people involved in or briefed on the talks, including current and former Gates Foundation and JPMorgan employees. In addition to the Gates money, Mr. Epstein planned to round up donations from his wealthy friends and, hopefully, from JPMorgan’s richest clients.

Mr. Epstein thought he could personally benefit. He circulated a four-page proposal that included a suggestion that he be paid 0.3 percent of whatever money he raised, according to one person who saw the proposal. If Mr. Epstein had raised $10 billion, for example, that would have amounted to $30 million in fees.

Ms. Arnold said Mr. Gates and the foundation had been unaware that Mr. Epstein had been seeking any fee. She said Mr. Epstein “did propose to Bill Gates and then foundation officials ideas that he promised would unleash hundreds of billions for global health-related work.”

In late 2011, at Mr. Gates’s instruction, the foundation sent a team to Mr. Epstein’s townhouse to have a preliminary talk about philanthropic fund-raising, according to three people who were there. Mr. Epstein told his guests that if they searched his name on the internet they might conclude he was a bad person but that what he had done — soliciting prostitution from an underage girl — was no worse than “stealing a bagel,” two of the people said.

Some of the Gates Foundation employees said they had been unaware of Mr. Epstein’s criminal record and had been shocked to learn that the foundation was working with a sex offender. They worried that it could seriously damage the foundation’s reputation.

In early 2012, another Gates Foundation team met Mr. Epstein at his mansion. He claimed that he had access to trillions of dollars of his clients’ money that he could put in the proposed charitable fund — a figure so preposterous that it left his visitors doubting Mr. Epstein’s credibility.

Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein kept seeing each other. Ms. Arnold would not say how many times the two had met.

In March 2013, Mr. Gates flew on Mr. Epstein’s Gulfstream plane from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey to Palm Beach, Fla., according to a flight manifest. Ms. Arnold said Mr. Gates — who has his own $40 million jet — hadn’t been aware it was Mr. Epstein’s plane.

Six months later, Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates were in New York for a meeting related to Schrödinger, a pharmaceutical software company in which Mr. Gates had a large investment. On that trip, Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates met for dinner and discussed the Gates Foundation and philanthropy, Ms. Arnold said.

And in October 2014, Mr. Gates donated $2 million to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab. University officials described the gift in internal emails as having been “directed” by Mr. Epstein. Ms. Arnold said, “There was no intention, nor explicit ask, for the funding to be controlled in any manner by Epstein.”

Soon after, the relationship between Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates appears to have cooled. The charitable fund that had been discussed with the Gates Foundation never materialized. Mr. Epstein complained to an acquaintance at the end of 2014 that Mr. Gates had stopped talking to him, according to a person familiar with the discussion.

The relationship, however, wasn’t entirely severed. At least two senior Gates Foundation officials maintained contacts with Mr. Epstein until late 2017, according to former foundation employees.

Ms. Arnold said the foundation was not aware of any such contact. “Over time, Gates and his team realized Epstein’s capabilities and ideas were not legitimate and all contact with Epstein was discontinued,” she said.

Days before Mr. Epstein hanged himself in a Manhattan jail cell on Aug. 10, he amended his will and named Mr. Nikolic as a fallback executor in the event that one of the two primary executors was unable to serve. (Mr. Nikolic has declined in court proceedings to serve as executor.)

Mr. Nikolic, who is now running a venture capital firm with Mr. Gates as one of his investors, said he was “shocked” to be named in Mr. Epstein’s will. He said in a statement to The Times: “I deeply regret ever meeting Mr. Epstein.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A Relationship With Jeffrey Epstein That Bill Gates Now ‘Regrets’

Westlake Legal Group 00epgates1-facebookJumbo A Relationship With Jeffrey Epstein That Bill Gates Now ‘Regrets’ Summers, Lawrence H Sex Crimes Philanthropy Microsoft Corp JPMorgan Chase&Company Gates, Bill and Melinda, Foundation Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Andrew, Duke of York

Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who committed suicide in prison, managed to lure an astonishing array of rich, powerful and famous men into his orbit.

There were billionaires (Leslie Wexner and Leon Black), politicians (Bill Clinton and Bill Richardson), Nobel laureates (Murray Gell-Mann and Frank Wilczek) and even royals (Prince Andrew).

Few, though, compared in prestige and power to the world’s second-richest person, a brilliant and intensely private luminary: Bill Gates. And unlike many others, Mr. Gates started the relationship after Mr. Epstein was convicted of sex crimes.

Mr. Gates, the Microsoft co-founder, whose $100 billion-plus fortune has endowed the world’s largest charitable organization, has done his best to minimize his connections to Mr. Epstein. “I didn’t have any business relationship or friendship with him,” he told The Wall Street Journal last month.

In fact, beginning in 2011, Mr. Gates met with Mr. Epstein on numerous occasions — including at least three times at Mr. Epstein’s palatial Manhattan townhouse, and at least once staying late into the night, according to interviews with more than a dozen people familiar with the relationship, as well as documents reviewed by The New York Times.

Employees of Mr. Gates’s foundation also paid multiple visits to Mr. Epstein’s mansion. And Mr. Epstein spoke with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and JPMorgan Chase about a proposed multibillion-dollar charitable fund — an arrangement that had the potential to generate enormous fees for Mr. Epstein.

“His lifestyle is very different and kind of intriguing although it would not work for me,” Mr. Gates emailed colleagues in 2011, after his first get-together with Mr. Epstein.

Bridgitt Arnold, a spokeswoman for Mr. Gates, said he “was referring only to the unique décor of the Epstein residence — and Epstein’s habit of spontaneously bringing acquaintances in to meet Mr. Gates.”

“It was in no way meant to convey a sense of interest or approval,” she said.

Over and over, Mr. Epstein managed to cultivate close relationships with some of the world’s most powerful men. He lured them with the whiff of money and the proximity to other powerful, famous or wealthy people — so much so that many looked past his reputation for sexual misconduct. And the more people he drew into his circle, the easier it was for him to attract others.

Mr. Gates and the $51 billion Gates Foundation have championed the well-being of young girls. By the time Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein first met, Mr. Epstein had served jail time for soliciting prostitution from a minor and was required to register as a sex offender.

Ms. Arnold said that “high-profile people” had introduced Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein and that they had met multiple times to discuss philanthropy.

“Bill Gates regrets ever meeting with Epstein and recognizes it was an error in judgment to do so,” Ms. Arnold said. “Gates recognizes that entertaining Epstein’s ideas related to philanthropy gave Epstein an undeserved platform that was at odds with Gates’s personal values and the values of his foundation.”

Two members of Mr. Gates’s inner circle — Boris Nikolic and Melanie Walker — were close to Mr. Epstein and at times functioned as intermediaries between the two men.

Ms. Walker met Mr. Epstein in 1992, six months after graduating from the University of Texas. Mr. Epstein, who was an adviser to Mr. Wexner, the owner of Victoria’s Secret, told Ms. Walker that he could land her an audition for a modeling job there, according to Ms. Walker. She later moved to New York and stayed in a Manhattan apartment building that Mr. Epstein owned. After she graduated from medical school, she said, Mr. Epstein hired her as a science adviser in 1998.

Ms. Walker later met Steven Sinofsky, a senior executive at Microsoft who became president of its Windows division, and moved to Seattle to be with him. In 2006, she joined the Gates Foundation with the title of senior program officer.

At the foundation, Ms. Walker met and befriended Mr. Nikolic, a native of what is now Croatia and a former fellow at Harvard Medical School who was the foundation’s science adviser. Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates frequently traveled and socialized together.

Ms. Walker, who had remained in close touch with Mr. Epstein, introduced him to Mr. Nikolic, and the men became friendly.

Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates first met face to face on the evening of Jan. 31, 2011, at Mr. Epstein’s townhouse on the Upper East Side. They were joined by Dr. Eva Andersson-Dubin, a former Miss Sweden whom Mr. Epstein had once dated, and her 15-year-old daughter. (Dr. Andersson-Dubin’s husband, the hedge fund billionaire Glenn Dubin, was a friend and business associate of Mr. Epstein’s. The Dubins declined to comment.)

The gathering started at 8 and lasted several hours, according to Ms. Arnold, Mr. Gates’s spokeswoman. Mr. Epstein subsequently boasted about the meeting in emails to friends and associates. “Bill’s great,” he wrote in one, reviewed by The Times.

Mr. Gates, in turn, praised Mr. Epstein’s charm and intelligence. Emailing colleagues the next day, he said: “A very attractive Swedish woman and her daughter dropped by and I ended up staying there quite late.”

Mr. Gates soon saw Mr. Epstein again. At a TED conference in Long Beach, Calif., attendees spotted the two men engaged in private conversation.

Later that spring, on May 3, 2011, Mr. Gates again visited Mr. Epstein at his New York mansion, according to emails about the meeting and a photograph reviewed by The Times.

The photo, taken in Mr. Epstein’s marble-clad entrance hall, shows a beaming Mr. Epstein — in blue-and-gold slippers and a fleece decorated with an American flag — flanked by luminaries. On his right: James E. Staley, at the time a senior JPMorgan executive, and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. On his left: Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates, smiling and wearing gray slacks and a navy sweater.

Around that time, the Gates Foundation and JPMorgan were teaming up to create the Global Health Investment Fund. Its goal was to provide “individual and institutional investors the opportunity to finance late-stage global health technologies that have the potential to save millions of lives in low-income countries.”

As the details of the fund were being hammered out, Mr. Staley told his JPMorgan colleagues that Mr. Epstein wanted to be brought into the discussions, according to two people familiar with the talks. Mr. Epstein was an important JPMorgan customer, holding millions of dollars in accounts at the bank and referring a procession of wealthy individuals to become clients of the company.

Mr. Epstein pitched an idea for a separate charitable fund to JPMorgan officials, including Mr. Staley, and to Mr. Gates’s adviser Mr. Nikolic. He envisioned a vast fund, seeded with the Gates Foundation’s money, that would focus on health projects around the world, according to five people involved in or briefed on the talks, including current and former Gates Foundation and JPMorgan employees. In addition to the Gates money, Mr. Epstein planned to round up donations from his wealthy friends and, hopefully, from JPMorgan’s richest clients.

Mr. Epstein thought he could personally benefit. He circulated a four-page proposal that included a suggestion that he be paid 0.3 percent of whatever money he raised, according to one person who saw the proposal. If Mr. Epstein had raised $10 billion, for example, that would have amounted to $30 million in fees.

Ms. Arnold said Mr. Gates and the foundation had been unaware that Mr. Epstein had been seeking any fee. She said Mr. Epstein “did propose to Bill Gates and then foundation officials ideas that he promised would unleash hundreds of billions for global health-related work.”

In late 2011, at Mr. Gates’s instruction, the foundation sent a team to Mr. Epstein’s townhouse to have a preliminary talk about philanthropic fund-raising, according to three people who were there. Mr. Epstein told his guests that if they searched his name on the internet they might conclude he was a bad person but that what he had done — soliciting prostitution from an underage girl — was no worse than “stealing a bagel,” two of the people said.

Some of the Gates Foundation employees said they had been unaware of Mr. Epstein’s criminal record and had been shocked to learn that the foundation was working with a sex offender. They worried that it could seriously damage the foundation’s reputation.

In early 2012, another Gates Foundation team met Mr. Epstein at his mansion. He claimed that he had access to trillions of dollars of his clients’ money that he could put in the proposed charitable fund — a figure so preposterous that it left his visitors doubting Mr. Epstein’s credibility.

Mr. Gates and Mr. Epstein kept seeing each other. Ms. Arnold would not say how many times the two had met.

In March 2013, Mr. Gates flew on Mr. Epstein’s Gulfstream plane from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey to Palm Beach, Fla., according to a flight manifest. Ms. Arnold said Mr. Gates — who has his own $40 million jet — hadn’t been aware it was Mr. Epstein’s plane.

Six months later, Mr. Nikolic and Mr. Gates were in New York for a meeting related to Schrödinger, a pharmaceutical software company in which Mr. Gates had a large investment. On that trip, Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates met for dinner and discussed the Gates Foundation and philanthropy, Ms. Arnold said.

And in October 2014, Mr. Gates donated $2 million to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab. University officials described the gift in internal emails as having been “directed” by Mr. Epstein. Ms. Arnold said, “There was no intention, nor explicit ask, for the funding to be controlled in any manner by Epstein.”

Soon after, the relationship between Mr. Epstein and Mr. Gates appears to have cooled. The charitable fund that had been discussed with the Gates Foundation never materialized. Mr. Epstein complained to an acquaintance at the end of 2014 that Mr. Gates had stopped talking to him, according to a person familiar with the discussion.

The relationship, however, wasn’t entirely severed. At least two senior Gates Foundation officials maintained contacts with Mr. Epstein until late 2017, according to former foundation employees.

Ms. Arnold said the foundation was not aware of any such contact. “Over time, Gates and his team realized Epstein’s capabilities and ideas were not legitimate and all contact with Epstein was discontinued,” she said.

Days before Mr. Epstein hanged himself in a Manhattan jail cell on Aug. 10, he amended his will and named Mr. Nikolic as a fallback executor in the event that one of the two primary executors was unable to serve. (Mr. Nikolic has declined in court proceedings to serve as executor.)

Mr. Nikolic, who is now running a venture capital firm with Mr. Gates as one of his investors, said he was “shocked” to be named in Mr. Epstein’s will. He said in a statement to The Times: “I deeply regret ever meeting Mr. Epstein.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

An Explosion in Online Child Sex Abuse: What You Need to Know

Westlake Legal Group 29child-takeaways-oak-facebookJumbo An Explosion in Online Child Sex Abuse: What You Need to Know Tumblr Snap Inc Facebook Inc Cyberharassment Computers and the Internet Child Abuse and Neglect

Tech companies are reporting a boom in online photos and videos of children being sexually abused — a record 45 million illegal images were flagged last year alone — exposing a system at a breaking point and unable to keep up with the perpetrators, an investigation by The New York Times found.

The spiraling activity can be attributed in part to a neglectful federal government, overwhelmed law enforcement agencies and struggling tech companies. And while global in scope, the problem is firmly rooted in the United States because of the role Silicon Valley plays in both the spread and detection of the material. Here are six key takeaways.

While the problem predates the internet, smartphone cameras, social media and cloud storage have made it much worse.

Before the digital age, offenders had to rely on having photographs developed and sending them through the postal system, but new technologies have lowered the barriers to creating, sharing and amassing the material, pushing it to unprecedented levels.

After years of uneven monitoring, major tech companies have stepped up surveillance of their platforms and have found them to be riddled with the content.

Read The Times’s investigation into the crisis.
The Internet Is Overrun With Images of Child Sexual Abuse. What Went Wrong?

Sept. 28, 2019

Criminals are increasingly “going dark” to hide their tracks. They are using virtual private networks to mask their locations; deploying encryption techniques to obscure their messages and make their hard drives impenetrable; and posting on the so-called dark web, the vast underbelly of the internet, which is inaccessible to conventional browsers.

As the technologies lower people’s inhibitions, online groups are sharing images of younger children and more extreme forms of abuse.

“Historically, you would never have gone to a black market shop and asked, ‘I want real hard-core with 3-year-olds,’” said Yolanda Lippert, a prosecutor in Illinois who leads a team investigating online child abuse. “But now you can sit seemingly secure on your device searching for this stuff, trading for it.”

Congress passed a landmark law in 2008 that foresaw many of today’s problems, but The Times found that the federal government had not fulfilled major aspects of the legislation. Annual funding for state and regional investigations was authorized at $60 million, but only about half of that is regularly approved.

Senator Richard Blumenthal, a sponsor of the law’s reauthorization, said there was “no adequate or logical explanation and no excuse” for why more money was not allocated. Even $60 million a year, he said, would now be “vastly inadequate.”

Another cornerstone of the law, biennial strategy reports by the Justice Department, was mostly ignored. And although a senior executive-level official was to oversee the federal response at the Justice Department, that has not happened.

The Justice Department’s coordinator for child exploitation prevention, Stacie B. Harris, said she could not explain the poor record. A spokeswoman for the department, citing limited resources, said the reports would now be written every four years beginning in 2020.

With so many reports of the images coming their way, police departments across the country are besieged. Some have managed their workload by focusing efforts on imagery depicting the youngest, most vulnerable victims.

“We go home and think, ‘Good grief, the fact that we have to prioritize by age is just really disturbing,’” said Detective Paula Meares, who has investigated child sex crimes for more than 10 years at the Los Angeles Police Department.

About one of every 10 agents in Homeland Security’s investigative section is assigned to child sexual exploitation cases, officials said, a clear indication of how big the problem is.

“We could double our numbers and still be getting crushed,” said Jonathan Hendrix, a Homeland Security agent who investigates cases in Nashville.

Science sheds light on the problem.
Preying on Children: The Emerging Psychology of Pedophiles

Sept. 29, 2019

Police records and emails, as well as interviews with nearly three dozen law enforcement officials, show that some tech companies can take weeks or months to respond to questions from the authorities, if they respond at all. Some do not retain essential information about what they find.

Law enforcement records shared with The Times show that Tumblr was one of the least cooperative companies. In one case, Tumblr alerted a person who had uploaded explicit images that the account had been referred to the authorities, a practice that a former employee told The Times was common for years. The tip allowed the man to destroy evidence, the police said.

A spokeswoman for Verizon said that Tumblr prioritized time-sensitive cases, which delayed other responses. Since Verizon acquired the company in 2017, the spokeswoman said, its practice was not to alert users of police requests for data. Verizon recently sold Tumblr to the web development company Automattic.

Facebook Messenger was responsible for nearly two-thirds of reports in 2018. And earlier this year, the company announced that it planned to begin encrypting messages, which would make them even harder to police.

Facebook has long known about abuse images on its platforms, including a video of a man sexually assaulting a 6-year-old that went viral last year on Messenger. When Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, announced the move to encryption, he acknowledged the risk it presented for “truly terrible things like child exploitation.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

An Explosion in Online Child Sex Abuse: What You Need to Know

Westlake Legal Group 29child-takeaways-oak-facebookJumbo An Explosion in Online Child Sex Abuse: What You Need to Know Tumblr Snap Inc Facebook Inc Cyberharassment Computers and the Internet Child Abuse and Neglect

Tech companies are reporting a boom in online photos and videos of children being sexually abused — a record 45 million illegal images were flagged last year alone — exposing a system at a breaking point and unable to keep up with the perpetrators, an investigation by The New York Times found.

The spiraling activity can be attributed in part to a neglectful federal government, overwhelmed law enforcement agencies and struggling tech companies. And while global in scope, the problem is firmly rooted in the United States because of the role Silicon Valley plays in both the spread and detection of the material. Here are six key takeaways.

While the problem predates the internet, smartphone cameras, social media and cloud storage have made it much worse.

Before the digital age, offenders had to rely on having photographs developed and sending them through the postal system, but new technologies have lowered the barriers to creating, sharing and amassing the material, pushing it to unprecedented levels.

After years of uneven monitoring, major tech companies have stepped up surveillance of their platforms and have found them to be riddled with the content.

Read The Times’s investigation into the crisis.
The Internet Is Overrun With Images of Child Sexual Abuse. What Went Wrong?

Sept. 28, 2019

Criminals are increasingly “going dark” to hide their tracks. They are using virtual private networks to mask their locations; deploying encryption techniques to obscure their messages and make their hard drives impenetrable; and posting on the so-called dark web, the vast underbelly of the internet, which is inaccessible to conventional browsers.

As the technologies lower people’s inhibitions, online groups are sharing images of younger children and more extreme forms of abuse.

“Historically, you would never have gone to a black market shop and asked, ‘I want real hard-core with 3-year-olds,’” said Yolanda Lippert, a prosecutor in Illinois who leads a team investigating online child abuse. “But now you can sit seemingly secure on your device searching for this stuff, trading for it.”

Congress passed a landmark law in 2008 that foresaw many of today’s problems, but The Times found that the federal government had not fulfilled major aspects of the legislation. Annual funding for state and regional investigations was authorized at $60 million, but only about half of that is regularly approved.

Senator Richard Blumenthal, a sponsor of the law’s reauthorization, said there was “no adequate or logical explanation and no excuse” for why more money was not allocated. Even $60 million a year, he said, would now be “vastly inadequate.”

Another cornerstone of the law, biennial strategy reports by the Justice Department, was mostly ignored. And although a senior executive-level official was to oversee the federal response at the Justice Department, that has not happened.

The Justice Department’s coordinator for child exploitation prevention, Stacie B. Harris, said she could not explain the poor record. A spokeswoman for the department, citing limited resources, said the reports would now be written every four years beginning in 2020.

With so many reports of the images coming their way, police departments across the country are besieged. Some have managed their workload by focusing efforts on imagery depicting the youngest, most vulnerable victims.

“We go home and think, ‘Good grief, the fact that we have to prioritize by age is just really disturbing,’” said Detective Paula Meares, who has investigated child sex crimes for more than 10 years at the Los Angeles Police Department.

About one of every 10 agents in Homeland Security’s investigative section is assigned to child sexual exploitation cases, officials said, a clear indication of how big the problem is.

“We could double our numbers and still be getting crushed,” said Jonathan Hendrix, a Homeland Security agent who investigates cases in Nashville.

Science sheds light on the problem.
Preying on Children: The Emerging Psychology of Pedophiles

Sept. 29, 2019

Police records and emails, as well as interviews with nearly three dozen law enforcement officials, show that some tech companies can take weeks or months to respond to questions from the authorities, if they respond at all. Some do not retain essential information about what they find.

Law enforcement records shared with The Times show that Tumblr was one of the least cooperative companies. In one case, Tumblr alerted a person who had uploaded explicit images that the account had been referred to the authorities, a practice that a former employee told The Times was common for years. The tip allowed the man to destroy evidence, the police said.

A spokeswoman for Verizon said that Tumblr prioritized time-sensitive cases, which delayed other responses. Since Verizon acquired the company in 2017, the spokeswoman said, its practice was not to alert users of police requests for data. Verizon recently sold Tumblr to the web development company Automattic.

Facebook Messenger was responsible for nearly two-thirds of reports in 2018. And earlier this year, the company announced that it planned to begin encrypting messages, which would make them even harder to police.

Facebook has long known about abuse images on its platforms, including a video of a man sexually assaulting a 6-year-old that went viral last year on Messenger. When Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, announced the move to encryption, he acknowledged the risk it presented for “truly terrible things like child exploitation.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Preying on Children: The Emerging Psychology of Pedophiles

Westlake Legal Group 29pedophile-facebookJumbo Preying on Children: The Emerging Psychology of Pedophiles Sex Crimes Psychology and Psychologists Cyberharassment Children and Childhood Child Abuse and Neglect

Images of child sex abuse have reached a crisis point on the internet, spreading at unprecedented rates in part because tech platforms and law enforcement agencies have failed to keep pace with the problem. But less is understood about the issue underlying it all: What drives people to sexually abuse children?

Science in recent years has begun to provide some answers. One thing most pedophiles have in common: They discover, usually as teenagers, that their sexual preferences have not matured like everyone else’s. Most get stuck on the same-age boys or girls who first attracted them at the start of puberty, though some retain interest in far younger children.

“People don’t choose what arouses them — they discover it,” said Dr. Fred Berlin, director of the Johns Hopkins Sex and Gender Clinic. “No one grows up wanting to be a pedophile.”

[Read The New York Times’s investigation into the spread of online child sex abuse.]

Over the past generation, psychologists, forensic specialists and others have studied pedophilia, a disorder characterized by “recurrent, intense arousing fantasies, urges or behaviors involving sexual activity with a prepubescent child,” according to psychiatry’s diagnostic manual. These experts have interviewed patients in depth, piecing together life histories and performing a variety of psychological and anatomical measures.

While no study offers a complete picture, a portrait is emerging — one that helps elucidate the mental dynamic behind the surge in abuse images and the deepening depravity they depict. These findings also defy common stereotypes about what pedophilia is, and what the risks are for engaging in physical abuse.

A majority of convicted offenders are men who prey on children ages 6 to 17. But women also commit hands-on offenses; rough estimates put the rate of pedophilic attraction at 1 to 4 percent in both men and women. Studies suggest that a small subset of male and female pedophiles have an interest in toddlers, or even infants.

As scientists seek to understand how the disorder develops, there is growing consensus that the origin is largely biological. This view is based in part on studies pointing to subtle physical traits that have a higher incidence among pedophiles.

“The biological clues attached to pedophilia demonstrate that its roots are prenatal,” said James Cantor, director of the Toronto Sexuality Center. “These are not genetic; they can be traced to specific periods of development in the womb.”

Psychological and environmental factors may also contribute, though it is not yet clear what those are or how they interact with developmental conditions.

By contrast, the common presumption that pedophiles were themselves abused as children now has less support. Child victims are at far greater risk of future substance abuse, depression, persistent traumatic stress or criminal aggression than of becoming molesters. The vast majority of offenders deny any sex abuse in their childhood, even though they could garner sympathy in court by doing so, experts say. “A chaotic childhood increases the likelihood of a chaotic adulthood, of any kind,” Dr. Cantor said.

The relationship between viewing or collecting images and committing hands-on abuse is a matter of continuing debate among some experts, and one that is critical to evaluating the risk an offender poses. Until recently, the prevailing view was that only a minority of people caught viewing such images, between 5 and 20 percent, also committed physical abuse.

That perception began to change in 2007, when a pair of psychologists at the Federal Bureau of Prisons reported that 85 percent of convicted online offenders acknowledged in therapy that they had raped or otherwise sexually abused children.

That finding circulated widely before the study was formally published, creating an uproar among therapists, researchers and law enforcement specialists. The prisons bureau balked at publishing it at all, and withdrew it from a peer-reviewed journal close to its release date.

Many cited concerns that the study sample was biased: It was based on the confessions of 155 convicts who had sought out therapy in prison, not on a representative sample of pedophiles, a much broader group with diverse habits.

“It was what we call a convenience sample — that was a legitimate criticism,” said Michael L. Bourke, a co-author of the study with Andres E. Hernandez, in a telephone interview. Dr. Bourke is now chief of the behavioral analysis unit of the United States Marshals.

Since then, several other studies have supported the prison finding, if not precisely the 85 percent number. In one, inspectors from an array of government agencies interviewed 127 online offenders shortly after their arrests. Less than 5 percent admitted to previously molesting at least one child.

When agents followed up with more in-depth, polygraph-assisted methods, another 53 percent admitted to hands-on offenses, for a total of nearly 60 percent.

“This was not a convenience sample; these were offenders, some of whom had downloaded just a single image, with no known history, from all over the country, interviewed by people from different agencies,” Dr. Bourke said. “They had zero incentive to admit to a previous offense — very much the opposite.”

The high rate of previous, hands-on offending undermines another common assumption about pedophiles. “We shouldn’t assume that viewing online images leads to abuse of a child victim in person,” said Joe Sullivan, a specialist in sex crimes against children in Ireland and Britain. “In my clinical experience, it’s the other way around. Most of these men have already committed hands-on offenses.”

From this point of view, downloading abuse images — and especially connecting with groups of like-minded pedophiles online — does not awaken latent desires. The desires are very much awake and, in many cases, have already been acted on. But the images and online communities can help erode inhibitions further, drawing pedophiles into more frequent or more aggressive acts, Dr. Bourke said.

“What you see, in their search histories,” he said, “is that they learn how to evade law enforcement, they become more confident and they begin to use cognitive distortions to overcome their moral inhibitions.”

Some therapists and researchers say these findings from law enforcement threaten to unfairly tar people who never act on their desires. This group certainly exists — they’re sometimes called “virtuous pedophiles” — but in an era of increasing alarm over the proliferation of online abuse, they are going only further underground.

“That is a shame, a tragedy,” Dr. Cantor said. “That is the group we need to learn about. That’s the kind of person we’d like our clients to become, a person who’s aware of the urges and learns to effectively manage them.”

Learning to manage a drive as visceral, and often consuming, as sexual desire is possible, therapists say, but it cannot be shut off; nor can it be replaced, the way heroin can be swapped for methadone. Treatment can require drugs that reduce circulating testosterone and software that limits online browsing habits.

Often, therapy addresses substance abuse as well. Studies suggest that at least 40 percent of sex offenders were using drugs or alcohol when they committed their crimes.

“The important thing, I think, is that people know that treatment is possible,” Dr. Berlin said. “There’s a subgroup out there, they refer themselves here, and they are quite convinced that they do not want real-life sex with children.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Taking Money From Jeffrey Epstein

Nearly a month after his death, Jeffrey Epstein continues to haunt some of America’s most prestigious institutions.

On Saturday, a prominent figure at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology stepped down after the disclosure of his efforts to conceal his financial connections to Mr. Epstein, the disgraced financier who killed himself in a Manhattan jail cell last month while facing federal sex trafficking charges.

Almost immediately, the M.I.T. official, Joichi Ito, left the boards of three other organizations: the MacArthur Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The New York Times Company, where he had been a board member since 2012. He also left a visiting professorship at Harvard.

Mr. Ito, the tech evangelist and master networker who led the M.I.T. Media Lab — a program that prides itself on contrarian thinking — acknowledged last week that he had received $1.7 million from Mr. Epstein, including $1.2 million for his own outside investment funds.

“After giving the matter a great deal of thought over the past several days and weeks, I think that it is best that I resign as director of the media lab and as a professor and employee of the Institute, effective immediately,” Mr. Ito wrote in an email on Saturday to M.I.T.’s provost, Martin A. Schmidt.

Mr. Ito’s resignation came less than a day after an article in The New Yorker described the measures that he and other media lab officials took to conceal its relationship with Mr. Epstein. The internal emails, which a former media lab employee shared with The New York Times, described the handling of donations that Mr. Epstein made and apparently solicited from the rich and powerful over the years, including a $2 million gift from the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

In an email in October 2014 — six years after Mr. Epstein had pleaded guilty to a sex charge involving a minor in Florida — Mr. Ito wrote that the gift from Mr. Gates had been “directed by Jeffrey Epstein.” A development official at the media lab, Peter Cohen, wrote in a subsequent email, “For gift recording purposes, we will not be mentioning Jeffrey’s name as the impetus for this gift.”

In a statement, a spokesman for Mr. Gates said Mr. Epstein had been introduced to Mr. Gates as a person interested in helping increase philanthropy. “Although Epstein pursued Bill Gates aggressively, any account of a business partnership or personal relationship between the two is simply not true,” the statement said. “And any claim that Epstein directed any programmatic or personal grant making for Bill Gates is completely false.”

Mr. Gates — one of the world’s richest men and perhaps its most generous philanthropist — is one of many powerful people to face scrutiny for their connections to Mr. Epstein. President Trump and former President Bill Clinton have been forced to explain their associations with him. So have Britain’s Prince Andrew, high-profile scientists and business executives including Leslie Wexner, the chief executive of L Brands, and Leon Black, the founder of Apollo Global Management, one of the world’s biggest private equity firms. R. Alexander Acosta, who as a federal prosecutor was involved in the plea agreement with Mr. Epstein in 2008, stepped down as labor secretary after that deal was heavily criticized.

Mr. Ito’s resignation from M.I.T. was followed in quick succession by announcements from other organizations.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 22nyepstein-articleLarge Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Taking Money From Jeffrey Epstein Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes Philanthropy New Yorker New York Times MIT Media Lab Microsoft Corp Massachusetts Institute of Technology MacArthur, John D and Catherine T, Foundation Knight, John S and James L, Foundation Ito, Joichi Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Apollo Global Management

Mr. Epstein at a court hearing in Florida in 2008. Internal emails at the Media Lab describe donations Mt. Epstein made and encouraged over the years.CreditUma Sanghvi/Palm Beach Post, via Associated Press

The MacArthur Foundation said reports about his actions, if true, were not in keeping with its values. “Most importantly, our hearts go out to the girls and women who survived the abuse of Jeffrey Epstein,” the foundation said in a statement.

A.G. Sulzberger, the publisher of The Times, and the company’s president, Mark Thompson, wrote an email to staff members that Mr. Ito had stepped down, effective immediately. “Our newsroom will continue its aggressive reporting on Mr. Epstein, investigating both the individuals and the broader systems of power that enabled him for so many years,” they said.

Signe Swenson, who served as a development associate and alumni relations coordinator at the M.I.T. Media Lab from 2014 to 2016, shared the internal emails concerning Mr. Epstein with The Times. She said she had told supervisors several times of her “disgust” at Mr. Epstein’s involvement.

“That was never listened to,” Ms. Swenson, who worked under Mr. Cohen, said in an interview on Saturday. Ms. Swenson shared the correspondence after consulting with the organization Whistleblower Aid.

She said she learned of Mr. Epstein’s connection with the media lab when she interviewed for a position in March 2014, and told Mr. Cohen that M.I.T. listed Mr. Epstein as “disqualified” as a donor. She said Mr. Cohen replied that Mr. Ito had a relationship with the wealthy financier. In one 2014 email that Ms. Swenson shared, Mr. Ito wrote about a $100,000 donation from Mr. Epstein, asking the development staff members to “make sure this gets accounted for as anonymous.”

Mr. Ito took over the Media Lab in 2011 following a rapid ascent in the tech world that made him an unorthodox choice to lead an academic program, but not the freewheeling media lab. He was a two-time college dropout who had run a nightclub, then ran a string of internet companies and invested early in Twitter, Kickstarter and Flickr.

He was also a master networker — one who visited the Obama White House to discuss artificial intelligence and became friends with the respected Harvard lawyer Lawrence Lessig after criticizing Mr. Lessig’s book when he gave a talk in Japan. Mr. Lessig later put Mr. Ito on the board of Creative Commons, a nonprofit advocate for public intellectual property rights.

Mr. Ito’s ability to connect with both students and wealthy donors had helped him raise at least $50 million for the Media Lab, a sort of academic skunkworks. It has contributed to the development of technology related to touchscreens and GPS, is home to a program dedicated to democratizing access to outer space and hands out $250,000 awards to those “challenging the norms, rules or laws that sustain society’s injustices.”

Mr. Ito faced significant criticism from inside the Media Lab. Two scholars said they would leave at the end of the academic year, with one saying he had urged Mr. Ito not to associate with Mr. Epstein. While Mr. Ito did enjoy the support of many within the lab, there were calls for his resignation.

“We have worked literally for years to try to make STEM fields safe and welcoming, attractive fields for women and girls in the face of crushing sexism and gender bias,” said Kim Holleman, an artist who was a visiting scholar and a research affiliate at the media lab from 2013 through 2017. “It’s humiliating to know that men in these institutions, in 2019, still think so little of women’s dignity and safety.”

At a meeting on Wednesday night with media lab personnel, Mr. Ito said he had “screwed up” by accepting the money, but that he had done so after a review by the university and consultation with his advisers.

Emails shared by a former employee at the Media Lab show that Mr. Epstein solicited a $2 million donation the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.CreditAlex Wong/Getty Images

On Saturday, the university’s president, L. Rafael Reif, said he had asked M.I.T.’s general counsel to hire an outside law firm to conduct “an immediate, thorough and independent investigation.”

“We are actively assessing how best to improve our policies, processes and procedures to fully reflect M.I.T.’s values and prevent such mistakes in the future,” he wrote in an email to the university community. “Our internal review process continues, and what we learn from it will inform the path ahead.”

The emails provided by Ms. Swenson outlined the informal role that Mr. Epstein played at the media lab. In the correspondence about the donation from Mr. Gates, Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Ito “did not talk with Bill Gates” and that the program “did not solicit this money.” In another, from May 2014, Mr. Cohen and Mr. Ito discussed Mr. Epstein helping connect the media lab to Mr. Black, the Apollo Global Management founder, who Mr. Epstein had advised on issues including philanthropy.

Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Black wanted to make a large donation “in honor of a friend, who wishes to remain anonymous,” and later asked Mr. Ito to find out from Mr. Epstein whether Mr. Black himself wanted to remain anonymous. One email indicated that Mr. Black had given the media lab a gift of $4 million by wire transfer.

Mr. Cohen also asked Mr. Ito whether Mr. Black would like a thank-you note from M.I.T.’s president. Mr. Black’s preference would be something “you or Jeffrey knows best,” be wrote.

A spokeswoman for Mr. Black, of Apollo Global Management, did not comment on Saturday. Mr. Black has sought to distance himself from Mr. Epstein, describing his interactions with him as limited to tax strategy, estate planning and philanthropic advice. He has also said Apollo had never done business with Mr. Epstein.

Mr. Cohen, now the director of development for computer and data science initiatives at Brown University, did not respond to messages seeking comment on Saturday.

The departure of Mr. Ito from the media lab came after he spent days trying to make amends. At Wednesday’s meeting, which was organized by professors at the program, he reiterated his apology. He described for the first time the amount of money he had received from Mr. Epstein, and said he had twice traveled to Mr. Epstein’s island home in the Caribbean to seek donations. He also told the crowd he had returned one check that Mr. Epstein had sent him earlier this year, after an article in the Miami Herald prompted heavy criticism of Mr. Epstein’s plea agreement in Florida in 2008.

But near the end, one of Mr. Ito’s staunchest supporters, Nicholas Negroponte, a founder of the media lab, said he had told Mr. Ito to take the money and would do it again. That prompted Mr. Ito to send an email to Mr. Negroponte in the middle of the night, complaining that he was undercutting his ability to make amends.

The situation worsened with the disclosure of the lab’s internal emails. An online petition established in support of Mr. Ito put a disclaimer at the top that it had been set up before news of the emails circulated. A few hours later, Mr. Ito tendered the first of several resignations he offered on Saturday afternoon.

By Saturday night, the petition site was no longer online.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Taking Money From Jeffrey Epstein

Nearly a month after his death, Jeffrey Epstein continues to haunt some of America’s most prestigious institutions.

On Saturday, a prominent figure at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology stepped down after the disclosure of his efforts to conceal his financial connections to Mr. Epstein, the disgraced financier who killed himself in a Manhattan jail cell last month while facing federal sex trafficking charges.

Almost immediately, the M.I.T. official, Joichi Ito, left the boards of three other organizations: the MacArthur Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and The New York Times Company, where he had been a board member since 2012. He also left a visiting professorship at Harvard.

Mr. Ito, the tech evangelist and master networker who led the M.I.T. Media Lab — a program that prides itself on contrarian thinking — acknowledged last week that he had received $1.7 million from Mr. Epstein, including $1.2 million for his own outside investment funds.

“After giving the matter a great deal of thought over the past several days and weeks, I think that it is best that I resign as director of the media lab and as a professor and employee of the Institute, effective immediately,” Mr. Ito wrote in an email on Saturday to M.I.T.’s provost, Martin A. Schmidt.

Mr. Ito’s resignation came less than a day after an article in The New Yorker described the measures that he and other media lab officials took to conceal its relationship with Mr. Epstein. The internal emails, which a former media lab employee shared with The New York Times, described the handling of donations that Mr. Epstein made and apparently solicited from the rich and powerful over the years, including a $2 million gift from the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

In an email in October 2014 — six years after Mr. Epstein had pleaded guilty to a sex charge involving a minor in Florida — Mr. Ito wrote that the gift from Mr. Gates had been “directed by Jeffrey Epstein.” A development official at the media lab, Peter Cohen, wrote in a subsequent email, “For gift recording purposes, we will not be mentioning Jeffrey’s name as the impetus for this gift.”

In a statement, a spokesman for Mr. Gates said Mr. Epstein had been introduced to Mr. Gates as a person interested in helping increase philanthropy. “Although Epstein pursued Bill Gates aggressively, any account of a business partnership or personal relationship between the two is simply not true,” the statement said. “And any claim that Epstein directed any programmatic or personal grant making for Bill Gates is completely false.”

Mr. Gates — one of the world’s richest men and perhaps its most generous philanthropist — is one of many powerful people to face scrutiny for their connections to Mr. Epstein. President Trump and former President Bill Clinton have been forced to explain their associations with him. So have Britain’s Prince Andrew, high-profile scientists and business executives including Leslie Wexner, the chief executive of L Brands, and Leon Black, the founder of Apollo Global Management, one of the world’s biggest private equity firms. R. Alexander Acosta, who as a federal prosecutor was involved in the plea agreement with Mr. Epstein in 2008, stepped down as labor secretary after that deal was heavily criticized.

Mr. Ito’s resignation from M.I.T. was followed in quick succession by announcements from other organizations.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 22nyepstein-articleLarge Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Taking Money From Jeffrey Epstein Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes Philanthropy New Yorker New York Times MIT Media Lab Microsoft Corp Massachusetts Institute of Technology MacArthur, John D and Catherine T, Foundation Knight, John S and James L, Foundation Ito, Joichi Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Apollo Global Management

Mr. Epstein at a court hearing in Florida in 2008. Internal emails at the Media Lab describe donations Mt. Epstein made and encouraged over the years.CreditUma Sanghvi/Palm Beach Post, via Associated Press

The MacArthur Foundation said reports about his actions, if true, were not in keeping with its values. “Most importantly, our hearts go out to the girls and women who survived the abuse of Jeffrey Epstein,” the foundation said in a statement.

A.G. Sulzberger, the publisher of The Times, and the company’s president, Mark Thompson, wrote an email to staff members that Mr. Ito had stepped down, effective immediately. “Our newsroom will continue its aggressive reporting on Mr. Epstein, investigating both the individuals and the broader systems of power that enabled him for so many years,” they said.

Signe Swenson, who served as a development associate and alumni relations coordinator at the M.I.T. Media Lab from 2014 to 2016, shared the internal emails concerning Mr. Epstein with The Times. She said she had told supervisors several times of her “disgust” at Mr. Epstein’s involvement.

“That was never listened to,” Ms. Swenson, who worked under Mr. Cohen, said in an interview on Saturday. Ms. Swenson shared the correspondence after consulting with the organization Whistleblower Aid.

She said she learned of Mr. Epstein’s connection with the media lab when she interviewed for a position in March 2014, and told Mr. Cohen that M.I.T. listed Mr. Epstein as “disqualified” as a donor. She said Mr. Cohen replied that Mr. Ito had a relationship with the wealthy financier. In one 2014 email that Ms. Swenson shared, Mr. Ito wrote about a $100,000 donation from Mr. Epstein, asking the development staff members to “make sure this gets accounted for as anonymous.”

Mr. Ito took over the Media Lab in 2011 following a rapid ascent in the tech world that made him an unorthodox choice to lead an academic program, but not the freewheeling media lab. He was a two-time college dropout who had run a nightclub, then ran a string of internet companies and invested early in Twitter, Kickstarter and Flickr.

He was also a master networker — one who visited the Obama White House to discuss artificial intelligence and became friends with the respected Harvard lawyer Lawrence Lessig after criticizing Mr. Lessig’s book when he gave a talk in Japan. Mr. Lessig later put Mr. Ito on the board of Creative Commons, a nonprofit advocate for public intellectual property rights.

Mr. Ito’s ability to connect with both students and wealthy donors had helped him raise at least $50 million for the Media Lab, a sort of academic skunkworks. It has contributed to the development of technology related to touchscreens and GPS, is home to a program dedicated to democratizing access to outer space and hands out $250,000 awards to those “challenging the norms, rules or laws that sustain society’s injustices.”

Mr. Ito faced significant criticism from inside the Media Lab. Two scholars said they would leave at the end of the academic year, with one saying he had urged Mr. Ito not to associate with Mr. Epstein. While Mr. Ito did enjoy the support of many within the lab, there were calls for his resignation.

“We have worked literally for years to try to make STEM fields safe and welcoming, attractive fields for women and girls in the face of crushing sexism and gender bias,” said Kim Holleman, an artist who was a visiting scholar and a research affiliate at the media lab from 2013 through 2017. “It’s humiliating to know that men in these institutions, in 2019, still think so little of women’s dignity and safety.”

At a meeting on Wednesday night with media lab personnel, Mr. Ito said he had “screwed up” by accepting the money, but that he had done so after a review by the university and consultation with his advisers.

Emails shared by a former employee at the Media Lab show that Mr. Epstein solicited a $2 million donation the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.CreditAlex Wong/Getty Images

On Saturday, the university’s president, L. Rafael Reif, said he had asked M.I.T.’s general counsel to hire an outside law firm to conduct “an immediate, thorough and independent investigation.”

“We are actively assessing how best to improve our policies, processes and procedures to fully reflect M.I.T.’s values and prevent such mistakes in the future,” he wrote in an email to the university community. “Our internal review process continues, and what we learn from it will inform the path ahead.”

The emails provided by Ms. Swenson outlined the informal role that Mr. Epstein played at the media lab. In the correspondence about the donation from Mr. Gates, Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Ito “did not talk with Bill Gates” and that the program “did not solicit this money.” In another, from May 2014, Mr. Cohen and Mr. Ito discussed Mr. Epstein helping connect the media lab to Mr. Black, the Apollo Global Management founder, who Mr. Epstein had advised on issues including philanthropy.

Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Black wanted to make a large donation “in honor of a friend, who wishes to remain anonymous,” and later asked Mr. Ito to find out from Mr. Epstein whether Mr. Black himself wanted to remain anonymous. One email indicated that Mr. Black had given the media lab a gift of $4 million by wire transfer.

Mr. Cohen also asked Mr. Ito whether Mr. Black would like a thank-you note from M.I.T.’s president. Mr. Black’s preference would be something “you or Jeffrey knows best,” be wrote.

A spokeswoman for Mr. Black, of Apollo Global Management, did not comment on Saturday. Mr. Black has sought to distance himself from Mr. Epstein, describing his interactions with him as limited to tax strategy, estate planning and philanthropic advice. He has also said Apollo had never done business with Mr. Epstein.

Mr. Cohen, now the director of development for computer and data science initiatives at Brown University, did not respond to messages seeking comment on Saturday.

The departure of Mr. Ito from the media lab came after he spent days trying to make amends. At Wednesday’s meeting, which was organized by professors at the program, he reiterated his apology. He described for the first time the amount of money he had received from Mr. Epstein, and said he had twice traveled to Mr. Epstein’s island home in the Caribbean to seek donations. He also told the crowd he had returned one check that Mr. Epstein had sent him earlier this year, after an article in the Miami Herald prompted heavy criticism of Mr. Epstein’s plea agreement in Florida in 2008.

But near the end, one of Mr. Ito’s staunchest supporters, Nicholas Negroponte, a founder of the media lab, said he had told Mr. Ito to take the money and would do it again. That prompted Mr. Ito to send an email to Mr. Negroponte in the middle of the night, complaining that he was undercutting his ability to make amends.

The situation worsened with the disclosure of the lab’s internal emails. An online petition established in support of Mr. Ito put a disclaimer at the top that it had been set up before news of the emails circulated. A few hours later, Mr. Ito tendered the first of several resignations he offered on Saturday afternoon.

By Saturday night, the petition site was no longer online.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Outcry Over Jeffrey Epstein Ties

The director of M.I.T.’s prestigious Media Lab stepped down on Saturday after an outcry over his financial ties with the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

“After giving the matter a great deal of thought over the past several days and weeks, I think that it is best that I resign as director of the media lab and as a professor and employee of the Institute, effective immediately,” the director, Joichi Ito, wrote in an email to the university’s provost, Martin A. Schmidt.

Mr. Ito stepped down less than a day after an article in The New Yorker described the measures officials at the lab took to conceal the relationship with Mr. Epstein, who killed himself in jail last month while facing federal sex trafficking charges. Mr. Ito sent a copy of the resignation email to The New York Times after repeated requests for comment.

Internal lab emails, which a former lab employee shared with The Times, described donations that Mr. Epstein made and solicited over the years — including a $2 million gift from the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

Mr. Ito acknowledged this past week taking $525,000 of Mr. Epstein’s money for the lab, as well as $1.2 million for his personal investment funds.

In a separate email to the lab community that he shared with The Times, Mr. Ito again apologized, confirmed his resignation and added, “The Media Lab community is strong and while this chapter is truly difficult, I am confident the lab will persevere.”

Mr. Ito has been a board member of The New York Times Company since 2012. The company did not immediately comment on Mr. Ito’s decision to leave M.I.T.

This is a developing story. It will be updated. A previous version of the article is below.

Administrators at the M.I.T. Media Lab took pains to conceal its association with the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, according to internal emails that describe donations he made and solicited over the years — including a $2 million gift from the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

Joichi Ito, the director of the influential academic center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, acknowledged this past week taking $525,000 of Mr. Epstein’s money for the lab. But the emails demonstrate lab administrators’ understanding of how Mr. Epstein — who killed himself in jail last month while facing federal sex trafficking charges — also encouraged contributions from other wealthy figures.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 22nyepstein-articleLarge Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Outcry Over Jeffrey Epstein Ties Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes Philanthropy New Yorker New York Times MIT Media Lab Microsoft Corp Massachusetts Institute of Technology MacArthur, John D and Catherine T, Foundation Knight, John S and James L, Foundation Ito, Joichi Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Apollo Global Management

Mr. Epstein at a court hearing in Florida in 2008. Internal emails at the Media Lab describe donations Mt. Epstein made and encouraged over the years.CreditUma Sanghvi/Palm Beach Post, via Associated Press

In an email in October 2014 — six years after Mr. Epstein had pleaded guilty to a sex charge involving a minor in Florida — Mr. Ito wrote that a $2 million gift from Mr. Gates was “directed by Jeffrey Epstein.” Peter Cohen, then a development official at the lab, wrote in a subsequent email, “For gift recording purposes, we will not be mentioning Jeffrey’s name as the impetus for this gift.”

Lab administrators’ efforts to conceal the donations’ links to Mr. Epstein were first reported on Friday night by The New Yorker.

Mr. Ito, in an email to The New York Times, said The New Yorker report was “full of factual errors.” He did not immediately respond to messages seeking further comment.

Messages sent to representatives for Mr. Gates were not immediately returned on Saturday. An M.I.T. spokesman did not immediately comment. Mr. Cohen, now the director of development for computer and data science initiatives at Brown University, did not respond to messages seeking comment on Saturday.

The emails were shared with The Times by Signe Swenson, who served as a development associate and alumni relations coordinator at the lab from 2014 to 2016. She said she had told supervisors at the lab several times of her “disgust” at Mr. Epstein’s involvement with the lab.

“That was never listened to,” Ms. Swenson, who worked under Mr. Cohen, said in an interview on Saturday that also included an attorney from the group Whistleblower Aid.

Ms. Swenson said she learned of Mr. Epstein’s connection with the lab when she interviewed for a position in March 2014. She said she later told Mr. Cohen that M.I.T. listed Mr. Epstein as “disqualified” as a donor, but Mr. Cohen replied that Mr. Ito had a relationship with the wealthy financier.

In one 2014 email shared by Ms. Swenson, Mr. Ito wrote about a $100,000 donation from Mr. Epstein, asking the development staff members to “make sure this gets accounted for as anonymous.” Mr. Cohen wrote in a subsequent email that the donation was “Jeffrey money, needs to be anonymous.”

Other emails suggest that Mr. Epstein sought out donations from others. In the correspondence about the donation from Mr. Gates, Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Ito “did not talk with Bill Gates” and that the lab “did not solicit this money.”

Mr. Ito acknowledged receiving money from Mr. Epstein in an online apology on Aug. 15, which led to calls for his resignation and a rift at the lab that deepened after a tense meeting with associates of the lab last Wednesday. At that meeting, Mr. Ito said he had accepted money from Mr. Epstein for the lab as well as $1.2 million for his own outside investment funds.

Emails shared by a former employee at the Media Lab show that Mr. Epstein solicited a $2 million donation the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.CreditAlex Wong/Getty Images

News of Ms. Swenson’s emails appeared to have weakened the support Mr. Ito had maintained within the lab. A petition signed by more than 200 people urging him not to resign lost some signatories after The New Yorker story was published, and a note was added that “signatures should not be read as continued support of Joi staying on as Media Lab director.”

Mr. Ito, who has led the lab since 2011, also holds board positions and advisory roles at a number of organizations, including the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation and The New York Times Company, where he has been a board member since 2012.

The New York Times Company did not comment on Saturday. The Knight and MacArthur foundations said that they had no comment.

Another series of emails, from May 2014, indicated that Mr. Epstein also helped connect the lab to Mr. Black, the founder of the private equity firm Apollo Global Management who Mr. Epstein had advised on issues including philanthropy.

Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Black wanted to make a large donation “in honor of a friend, who wishes to remain anonymous,” and later asked Mr. Ito to find out from Mr. Epstein whether Mr. Black himself wanted to remain anonymous. One email indicated that Mr. Black had given the lab a gift of $4 million by wire transfer.

Mr. Cohen also asked Mr. Ito whether Mr. Black would like a thank-you note from M.I.T.’s president. Mr. Black’s preference would be something “you or Jeffrey knows best,” be wrote.

A spokeswoman for Mr. Black, who leads one of the world’s largest private equity firms, did not immediately comment on Saturday. Mr. Black has sought to distance himself from Mr. Epstein, describing his interactions with him as limited to tax strategy, estate planning and philanthropic advice. He has also said Apollo had never done business with Mr. Epstein.

Some colleagues at the lab have called for Mr. Ito to step down, questioning his judgment for taking contributions from Mr. Epstein. Two scholars said they would leave the lab at the end of the academic year because of them, and one of said he had urged Mr. Ito not to associate with Mr. Epstein.

The meeting last Wednesday was intended to help bolster support for Mr. Ito. He told the crowd that he had “screwed up” by accepting the money, but that he had done so after a review by the university and consultation with his advisers.

But near the end, one of Mr. Ito’s staunchest supporters, Nicholas Negroponte, a founder of the lab, said he had told Mr. Ito to take the money and would do it again. That prompted Mr. Ito to send an email to Mr. Negroponte in the middle of the night, complaining that he was undercutting his ability to make amends.

M.I.T. started an inquiry after Mr. Ito disclosed the contributions from Mr. Epstein last month. The university’s provost, Martin A. Schmidt, described the review as an attempt to “identify lessons for the future.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Outcry Over Jeffrey Epstein Ties

The director of M.I.T.’s prestigious Media Lab stepped down on Saturday after an outcry over his financial ties with the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

“After giving the matter a great deal of thought over the past several days and weeks, I think that it is best that I resign as director of the media lab and as a professor and employee of the Institute, effective immediately,” the director, Joichi Ito, wrote in an email to the university’s provost, Martin A. Schmidt.

Mr. Ito stepped down less than a day after an article in The New Yorker described the measures officials at the lab took to conceal the relationship with Mr. Epstein, who killed himself in jail last month while facing federal sex trafficking charges. Mr. Ito sent a copy of the resignation email to The New York Times after repeated requests for comment.

Internal lab emails, which a former lab employee shared with The Times, described donations that Mr. Epstein made and solicited over the years — including a $2 million gift from the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

Mr. Ito acknowledged this past week taking $525,000 of Mr. Epstein’s money for the lab, as well as $1.2 million for his personal investment funds.

In a separate email to the lab community that he shared with The Times, Mr. Ito again apologized, confirmed his resignation and added, “The Media Lab community is strong and while this chapter is truly difficult, I am confident the lab will persevere.”

Mr. Ito has been a board member of The New York Times Company since 2012. The company did not immediately comment on Mr. Ito’s decision to leave M.I.T.

This is a developing story. It will be updated. A previous version of the article is below.

Administrators at the M.I.T. Media Lab took pains to conceal its association with the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein, according to internal emails that describe donations he made and solicited over the years — including a $2 million gift from the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.

Joichi Ito, the director of the influential academic center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, acknowledged this past week taking $525,000 of Mr. Epstein’s money for the lab. But the emails demonstrate lab administrators’ understanding of how Mr. Epstein — who killed himself in jail last month while facing federal sex trafficking charges — also encouraged contributions from other wealthy figures.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 22nyepstein-articleLarge Director of M.I.T.’s Media Lab Resigns After Outcry Over Jeffrey Epstein Ties Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes Philanthropy New Yorker New York Times MIT Media Lab Microsoft Corp Massachusetts Institute of Technology MacArthur, John D and Catherine T, Foundation Knight, John S and James L, Foundation Ito, Joichi Gates, Bill Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Child Abuse and Neglect Apollo Global Management

Mr. Epstein at a court hearing in Florida in 2008. Internal emails at the Media Lab describe donations Mt. Epstein made and encouraged over the years.CreditUma Sanghvi/Palm Beach Post, via Associated Press

In an email in October 2014 — six years after Mr. Epstein had pleaded guilty to a sex charge involving a minor in Florida — Mr. Ito wrote that a $2 million gift from Mr. Gates was “directed by Jeffrey Epstein.” Peter Cohen, then a development official at the lab, wrote in a subsequent email, “For gift recording purposes, we will not be mentioning Jeffrey’s name as the impetus for this gift.”

Lab administrators’ efforts to conceal the donations’ links to Mr. Epstein were first reported on Friday night by The New Yorker.

Mr. Ito, in an email to The New York Times, said The New Yorker report was “full of factual errors.” He did not immediately respond to messages seeking further comment.

Messages sent to representatives for Mr. Gates were not immediately returned on Saturday. An M.I.T. spokesman did not immediately comment. Mr. Cohen, now the director of development for computer and data science initiatives at Brown University, did not respond to messages seeking comment on Saturday.

The emails were shared with The Times by Signe Swenson, who served as a development associate and alumni relations coordinator at the lab from 2014 to 2016. She said she had told supervisors at the lab several times of her “disgust” at Mr. Epstein’s involvement with the lab.

“That was never listened to,” Ms. Swenson, who worked under Mr. Cohen, said in an interview on Saturday that also included an attorney from the group Whistleblower Aid.

Ms. Swenson said she learned of Mr. Epstein’s connection with the lab when she interviewed for a position in March 2014. She said she later told Mr. Cohen that M.I.T. listed Mr. Epstein as “disqualified” as a donor, but Mr. Cohen replied that Mr. Ito had a relationship with the wealthy financier.

In one 2014 email shared by Ms. Swenson, Mr. Ito wrote about a $100,000 donation from Mr. Epstein, asking the development staff members to “make sure this gets accounted for as anonymous.” Mr. Cohen wrote in a subsequent email that the donation was “Jeffrey money, needs to be anonymous.”

Other emails suggest that Mr. Epstein sought out donations from others. In the correspondence about the donation from Mr. Gates, Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Ito “did not talk with Bill Gates” and that the lab “did not solicit this money.”

Mr. Ito acknowledged receiving money from Mr. Epstein in an online apology on Aug. 15, which led to calls for his resignation and a rift at the lab that deepened after a tense meeting with associates of the lab last Wednesday. At that meeting, Mr. Ito said he had accepted money from Mr. Epstein for the lab as well as $1.2 million for his own outside investment funds.

Emails shared by a former employee at the Media Lab show that Mr. Epstein solicited a $2 million donation the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.CreditAlex Wong/Getty Images

News of Ms. Swenson’s emails appeared to have weakened the support Mr. Ito had maintained within the lab. A petition signed by more than 200 people urging him not to resign lost some signatories after The New Yorker story was published, and a note was added that “signatures should not be read as continued support of Joi staying on as Media Lab director.”

Mr. Ito, who has led the lab since 2011, also holds board positions and advisory roles at a number of organizations, including the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation and The New York Times Company, where he has been a board member since 2012.

The New York Times Company did not comment on Saturday. The Knight and MacArthur foundations said that they had no comment.

Another series of emails, from May 2014, indicated that Mr. Epstein also helped connect the lab to Mr. Black, the founder of the private equity firm Apollo Global Management who Mr. Epstein had advised on issues including philanthropy.

Mr. Cohen wrote that Mr. Black wanted to make a large donation “in honor of a friend, who wishes to remain anonymous,” and later asked Mr. Ito to find out from Mr. Epstein whether Mr. Black himself wanted to remain anonymous. One email indicated that Mr. Black had given the lab a gift of $4 million by wire transfer.

Mr. Cohen also asked Mr. Ito whether Mr. Black would like a thank-you note from M.I.T.’s president. Mr. Black’s preference would be something “you or Jeffrey knows best,” be wrote.

A spokeswoman for Mr. Black, who leads one of the world’s largest private equity firms, did not immediately comment on Saturday. Mr. Black has sought to distance himself from Mr. Epstein, describing his interactions with him as limited to tax strategy, estate planning and philanthropic advice. He has also said Apollo had never done business with Mr. Epstein.

Some colleagues at the lab have called for Mr. Ito to step down, questioning his judgment for taking contributions from Mr. Epstein. Two scholars said they would leave the lab at the end of the academic year because of them, and one of said he had urged Mr. Ito not to associate with Mr. Epstein.

The meeting last Wednesday was intended to help bolster support for Mr. Ito. He told the crowd that he had “screwed up” by accepting the money, but that he had done so after a review by the university and consultation with his advisers.

But near the end, one of Mr. Ito’s staunchest supporters, Nicholas Negroponte, a founder of the lab, said he had told Mr. Ito to take the money and would do it again. That prompted Mr. Ito to send an email to Mr. Negroponte in the middle of the night, complaining that he was undercutting his ability to make amends.

M.I.T. started an inquiry after Mr. Ito disclosed the contributions from Mr. Epstein last month. The university’s provost, Martin A. Schmidt, described the review as an attempt to “identify lessons for the future.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com