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Westlake Legal Group > Commerce Department

Trump Pressed Top Aide to Have Weather Service ‘Clarify’ Forecast That Contradicted Trump

Westlake Legal Group 11dc-storm-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Trump Pressed Top Aide to Have Weather Service ‘Clarify’ Forecast That Contradicted Trump Weather United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr National Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mulvaney, Mick Jacobs, Neil Hurricane Dorian (2019) Commerce Department

WASHINGTON — President Trump, seeking to justify his claim of a hurricane threat to Alabama, pressed aides to intervene with a federal scientific agency, leading to a highly unusual public rebuke of the forecasters who contradicted him, according to people familiar with the events.

In response to the president’s request, Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, told Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary, to have the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration publicly correct the forecasters, who had insisted that Alabama was not actually at risk from Hurricane Dorian.

A senior administration official, who asked not to be identified discussing internal matters, said Mr. Trump told his staff to have NOAA “clarify” the forecasters’ position. NOAA, which is part of the Commerce Department, then issued an unsigned statement saying the Birmingham, Ala., office of the National Weather Service was wrong to refute the president’s warning so categorically.

But the statement only exacerbated the uproar over Mr. Trump’s storm prediction as critics accused his administration of politicizing the weather. The Commerce Department inspector general has opened an investigation, and on Wednesday, a Democrat-controlled House science committee kicked off its own inquiry.

As a result, the furor over Mr. Trump’s storm prediction has evolved from a momentary embarrassment into a sustained political liability for the administration — no longer just a question of a president unwilling to admit a mistake but now a White House willing to force scientists to validate it.

The New York Times reported this week that Mr. Ross warned NOAA’s acting administrator that top employees at the agency could be fired if the situation were not addressed. Mr. Ross’s spokesman has denied that he threatened to fire anyone. A senior official on Wednesday said that if Mr. Ross did make such threats, it was not at the direction of Mr. Mulvaney.

After The Times disclosed Mr. Mulvaney’s role on Wednesday, The Washington Post reported that he was acting at Mr. Trump’s direction, which the senior official confirmed to The Times. But when Mr. Trump was asked by a reporter if he told his chief of staff to instruct NOAA to “disavow those forecasters,” he denied it.

“No, I never did that,” Mr. Trump said. “I never did that. That’s a whole hoax by the fake news media. When they talk about the hurricane and when they talk about Florida and they talk about Alabama, that’s just fake news. It was — right from the beginning, it was a fake story.”

The White House had no comment beyond the president’s remarks. The senior official made a distinction between telling NOAA to “disavow” the forecast and “clarify” it. The White House argument was that the forecasters had gone too far and the president was right to suggest there had been models showing possible impact on Alabama.

The release of the NOAA statement provoked complaints that the Trump administration was improperly intruding in the professional weather forecasting system to rationalize an inaccurate presidential assertion. In opening its investigation, the Commerce Department’s inspector general said the events could call into question scientific independence.

The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology expressed similar concerns as it announced its own investigation into Mr. Ross’s actions on Wednesday.

“We are deeply disturbed by the politicization of NOAA’s weather forecast activities for the purpose of supporting incorrect statements by the president,” wrote Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson, the chairwoman of the committee, along with Representative Mikie Sherrill, the chairman of its oversight panel.

The latest challenge to Mr. Trump’s credibility has its origins in one of the more prosaic duties a president has, warning the nation when natural disasters like Hurricane Dorian threaten communities.

On Sept. 1, as Dorian gathered strength over the Atlantic and headed toward the east coast, the president wrote on Twitter that Alabama, among other states, “will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.” Earlier forecast maps had suggested that Alabama might see some effects from the edge of the storm, but by the time of the president’s tweet, the predictions had already changed.

A few minutes after Mr. Trump’s tweet, the National Weather Service in Birmingham posted its own message on Twitter flatly declaring that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from Dorian. We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane Dorian will be felt across Alabama.” The forecasters were correct; Alabama was not struck by the hurricane.

Nonetheless, Mr. Trump was furious at being challenged and kept insisting for days that he had been right. He displayed or posted outdated maps, including one that had been apparently altered with a Sharpie pen to make it look like Alabama might still be in the path of the storm. He had his homeland security adviser release a statement backing him up.

After Mr. Trump told his staff on Sept. 5 to address the matter, Mr. Mulvaney called Mr. Ross, who was in Greece traveling for meetings. Mr. Ross then called Neil Jacobs, the acting administrator of NOAA, at home around 3 a.m. on Friday morning Washington time and instructed him to clear up the agency’s contradiction of the president, according to three people informed about the discussions.

Dr. Jacobs objected to the demand and was told that the political appointees at NOAA would be fired if the situation was not fixed, according to the three individuals, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the episode. The political staff at an agency typically includes a handful of top officials, such as Dr. Jacobs, and their aides. They are appointed by the administration currently in power, as opposed to career government employees, who remain as administrations come and go.

The statement NOAA ultimately issued later on Friday faulted the Birmingham office for a tweet that “spoke in absolute terms that were inconsistent with probabilities from the best forecast products available at the time.”

Dr. Jacobs has since sought to reassure his work force and the broader scientific community concerned about political interference.

“This administration is committed to the important mission of weather forecasting,” Dr. Jacobs told a weather conference in Huntsville, Ala., on Tuesday. “There is no pressure to change the way you communicate or forecast risk in the future.”

In the speech, Dr. Jacobs praised Mr. Trump, calling him “genuinely interested in improving weather forecasts,” and echoed the president’s position that Dorian initially threatened Alabama. “At one point, Alabama was in the mix, as was the rest of the Southeast.”

He also said he still had faith in the Birmingham office. “The purpose of the NOAA statement was to clarify the technical aspects of the potential impacts of Dorian,” Dr. Jacobs said. “What it did not say, however, is that we understand and fully support the good intent of the Birmingham weather forecast office, which was to calm fears in support of public safety.”

Unassuaged, the House science committee has demanded documents and information related to the NOAA statement and its origins.

In addition to emails, memos, text messages and records of telephone calls, the committee asked Mr. Ross to answer a number of questions, including whether any representative of the Executive Office of the President directed NOAA to issue Friday’s statement or specify the language in it.

They also reminded Mr. Ross of statements that he made under oath in his confirmation hearing that he would not interfere with science, particularly at NOAA, which in addition to weather forecasting is the agency responsible for understanding and predicting changes in the earth’s climate.

“Science should be done by scientists,” Mr. Ross testified in that January 2017 hearing. “I support the release of factual scientific data.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Pressed Top Aide to Have Weather Service ‘Clarify’ Forecast That Contradicted Trump

Westlake Legal Group 11dc-storm-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Trump Pressed Top Aide to Have Weather Service ‘Clarify’ Forecast That Contradicted Trump Weather United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr National Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mulvaney, Mick Jacobs, Neil Hurricane Dorian (2019) Commerce Department

WASHINGTON — President Trump, seeking to justify his claim of a hurricane threat to Alabama, pressed aides to intervene with a federal scientific agency, leading to a highly unusual public rebuke of the forecasters who contradicted him, according to people familiar with the events.

In response to the president’s request, Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, told Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary, to have the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration publicly correct the forecasters, who had insisted that Alabama was not actually at risk from Hurricane Dorian.

A senior administration official, who asked not to be identified discussing internal matters, said Mr. Trump told his staff to have NOAA “clarify” the forecasters’ position. NOAA, which is part of the Commerce Department, then issued an unsigned statement saying the Birmingham, Ala., office of the National Weather Service was wrong to refute the president’s warning so categorically.

But the statement only exacerbated the uproar over Mr. Trump’s storm prediction as critics accused his administration of politicizing the weather. The Commerce Department inspector general has opened an investigation, and on Wednesday, a Democrat-controlled House science committee kicked off its own inquiry.

As a result, the furor over Mr. Trump’s storm prediction has evolved from a momentary embarrassment into a sustained political liability for the administration — no longer just a question of a president unwilling to admit a mistake but now a White House willing to force scientists to validate it.

The New York Times reported this week that Mr. Ross warned NOAA’s acting administrator that top employees at the agency could be fired if the situation were not addressed. Mr. Ross’s spokesman has denied that he threatened to fire anyone. A senior official on Wednesday said that if Mr. Ross did make such threats, it was not at the direction of Mr. Mulvaney.

After The Times disclosed Mr. Mulvaney’s role on Wednesday, The Washington Post reported that he was acting at Mr. Trump’s direction, which the senior official confirmed to The Times. But when Mr. Trump was asked by a reporter if he told his chief of staff to instruct NOAA to “disavow those forecasters,” he denied it.

“No, I never did that,” Mr. Trump said. “I never did that. That’s a whole hoax by the fake news media. When they talk about the hurricane and when they talk about Florida and they talk about Alabama, that’s just fake news. It was — right from the beginning, it was a fake story.”

The White House had no comment beyond the president’s remarks. The senior official made a distinction between telling NOAA to “disavow” the forecast and “clarify” it. The White House argument was that the forecasters had gone too far and the president was right to suggest there had been models showing possible impact on Alabama.

The release of the NOAA statement provoked complaints that the Trump administration was improperly intruding in the professional weather forecasting system to rationalize an inaccurate presidential assertion. In opening its investigation, the Commerce Department’s inspector general said the events could call into question scientific independence.

The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology expressed similar concerns as it announced its own investigation into Mr. Ross’s actions on Wednesday.

“We are deeply disturbed by the politicization of NOAA’s weather forecast activities for the purpose of supporting incorrect statements by the president,” wrote Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson, the chairwoman of the committee, along with Representative Mikie Sherrill, the chairman of its oversight panel.

The latest challenge to Mr. Trump’s credibility has its origins in one of the more prosaic duties a president has, warning the nation when natural disasters like Hurricane Dorian threaten communities.

On Sept. 1, as Dorian gathered strength over the Atlantic and headed toward the east coast, the president wrote on Twitter that Alabama, among other states, “will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.” Earlier forecast maps had suggested that Alabama might see some effects from the edge of the storm, but by the time of the president’s tweet, the predictions had already changed.

A few minutes after Mr. Trump’s tweet, the National Weather Service in Birmingham posted its own message on Twitter flatly declaring that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from Dorian. We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane Dorian will be felt across Alabama.” The forecasters were correct; Alabama was not struck by the hurricane.

Nonetheless, Mr. Trump was furious at being challenged and kept insisting for days that he had been right. He displayed or posted outdated maps, including one that had been apparently altered with a Sharpie pen to make it look like Alabama might still be in the path of the storm. He had his homeland security adviser release a statement backing him up.

After Mr. Trump told his staff on Sept. 5 to address the matter, Mr. Mulvaney called Mr. Ross, who was in Greece traveling for meetings. Mr. Ross then called Neil Jacobs, the acting administrator of NOAA, at home around 3 a.m. on Friday morning Washington time and instructed him to clear up the agency’s contradiction of the president, according to three people informed about the discussions.

Dr. Jacobs objected to the demand and was told that the political appointees at NOAA would be fired if the situation was not fixed, according to the three individuals, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the episode. The political staff at an agency typically includes a handful of top officials, such as Dr. Jacobs, and their aides. They are appointed by the administration currently in power, as opposed to career government employees, who remain as administrations come and go.

The statement NOAA ultimately issued later on Friday faulted the Birmingham office for a tweet that “spoke in absolute terms that were inconsistent with probabilities from the best forecast products available at the time.”

Dr. Jacobs has since sought to reassure his work force and the broader scientific community concerned about political interference.

“This administration is committed to the important mission of weather forecasting,” Dr. Jacobs told a weather conference in Huntsville, Ala., on Tuesday. “There is no pressure to change the way you communicate or forecast risk in the future.”

In the speech, Dr. Jacobs praised Mr. Trump, calling him “genuinely interested in improving weather forecasts,” and echoed the president’s position that Dorian initially threatened Alabama. “At one point, Alabama was in the mix, as was the rest of the Southeast.”

He also said he still had faith in the Birmingham office. “The purpose of the NOAA statement was to clarify the technical aspects of the potential impacts of Dorian,” Dr. Jacobs said. “What it did not say, however, is that we understand and fully support the good intent of the Birmingham weather forecast office, which was to calm fears in support of public safety.”

Unassuaged, the House science committee has demanded documents and information related to the NOAA statement and its origins.

In addition to emails, memos, text messages and records of telephone calls, the committee asked Mr. Ross to answer a number of questions, including whether any representative of the Executive Office of the President directed NOAA to issue Friday’s statement or specify the language in it.

They also reminded Mr. Ross of statements that he made under oath in his confirmation hearing that he would not interfere with science, particularly at NOAA, which in addition to weather forecasting is the agency responsible for understanding and predicting changes in the earth’s climate.

“Science should be done by scientists,” Mr. Ross testified in that January 2017 hearing. “I support the release of factual scientific data.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Pressed Top Aide to Have Weather Service ‘Clarify’ Forecast That Contradicted Trump

Westlake Legal Group 11dc-storm-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Trump Pressed Top Aide to Have Weather Service ‘Clarify’ Forecast That Contradicted Trump Weather United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr National Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mulvaney, Mick Jacobs, Neil Hurricane Dorian (2019) Commerce Department

WASHINGTON — President Trump, seeking to justify his claim of a hurricane threat to Alabama, pressed aides to intervene with a federal scientific agency, leading to a highly unusual public rebuke of the forecasters who contradicted him, according to people familiar with the events.

In response to the president’s request, Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, told Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary, to have the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration publicly correct the forecasters, who had insisted that Alabama was not actually at risk from Hurricane Dorian.

A senior administration official, who asked not to be identified discussing internal matters, said Mr. Trump told his staff to have NOAA “clarify” the forecasters’ position. NOAA, which is part of the Commerce Department, then issued an unsigned statement saying the Birmingham, Ala., office of the National Weather Service was wrong to refute the president’s warning so categorically.

But the statement only exacerbated the uproar over Mr. Trump’s storm prediction as critics accused his administration of politicizing the weather. The Commerce Department inspector general has opened an investigation, and on Wednesday, a Democrat-controlled House science committee kicked off its own inquiry.

As a result, the furor over Mr. Trump’s storm prediction has evolved from a momentary embarrassment into a sustained political liability for the administration — no longer just a question of a president unwilling to admit a mistake but now a White House willing to force scientists to validate it.

The New York Times reported this week that Mr. Ross warned NOAA’s acting administrator that top employees at the agency could be fired if the situation were not addressed. Mr. Ross’s spokesman has denied that he threatened to fire anyone. A senior official on Wednesday said that if Mr. Ross did make such threats, it was not at the direction of Mr. Mulvaney.

After The Times disclosed Mr. Mulvaney’s role on Wednesday, The Washington Post reported that he was acting at Mr. Trump’s direction, which the senior official confirmed to The Times. But when Mr. Trump was asked by a reporter if he told his chief of staff to instruct NOAA to “disavow those forecasters,” he denied it.

“No, I never did that,” Mr. Trump said. “I never did that. That’s a whole hoax by the fake news media. When they talk about the hurricane and when they talk about Florida and they talk about Alabama, that’s just fake news. It was — right from the beginning, it was a fake story.”

The White House had no comment beyond the president’s remarks. The senior official made a distinction between telling NOAA to “disavow” the forecast and “clarify” it. The White House argument was that the forecasters had gone too far and the president was right to suggest there had been models showing possible impact on Alabama.

The release of the NOAA statement provoked complaints that the Trump administration was improperly intruding in the professional weather forecasting system to rationalize an inaccurate presidential assertion. In opening its investigation, the Commerce Department’s inspector general said the events could call into question scientific independence.

The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology expressed similar concerns as it announced its own investigation into Mr. Ross’s actions on Wednesday.

“We are deeply disturbed by the politicization of NOAA’s weather forecast activities for the purpose of supporting incorrect statements by the president,” wrote Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson, the chairwoman of the committee, along with Representative Mikie Sherrill, the chairman of its oversight panel.

The latest challenge to Mr. Trump’s credibility has its origins in one of the more prosaic duties a president has, warning the nation when natural disasters like Hurricane Dorian threaten communities.

On Sept. 1, as Dorian gathered strength over the Atlantic and headed toward the east coast, the president wrote on Twitter that Alabama, among other states, “will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.” Earlier forecast maps had suggested that Alabama might see some effects from the edge of the storm, but by the time of the president’s tweet, the predictions had already changed.

A few minutes after Mr. Trump’s tweet, the National Weather Service in Birmingham posted its own message on Twitter flatly declaring that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from Dorian. We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane Dorian will be felt across Alabama.” The forecasters were correct; Alabama was not struck by the hurricane.

Nonetheless, Mr. Trump was furious at being challenged and kept insisting for days that he had been right. He displayed or posted outdated maps, including one that had been apparently altered with a Sharpie pen to make it look like Alabama might still be in the path of the storm. He had his homeland security adviser release a statement backing him up.

After Mr. Trump told his staff on Sept. 5 to address the matter, Mr. Mulvaney called Mr. Ross, who was in Greece traveling for meetings. Mr. Ross then called Neil Jacobs, the acting administrator of NOAA, at home around 3 a.m. on Friday morning Washington time and instructed him to clear up the agency’s contradiction of the president, according to three people informed about the discussions.

Dr. Jacobs objected to the demand and was told that the political appointees at NOAA would be fired if the situation was not fixed, according to the three individuals, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the episode. The political staff at an agency typically includes a handful of top officials, such as Dr. Jacobs, and their aides. They are appointed by the administration currently in power, as opposed to career government employees, who remain as administrations come and go.

The statement NOAA ultimately issued later on Friday faulted the Birmingham office for a tweet that “spoke in absolute terms that were inconsistent with probabilities from the best forecast products available at the time.”

Dr. Jacobs has since sought to reassure his work force and the broader scientific community concerned about political interference.

“This administration is committed to the important mission of weather forecasting,” Dr. Jacobs told a weather conference in Huntsville, Ala., on Tuesday. “There is no pressure to change the way you communicate or forecast risk in the future.”

In the speech, Dr. Jacobs praised Mr. Trump, calling him “genuinely interested in improving weather forecasts,” and echoed the president’s position that Dorian initially threatened Alabama. “At one point, Alabama was in the mix, as was the rest of the Southeast.”

He also said he still had faith in the Birmingham office. “The purpose of the NOAA statement was to clarify the technical aspects of the potential impacts of Dorian,” Dr. Jacobs said. “What it did not say, however, is that we understand and fully support the good intent of the Birmingham weather forecast office, which was to calm fears in support of public safety.”

Unassuaged, the House science committee has demanded documents and information related to the NOAA statement and its origins.

In addition to emails, memos, text messages and records of telephone calls, the committee asked Mr. Ross to answer a number of questions, including whether any representative of the Executive Office of the President directed NOAA to issue Friday’s statement or specify the language in it.

They also reminded Mr. Ross of statements that he made under oath in his confirmation hearing that he would not interfere with science, particularly at NOAA, which in addition to weather forecasting is the agency responsible for understanding and predicting changes in the earth’s climate.

“Science should be done by scientists,” Mr. Ross testified in that January 2017 hearing. “I support the release of factual scientific data.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

White House Pressed Agency to Repudiate Weather Forecasters Who Contradicted Trump

Westlake Legal Group 11dc-storm-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 White House Pressed Agency to Repudiate Weather Forecasters Who Contradicted Trump Weather United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr National Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mulvaney, Mick Jacobs, Neil Hurricane Dorian (2019) Commerce Department

WASHINGTON — The White House was directly involved in pressing a federal scientific agency to repudiate the weather forecasters who contradicted President Trump’s claim that Hurricane Dorian would probably strike Alabama, according to several people familiar with the events.

Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, told Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary, to have the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration publicly disavow the forecasters’ position that Alabama was not at risk. NOAA, which is part of the Commerce Department, issued an unsigned statement last Friday in response, saying that the Birmingham, Ala., office was wrong to dispute the president’s warning.

In pressing NOAA’s acting administrator to take action, Mr. Ross warned that top employees at the agency could be fired if the situation was not addressed, The New York Times previously reported. Mr. Ross’s spokesman has denied that he threatened to fire anyone, and a senior administration official on Wednesday said Mr. Mulvaney did not tell the commerce secretary to make such a threat.

The release of the NOAA statement provoked complaints that the Trump administration was improperly intervening in the professional weather forecasting system to justify the president’s mistaken assertion. The Commerce Department’s inspector general is investigating how that statement came to be issued, saying it could call into question scientific independence.

The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, which is controlled by Democrats, announced on Wednesday that it too has opened an investigation into Mr. Ross’s actions.

The White House had no immediate comment on Wednesday, but the senior administration official said Mr. Mulvaney was interested in having the record corrected because, in his view, the Birmingham forecasters had gone too far and the president was right to suggest there had been forecasts showing possible impact on Alabama.

Mr. Trump was furious at being contradicted by the forecasters in Alabama. On Sept. 1, the president wrote on Twitter that Alabama “will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.” A few minutes later, the National Weather Service in Birmingham posted on Twitter that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from Dorian. We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane Dorian will be felt across Alabama.”

For nearly a week, Mr. Trump kept insisting he was right, displaying outdated maps, including one that had been apparently altered with a Sharpie pen to make it look like Alabama might be in the path of the storm. He had his homeland security adviser release a statement backing him up.

Mr. Ross called Neil Jacobs, the acting administrator of NOAA, from Greece where the secretary was traveling for meetings, and instructed Dr. Jacobs to fix the agency’s perceived contradiction of the president, according to three people informed about the discussions.

Dr. Jacobs objected to the demand and was told that the political appointees at NOAA would be fired if the situation was not fixed, according to the three individuals, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the episode.

The political staff at an agency typically includes a handful of top officials, such as Dr. Jacobs, and their aides. They are appointed to their jobs by the administration currently in power, as opposed to career government employees, who remain in their jobs as administrations come and go.

The statement NOAA ultimately issued later on Friday called the Birmingham office’s statement “inconsistent with probabilities from the best forecast products available at the time.”

Dr. Jacobs has since sought to reassure his work force and the broader scientific community concerned about political interference.

“This administration is committed to the important mission of weather forecasting,” Dr. Jacobs told a weather conference in Huntsville, Ala., on Tuesday. “There is no pressure to change the way you communicate or forecast risk in the future.”

In the speech, Dr. Jacobs praised Mr. Trump, calling him “genuinely interested in improving weather forecasts,” and echoed the president’s position that Dorian initially threatened Alabama. “At one point, Alabama was in the mix, as was the rest of the Southeast.”

He also said he still had faith in the Birmingham office. “The purpose of the NOAA statement was to clarify the technical aspects of the potential impacts of Dorian,” Dr. Jacobs said. “What it did not say, however, is that we understand and fully support the good intent of the Birmingham weather forecast office, which was to calm fears in support of public safety.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Gives Companies More Time to Cease Doing Business With Huawei

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-HUAWEI-facebookJumbo U.S. Gives Companies More Time to Cease Doing Business With Huawei Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr International Trade and World Market Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Commerce Department Blacklisting 5G (Wireless Communications)

WASHINGTON — The United States will allow American companies to continue doing business with Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant, for an additional 90 days, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.

The government’s reprieve is intended to give rural telecommunications companies in the United States more time to wean themselves off Huawei, which supplies many of those providers with parts and equipment. Rural telecom firms in the United States have been scrambling to figure out how they will replace Huawei equipment since the Trump administration effectively banned the company from United States communications networks in May and have been lobbying the White House for more time.

“As we continue to urge consumers to transition away from Huawei’s products, we recognize that more time is necessary to prevent any disruption,” Mr. Ross said in a statement.

In a sign that the administration is not completely easing pressure on Huawei, the Commerce Department said that it was also adding 46 affiliates of Huawei to the entity list.

In a terse statement issued on Monday, Huawei called the addition of the affiliates “politically motivated” and unrelated to national security and said that it was being treated “unjustly.”

“These actions violate the basic principles of free market competition,” Huawei said in a statement. “Attempts to suppress Huawei’s business won’t help the United States achieve technological leadership.”

Huawei has been thrust into the middle of President Trump’s trade fight with China and the president has given mixed signals about the telecom giant’s fate. After trade talks broke down in May, Mr. Trump’s Commerce Department added the company to a United States “entity list” that effectively banned the firm from buying American technology and other products without government approval.

Mr. Trump has also called the company a national security threat. The United States has concerns that Huawei could pose a national security threat by being used to help the Chinese government’s espionage efforts and to disrupt American telecommunications infrastructure in the event of a conflict.

But after adding Huawei to the entity list in May, Commerce promptly offered a reprieve for American firms doing business with the company until Aug. 19. Mr. Trump had hinted that he could yield further on Huawei in exchange for China purchasing more American farm products, but no such agreement has emerged.

Speaking to reporters on Sunday, Mr. Trump suggested that there might not be another extension.

“Huawei is a company we may not do business with at all,” he said.

The temporary relief for Huawei comes as trade negotiations between the United States and China remain at an impasse.

Mr. Trump agreed last week to delay some additional tariffs on toys and electronics until December but the United States is still expected to slap levies on more Chinese imports on Sept. 1, Earlier this month it labeled China a currency manipulator for the first time since 1994. China is expected to unveil plans to retaliate.

Despite escalating tension, Mr. Trump said that he and President Xi Jinping of China were planning to speak and that the two countries would continue to have trade talks.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have been urging Mr. Trump to keep his hard line on Huawei. Lifting the ban outright would likely be met with strong bipartisan disapproval.

Speaking on the Fox Business Network on Monday, Mr. Ross said that the administration would offer another extension through mid-November.

The Trump administration has warned that Huawei poses a national security threat and American officials have been warning allies for months that the United States would stop sharing intelligence if they use Huawei and other Chinese technology to build the core of their fifth-generation, or 5G, networks.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Companies Working With Huawei Get More Time to Stop

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-HUAWEI-facebookJumbo U.S. Companies Working With Huawei Get More Time to Stop Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr International Trade and World Market Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Commerce Department Blacklisting 5G (Wireless Communications)

WASHINGTON — The United States will allow American companies to continue doing business with Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant, for an additional 90 days, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.

The government’s reprieve is intended to give rural telecommunications companies in the United States more time to wean themselves off Huawei, which supplies many of those providers with parts and equipment. Rural telecom firms in the United States have been scrambling to figure out how they will replace Huawei equipment since the Trump administration effectively banned the company from United States communications networks in May and have been lobbying the White House for more time.

“As we continue to urge consumers to transition away from Huawei’s products, we recognize that more time is necessary to prevent any disruption,” Mr. Ross said in a statement.

Huawei has been thrust into the middle of President Trump’s trade fight with China and the president has given mixed signals about the telecom giant’s fate. After trade talks broke down in May, Mr. Trump’s Commerce Department added the company to a United States “entity list” that effectively banned the firm from buying American technology and other products without government approval.

Mr. Trump has also called the company a national security threat. The United States has concerns that Huawei could pose a national security threat by being used to help the Chinese government’s espionage efforts and to disrupt American telecommunications infrastructure in the event of a conflict.

But after adding Huawei to the entity list in May, Commerce promptly offered a reprieve for American firms doing business with the company until Aug. 19. Mr. Trump had hinted that he could yield further on Huawei in exchange for China purchasing more American farm products, but no such agreement has emerged.

Speaking to reporters on Sunday, Mr. Trump suggested that there might not be another extension.

“Huawei is a company we may not do business with at all,” he said.

The temporary relief for Huawei comes as trade negotiations between the United States and China remain at an impasse.

Mr. Trump agreed last week to delay some additional tariffs on toys and electronics until December but the United States is still expected to slap levies on more Chinese imports on Sept. 1, Earlier this month it labeled China a currency manipulator for the first time since 1994. China is expected to unveil plans to retaliate.

Despite escalating tension, Mr. Trump said that he and President Xi Jinping of China were planning to speak and that the two countries would continue to have trade talks.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have been urging Mr. Trump to keep his hard line on Huawei. Lifting the ban outright would likely be met with strong bipartisan disapproval.

Speaking on the Fox Business Network on Monday, Mr. Ross said that the administration would offer another extension through mid-November.

In a sign that the administration is not easing pressure on Huawei, the Commerce Department said that it was also adding 46 affiliates of Huawei to the entity list.

The Trump administration has warned that Huawei poses a national security threat and American officials have been warning allies for months that the United States would stop sharing intelligence if they use Huawei and other Chinese technology to build the core of their fifth-generation, or 5G, networks.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Companies Working With Huawei Get More Time to Stop

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-HUAWEI-facebookJumbo U.S. Companies Working With Huawei Get More Time to Stop Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr International Trade and World Market Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Commerce Department Blacklisting 5G (Wireless Communications)

WASHINGTON — The United States will allow American companies to continue doing business with Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant, for an additional 90 days, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.

The government’s reprieve is intended to give rural telecommunications companies in the United States more time to wean themselves off Huawei, which supplies many of those providers with parts and equipment. Rural telecom firms in the United States have been scrambling to figure out how they will replace Huawei equipment since the Trump administration effectively banned the company from United States communications networks in May and have been lobbying the White House for more time.

“As we continue to urge consumers to transition away from Huawei’s products, we recognize that more time is necessary to prevent any disruption,” Mr. Ross said in a statement.

Huawei has been thrust into the middle of President Trump’s trade fight with China and the president has given mixed signals about the telecom giant’s fate. After trade talks broke down in May, Mr. Trump’s Commerce Department added the company to a United States “entity list” that effectively banned the firm from buying American technology and other products without government approval.

Mr. Trump has also called the company a national security threat. The United States has concerns that Huawei could pose a national security threat by being used to help the Chinese government’s espionage efforts and to disrupt American telecommunications infrastructure in the event of a conflict.

But after adding Huawei to the entity list in May, Commerce promptly offered a reprieve for American firms doing business with the company until Aug. 19. Mr. Trump had hinted that he could yield further on Huawei in exchange for China purchasing more American farm products, but no such agreement has emerged.

Speaking to reporters on Sunday, Mr. Trump suggested that there might not be another extension.

“Huawei is a company we may not do business with at all,” he said.

The temporary relief for Huawei comes as trade negotiations between the United States and China remain at an impasse.

Mr. Trump agreed last week to delay some additional tariffs on toys and electronics until December but the United States is still expected to slap levies on more Chinese imports on Sept. 1, Earlier this month it labeled China a currency manipulator for the first time since 1994. China is expected to unveil plans to retaliate.

Despite escalating tension, Mr. Trump said that he and President Xi Jinping of China were planning to speak and that the two countries would continue to have trade talks.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have been urging Mr. Trump to keep his hard line on Huawei. Lifting the ban outright would likely be met with strong bipartisan disapproval.

Speaking on the Fox Business Network on Monday, Mr. Ross said that the administration would offer another extension through mid-November.

In a sign that the administration is not easing pressure on Huawei, the Commerce Department said that it was also adding 46 affiliates of Huawei to the entity list.

The Trump administration has warned that Huawei poses a national security threat and American officials have been warning allies for months that the United States would stop sharing intelligence if they use Huawei and other Chinese technology to build the core of their fifth-generation, or 5G, networks.

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U.S. Companies Get More Time to Stop Working With Huawei

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-HUAWEI-facebookJumbo U.S. Companies Get More Time to Stop Working With Huawei Trump, Donald J Ross, Wilbur L Jr International Trade and World Market Huawei Technologies Co Ltd Commerce Department Blacklisting 5G (Wireless Communications)

WASHINGTON — The United States will allow American companies to continue doing business with Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant, for an additional 90 days, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.

The government’s reprieve is intended to give rural telecommunications companies in the United States more time to wean themselves off Huawei, which supplies many of those providers with parts and equipment. Rural telecom firms in the United States have been scrambling to figure out how they will replace Huawei equipment since the Trump administration effectively banned the company from United States communications networks in May and have been lobbying the White House for more time.

“As we continue to urge consumers to transition away from Huawei’s products, we recognize that more time is necessary to prevent any disruption,” Mr. Ross said in a statement.

Huawei has been thrust into the middle of President Trump’s trade fight with China and the president has given mixed signals about the telecom giant’s fate. After trade talks broke down in May, Mr. Trump’s Commerce Department added the company to a United States “entity list” that effectively banned the firm from buying American technology and other products without government approval.

Mr. Trump has also called the company a national security threat . The United States has concerns that Huawei could pose a national security threat by being used to help the Chinese government’s espionage efforts and to disrupt American telecommunications infrastructure in the event of a conflict.

But after adding Huawei to the entity list in May, Commerce promptly offered a reprieve for American firms doing business with the company until Aug. 19. Mr. Trump had hinted that he could yield further on Huawei in exchange for China purchasing more American farm products, but no such agreement has emerged.

Speaking to reporters on Sunday, Mr. Trump suggested that there might not be another extension.

“Huawei is a company we may not do business with at all,” he said.

The temporary relief for Huawei comes as trade negotiations between the United States and China remain at an impasse.

Mr. Trump agreed last week to delay some additional tariffs on toys and electronics until December but the United States is still expected to slap levies on more Chinese imports on Sept. 1, Earlier this month it labeled China a currency manipulator for the first time since 1994. China is expected to unveil plans to retaliate.

Despite escalating tension, Mr. Trump said that he and President Xi Jinping of China were planning to speak and that the two countries would continue to have trade talks.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have been urging Mr. Trump to keep his hard line on Huawei. Lifting the ban outright would likely be met with strong bipartisan disapproval.

Speaking on the Fox Business Network on Monday, Mr. Ross said that the administration would offer another extension through mid-November.

In a sign that the administration is not easing pressure on Huawei, the Commerce Department said that it was also adding 46 affiliates of Huawei to the entity list.

The Trump administration has warned that Huawei poses a national security threat and American officials have been warning allies for months that the United States would stop sharing intelligence if they use Huawei and other Chinese technology to build the core of their fifth-generation, or 5G, networks.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Economy Slows, Denying Trump 3% Talking Point

The American economy is slowing, dragged down by trade tensions and weak growth overseas. But there are few signs that the decade-long expansion is on the verge of stalling out.

Gross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services produced in the economy, rose at a 2.1 percent annual rate in the second quarter, according to preliminary data released by the Commerce Department on Friday.

That is significantly lower than the 3.1 percent growth rate in the first quarter. And it falls far short of the 3 percent target that President Trump has repeatedly promised. Data revisions released Friday wiped away what had been a prized talking point for the White House: G.D.P. grew 2.5 percent for all of 2018, down from the 3 percent previously reported.

During the 2016 campaign, Mr. Trump slammed President Barack Obama for being “the first president in modern history not to have a single year of 3 percent growth.” Nonetheless, Mr. Trump hailed the report on Friday, even as he renewed his criticism of the Federal Reserve, calling its policies an “anchor wrapped around our neck” in a post on Twitter.

Fed officials have said repeatedly that Mr. Trump’s comments will not affect their decisions. Still, they are expected to cut interest rates at their meeting next week to try to prevent a more significant slowdown.

But while a cut is all but certain, Friday’s report might actually weaken the case for further stimulus later this year — something that investors have been anticipating but that Fed officials have not promised. Inflation, which had been running below the bank’s 2 percent target, picked up in the second quarter: Consumer prices rose at a 2.3 percent rate, or 1.8 percent excluding the volatile food and energy components. The report also showed that final demand — a measure of underlying growth that strips out some of the most volatile components — accelerated this spring.

The big quarter-to-quarter swings in the growth data are almost certainly exaggerated. The larger trend shows that the economy has cooled since last year, when tax cuts and government spending gave growth a temporary jolt. But the strong job market and robust consumer spending are keeping the recovery on track, even as various forces — foreign and domestic — threaten to knock it off course.

Still, on Friday, the S&P 500-stock index and the Nasdaq composite index closed at new highs after the G.D.P. report was released.

“It’s a good economy, but it’s got fragilities in it,” said Diane Swonk, chief economist for the accounting firm Grant Thornton. “You’d expect to feel more euphoria and more underlying strength, and instead what we’re seeing is fault lines.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157531398_6bfe1a8e-1792-46f0-aeba-82818843adb6-articleLarge U.S. Economy Slows, Denying Trump 3% Talking Point United States Politics and Government United States Economy Trump, Donald J Recession and Depression International Trade and World Market Gross Domestic Product Consumer Behavior Commerce Department

Consumer spending, which accounts for two-thirds of the economy, snapped back in the second quarter after a weak start in the first three months of the year.CreditSpencer Platt/Getty Images

Consumer spending is the bedrock of the economy and has been resilient throughout the recovery. So it was a worrying sign when spending slumped in late 2018 and early 2019, dragged down by stock market volatility, a prolonged government shutdown and harsh winter weather.

But consumer spending roared back in the spring, rising at a 4.3 percent rate. Government spending, which picked up in the second quarter after being depressed by the shutdown, also helped lift growth.

Unfortunately, other parts of the economy look much weaker. Residential investment, which includes housing construction, declined for the sixth consecutive quarter. Business investment also declined and exports slumped as manufacturers, in particular, were battered by tariffs and slowing demand from overseas.

Meta Fab, a contract manufacturer outside Portland, Ore., has had strong sales growth in recent years, enough that it finally went ahead with a long-delayed expansion project. But now, just as its new 21,000-foot facility is nearing completion, the company is seeing sales slow, said Tony Varela, a manager there.

“Does it give us any pause?” Mr. Varela said. “Absolutely.”

Mr. Varela said it is hard to know for sure what is behind the drop-off in business, which has hit in just the last couple of months. His company’s costs increased when Mr. Trump imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports early in his term. The company largely passed those on to its customers in the form of higher prices, which might be hurting its business, Mr. Varela said.

Meta Fab originally planned to spend $1 million on new equipment for the facility, but it paused those plans when costs rose — a decision Mr. Varela is glad of now. Other companies are also taking a cautious approach. At a recent industry gathering, human resources officers told Mr. Varela that their companies were putting the brakes on hiring.

“It was a pretty resounding that every one of the H.R. managers has actually frozen any new hiring,” he said.

If that caution spreads, it will eventually affect consumers as well, said Ellen Zentner, chief United States economist for Morgan Stanley.

“There’s nothing that I can point to about the consumer and say I’m worried,” she said. “But how long can business investment remain this sluggish without spilling over into jobs and the consumer?”

Already, there are signs that consumers are keeping a wary eye on the state of the economy. Recent confidence surveys have found that people feel good about the economy now but are more nervous about the future.

The second quarter of this year was the 10th anniversary of the end of the Great Recession. Assuming another downturn hasn’t already begun, this is now the longest expansion on record.

But while the recovery has been durable, it has not been particularly strong. Wage growth has been anemic for much of the past decade, and income gains have gone disproportionately to the richest households. Parts of the country that suffered the most during the recession have in many cases fallen further behind since it ended.

Beef ‘O’ Brady’s, a Tampa-based chain of sports bars, has seen traffic slow in many locations in recent months. Chris Elliott, the company’s chief executive, attributed the decline in part to increased competition. But he also said it reflected caution from consumers, particularly in the smaller towns where many of its restaurants are. That has forced the company to focus on keeping prices low.

“What I find interesting is that with the economy as good as it is, and as many people employed as they are, how focused the restaurant consumer is on value,” Mr. Elliott said. “There are a lot of people in our economy that are still not doing that great.”

There are some signs that the record expansion could be nearing its end. Some forecasting models, particularly those based on the market for government bonds, have been flashing warning signs. And surveys show that economists think the risk of a recession in 2020 has been gradually rising.

“Obviously, the headwinds are increasing,” said Joe Brusuelas, chief economist for RSM, a financial consulting firm. Europe is close to a recession or perhaps already in one. A trade deal with China looks to be months away at best. A flare-up in the trade war could be enough to cause a recession, he said.

On the other hand, this week’s budget deal between the Trump administration and Congress eased the risk of another government shutdown or a standoff over the debt ceiling. And if the United States and China were to reach a deal this fall, the expansion could get a new life, Mr. Brusuelas said.

“Once that uncertainty is off the table, you’ll see a release of demand,” he said.

More about the economy
‘We’re Full,’ Car Dealers Say as Auto Sales Slow After a Long Boom

Jul 23, 2019

Fed Chair Powell Signals Rate Cut as Economic Risks Loom

Jul 10, 2019

Global Recession Risks Are Up, and Central Banks Aren’t Ready

Jul 9, 2019

Strong Jobs Report Eases Fears of Damage From Trade War

Jul 5, 2019

Last year was one of the best years of the recovery — but it wasn’t as good as it appeared initially.

The Commerce Department on Friday revised G.D.P. data back to 2014, an annual process that incorporates data not available when earlier estimates were released. The revisions made 2017 look stronger than first reported, while 2018 now looks weaker.

Before the revisions, growth last year met Mr. Trump’s 3 percent target by one of two commonly used measures. (It fell just short by the other.) Now, by the White House’s preferred method, G.D.P. grew just 2.5 percent last year.

Mr. Trump’s 3 percent target matters for politics, not economics. But the slower growth last year does have real-world implications. It suggests that the economy came into this year in weaker shape than previously believed, and it could help explain why business investment has lagged.

“That’s half a percentage point less momentum in the economy than we thought before,” said Ben Herzon, an economist for Macroeconomic Advisers, a forecasting firm. “We had been expecting Q2 to be the beginning of the downshift, but it looks like it started before.”

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G.D.P. Report Shows U.S. Economy Grew at 2.1% Rate in 2nd Quarter

Economic growth slowed last spring, but don’t panic: The decade-long expansion has lost some momentum, but there’s little reason to think it is about to stall out.

Gross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services produced in the economy, rose at a 2.1 percent annual rate in the second quarter, according to preliminary data released by the Commerce Department on Friday. That represents a significant deceleration from the 3.1 percent growth rate in the first quarter.

But the big swings in the quarterly data are almost certainly exaggerated. The larger trend shows that the economy has cooled since last year, when tax cuts and government spending gave growth a temporary jolt. But the strong job market and robust consumer spending are keeping the recovery on track, even as trade tensions and a slowing global economy are threatening to knock it off course.

“It’s a good economy, but it’s got fragilities in it,” said Diane Swonk, chief economist for the accounting firm Grant Thornton. “You’d expect to feel more euphoria and more underlying strength, and instead what we’re seeing is fault lines.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157531398_6bfe1a8e-1792-46f0-aeba-82818843adb6-articleLarge G.D.P. Report Shows U.S. Economy Grew at 2.1% Rate in 2nd Quarter United States Politics and Government United States Economy Trump, Donald J Recession and Depression International Trade and World Market Gross Domestic Product Consumer Behavior Commerce Department

Consumer spending, which accounts for two-thirds of the economy, snapped back in the second quarter after a weak start in the first three months of the year.CreditSpencer Platt/Getty Images

Growth in the first quarter looked good on the surface, but the underlying details were much weaker. The pattern reversed in the second quarter. Final demand — a measure of underlying growth that strips out some of the most volatile components — actually accelerated.

The biggest factor: consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of the American economy. Stock market volatility, a prolonged government shutdown and harsh winter weather all contributed to weak spending early in the year. But consumer spending roared back in the spring, rising at a 4.3 percent rate. Government spending, which picked up in the second quarter after being depressed by the shutdown, also helped lift growth.

Unfortunately, other parts of the economy look much weaker. Business investment declined and exports slumped as manufacturers, in particular, were battered by tariffs and slowing demand from overseas. If that continues, it could slow hiring or even lead to layoffs, which would hurt consumer spending as well.

“There’s nothing that I can point to about the consumer and say I’m worried,” said Ellen Zentner, chief United States economist for Morgan Stanley. “But how long can business investment remain this sluggish without spilling over into jobs and the consumer?”

The housing market continued its recent struggle. Residential fixed investment, which includes housing construction, declined for the sixth consecutive quarter.

Last year was one of the best years of the recovery — but it wasn’t as good as it appeared initially.

The Commerce Department on Friday revised G.D.P. data back to 2014, an annual process that incorporates data not available when earlier estimates were released. One big change in the data: growth in the middle of 2018 was not quite as strong as it seemed at first.

The change robbed President Trump of a favorite talking point: Before the revisions, growth last year was 3 percent by one of two commonly used measures. (It fell just short by the other.) Now, by the White House’s preferred method, G.D.P. grew just 2.5 percent last year.

Mr. Trump’s 3 percent target matters for politics, not economics. But the slower growth last year does have real-world implications. It suggests that the economy came into this year in weaker shape than previously believed, and it could help explain why business investment has lagged.

“That’s half a percentage point less momentum in the economy than we thought before,” said Ben Herzon, an economist for Macroeconomic Advisers, a forecasting firm. “We had been expecting Q2 to be the beginning of the downshift, but it looks like it started before.”

The second quarter of this year was the 10th anniversary of the end of the Great Recession. Assuming another downturn hasn’t already begun, this is now the longest expansion on record.

There are some signs that the record run could be nearing its end. Some forecasting models, particularly those based on the market for government bonds, have been flashing warning signs, and surveys show that economists think the risk of a recession in 2020 has been gradually rising.

“Obviously, the headwinds are increasing,” said Joe Brusuelas, chief economist for RSM, a financial consulting firm. Europe is close to a recession or perhaps already in one. A trade deal with China looks to be months away at best. A flare-up in the trade war could be enough to cause a recession, he said.

On the other hand, this week’s budget deal between the Trump administration and Congress eased the risk of another government shutdown or a standoff over the debt ceiling. And if the United States and China were to reach a deal this fall, that could give the expansion a new life, Mr. Brusuelas said.

“Once that uncertainty is off the table, you’ll see a release of demand,” he said.

Friday’s report is one of the last major pieces of economic data before next week’s Federal Reserve Board meeting, when policymakers are widely expected to cut interest rates in an effort to stimulate the economy.

The report is unlikely change the Fed’s mind. But it could affect how policymakers think about the need for further cuts later this year — something investors have been anticipating but that Fed officials have yet to commit to.

The strong details in Friday’s report might weaken the case for further cuts. The Fed has been paying particular attention to inflation, which had been running below its 2 percent target. But inflation picked up in the second quarter: Consumer prices rose at a 2.3 percent rate, or 1.8 percent excluding the volatile food and energy components, according to Friday’s G.D.P. report.

More about the economy
‘We’re Full,’ Car Dealers Say as Auto Sales Slow After a Long Boom

Jul 23, 2019

Fed Chair Powell Signals Rate Cut as Economic Risks Loom

Jul 10, 2019

Global Recession Risks Are Up, and Central Banks Aren’t Ready

Jul 9, 2019

Strong Jobs Report Eases Fears of Damage From Trade War

Jul 5, 2019

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