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Westlake Legal Group > Democratic Party

Inslee Out. Hickenlooper Out. De Blasio? Town Hall May Be Last Gasp.

He’s entrenched toward the rear in fund-raising totals. He rejects the validity of the various polls showing him at zero percent.

And he also acknowledges that he will probably not qualify for the third Democratic presidential debate next month.

Yet Mayor Bill de Blasio refuses to “accept the premise” of questions about the wisdom of his continued candidacy, even as other candidates who shared his political standing, like Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington and the former Colorado governor, John Hickenlooper, dropped out of the crowded Democratic field this month.

Instead, the mayor persists in the belief that he has a story worth telling — and that his stewardship in New York City should be viewed as a way to cast light on how the nation can recover from a Trump White House.

On Sunday, Mr. de Blasio may get his last best chance to tell his story, when he appears on a one-hour town hall on CNN at 7 p.m. in New York; Ana Cabrera will serve as the moderator, and 100 likely primary voters from the region will make up the audience.

Which Democrats Are Leading the 2020 Presidential Race?

June 14, 2019

Westlake Legal Group democratic-polls-promo-1560481207024-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v6 Inslee Out. Hickenlooper Out. De Blasio? Town Hall May Be Last Gasp. Trump, Donald J Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Polls and Public Opinion Politics and Government New York City Democratic Party de Blasio, Bill CNN

Jim Crounse, a senior adviser to Mr. de Blasio’s campaign, called the town hall a “big opportunity” for the mayor, who has already hosted 65 town-hall style meetings during his six years as mayor of the country’s largest city.

“Unlike the debates, where quick responses were required, a town hall format will allow the mayor to tell his story, articulate his message and interact with people,” Mr. Crounse said.

But even if Democratic voters approve of Mr. de Blasio’s vision, there is evidence that they do not believe that he should be the candidate to execute it.

“Exposure is not his problem,” said Douglas Muzzio, a public affairs professor at Baruch College. “You can turn people off with exposure as well as turn them on.”

The mayor participated in the first two Democratic debates, and he has made regular appearances on MSNBC, Fox News, CNN and on other nationally televised programs.

He has already tried to grab voter attention by making President Trump his foil. He recently spent 40 minutes speaking with one of the president’s strongest supporters in the media, Fox News host Sean Hannity, in a raucous televised interview.

In recent days, Mr. de Blasio has sought to capitalize on his police commissioner’s decision to fire the police officer whose chokehold led to the death of Eric Garner, an unarmed man whose repeated “I can’t breathe” pleas helped galvanize the Black Lives Matter movement.

On CNN, the mayor called it a “never-again moment.” On MSNBC, he said the episode taught him that the Justice Department is not “dispensing justice anymore,” and that city police forces need to adopt de-escalation strategies. And at his news conference hours after the decision was announced, the mayor paraphrased Martin Luther King Jr., saying we should use the Garner death to try to “transform the suffering into progress.”

Still, Mr. de Blasio reported just over 6,600 donors on his last campaign finance filing and he remains at 1 percent or less in most polls, including a recent CNN poll. A poll in May from Quinnipiac University found that the mayor had the highest unfavorability rating among the Democratic candidates at 45 percent.

“I don’t know if he’s turning people off, but he’s not turning them on,” Professor Muzzio said.

And when poor weather forced the mayor to cancel a trip to a labor conference in Iowa on Wednesday, a technical glitch turned his video call into a made-for-social media moment: The pitch of his voice was altered into “Alvin and the Chipmunks” territory.

Fellow Democrats from New York say that the mayor must find some way to use the CNN town hall to give voters a reason to donate to his campaign, and boost his poll numbers ever so slightly.

“It’s going to be a test of whether or not he can say something that is so newsworthy that it can give him the same bump that a good debate would, since it doesn’t look like he’ll make the next debate stage,” said the Rev. Al Sharpton, a former presidential candidate and host of a show on MSNBC.

“I would never call one thing a make-or-break moment,” Mr. Sharpton added. “But I can’t see how, even after this, he has an easy path forward.”

If Mr. de Blasio was in need of a role model, he could refer to March 10, the date of Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s CNN town hall. Mr. Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., was a relative unknown before his CNN appearance; afterward, he received hundreds of thousands of donors and a deluge of attention.

“It was the singular most game-changing moment on the campaign,” said Lis Smith, a spokeswoman for the Buttigieg campaign who formerly worked for Mr. de Blasio’s first mayoral campaign. “Overnight, it launched him from being an unknown quantity to being in the hunt with U.S. senators and a former vice president in the polls.”

Ms. Smith’s free advice: Prepare, but don’t overprepare. You don’t want too many answers that seem scripted. Be clear about what you are bringing to the table that the Democratic Party and the country need.

“The stage is yours for an hour. There are no bells and whistles, no other candidate to parry with,” Ms. Smith said. “There’s no one to hide behind.”

Even if Mr. de Blasio should falter, his candidacy may continue simply because he lacks the immediate political alternatives that some of his peers have. Mr. Hickenlooper announced that he is running for the Senate in Colorado. Steve Bullock, the Democratic governor of Montana, who will appear in his own CNN town hall that will air just before Mr. de Blasio’s, is also doing poorly in the polls, and Democratic leaders have urged him to drop out and run for the Senate.

If Mr. de Blasio abandons the presidential trail, he will simply return to New York, where he will serve out the last 16 months of his mayoralty, before vacating the office because of term limits. At the moment, that prospect seems far from the mayor’s mind.

As long as he has a chance to speak with voters, “anything can happen because we are in the age of social media,” he said on Thursday, echoing comments from the previous week.

“I think things move now on social media that a day or two can make a huge amount of difference,” he said then.

“The only thing I’d say to you is,” he added, “as more candidates drop out, there’s more opportunity for everyone who remains.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Joe Biden’s Poll Numbers Mask an Enthusiasm Challenge

PROLE, Iowa — Joseph R. Biden Jr. is coasting in the national polls. Surveys show him ahead of his Democratic rivals in hypothetical matchups against President Trump. He has maintained a lead in Iowa all summer, despite facing months of controversies over his record and his campaign missteps.

But less than two weeks before Labor Day, when presidential campaigns traditionally kick into high gear, there are signs of a disconnect between his relatively rosy poll numbers and excitement for his campaign on the ground here, in the state that begins the presidential nominating process.

In conversations with county chairs, party strategists and dozens of voters this week at Mr. Biden’s events, many Democrats in Iowa described a case for Mr. Biden, the former vice president, that reflected shades of the one his wife, Jill Biden, bluntly sketched out on Monday. “You may like another candidate better, but you have to look at who is going to win,” she said, citing Mr. Biden’s consistent lead in early surveys.

The first ad of Mr. Biden’s campaign, released this week in Iowa, flashed some of his positive poll results against Mr. Trump on screen, and voter after voter cited those numbers in outlining their support for him, saying that defeating the president was their most urgent priority.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 21biden-enthusiasm3-articleLarge Joe Biden’s Poll Numbers Mask an Enthusiasm Challenge Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Iowa Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr

There are signs of an enthusiasm gap among Iowa voters. “He’s doing O.K., but I think a lot of his initial strength was name recognition,” one county chairwoman said.CreditTom Brenner for The New York Times

That stands in stark contrast to the way voters explain their support for candidates like Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who drew 12,000 people to an event this week in Minnesota, Iowa’s northern neighbor, or Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who also draws large crowds and maintains a core base of die-hard fans.

They and others trail Mr. Biden in most polls and face plenty of their own skeptics, but they also have followings rooted in zealous support for their ideas rather than the political calculus that many voters describe in assessing Mr. Biden.

The former vice president certainly has devoted fans, in Iowa and around the country, and continues to enjoy good will and respect from Democratic voters.

But the risks of a campaign argument that is heavily reliant on strong poll numbers, which can be fickle in a tumultuous election, were on vivid display throughout Mr. Biden’s trip to Iowa, as voters repeatedly emphasized that their support for him was closely linked to what they perceived as his strength against Mr. Trump.

It’s a case they make even as polls have shown several other candidates, namely Mr. Sanders, Ms. Warren and Senator Kamala Harris of California, running strongly against Mr. Trump, and as strategists caution that such theoretical matchups are hardly predictive of an election that’s more than a year away. The polls at this early stage are also partly a reflection of a candidate’s name recognition.

“If there would be a horse leading right now for me, it would probably be Biden, because all the polls indicate he would beat Trump handily,” said Rick Spellerberg, 57, as he waited to see Mr. Biden address a group of voters gathered in a gazebo in Prole, a small rural town, on Tuesday afternoon.

Mr. Spellerberg, of Prole, said that he was “still open” to other candidates and that he was planning to see former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas speak afterward.

Asked how Mr. Biden had been doing, Mr. Spellerberg replied, “He hasn’t been doing anything wrong, let’s put it that way.”

Later that day, Mr. Biden addressed another group gathered on a muggy lawn in front of a picturesque barn in Urbandale, as large flies zoomed overhead. Attendees frequently said that Mr. Biden was one of their top two or three choices — again, citing the polls.

“Basically whoever can beat Donald Trump, but I think Biden has the best chance,” said Cheryl Wheeler, 66, of Urbandale. “He’s in the lead, and a proven leader.”

She said she “probably would stick with Biden,” but noted, “I’ll go vote for whoever can do it.”

Samy El-Baroudi, 56, of Des Moines, called Ms. Warren “absolutely amazing, a brilliant woman, brings great ideas.” But Mr. Biden is his current first choice — followed by Ms. Warren and Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey.

Mr. Biden is “human, very electable, which is a major concern,” said Mr. El-Baroudi. “Very real and very sincere, he speaks from the heart. Sometimes that means you put your foot in your mouth. Isn’t that what they liked about Trump?”

A Monmouth University poll from this month showed Mr. Biden leading with the support of 28 percent of likely Iowa caucusgoers — virtually unchanged from the same poll’s results from April.

But Patrick Murray, the director of Monmouth’s Polling Institute, who recently spent time in Iowa, said those numbers did not give the full picture of Mr. Biden’s support in the state.

The Biden campaign points out that his lead in the polls has been durable, despite a summer of controversies.CreditTom Brenner for The New York Times

“I did not meet one Biden voter who was in any way, shape or form excited about voting for Biden,” Mr. Murray said. “They feel that they have to vote for Joe Biden as the centrist candidate, to keep somebody from the left who they feel is unelectable from getting the nomination.”

And JoAnn Hardy, the Democratic chairwoman of Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, where most of the Democratic candidates recently attended the gathering known as the Wing Ding dinner, attributed Mr. Biden’s lead in part to simply being well-known.

“He’s doing O.K., but I think a lot of his initial strength was name recognition,” she said. “As the voters get to meet the other candidates, he may be surpassed soon. I would not be surprised.”

Asked who was poised to do that, she replied: “Elizabeth Warren has the most incredible organization in this state. I could see it being Warren.”

Some of Mr. Biden’s allies view Ms. Warren as his most significant threat in Iowa for now, aware of the extensive organization she built early, her surge in the Monmouth poll and other polls here this summer, and her ability to connect with progressives who traditionally play an important role in the caucuses.

But representatives for the Biden campaign argued that several candidates have risen this summer, only to see their numbers fall back down to earth. His position as poll-leader has been steady up to this point, they stress, though his favorability rating has dipped since he re-entered the political arena, and his advantage has ebbed in some early-state polls.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 25bidenrunsHFO1-videoSixteenByNine3000 Joe Biden’s Poll Numbers Mask an Enthusiasm Challenge Warren, Elizabeth Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Iowa Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr

Joseph R. Biden Jr. was a two-term vice president and spent 36 years as a senator. But his front-runner status in the Democratic primary will be tested by the party’s desire for generational change.CreditCreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times

“We reject the premise that the only reason Biden is doing well in the polls is because of name recognition,” said T.J. Ducklo, Mr. Biden’s national press secretary. “Voters have genuine affection for Joe Biden. They know him and his character, which is why their support for him has been so durable in the face of relentless attacks by all of his primary opponents.”

Yet there have also been self-inflicted controversies. His trip to Iowa earlier this month was marred by multiple gaffes, a dynamic that dominated coverage of the visit and gave some Democrats here pause.

On his visit this week, he was frequently flanked by teleprompters, though he often walked away from them. He misstated the dates of the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy in a passing remark, something the Republican National Committee seized on.

Still, there are plenty of voters who adore Mr. Biden, praising his experience and his empathy.

“Joe Biden is stability for me, stability and common sense,” Peggy Halterman, 65, of Martensdale, said, describing him as akin to “a member of the family.” She added, “I don’t care about his gaffes. It’s the person inside.”

An “Iowa 4 Biden” sign in Prole, Iowa. “If there would be a horse leading right now for me, it would probably be Biden,” one voter there said, stressing that he was “still open” to other candidates.CreditTom Brenner for The New York Times

After a slow organizational start, Mr. Biden’s campaign now appears to have the largest operation in the state, employing about 75 staff members there, both by its count and according to the outlet Iowa Starting Line, which tracks staff hires. The Warren campaign, which has been praised for its creative ground game, claims more than 65 staff members in Iowa.

“We plan to win here, and so that’s why we’ve got such a huge staff,” said Jake Braun, Mr. Biden’s Iowa state director, adding that around 60 of the staff members are devoted to field operations and that the number of volunteers has increased each week. There are 13 offices in the state so far, with plans to keep growing, he said. And Mr. Biden is regularly landing new endorsements in Iowa, including Michael Gronstal, the former majority leader of the State Senate, and several prominent Democrats who supported Mr. Sanders in 2016.

Like Dr. Biden and some of Mr. Biden’s supporters, Mr. Braun cited the polls when asked how Mr. Biden would maintain momentum as other candidates become better-known — and potentially viewed as more viable.

“We are doing better than everybody else in a lot of these key states we need to win,” he said, before going on to describe the coalition Mr. Biden is seeking to build, including outreach to independents, students, white working-class people and people of color.

Yet for all the talk about polls at Biden events, in his own ad and from his own team, Mr. Biden himself, who often insists that he’s more focused on the “marathon” of the campaign, struggled to discuss the issue this week, offering seemingly contradictory statements about how much attention should be paid to polling.

“I notice you didn’t ask me why I’m ahead in all the polls still,” he said in an exchange with a reporter on Tuesday. “I notice you didn’t ask me about how I feel about the new CNN poll. I notice you don’t ask me those things.”

Asked by another reporter if polls should be ignored, Mr. Biden replied, “You already do, so it’s O.K.”

But, he added, “These polls will go up and they will go down. I’ve got to come out here and I’ve got to earn the support of these people.”

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Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Accuses Jewish Democrats of ‘Great Disloyalty’

Westlake Legal Group 21dc-trumpjews-facebookJumbo Trump Accuses Jewish Democrats of ‘Great Disloyalty’ United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Omar, Ilhan Muslim Americans Jews and Judaism Democratic Party Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) anti-semitism

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Tuesday that any Jewish person who votes for a Democrat is guilty of ignorance or “great disloyalty,” intensifying his efforts to drive in a partisan wedge over religion and support for Israel even as he appeared to draw on an anti-Semitic trope.

Mr. Trump did not go into specifics about what he considered to be Jews’ disloyalty, but his language is reminiscent of the anti-Semitic smear that Jews have a “dual loyalty” and are more devoted to Israel than they are to their own countries.

Mr. Trump’s comments were the latest turn in a controversy over religion and politics that erupted last week after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, at the president’s urging, barred an official visit to Israel by the first two Muslim women in Congress, Representatives Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, both Democrats. The two have been harshly critical of Israel’s policies toward the Palestinians.

The move prompted condemnation from diplomats and analysts across the political spectrum that in Mr. Trump’s zeal to curry favor with Jewish voters and tighten his alliance with Mr. Netanyahu, he risked endangering the bipartisan support of Israel that has long existed in the United States, the country’s most reliable ally.

“It’s unclear who @POTUS is claiming Jews would be ‘disloyal’ to,” Jonathan Greenblatt, the chief executive of the Anti-Defamation League, said on Twitter, using a common acronym to refer to the president of the United States, “but charges of disloyalty have long been used to attack Jews.”

Logan Bayroff, the communications director for J Street, a progressive Jewish organization, said: “It is dangerous and shameful for President Trump to attack the large majority of the American Jewish community as unintelligent and ‘disloyal.’ But it is no surprise that the president’s racist, disingenuous attacks on progressive women of color in Congress have now transitioned into smears against Jews.”

The accusation that Jews have dual loyalty is nothing new, but it is a toxic element of white nationalist philosophy. In his comments on Tuesday, the president lashed out anew at Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib for suggesting in a news conference on Monday that the United States should cut off aid to Israel. The two are vocal proponents of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, which advocates cutting ties with Israel until it ends its occupation of the West Bank. It is often condemned by its critics as inherently anti-Semitic.

“Where has the Democratic Party gone?” Mr. Trump said in the Oval Office, at the tail end of a freewheeling round of comments to reporters during a visit by the president of Romania. “Where have they gone where they are defending these two people over the state of Israel? And I think any Jewish people that vote for a Democrat, I think it shows either a total lack of knowledge or great disloyalty.”

The remark was the latest from a president who has a history of language that stokes racial and religious divisions. That language has been echoed recently in the statements and writings of deranged people bent on committing violence.

On Tuesday, the F.B.I. said it had arrested a Nazi sympathizer who threatened to butcher a Hispanic woman and boasted that Mr. Trump would wipe out nonwhites in a “racial war and crusade.” Earlier this month, a 21-year-old man accused of killing 20 people and injuring dozens more at a Walmart in El Paso wrote a manifesto echoing Mr. Trump’s language calling migrants crossing the southwestern border “an invasion,” and saying that “this attack is a response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas.”

The president’s “disloyalty” comment prompted a fresh round of outrage on Tuesday from Jewish leaders, who called it divisive and dangerous.

Representative Ted Deutch, Democrat of Florida, said Mr. Trump should apologize for using “the kind of language that ends up fueling the anger of white nationalists.”

“What the president is doing is creating an environment in which anti-Semitism can flourish,” Mr. Deutch said on CNN.

Mr. Trump’s remarks on Tuesday had broad implications: According to the Pew Research Center, 79 percent of Jews voted for Democrats in last year’s midterm congressional elections. The president’s comments were in keeping with his strategy of trying to make the two Muslim lawmakers, along with two other progressive congresswomen of color who have been among his most vocal critics, the face of the Democratic Party.

“A.O.C. plus three,” Mr. Trump said, referring to Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, who, along with Ms. Tlaib, Ms. Omar and Representative Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts, makes up the first-term quartet, which he has repeatedly attacked in explicitly racial terms. “That’s what I call it: Just take A.O.C. plus three. And you should see the things that the four of them have said about Israel over the last couple of years.”

Some conservative allies of Mr. Trump in the Jewish community sprung to his defense on Tuesday, arguing that the president’s comments were giving voice to a sense of befuddlement among many American Jews that too many Democrats appeared to be tolerating extreme views about Israel within their ranks. Matt Brooks, the executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, said the views of Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, both of whom have made remarks condemned as anti-Semitic, were far outside the mainstream of their party and the country as a whole, and should be rejected by other Democrats.

“There is a growing cancer within the Democratic Party right now of people who are supportive of B.D.S., who are advocating a shift in the U.S.-Israel relationship away from the strong bond that exists now between this administration and the government in Israel,” Mr. Brooks said. “As the center of gravity in the Democratic Party moves further and further to the left, this problem becomes clearer and more acute. It’s certainly not an indictment of the entire Democratic Party, but the unfortunate part is that none of them are speaking up and speaking out.”

In fact, the Democrat-led House voted overwhelmingly last month to condemn the boycott-Israel movement. During the debate, Ms. Tlaib, who is Palestinian-American, passionately defended the movement as a legitimate economic protest to advance human rights, calling Israel’s policies toward Palestinians “racist” and comparing the campaign to American boycotts of Nazi Germany.

On Monday in St. Paul, Minn., Ms. Omar raised the prospect of cutting off aid to Israel, arguing that a central purpose of the visit that she and Ms. Tlaib had hoped to make there was to conduct oversight over the $3 billion in funding that United States provides.

“We must be asking, as Israel’s ally, the Netanyahu government stop the expansion of settlements on Palestinian land and ensure full rights for Palestinians if we are to give them aid,” Ms. Omar said. “We know Donald Trump would love nothing more than to use this issue to pit Muslims and Jewish Americans against each other. The Muslim community and the Jewish community are being othered and made into the boogeyman by this administration.”

In an emotional moment during the news conference, Ms. Tlaib broke down in tears when discussing why she turned down a last-minute offer by Mr. Netanyahu’s government to allow her to visit her 90-year-old grandmother in the West Bank if she promised not to speak out about the boycott during her stay.

“I’m her free bird, so why would I come back and be caged and bow down when my election rose her head up high, gave her dignity for the first time?” Ms. Tlaib said of her grandmother. “You don’t let anybody tell you that you’re less than or humiliate you.”

Mr. Trump ridiculed the congresswoman for the display, saying her grief was not genuine.

“All of a sudden, she starts with tears, tears — I don’t buy it,” Mr. Trump said. “I don’t buy it for a second, because I’ve seen her in a very vicious mood at campaign rallies.”

“I saw a woman who was violent and vicious and out of control,” Mr. Trump added, without elaborating on what violence he was referring to.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Accuses Jewish Democrats of ‘Great Disloyalty’

Westlake Legal Group 21dc-trumpjews-facebookJumbo Trump Accuses Jewish Democrats of ‘Great Disloyalty’ United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Omar, Ilhan Muslim Americans Jews and Judaism Democratic Party Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) anti-semitism

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Tuesday that any Jewish person who votes for a Democrat is guilty of ignorance or “great disloyalty,” intensifying his efforts to drive in a partisan wedge over religion and support for Israel even as he appeared to draw on an anti-Semitic trope.

Mr. Trump did not go into specifics about what he considered to be Jews’ disloyalty, but his language is reminiscent of the anti-Semitic smear that Jews have a “dual loyalty” and are more devoted to Israel than they are to their own countries.

Mr. Trump’s comments were the latest turn in a controversy over religion and politics that erupted last week after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, at the president’s urging, barred an official visit to Israel by the first two Muslim women in Congress, Representatives Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, both Democrats. The two have been harshly critical of Israel’s policies toward the Palestinians.

The move prompted condemnation from diplomats and analysts across the political spectrum that in Mr. Trump’s zeal to curry favor with Jewish voters and tighten his alliance with Mr. Netanyahu, he risked endangering the bipartisan support of Israel that has long existed in the United States, the country’s most reliable ally.

“It’s unclear who @POTUS is claiming Jews would be ‘disloyal’ to,” Jonathan Greenblatt, the chief executive of the Anti-Defamation League, said on Twitter, using a common acronym to refer to the president of the United States, “but charges of disloyalty have long been used to attack Jews.”

Logan Bayroff, the communications director for J Street, a progressive Jewish organization, said: “It is dangerous and shameful for President Trump to attack the large majority of the American Jewish community as unintelligent and ‘disloyal.’ But it is no surprise that the president’s racist, disingenuous attacks on progressive women of color in Congress have now transitioned into smears against Jews.”

The accusation that Jews have dual loyalty is nothing new, but it is a toxic element of white nationalist philosophy. In his comments on Tuesday, the president lashed out anew at Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib for suggesting in a news conference on Monday that the United States should cut off aid to Israel. The two are vocal proponents of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, which advocates cutting ties with Israel until it ends its occupation of the West Bank. It is often condemned by its critics as inherently anti-Semitic.

“Where has the Democratic Party gone?” Mr. Trump said in the Oval Office, at the tail end of a freewheeling round of comments to reporters during a visit by the president of Romania. “Where have they gone where they are defending these two people over the state of Israel? And I think any Jewish people that vote for a Democrat, I think it shows either a total lack of knowledge or great disloyalty.”

The remark was the latest from a president who has a history of language that stokes racial and religious divisions. That language has been echoed recently in the statements and writings of deranged people bent on committing violence.

On Tuesday, the F.B.I. said it had arrested a Nazi sympathizer who threatened to butcher a Hispanic woman and boasted that Mr. Trump would wipe out nonwhites in a “racial war and crusade.” Earlier this month, a 21-year-old man accused of killing 20 people and injuring dozens more at a Walmart in El Paso wrote a manifesto echoing Mr. Trump’s language calling migrants crossing the southwestern border “an invasion,” and saying that “this attack is a response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas.”

The president’s “disloyalty” comment prompted a fresh round of outrage on Tuesday from Jewish leaders, who called it divisive and dangerous.

Representative Ted Deutch, Democrat of Florida, said Mr. Trump should apologize for using “the kind of language that ends up fueling the anger of white nationalists.”

“What the president is doing is creating an environment in which anti-Semitism can flourish,” Mr. Deutch said on CNN.

Mr. Trump’s remarks on Tuesday had broad implications: According to the Pew Research Center, 79 percent of Jews voted for Democrats in last year’s midterm congressional elections. The president’s comments were in keeping with his strategy of trying to make the two Muslim lawmakers, along with two other progressive congresswomen of color who have been among his most vocal critics, the face of the Democratic Party.

“A.O.C. plus three,” Mr. Trump said, referring to Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, who, along with Ms. Tlaib, Ms. Omar and Representative Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts, makes up the first-term quartet, which he has repeatedly attacked in explicitly racial terms. “That’s what I call it: Just take A.O.C. plus three. And you should see the things that the four of them have said about Israel over the last couple of years.”

Some conservative allies of Mr. Trump in the Jewish community sprung to his defense on Tuesday, arguing that the president’s comments were giving voice to a sense of befuddlement among many American Jews that too many Democrats appeared to be tolerating extreme views about Israel within their ranks. Matt Brooks, the executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, said the views of Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, both of whom have made remarks condemned as anti-Semitic, were far outside the mainstream of their party and the country as a whole, and should be rejected by other Democrats.

“There is a growing cancer within the Democratic Party right now of people who are supportive of B.D.S., who are advocating a shift in the U.S.-Israel relationship away from the strong bond that exists now between this administration and the government in Israel,” Mr. Brooks said. “As the center of gravity in the Democratic Party moves further and further to the left, this problem becomes clearer and more acute. It’s certainly not an indictment of the entire Democratic Party, but the unfortunate part is that none of them are speaking up and speaking out.”

In fact, the Democrat-led House voted overwhelmingly last month to condemn the boycott-Israel movement. During the debate, Ms. Tlaib, who is Palestinian-American, passionately defended the movement as a legitimate economic protest to advance human rights, calling Israel’s policies toward Palestinians “racist” and comparing the campaign to American boycotts of Nazi Germany.

On Monday in St. Paul, Minn., Ms. Omar raised the prospect of cutting off aid to Israel, arguing that a central purpose of the visit that she and Ms. Tlaib had hoped to make there was to conduct oversight over the $3 billion in funding that United States provides.

“We must be asking, as Israel’s ally, the Netanyahu government stop the expansion of settlements on Palestinian land and ensure full rights for Palestinians if we are to give them aid,” Ms. Omar said. “We know Donald Trump would love nothing more than to use this issue to pit Muslims and Jewish Americans against each other. The Muslim community and the Jewish community are being othered and made into the boogeyman by this administration.”

In an emotional moment during the news conference, Ms. Tlaib broke down in tears when discussing why she turned down a last-minute offer by Mr. Netanyahu’s government to allow her to visit her 90-year-old grandmother in the West Bank if she promised not to speak out about the boycott during her stay.

“I’m her free bird, so why would I come back and be caged and bow down when my election rose her head up high, gave her dignity for the first time?” Ms. Tlaib said of her grandmother. “You don’t let anybody tell you that you’re less than or humiliate you.”

Mr. Trump ridiculed the congresswoman for the display, saying her grief was not genuine.

“All of a sudden, she starts with tears, tears — I don’t buy it,” Mr. Trump said. “I don’t buy it for a second, because I’ve seen her in a very vicious mood at campaign rallies.”

“I saw a woman who was violent and vicious and out of control,” Mr. Trump added, without elaborating on what violence he was referring to.

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Julián Castro Is the 10th Candidate to Qualify for the Next Democratic Debate

The former housing secretary Julián Castro on Tuesday became the 10th Democratic presidential candidate to qualify for the next round of debates, after a new national poll showed him earning 2 percent support.

The poll, conducted for CNN by SSRS, a research firm, was the fourth qualifying poll to show Mr. Castro having cleared that hurdle. He had already met the other qualifying standard set by the Democratic National Committee by receiving donations from more than 130,000 people.

In qualifying for the third set of debates, Mr. Castro joins nine other candidates who have also done so: former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.; Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey; Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.; Senator Kamala Harris of California; Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas; Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont; Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; and the entrepreneur Andrew Yang.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 14castro-videoSixteenByNine3000 Julián Castro Is the 10th Candidate to Qualify for the Next Democratic Debate Presidential Election of 2020 Democratic Party democratic national committee Debates (Political) Castro, Julian

The former San Antonio mayor entered the presidential race in January and has had a tough time distinguishing himself from a crowded field of Democratic candidates. But Julián Castro is proving his strength is going head-to-head with his opponents.CreditCreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times

“With two standout debate performances, Secretary Castro has been building momentum for his candidacy,” his campaign manager, Maya Rupert, said in a statement. “He has never wanted to be a ‘flash in the pan’ candidate, but rather has continued to build support and momentum by leading the field on critical issues and showing voters every day why he’s the best candidate to go toe-to-toe with Donald Trump.”

Candidates are required to both have 130,000 unique donors and register at least 2 percent support in four polls in order to make the cut for the next debates, scheduled for Sept. 12 and 13 in Houston — though it is not yet clear whether there will be one night of debates or two. The candidates have until Aug. 28 to reach those benchmarks.

All of the candidates who qualify for the debate stage in September will also make the cut for the following round of debates, in October.

Mr. Castro, who is also a former mayor of San Antonio, released a new ad last week in which he sharply criticized President Trump and accused him of inspiring the mass shooting in El Paso this month that left 22 people dead. The ad aired on Fox News in Bedminster, N.J., while Mr. Trump was vacationing there, and shortly before the CNN poll was conducted.

More reporting on the Castro campaign
Why Julián Castro’s Obama Moment Didn’t Last
As a young mayor, he was given a prime-time speaking spot at the 2012 Democratic Convention. He is still trying to see how far that star turn can take him.

Aug. 18, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 14castro-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Julián Castro Is the 10th Candidate to Qualify for the Next Democratic Debate Presidential Election of 2020 Democratic Party democratic national committee Debates (Political) Castro, Julian

The new CNN poll also helped Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii inch closer to debate qualification. Like Mr. Castro, she earned 2 percent support in the poll, leaving her just two surveys short of meeting the D.N.C.’s standard; she has already surpassed the donor threshold. Ms. Gabbard left the trail last week in order to fulfill her obligations with the National Guard, and is scheduled to resume campaign activities this Sunday.

Tom Steyer, the former hedge fund investor turned impeachment activist, needs only one more qualifying poll to make the cut for the debates, having already met the donor standard. When he entered the race in July, his team said he planned to spend at least $100 million on the race. In the weeks since, he has spent millions of dollars on internet and television ads that have helped him attract donors. He received 1 percent support in Tuesday’s CNN poll.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who received less than 1 percent support in Tuesday’s poll, is the only other candidate still shy of making the cut who has earned 2 percent support in any qualifying poll. She has amassed more than 100,000 individual donors.

No other lower-tier candidate in the 23-person field is particularly close to making the debate stage. Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington announced Monday that he had crossed the 130,000 donor threshold, but he needs to earn 2 percent support in four polls in the next week to qualify.

And on Tuesday, the self-help author Marianne Williamson announced that she had also met the donor requirement, but like Mr. Inslee, she needs to earn 2 percent in four qualifying polls.

Mr. Castro, who has focused his campaign around issues like education and immigration, was buoyed by a strong performance in the first debate. He confronted Mr. O’Rourke over his immigration policy and argued for decriminalizing border crossings — a stance many of his rivals have since adopted.

Mr. Castro saw an uptick in fund-raising after the first debate, but his performance in polling has continued to hover in the low single digits.

The CNN poll released Tuesday had Mr. Biden in the lead with 29 percent of Democrats or Democratic-leaning voters selecting him as their first choice for the nomination. Mr. Sanders finished next with 15 percent support, essentially tied with Ms. Warren, who had 14 percent.

Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Harris came in next, both with 5 percent support. Ms. Harris had earned 17 percent support when the CNN survey was last conducted in late June, immediately following a standout performance in the first debate.

The poll was conducted Aug. 15 to 18 and surveyed 402 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who are registered to vote. It had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 6 percentage points.

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Julián Castro Qualifies for the Next Democratic Debate

The former housing secretary Julián Castro on Tuesday became the 10th Democratic presidential candidate to qualify for the next round of debates, after a new national poll showed him earning 2 percent support.

The poll, conducted for CNN by SSRS, a research firm, was the fourth qualifying poll to show Mr. Castro having cleared that hurdle. He had already met the other qualifying standard set by the Democratic National Committee by receiving donations from more than 130,000 people.

In qualifying for the third set of debates, Mr. Castro joins nine other candidates who have also done so: former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.; Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey; Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.; Senator Kamala Harris of California; Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas; Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont; Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; and the entrepreneur Andrew Yang.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 14castro-videoSixteenByNine3000 Julián Castro Qualifies for the Next Democratic Debate Presidential Election of 2020 Democratic Party democratic national committee Debates (Political) Castro, Julian

The former San Antonio mayor entered the presidential race in January and has had a tough time distinguishing himself from a crowded field of Democratic candidates. But Julián Castro is proving his strength is going head-to-head with his opponents.CreditCreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times

“With two standout debate performances, Secretary Castro has been building momentum for his candidacy,” his campaign manager, Maya Rupert, said in a statement. “He has never wanted to be a ‘flash in the pan’ candidate, but rather has continued to build support and momentum by leading the field on critical issues and showing voters every day why he’s the best candidate to go toe-to-toe with Donald Trump.”

Candidates are required to both have 130,000 unique donors and register at least 2 percent support in four polls in order to make the cut for the next debates, scheduled for Sept. 12 and 13 in Houston — though it is not yet clear whether there will be one night of debates or two. The candidates have until Aug. 28 to reach those benchmarks.

All of the candidates who qualify for the debate stage in September will also make the cut for the following round of debates, in October.

Mr. Castro, who is also a former mayor of San Antonio, released a new ad last week in which he sharply criticized President Trump and accused him of inspiring the mass shooting in El Paso this month that left 22 people dead. The ad aired on Fox News in Bedminster, N.J., while Mr. Trump was vacationing there, and shortly before the CNN poll was conducted.

More reporting on the Castro campaign
Why Julián Castro’s Obama Moment Didn’t Last
As a young mayor, he was given a prime-time speaking spot at the 2012 Democratic Convention. He is still trying to see how far that star turn can take him.

Aug 18, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 14castro-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Julián Castro Qualifies for the Next Democratic Debate Presidential Election of 2020 Democratic Party democratic national committee Debates (Political) Castro, Julian

The new CNN poll also helped Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii inch closer to debate qualification. Like Mr. Castro, she earned 2 percent support in the poll, leaving her just two surveys short of meeting the D.N.C.’s standard; she has already surpassed the donor threshold. Ms. Gabbard left the trail last week in order to fulfill her obligations with the National Guard, and is scheduled to resume campaign activities this Sunday.

Tom Steyer, the former hedge fund investor turned impeachment activist, needs only one more qualifying poll to make the cut for the debates, having already met the donor standard. When he entered the race in July, his team said he planned to spend at least $100 million on the race. In the weeks since, he has spent millions of dollars on internet and television ads that have helped him attract donors. He received 1 percent support in Tuesday’s CNN poll.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who received less than 1 percent support in Tuesday’s poll, is the only other candidate still shy of making the cut who has earned 2 percent support in any qualifying poll. She has amassed more than 100,000 individual donors.

No other lower-tier candidate in the 23-person field is particularly close to making the debate stage. Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington announced Monday that he had crossed the 130,000 donor threshold, but he needs to earn 2 percent support in four polls in the next week to qualify.

And on Tuesday, the self-help author Marianne Williamson announced that she had also met the donor requirement, but like Mr. Inslee, she needs to earn 2 percent in four qualifying polls.

Mr. Castro, who has focused his campaign around issues like education and immigration, was buoyed by a strong performance in the first debate. He confronted Mr. O’Rourke over his immigration policy and argued for decriminalizing border crossings — a stance many of his rivals have since adopted.

Mr. Castro saw an uptick in fund-raising after the first debate, but his performance in polling has continued to hover in the low single digits.

The CNN poll released Tuesday had Mr. Biden in the lead with 29 percent of Democrats or Democratic-leaning voters selecting him as their first choice for the nomination. Mr. Sanders finished next with 15 percent support, essentially tied with Ms. Warren, who had 14 percent.

Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Harris came in next, both with 5 percent support. Ms. Harris had earned 17 percent support when the CNN survey was last conducted in late June, immediately following a standout performance in the first debate.

The poll was conducted Aug. 15 to 18 and surveyed 402 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who are registered to vote. It had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 6 percentage points.

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Jill Biden, Stressing Trump Matchup, Makes a Blunt Case for Her Husband

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Jill Biden laid out the political calculus of her husband’s presidential campaign in extraordinarily blunt terms on Monday, directly acknowledging that some voters may prefer other candidates but urging them to support Joseph R. Biden Jr. anyway, in an effort to defeat President Trump.

As Mr. Biden, the early poll leader, works — and sometimes struggles — to excite a Democratic base that has moved left since he last ran for office, Dr. Biden, campaigning in New Hampshire, called on Democrats to prioritize perceived electability over enthusiasm for individual contenders or their policies.

“You may like another candidate better, but you have to look at who is going to win,” she said, addressing a gathering of educators. “And if education is your main issue, Joe is that person.”

“Your candidate might be better on, I don’t know, health care than Joe is, but you’ve got to look at who’s going to win this election,” Dr. Biden said. “And maybe you have to swallow a little bit and say, ‘O.K., I sort of personally like so-and-so better,’ but your bottom line has to be that we have to beat Trump.”

Her remarks were first reported by NBC News.

A Biden aide noted that Dr. Biden had also said that many people in the room were not sold on her husband — a suggestion that she was simply trying to persuade.

“I know that not all of you are committed to my husband, and I respect that, but I want you to think about your candidate, his or her electability, and who’s going to win this race,” she said, pointing to polls showing Mr. Biden with consistent leads.

Mr. Biden has indeed led both national and state polls throughout the summer, though he has seen his leads in Iowa and New Hampshire slide in some surveys, and his overall favorability rating has dipped as a presidential candidate. He will return to Iowa on Tuesday for another campaign swing.

His campaign is slated to start airing its first television ad on Tuesday, part of what his team said was a “high six-figure” ad buy aimed at several Iowa media markets over the next few weeks. The one-minute spot, called “Bones,” hits some of the same electability themes that Dr. Biden had raised.

“We know in our bones this election is different,” the ad says. “The stakes are higher. The threat more serious. We have to beat Donald Trump, and all the polls agree, Joe Biden is the strongest Democrat to do the job.”

Many political strategists caution that it is far too early for general election matchup polling to be predictive of the outcome in November 2020. Still, Mr. Biden’s allies have pointed to several surveys that do show him ahead of his rivals in matchups against Mr. Trump nationally or in key states including Ohio.

He and his allies often argue that of all of the Democratic candidates running, his more centrist approach, potential appeal to independents and longstanding ties to labor would help him win back states Mr. Trump won in the industrial Midwest.

Dr. Biden’s unvarnished emphasis on pragmatism reflected that bet, even as many other candidates believe that the way to defeat Mr. Trump is by energizing young voters, particularly younger voters of color, through boldly progressive policy proposals.

“Electability is not only the most important issue, it’s virtually the only issue,” Dick Harpootlian, a South Carolina state senator and longtime friend of Mr. Biden’s, said about Dr. Biden’s remarks.

Asked whether he perceived the comments as an acknowledgment of enthusiasm challenges for Mr. Biden, Mr. Harpootlian replied: “This is not an admission of anything. It’s an admission that he is the strongest person to beat Donald Trump. That’s all it is.”

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Why Julián Castro’s Obama Moment Didn’t Last

The night before Julián Castro delivered the keynote address at the 2012 Democratic National Convention for President Barack Obama’s re-election, he had eaten by himself at the T.G.I. Friday’s not far from the Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, N.C.

No one recognized the 37-year-old mayor of San Antonio. As the other delegates party-hopped around Charlotte, Mr. Castro studied his notes over dinner and went to bed by 9 p.m. He wanted to be well-rested before giving the biggest speech of his political career — a speech that he and his family now remember as transforming everything.

“The next morning, when we walked down the street, he was just mobbed,” said Mr. Castro’s twin brother, Joaquin, who is a United States congressman. “It was this instantaneous example of how things can change so quickly.”

Mr. Castro’s speech, in a prime-time slot, burst him onto the national stage, just like the one that had catapulted Mr. Obama to superstardom in 2004. Mr. Castro symbolized a new moment in American politics: The grandson of a Mexican immigrant with a fourth-grade education, the young mayor talked about his family’s story, one so common for millions of Latinos and yet almost nonexistent at the highest level of national politics. “My family’s story isn’t special,” Mr. Castro said. “What’s special is the America that makes our story possible.”

The applause was raucous. The reviews were overwhelmingly glowing (“A Political Star is Born” and “A Latino Obama?” the headlines read). People started to recognize Mr. Castro, even if they often confused him for Joaquin. On the way back to San Antonio, a fan stopped him in a men’s room at the Atlanta airport to shake his hand. (“He wanted to shake my hand in a men’s room!” Mr. Castro said. “I couldn’t believe it.”) Political pundits declared the Castro brothers the future of the party.

“He was this kind of phenom and, you know, was this symbol of the growing diverse country,” David Axelrod, Mr. Obama’s chief strategist, said of Julián.

Party leaders waited for him to seize on his “Obama Moment.” And waited. And waited. And waited.

The keynote, as it turned out, became a turning point that didn’t quite turn him.

Now, as Mr. Castro seeks the Democratic nomination for president, he finds himself in a completely different political landscape. In 2012, both parties were courting Latino voters, and an incumbent Democratic president needed help softening his image as the “deporter in chief.” Today, the incumbent Republican president is pushing to build a wall between the United States and Mexico and has separated thousands of migrant families at the border.

Mr. Castro must convince his party that his Latino appeal, his record, his relative moderation and, most important, the themes he laid out in that 2012 speech — family, the immigrant experience, the importance of education — will resonate across a nation more divided than when he had his first star moment.

So far, however, Mr. Castro has mostly languished in polls, eclipsed first by another Texan, Beto O’Rourke, and then by another mayor, Pete Buttigieg. He is currently one qualifying poll away from earning a spot in the September debate.

Some Democrats wondered earlier this year whether Mr. Castro’s problem was that he peaked too soon. One challenge was that there was no clear path forward from the Charlotte convention. His most logical next step, running for statewide office, was all but impossible given his home state: Republicans had dominated Texas politics for more than two decades. The state was changing — by the 2020 presidential election, the Democratic-leaning Latino population could turn it purple. But back then, Mr. Castro seemed stuck.

In 2014, he became Mr. Obama’s housing secretary. Two years later, he stumped for Hillary Clinton and was floated as a potential running mate. Last year he published a memoir, the kind that maybe-presidential candidates often publish. (“In the spirit of a young Barack Obama’s ‘Dreams From My Father,’” the book’s description reads.)

After Mr. Castro’s solid performance in the first presidential debate in June, Democrats asked his finance chair, Scott Atlas, a lawyer in Houston, where he’d been hiding Mr. Castro. Mr. Atlas would go red in the face reminding them of his 2012 speech. “I said, ‘He’s been hiding in plain sight!’”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_60474364_f3544a57-c0fe-4ffd-bfdc-3fc290d6c2f2-articleLarge Why Julián Castro’s Obama Moment Didn’t Last United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 Democratic Party Castro, Julian

Julián Castro’s record as mayor of San Antonio earned him national praise. CreditMichael Stravato for The New York Times

Even before the speech, Mr. Castro’s record as mayor, particularly his success implementing a universal pre-K program, had earned him national praise. At a 2010 forum on economic development at the White House, Mr. Castro, who was 35 at the time, looked so young that Mr. Obama joked that he thought he was an intern. “This guy’s a mayor?” he asked.

Two years later, Mr. Obama’s re-election campaign saw that his path to defeat Mitt Romney relied on high Latino turnout to hold Nevada and Colorado.

This would be a challenge for the president, who faced criticism from immigration activists and Latino advocacy groups over aggressive deportation policies and his failure to make progress on overhauling the immigration system.

Mr. Obama’s campaign manager, Jim Messina, crunched the numbers and called the White House from the campaign’s Chicago headquarters to report that the re-election effort had a Latino problem.

In June 2012, Mr. Obama announced an executive action to protect some young undocumented immigrants, known as Dreamers. (It also helped that Mr. Romney had stumbled by saying he favored “self deportation.”) The campaign needed something else, though, recalled Frank Sharry, the executive director of America’s Voice, an immigration advocacy group. The Democratic Party, he said, was asking, “Who is the Obama-like Latino who can electrify the convention?”

Enter Mr. Castro, in one of the most coveted speaking gigs in American politics.

Mr. Obama’s speech at the 2004 convention, a rebuke of a divided red and blue America under President George W. Bush, had been such a sensation that it laid the groundwork for his 2008 presidential campaign. Before the 2012 convention, Mr. Castro hadn’t ever delivered a speech using a teleprompter.

“I’d never been in front of a national audience before, and this would be 19,000 people in the arena and another 25 million watching, so it was literally stepping up to a different league,” Mr. Castro recalled.

The Obama campaign had polled how several potential keynote speakers might go over, but Mr. Castro’s personal narrative — the single mom, the bootstraps, the journey from public schools in a poverty-stricken, predominantly Hispanic area of San Antonio to degrees from Stanford and Harvard — seemed like the best message.

“The Latino thing was important to us because that was one place where we had to run up the numbers against Romney,” Mr. Messina said. But mostly it was Mr. Castro’s biography that appealed. “He was the Latino version of Barack Obama — at least in his story, if not the talent.”

Mr. Castro took a break from rehearsing his keynote speech with his wife, Erica, and daughter, Carina, in Charlotte, N.C.CreditLisa Krantz/San Antonio Express-News

In July 2012, Mr. Messina called Mr. Castro in San Antonio to offer him the keynote address at the upcoming convention. Mr. Castro sent an aide out to scramble around South Texas to find the nearest teleprompter so he could begin to practice.

The Obama campaign sent a couple of speech coaches to run through practice sessions in Charlotte. “He’d start delivering it and they’d say, ‘Don’t yell into the mic,’ and, ‘Don’t lean back and forth from the mic,’” recalled his communications director at the time, Jaime Castillo.

Mr. Castro told Mr. Messina that he wanted to write his own speech, or at least most of it. Ever the student, he studied the greatest hits of convention speeches. There was Ann Richards’s 1988 address (“Poor George, he can’t help it — he was born with a silver foot in his mouth”), Mario Cuomo’s 1984 speech (“This nation is more ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ than it is just a ‘shining city on a hill’”), and, of course, Mr. Obama’s in 2004 speech (“There’s not a liberal America and a conservative America; there’s the United States of America”).

“The common theme that connected them was the way you communicate your personal story, your aspirational vision for the future of the country — those things never go out of style,” Mr. Castro said.

The campaign largely agreed to leave it to the Castro brothers, but they did cut “this idea of infrastructure of opportunity we’d both been talking about for a while because they thought it sounded too technical,” Joaquin Castro said. The brothers convinced the Obama campaign to leave the line about the American dream being “not a sprint or even a marathon, but a relay,” passed from one generation or another — a line Julián Castro uses often in his 2020 campaign.

Mr. Castro was introduced by his twin brother, Joaquin, at the convention in 2012.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Mr. Castro divided his remarks into three parts: First, there was the story of growing up the son of a single mom, raised partly by his grandmother Victoria, who had left Mexico when she was a child and worked as a maid most of her life, “barely scraping by, but still working hard to give my mother, her only child, a chance in life so that my mother could give my brother and me an even better one.” Then, he criticized Mr. Romney, delivering the red meat that the party and re-election campaign demanded. (“Mitt Romney, quite simply, doesn’t get it.”) Finally, he told voters why they should choose Mr. Obama.

He’d done several rehearsals on the stage, but 30 seconds after Joaquin introduced him, Mr. Castro clutched the podium, felt the heat of the bright lights and thought he might pass out. (He later confessed that to Mr. Obama, who said that he, too, felt faint before his 2004 keynote.) Mr. Castro got more comfortable as he went on. Watch it on YouTube and you can see his hands unclenching, his expression soften. By the time Mr. Castro concluded, reciting the Spanish words his grandmother had whispered to him — “Que dios te bendiga,” may God bless you — the room roared.

“It didn’t launch him the way it did Barack Obama,” Mr. Messina said. “But he gave a very good speech that was good for us and, for a moment, he was this very big thing nationally.”

In his 2020 campaign, Mr. Castro has led the party left in the immigration debate. He was the first candidate to propose repealing a section of the immigration laws that criminalizes illegal border crossings. It’s a position that some Republicans believe can be used against the Democrats in a general election where “decriminalization” likely won’t play as well as a proposal framed simply around ending family separations. But almost all of the major Democratic candidates have followed Mr. Castro’s lead on border crossing policy, reflecting both where primary voters stand on the issue and a desire to draw a sharp contrast between the party and President Trump’s views.

“Our current president, for whatever reason, has decided to paint brown people as dangerous and dirty and unwanted, so we need brown people represented,” said Patti Solis Doyle, a Democratic operative and one of Mrs. Clinton’s campaign managers in 2008.

The Castro brothers believe that the current climate makes the echoes of that first major speech and their family’s story even more potent. They dusted off the 2012 keynote address to prepare for the first Democratic primary debate in Miami.

During the debate, as his opponents spoke, Mr. Castro scribbled on a notepad a closing statement that was essentially a 47-second distillation of his 20-minute convention speech. He repeated the story of his immigrant roots, and he declared that the nation would soon say “adiós” to Mr. Trump. “There is a direct line between what I talked about in 2012 and what I am campaigning on in 2019,” Mr. Castro said.

Mr. Castro and Senator Cory Booker during the Democratic presidential debate in Miami in June.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Online donations in the two days after the June debate spiked 3,255 percent from the previous two days, according to the campaign. Caucusgoers started to show up in greater numbers to his town halls in Iowa. The merchandise on his website inspired by the Mexican lottery started to sell out.

“Before the debate, people said, ‘I don’t know why you’re doing this. This guy isn’t ready for prime time,’” Mr. Atlas, the lawyer and finance chair, said. “After the debate, they said, ‘I take it back! I take it back!’”

Mr. Castro delivered a less standout performance in the second debate in Detroit. But he is optimistic about his chances to make the September debate stage, in his home state of Texas. His mom, Rosie, said her son, who doesn’t look or act like most of his opponents, has an advantage. “He’s a calm guy. He’s not a good ol’ boy. He’s not a back slapper. He’s quiet and introspective and likes to read,” she said. “People always end up underestimating him.”

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Trump and Netanyahu Put Bipartisan Support for Israel at Risk

WASHINGTON — By pushing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel into barring an official visit by the first two Muslim women in Congress, President Trump is doubling down on a strategy aimed at dividing the Democratic Party and pushing some Jewish voters into the arms of Republicans.

But people in both parties warn that over the long term, the president could further erode bipartisan support for Israel, which has long relied on the United States as its most important ally.

In the run-up to his 2020 re-election campaign, Mr. Trump has spent months attacking the two freshman Democrats, Representatives Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, angering the Democratic Party as he seeks to paint Republicans as Israel’s only true friend in Washington.

He has also marched in lock step with Mr. Netanyahu, who faces legislative elections in a few weeks. Mr. Netanyahu’s hard-line settlement policies and rigid bond with ultra-Orthodox Jews have also alienated Democrats, including many American Jews, posing a threat to the bipartisanship that has been fundamental to the two countries’ relationship since Israel’s founding in 1948.

If Israel becomes a partisan issue in the United States, advocates warn that there could be negative consequences for both countries. Israel’s security would be severely undermined without the political, economic and military support that flows from bipartisan backing in Washington. And if Israel is weakened, so too is the United States’ position in the Middle East, which is always stronger when both parties are behind it.

“You have a situation where Netanyahu is relying on Trump to help him in his re-election, and Trump is expecting Netanyahu to reciprocate,” said Martin S. Indyk, a former ambassador to Israel under President Bill Clinton. Mr. Trump’s election strategy, he said, was to paint Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar as the “face” of a Democratic Party that is anti-Israel because the two women have been critical of the country.

In a string of Twitter posts on Friday evening, Mr. Trump said just that, writing that Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar “are fast becoming the face of the Democrat Party” and that Ms. Tlaib had behaved “obnoxiously” toward Israel.

The bond between Israel and the United States has long been rooted in what Aaron David Miller, a veteran Middle East negotiator for both Republican and Democratic administrations, calls “a confluence of interests and values,” such as free speech and an open society. The cancellation of the congresswomen’s trip, he said, raised questions about those shared values.

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President Trump and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel in March at the White House. The two leaders have a close relationship.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar both support the boycott Israel movement and had planned a four-day fact-finding tour that was largely centered around examining the condition of Palestinians under Israeli occupation.

Tensions deepened on Friday, when Ms. Tlaib rejected an offer by Israel to allow her to visit her grandmother, who lives on the West Bank, on humanitarian grounds, switching course after she had agreed in writing not to “promote boycotts against Israel” during her trip. Ms. Tlaib’s reversal under pressure drew criticism from Mr. Trump, who said on Twitter that she had “grandstanded.”

“There is a perception, right or wrong, true or untrue, that the Netanyahu administration and the Trump administration are working hand in glove,” said Mark Mellman, the president of Democratic Majority for Israel, a nonprofit that works to ensure that the Democratic Party remains pro-Israel.

Israel’s stance, Mr. Mellman said, has made his task harder. “In our hyperpartisan world,” he said, “the friend of my enemy is my enemy, and to the extent that Democrats look at Trump as the enemy, if they see Israel or the Netanyahu administration as operating hand in glove, that gives them real pause.”

Mr. Netanyahu made clear his affinity for the Republican Party long before Mr. Trump moved into the White House. His relations with President Barack Obama were so strained that in 2015, in a rare breach of protocol, he circumvented the White House in accepting an invitation to address the Republican-led Congress. Representative Nancy Pelosi, then the Democratic leader, called the address an “insult” to the United States, and dozens of Democrats skipped it.

With Mr. Trump in office, the Netanyahu-Republican alliance has only strengthened. Mr. Trump’s policies, including moving the American Embassy to Jerusalem and recognizing Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights (where Mr. Netanyahu named a new town after Mr. Trump in June, erecting a sign with his name in gold block letters), have made him more popular in Israel than he is at home. When the president pushed Mr. Netanyahu to bar entry to Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, he was effectively calling in a favor.

Even the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the powerful and assiduously bipartisan pro-Israel lobbying group known as AIPAC, has split with the Netanyahu government on its decision. AIPAC typically backs Israel no matter who is in power, but its view is that while presidents and prime ministers come and go, support for Israel in Congress is essential.

“What is the one mantra of the pro-Israel organizations for 30, 40 years?” asked William Kristol, a conservative critic of Mr. Trump who fought Mr. Obama’s policies toward Israel. “It’s congressional support. Presidents have their own views, but Congress is the core. So to pick a fight with members of Congress, which is going to force half of Congress to rally to their defense, is really foolish.”

While support for Israel among congressional Democrats remains strong, polls show that support has long been slipping among Democratic voters. A survey last year by the Pew Research Center found the partisan divide in support for Israel was at its widest in four decades, with 79 percent of Republicans sympathizing with Israel in its dispute with the Palestinians, versus 27 percent of Democrats.

That is evident on the presidential campaign trail, where Democrats once vied to see who could be the most supportive of Israel. Now, some are vying to see who can be the most critical. Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman, recently called Mr. Netanyahu a “racist.” Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont accused the Netanyahu government of “racism” and proposed using American aid to Israel as leverage to change its policies.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi in March at the AIPAC conference in Washington. The pro-Israel lobbying group split with the Netanyahu government on its decision to bar an official visit from two Democratic members of Congress.CreditJose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Matt Brooks, the executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, which aims to woo Jews to the Republican Party, said it was wrong to lay the dwindling Democratic support at the feet of Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu.

“When you have a leading Democratic presidential candidate like Bernie Sanders who can call the prime minister of Israel a racist and nobody says anything, you tell me who’s responsible for it,” Mr. Brooks said. “We have a president who is the most pro-Israel president ever in history.”

Traveling to Israel is a rite of passage for members of Congress, especially freshmen. Representative Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader, and Representative Steny H. Hoyer, the Democratic leader, held a joint news conference in Jerusalem on Sunday, along with dozens of members, in a show of bipartisan support.

“We understand the importance of this relationship,” Mr. McCarthy said then. “We understand undeniably the bond that has to be maintained, and you have that support in the House.”

Both men urged then that Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar be allowed to visit. When Israel refused, citing what officials viewed as the congresswomen’s one-sided itinerary, Mr. McCarthy issued a careful statement on Twitter saying they should have come with their colleagues, and that it was “unfortunate that a few freshmen members declined to join this opportunity to hear from all sides.”

As Mr. Trump and his fellow Republicans have sought to portray themselves as the only party for American Jews, Democrats in Congress have gone to great lengths this year to show their support for the Jewish state and to isolate Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar.

Last month, the House overwhelmingly passed a resolution condemning the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel, known as B.D.S. After Ms. Omar criticized AIPAC in remarks that were widely construed as anti-Semitic, Democratic leaders called on her to apologize — she did — and the House later passed a resolution condemning hatred of any kind.

But the Israeli government’s decision to bar the two women has strong supporters of Israel like Representative Josh Gottheimer, Democrat of New Jersey and no fan of Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar, taking issue with the Jewish state. Mr. Gottheimer, a centrist, called Israel’s decision “a serious, strategic mistake.”

Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu have also helped turn Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar into victims in the eyes of the liberal left. That has energized the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, which is already deeply critical of the Netanyahu administration, and thrust Israel policy into the center of the 2020 electoral debate.

“Trump and Netanyahu are enabling one another to make Republicans the go-to party on Israel and Democrats the devil, eroding the bipartisanship that is so critical to the U.S.-Israel special bond,” said Mr. Miller, the former Middle East negotiator. “It is not yet fatal. But a few more years of the Trump-Netanyahu experience and it may well be.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Doubles Down on Effort to Push Jewish Voters to G.O.P.

WASHINGTON — By pushing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel into barring an official visit by the first two Muslim women in Congress, President Trump is doubling down on a strategy aimed at dividing the Democratic Party and pushing some Jewish voters into the arms of Republicans.

But people in both parties warn that over the long term, the president could further erode bipartisan support for Israel, which has long relied on the United States as its most important ally.

In the run-up to his 2020 re-election campaign, Mr. Trump has spent months attacking the two freshman Democrats, Representatives Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota — who are part of a liberal foursome that has dubbed itself “the squad” — roiling the Democratic Party as he seeks to paint Republicans as Israel’s only true friend in Washington.

He has also marched in lock step with Mr. Netanyahu, who faces legislative elections in a few weeks. Mr. Netanyahu’s hard-line settlement policies and rigid bond with ultra-Orthodox Jews have also alienated Democrats, including many American Jews, posing a threat to the bipartisanship that has been fundamental to the two countries’ relationship since Israel’s founding in 1948.

If Israel becomes a partisan issue in the United States, advocates warn that there could be negative consequences for both countries. Israel’s security would be severely undermined without the political, economic and military support that flows from bipartisan backing in Washington. And if Israel is weakened, so too is the United States’ position in the Middle East, which is always stronger when both parties are behind it.

“You have a situation where Netanyahu is relying on Trump to help him in his re-election, and Trump is expecting Netanyahu to reciprocate,” said Martin Indyk, a former ambassador to Israel under President Bill Clinton. “Part of Trump’s election strategy is to paint the squad as the face of the Democratic Party and argue that because they are critical of Israel, therefore the Democratic Party is anti-Israel.”

In a string of Twitter posts on Friday evening, Mr. Trump said just that, writing that Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar “are fast becoming the face of the Democrat Party” and that Ms. Tlaib had behaved “obnoxiously” toward Israel.

The bond between Israel and the United States has long been rooted in what Aaron David Miller, a veteran Middle East negotiator for both Republican and Democratic administrations, calls “a confluence of interests and values,” such as free speech and an open society. The cancellation of the congresswomen’s trip, he said, raised questions about those shared values.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_152608935_22bd3ed6-543d-4804-9e3b-839936b98015-articleLarge Trump Doubles Down on Effort to Push Jewish Voters to G.O.P. United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Republican Party Omar, Ilhan Netanyahu, Benjamin Jews and Judaism Israel Democratic Party Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) American Israel Public Affairs Committee

President Trump and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel at the White House in March. The two leaders have a close relationship.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar both support the boycott Israel movement and had planned a four-day fact-finding tour that was largely centered around examining the condition of Palestinians under Israeli occupation.

Tensions deepened on Friday, when Ms. Tlaib rejected an offer by Israel to allow her to visit her grandmother, who lives on the West Bank, on humanitarian grounds, switching course after she had agreed in writing not to “promote boycotts against Israel” during her trip. Ms. Tlaib’s reversal under pressure drew criticism from Mr. Trump, who said on Twitter that she had “grandstanded.”

“There is a perception, right or wrong, true or untrue, that the Netanyahu administration and the Trump administration are working hand in glove,” said Mark Mellman, president of Democratic Majority for Israel, a nonprofit that works to ensure that the Democratic Party remains pro-Israel.

Israel’s stance, Mr. Mellman said, has made his task harder. “In our hyperpartisan world, the friend of my enemy is my enemy, and to the extent that Democrats look at Trump as the enemy, if they see Israel or the Netanyahu administration as operating hand in glove, that gives them real pause.”

Mr. Netanyahu made clear his affinity for the Republican Party long before Mr. Trump moved into the White House. His relations with former President Barack Obama were so strained that in 2015, in a rare breach of protocol, he circumvented the White House in accepting an invitation to address the Republican-led Congress. Representative Nancy Pelosi, then the Democratic leader, called the address an “insult” to the United States, and dozens of Democrats skipped it.

With Mr. Trump in office, the Netanyahu-Republican alliance has only strengthened. Mr. Trump’s policies, including moving the American embassy to Jerusalem and recognizing Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights (where Mr. Netanyahu named a new town after Mr. Trump in June, erecting a sign with his name in gold block letters), have made him more popular in Israel than he is at home. When the president pushed Mr. Netanyahu to bar entry to Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, he was effectively calling in a favor.

Even the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the powerful and assiduously bipartisan pro-Israel lobbying group known as AIPAC, has split with the Netanyahu government on its decision. AIPAC typically backs Israel no matter who is in power, but its view is that while presidents and prime ministers come and go, support for Israel in Congress is essential.

“What is the one mantra of the pro-Israel organizations for 30, 40 years?” asked William Kristol, a conservative critic of Mr. Trump who fought Mr. Obama’s policies toward Israel. “It’s congressional support. Presidents have their own views, but Congress is the core. So to pick a fight with members of Congress, which is going to force half of Congress to rally to their defense, is really foolish.”

While support for Israel among congressional Democrats remains strong, polls show that support has long been slipping among Democratic voters. A survey last year by the Pew Research Center found the partisan divide in support for Israel was at its widest in four decades, with 79 percent of Republicans sympathizing with Israel in its dispute with the Palestinians, versus 27 percent of Democrats.

That is evident on the presidential campaign trail, where Democrats once vied to see who could be the most supportive of Israel. Now, some are vying to see who can be the most critical. Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman, recently called Mr. Netanyahu a “racist.” Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont accused the Netanyahu government of “racism” and proposed using American aid to Israel as leverage to change its policies.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi at the AIPAC conference in Washington in March. The pro-Israel lobbying group split with the Netanyahu government on its decision to bar an official visit from two Democratic members of Congress.CreditJose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Matt Brooks, executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, which aims to woo Jews to the Republican Party, said it was wrong to lay the dwindling Democratic support at the feet of Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu.

“When you have a leading Democratic presidential candidate like Bernie Sanders who can call the prime minister of Israel a racist and nobody says anything, you tell me who’s responsible for it,” Mr. Brooks said. “We have a president who is the most pro-Israel president ever in history.”

Traveling to Israel is a rite of passage for members of Congress, especially freshmen. Representative Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader, and Representative Steny Hoyer, the Democratic leader, held a joint news conference in Jerusalem on Sunday, along with dozens of members, in a show of bipartisan support.

“We understand the importance of this relationship,” Mr. McCarthy said then. “We understand undeniably the bond that has to be maintained, and you have that support in the House.”

Both men urged then that Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar be allowed to visit. When Israel refused, citing what officials viewed as the congresswomen’s one-sided itinerary, Mr. McCarthy issued a careful statement on Twitter saying they should have come with their colleagues, and that it was “unfortunate that a few freshmen members declined to join this opportunity to hear from all sides.”

As Mr. Trump and his fellow Republicans have sought to portray themselves as the only party for American Jews, Democrats in Congress have gone to great lengths this year to show their support for the Jewish state and to isolate Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar.

Last month, the House overwhelmingly passed a resolution condemning the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel, known as B.D.S. After Ms. Omar criticized AIPAC in remarks that were widely construed as anti-Semitic, Democratic leaders called on her to apologize — she did — and the House later passed a resolution condemning hatred of any kind.

But the Israeli government’s decision to bar the two women has strong supporters of Israel like Representative Josh Gottheimer, Democrat of New Jersey and no fan of Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar, taking issue with the Jewish state. Mr. Gottheimer, a centrist, called Israel’s decision “a serious, strategic mistake.”

Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu have also helped turn Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar into victims in the eyes of the liberal left. That has energized the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, which is already deeply critical of the Netanyahu administration, and thrust Israel policy into the center of the 2020 electoral debate.

“Trump and Netanyahu are enabling one another to make Republicans the go-to party on Israel and Democrats the devil, eroding the bipartisanship that is so critical to the U.S.-Israel special bond,” said Mr. Miller, the former Middle East negotiator. “It is not yet fatal. But a few more years of the Trump-Netanyahu experience and it may well be.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com