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Westlake Legal Group > Deportation

ICE Begins Its Raids On Illegal Immigrants Under Court Order in NYC. De Blasio Assures the Targets: ‘This is Your City’

Westlake Legal Group matthew-albence-fox-news-SCREENSHOT-620x324 ICE Begins Its Raids On Illegal Immigrants Under Court Order in NYC. De Blasio Assures the Targets: ‘This is Your City’ white house washington D.C. Uncategorized raids New York matthew albence law Judicial Immigration and Customs Enforcement Illegal Immigration Ice Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump Deportation border security Bill de Blasio Allow Media Exception

[Screenshot from TheDC Shorts, https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=46&v=cH-evJA3RHY]

 

Big news in this current climate: Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents began the first raid in an impending series as the Trump administration moves to detain and deport a distinct group in the country illegally.

The following was the response of NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio:

“Receiving reports of attempted but reportedly unsuccessful ICE enforcement actions in Sunset Park and Harlem. To everyone worried this weekend: This is your city. We will do everything we can to protect you.”

What’s his intention in giving them the city? Well, Bill indicated in January he’d like to take all the money from the people who shouldn’t have it and give it to the people of his choosing (here).

Kind of a Robin Hood who uses force of gun. Oh, wait — that’s called a thief.

To be fair, depending on your perspective, the forceful transference of resources — to some degree — could describe the government in general; so Bill’s merely keeping up with the times. Still, he seems desirous to take it up a notch or ten.

An official confirmed ICE’s attempt Saturday — in the neighborhoods of Manhattan’s Harlem section and Brooklyn’s Sunset Park — to The Wall Street Journal.

No arrests were made.



 

Who are the targets of the effort? That would be people who’ve resisted court orders to self-deport.

The raids will be performed in 10 major cities:

Atlanta
Chicago
Miami
Denver
New York City
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Baltimore
New Orleans
Houston

On Sunday, ICE Acting Director Matthew Albence explained the task to Fox News thusly:

“We are doing targeted enforcement actions against specific individuals who have had their day in immigration court and have been ordered removed by an immigration judge. We are merely executing those lawfully issued judge’s orders.

“These are individuals who have come into this country illegally, had the opportunity to make an asylum claim in front of an immigration judge, and most of them chose not to avail themselves at the opportunity and didn’t even show up to their first hearing.”

The battle continues. Will heightened defiance on the Left in America’s sanctuary cities hurt Democrats’ 2020 chances? As indicated by a poll covered by RedState’s Bonchie, the farther Left antics among Blue State operatives appear to be turning off voters. Presumably, the upcoming hoopla won’t help.

-ALEX

 

Relevant RedState links in this article: here.

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. 

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The post ICE Begins Its Raids On Illegal Immigrants Under Court Order in NYC. De Blasio Assures the Targets: ‘This is Your City’ appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group matthew-albence-fox-news-SCREENSHOT-300x157 ICE Begins Its Raids On Illegal Immigrants Under Court Order in NYC. De Blasio Assures the Targets: ‘This is Your City’ white house washington D.C. Uncategorized raids New York matthew albence law Judicial Immigration and Customs Enforcement Illegal Immigration Ice Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump Deportation border security Bill de Blasio Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

With ICE Raids Looming, Immigrants Worry: ‘Every Time Someone Knocks, You Get Scared’

All week, Veronica had distracted herself from a constant barrage of news about a series of coordinated immigration raids that the Trump administration planned to begin this weekend in cities across the country.

She worked late every night, preparing for a weeklong family vacation to Florida to visit Disney World and go fishing. She booked a three-bedroom apartment for herself and 13 family members. She packed her 4-year-old daughter’s Mickey Mouse backpack and “Frozen”-themed suitcase with clothes, stuffed animals and a blanket to sleep with.

But then, the woman who cleans Veronica’s home, who is undocumented, showed her cellphone videos of immigration arrests happening in Miami. The woman warned that Freddie, Veronica’s husband and partner of 15 years, who is undocumented and has a standing deportation order, could be swept up. Other family members and friends started to call, saying the same.

Hours before the family was scheduled to pile into cars for the long drive to Florida from their home in Prince George’s County, Maryland, Veronica, who asked to be identified only by her first name, called her immigration lawyer for advice. The lawyer told her to cancel.

“It’s a disaster because my daughter was happy that we were taking this trip. She’s only 4 years old but she knows a lot things,” Veronica said. “Now we don’t know how we are going to explain to her that we’re not going to be able to go on vacation anymore.”

President Trump’s promises on Friday that the administration would execute a series of immigration arrests nationwide added to fears that have been growing among immigrant communities for more than a month, as the raids have been debated, scheduled and then rescheduled.

The operation will target some 2,000 undocumented immigrants who crossed the border recently, in groups of family units. That is a departure from what is typical for Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, who tend to focus on deporting adults who entered the country alone. But word of the operation seems to have struck fear across undocumented communities, including among people who have been living here for years.

Immigration agents were spotted on Friday in Immokalee, Fla., about 40 miles east of Naples, though it was not clear whether their work was connected to the larger operation. Norelia Sanchez, an immigrant family support worker with the Redlands Christian Migrant Association in Immokalee, said locals had called her at 6 a.m., when ICE agents were seen parked outside of a local Hispanic restaurant.

Ms. Sanchez said residents had reported seeing the agents “knocking door by door.” Her organization was still trying to confirm on Saturday reports that a mother had been detained when she had met one of her children at a bus stop.

Some parents called the center’s offices and apologized for not sending their children into summer day care and education programs; they would not be leaving the house because of ICE’s presence, they told Ms. Sanchez and her colleagues.

“The ones who did, you could actually see mothers with children, holding their hands, holding their cellphones, and they were literally running to the school,” Ms. Sanchez said.

The Campo Rojo area, where many migrants live, appeared deserted on Friday, Ms. Sanchez said. “It was just plain silent. It was completely a ghost town.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157875297_3a893e80-6dc0-4f50-8b22-9f24679b8480-articleLarge With ICE Raids Looming, Immigrants Worry: ‘Every Time Someone Knocks, You Get Scared’ United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Immigration Detention Immigration and Emigration Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Deportation

Demonstrators held photos of children who have died in detention during a rally Friday outside of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Chicago.CreditBrittany Greeson for The New York Times

The raids were planned out of Mr. Trump’s frustration over the steady stream of migrant parents and children who began crossing the border in record numbers last October, with numbers increasing almost every month since. Though border crossings dropped slightly in June, the administration says that the situation is still a “humanitarian crisis.”

Caving to pressure from Democratic lawmakers and immigrant advocates who had labeled the raid operation as inhumane and unnecessary, Mr. Trump delayed the raids in June, saying that he would give Democratic lawmakers time to adjust existing immigration laws to tighten up the asylum process. In the absence of legislative change, plans for the raids re-emerged this week, spiking fear once again.

Now, a number of undocumented immigrants — particularly those in the dozen or so cities that are rumored to be a focus of the event — are making plans to evade arrest. Some have fled their homes, choosing to get as far as possible from the addresses that the government has on file for them. Others are hunkering down with reserves of food, planning to shut themselves inside until the operation ends.

They are helped by the fact that ICE agents cannot forcibly enter the homes of their targets under the law. But if past tactics are any measure, agents are likely to come to the operation armed with ruses to coax people outside. They will likely have new strategies that might help to counteract the preparations that undocumented immigrants have been making with the help of their lawyers.

Anticipating that they will not manage to block all of the arrests through preventive strategies, immigration lawyers and advocates across the country have been working swiftly to distribute contingency plans for those who are captured.

Shannon Camacho, a coordinator of the Los Angeles Raids Rapid Response Network for immigrants, said the organization is urging undocumented parents with children who are United States citizens or legal permanent residents to sign caregiver affidavits, so that if the parents are deported, the children will not be left without legal guardians.

“When people are arrested, their children can’t be picked up from school, or if they’re caring for the elderly, no one will be around to give them their medicine. We tell them to have designated people in their friends or family networks to respond,” said Ms. Camacho.

Mony Ruiz-Velasco, the director of PASO-West Suburban Action Project, a community group in Melrose Park, Ill., said her staff and volunteers were advising families to memorize at least one phone number so that they can call for help if they are detained.

Win, the largest nonprofit provider of shelters for families with children in New York, notified families with undocumented members to be cautious and to leave over the weekend, if necessary, a person familiar with the instructions confirmed. The nonprofit operates 11 shelters, and houses about 10 percent of the nearly 12,000 families in the city currently living in shelters.

A 17-year-old girl, who lives in one of the shelters and who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a shelter employee used coded language to warn her family to go into hiding and to return on Monday. “They said, ‘Your room is going to be very hot this weekend. Come back Monday when things cool off,’” she said.

Meanwhile, immigrants’ rights lawyers were preparing to file court motions to reopen the immigration cases of people who are arrested in the operation before they can be deported. Doing so will require that the lawyers get access to the detention centers where the migrants will be held, and it is unclear whether federal officials will make such access available, lawyers said.

“We have a library at this point of different kinds of motions that we can file,” said Judy London, directing attorney of Public Counsel’s Immigrants’ Rights Project in Los Angeles. She added: “The access issue is what we are most concerned about.”

Ms. London’s organization is party to a lawsuit filed this week in New York to prevent the operation. In the lawsuit, the lawyers, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, claim that many of the migrants who are being targeted failed to appear in immigration court — a common reason for a deportation order — because the Trump administration did not inform them of their court dates.

Across the country, news of the operation sparked fear, even among immigrants who were unlikely to be affected — such as those who had never had an encounter with federal authorities, and were therefore unknown to the government, according to lawyers who were making preparations on Friday.

In Atlanta, Anna Ruiz, a legal intern with the social justice organization Project South, handed out information about the rights of people who may be targeted by ICE.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

That afternoon, Atlanta immigration lawyer Charles Kuck took audience questions from inside the Univision 34 studio for a Facebook Live interview. Some in the audience said they had work permits or pending green card applications, or had been granted permission by authorities to voluntarily leave the United States but had not yet reached the deadline before which they must do so. They asked if they should be worried. In each case, his answer was no.

“There are people worrying who shouldn’t be worrying,” Mr. Kuck said in a phone interview afterward.

After a brief stop at a Chick-fil-A, Mr. Kuck planned to meet with more clients, conduct a second Facebook Live interview, and attend a “Lights for Liberty” rally at Plaza Fiesta, a sprawling strip mall along Buford Highway, a corridor that is home to many Atlanta-area immigrants. As he continued to arm immigrants with information about their legal rights, he hoped to tame the panic that had spread throughout the region’s Latino communities.

“ICE isn’t driving up and down Buford Highway,” Mr. Kuck said. “They’re going to do targeted raids. I’d be shocked if Atlanta took more than a couple hundred people.”

Democratic lawmakers also rallied around immigrants, promising to protect their rights to due process and prevent as many arrests as possible. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said on Friday that the city would increase funding for legal protections for immigrant families, and reiterated that she had banned ICE from accessing Chicago Police Department databases related to federal immigration enforcement activities.

Harry Osterman, a city alderman whose far-north-side district includes many Latinos, emailed constituents on Friday evening with hotline numbers and information on what to do if they see ICE activity.

Gov. Gavin Newsom of California posted a video on Facebook informing immigrants of their rights. And Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young of Baltimore released a statement encouraging anyone who was arrested to avail themselves of the city’s public immigration defense fund.

The only immigrants who appear to be shielded from any deportation raids, for now, are those living in New Orleans — which is experiencing heavy flooding this week and is bracing for more, brought on by tropical storm Barry. Following the agency’s usual practice during extreme weather, ICE leadership sent a staff-wide email this week saying that agents would not conduct enforcement operations there during the storm.

Some undocumented immigrants have chosen to continue their routines as much as possible, in some cases a way to cope with the stress. When rumors first swirled about the latest round of immigration raids, said Geovani, 24, he didn’t panic about his family’s well-being. In a way, this weekend would be like any other for the undocumented family from Mexico, now living in Atlanta: home-cooked meals, hours lost on Facebook, down time shared among his parents and children.

Silvia Padilla has been living illegally in Los Angeles for 14 years. Her husband is also undocumented. She stressed multiple times that her family had never taken any government assistance. Her youngest child, Joshua, 1, is an American citizen.

News of the raids, Ms. Padilla said, is alarming. But it is a fear she has lived with for a long time. If ICE agents show up at their home, the entire family knows not to open the door.

This weekend, she still intends to take her children to the park and let them walk to the mall, and she plans to go to a doctor’s appointment with her husband.

“We’re going to go about our lives the same as we do. We have a lot of things to do. We’re leaving it up to God,” she said.

Veronica, the woman from Maryland who canceled her trip to Florida, is more uneasy. “Every time someone knocks, you get scared of who’s going to be behind the door,” she said. “Especially when you’re not expecting anyone.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Thousands Are Targeted as ICE Prepares to Raid Undocumented Migrant Families

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-ice-1-facebookJumbo Thousands Are Targeted as ICE Prepares to Raid Undocumented Migrant Families United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A McAleenan, Kevin K Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Humanitarian Aid Homeland Security Department Deportation

Nationwide raids to arrest thousands of members of undocumented families have been scheduled to begin Sunday, according to two current and one former homeland security officials, moving forward with a rapidly changing operation, the final details of which remain in flux. The operation, backed by President Trump, had been postponed, partly because of resistance among officials at his own immigration agency.

The raids, which will be conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement over multiple days, will include “collateral” deportations, according to the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the preliminary stage of the operation. In those deportations, the authorities might detain immigrants who happened to be on the scene, even though they were not targets of the raids.

When possible, family members who are arrested together will be held in family detention centers in Texas and Pennsylvania. But because of space limitations, some might end up staying in hotel rooms until their travel documents can be prepared. ICE’s goal is to deport the families as quickly as possible.

The officials said ICE agents were targeting at least 2,000 immigrants who have been ordered deported — some as a result of their failure to appear in court — but who remain in the country illegally. The operation is expected to take place in at least 10 major cities.

The families being targeted crossed the border recently: The Trump administration expedited their immigration proceedings last fall. In February, many of those immigrants were given notice to report to an ICE office and leave the United States, the homeland security officials said.

Matthew Bourke, an ICE spokesman, said in a statement on Wednesday that the agency would not comment on specific details related to enforcement operations, to ensure the safety and security of agency personnel.

The threat of deportation has rattled immigrant communities across the country, prompted backlash from local politicians and police officials and stoked division inside the Department of Homeland Security — the agency that is charged with carrying out the deportations. The Trump administration’s goal is to use the operation as a show of force to deter families from approaching the southwestern border, the officials said.

While rare, such coordinated raids have occurred under previous administrations. Agents have expressed apprehensions about arresting babies and young children, officials have said. The agents have also noted that the operation might have limited success because word has already spread among immigrant communities about how to avoid arrest — namely, by refusing to open the door when an agent approaches one’s home. ICE agents are not legally allowed to forcibly enter a home.

Immigration defense lawyers are likely to file motions to reopen the families’ immigration cases, which would significantly delay, if not stop altogether, their removal from the United States.

For weeks last month, the ICE director at the time, Mark Morgan, signaled that agents would escalate efforts to round up families. Days before the operation was to begin, Mr. Trump forecast the plan on Twitter, blindsiding ICE agents whose safety officials feared would be compromised as a result.

In early June, the Department of Homeland Security’s acting secretary, Kevin K. McAleenan, told Mr. Morgan to call off the operation. Mr. McAleenan did not support the raids, officials said at the time, in part out of concern that undocumented parents could be separated from any of their children who are American citizens.

Mr. Morgan then directly lobbied Mr. Trump to move forward with the raids. He is now the commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, another arm of the Department of Homeland Security.

In a tense meeting with White House officials on June 21, two days before the raids were scheduled to begin, Mr. McAleenan again outlined the challenges of the operation, including the separation of families and the logistics of housing them until they can be removed. If undocumented parents are found to have children who are United States citizens, for example, ICE agents will need to wait with the children in a hotel room until a relative in the United States can claim them.

Homeland security officials also worried that many of the families that the administration had hoped to detain might have left the addresses known to ICE after Mr. Trump tweeted the agency’s plans.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi called Mr. Trump after his tweet and urged him to halt the operation, which in a statement hours later she described as “heartless.”

Mr. Trump then tweeted that he would delay the effort at the Democrats’ request. But he also threatened to resume the deportations if Democrats refused to join with Republican lawmakers to “work out a solution to the Asylum and Loophole problems at the Southern Border.”

Days later, the Senate passed a $4.6 billion humanitarian aid package for the border.

Migrant crossings have declined since May, when 144,200 migrants were taken into custody at the southwestern border — a 13-year high.

Last Friday, Mr. Trump said the raids would begin “fairly soon.”

“I say they came in illegally, and we’re bringing them out legally,” the president told reporters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Prepares to Arrest Thousands of Immigrant Family Members

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-ice-1-facebookJumbo U.S. Prepares to Arrest Thousands of Immigrant Family Members United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A McAleenan, Kevin K Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Humanitarian Aid Homeland Security Department Deportation

Nationwide raids to arrest thousands of members of undocumented families have been scheduled to begin Sunday, according to two current and one former homeland security officials, moving forward with a rapidly changing operation, the final details of which remain in flux. The operation, backed by President Trump, had been postponed, partly because of resistance among officials at his own immigration agency.

The raids, which will be conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement over multiple days, will include “collateral” deportations, according to the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the preliminary stage of the operation. In those deportations, the authorities might detain immigrants who happened to be on the scene, even though they were not targets of the raids.

When possible, family members who are arrested together will be held in family detention centers in Texas and Pennsylvania. But because of space limitations, some might end up staying in hotel rooms until their travel documents can be prepared. ICE’s goal is to deport the families as quickly as possible.

The officials said ICE agents were targeting at least 2,000 immigrants who have been ordered deported — some as a result of their failure to appear in court — but who remain in the country illegally. The operation is expected to take place in at least 10 major cities.

The families being targeted crossed the border recently: The Trump administration expedited their immigration proceedings last fall. In February, many of those immigrants were given notice to report to an ICE office and leave the United States, the homeland security officials said.

Matthew Bourke, an ICE spokesman, said in a statement on Wednesday that the agency would not comment on specific details related to enforcement operations, to ensure the safety and security of agency personnel.

The threat of deportation has rattled immigrant communities across the country, prompted backlash from local politicians and police officials and stoked division inside the Department of Homeland Security — the agency that is charged with carrying out the deportations. The Trump administration’s goal is to use the operation as a show of force to deter families from approaching the southwestern border, the officials said.

Agents have expressed apprehensions about arresting babies and young children, officials have said. The agents have also noted that the operation might have limited success because word has already spread among immigrant communities about how to avoid arrest — namely, by refusing to open the door when an agent approaches one’s home. ICE agents are not legally allowed to forcibly enter a home.

Immigration defense lawyers are likely to file motions to reopen the families’ immigration cases, which would significantly delay, if not stop altogether, their removal from the United States.

For weeks last month, the ICE director at the time, Mark Morgan, signaled that agents would escalate efforts to round up families. Days before the operation was to begin, Mr. Trump forecast the plan on Twitter, blindsiding ICE agents whose safety officials feared would be compromised as a result.

In early June, the Department of Homeland Security’s acting secretary, Kevin K. McAleenan, told Mr. Morgan to call off the operation. Mr. McAleenan did not support the raids, officials said at the time, in part out of concern that undocumented parents could be separated from any of their children who are American citizens.

Mr. Morgan then directly lobbied Mr. Trump to move forward with the raids. He is now the commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, another arm of the Department of Homeland Security.

In a tense meeting with White House officials on June 21, two days before the raids were scheduled to begin, Mr. McAleenan again outlined the challenges of the operation, including the separation of families and the logistics of housing them until they can be removed. If undocumented parents are found to have children who are United States citizens, for example, ICE agents will need to wait with the children in a hotel room until a relative in the United States can claim them.

Homeland security officials also worried that many of the families that the administration had hoped to detain might have left the addresses known to ICE after Mr. Trump tweeted the agency’s plans.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi called Mr. Trump after his tweet and urged him to halt the operation, which in a statement hours later she described as “heartless.”

Mr. Trump then tweeted that he would delay the effort at the Democrats’ request. But he also threatened to resume the deportations if Democrats refused to join with Republican lawmakers to “work out a solution to the Asylum and Loophole problems at the Southern Border.”

Days later, the Senate passed a $4.6 billion humanitarian aid package for the border.

Migrant crossings have declined since May, when 144,200 migrants were taken into custody at the southwestern border — a 13-year high.

Last Friday, Mr. Trump said the raids would begin “fairly soon.”

“I say they came in illegally, and we’re bringing them out legally,” the president told reporters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Prepares to Arrest Thousands of Immigrant Family Members

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-ice-1-facebookJumbo U.S. Prepares to Arrest Thousands of Immigrant Family Members United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A McAleenan, Kevin K Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Humanitarian Aid Homeland Security Department Deportation

Nationwide raids to arrest thousands of members of undocumented families have been scheduled to begin Sunday, according to two current and one former homeland security officials, moving forward with a rapidly changing operation, the final details of which remain in flux. The operation, backed by President Trump, had been postponed, partly because of resistance among officials at his own immigration agency.

The raids, which will be conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement over multiple days, will include “collateral” deportations, according to the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the preliminary stage of the operation. In those deportations, the authorities might detain immigrants who happened to be on the scene, even though they were not targets of the raids.

When possible, family members who are arrested together will be held in family detention centers in Texas and Pennsylvania. But because of space limitations, some might end up staying in hotel rooms until their travel documents can be prepared. ICE’s goal is to deport the families as quickly as possible.

The officials said ICE agents were targeting at least 2,000 immigrants who have been ordered deported — some as a result of their failure to appear in court — but who remain in the country illegally. The operation is expected to take place in at least 10 major cities.

The families being targeted crossed the border recently: The Trump administration expedited their immigration proceedings last fall. In February, many of those immigrants were given notice to report to an ICE office and leave the United States, the homeland security officials said.

Matthew Bourke, an ICE spokesman, said in a statement on Wednesday that the agency would not comment on specific details related to enforcement operations, to ensure the safety and security of agency personnel.

The threat of deportation has rattled immigrant communities across the country, prompted backlash from local politicians and police officials and stoked division inside the Department of Homeland Security — the agency that is charged with carrying out the deportations. The Trump administration’s goal is to use the operation as a show of force to deter families from approaching the southwestern border, the officials said.

Agents have expressed apprehensions about arresting babies and young children, officials have said. The agents have also noted that the operation might have limited success because word has already spread among immigrant communities about how to avoid arrest — namely, by refusing to open the door when an agent approaches one’s home. ICE agents are not legally allowed to forcibly enter a home.

Immigration defense lawyers are likely to file motions to reopen the families’ immigration cases, which would significantly delay, if not stop altogether, their removal from the United States.

For weeks last month, the ICE director at the time, Mark Morgan, signaled that agents would escalate efforts to round up families. Days before the operation was to begin, Mr. Trump forecast the plan on Twitter, blindsiding ICE agents whose safety officials feared would be compromised as a result.

In early June, the Department of Homeland Security’s acting secretary, Kevin K. McAleenan, told Mr. Morgan to call off the operation. Mr. McAleenan did not support the raids, officials said at the time, in part out of concern that undocumented parents could be separated from any of their children who are American citizens.

Mr. Morgan then directly lobbied Mr. Trump to move forward with the raids. He is now the commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, another arm of the Department of Homeland Security.

In a tense meeting with White House officials on June 21, two days before the raids were scheduled to begin, Mr. McAleenan again outlined the challenges of the operation, including the separation of families and the logistics of housing them until they can be removed. If undocumented parents are found to have children who are United States citizens, for example, ICE agents will need to wait with the children in a hotel room until a relative in the United States can claim them.

Homeland security officials also worried that many of the families that the administration had hoped to detain might have left the addresses known to ICE after Mr. Trump tweeted the agency’s plans.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi called Mr. Trump after his tweet and urged him to halt the operation, which in a statement hours later she described as “heartless.”

Mr. Trump then tweeted that he would delay the effort at the Democrats’ request. But he also threatened to resume the deportations if Democrats refused to join with Republican lawmakers to “work out a solution to the Asylum and Loophole problems at the Southern Border.”

Days later, the Senate passed a $4.6 billion humanitarian aid package for the border.

Migrant crossings have declined since May, when 144,200 migrants were taken into custody at the southwestern border — a 13-year high.

Last Friday, Mr. Trump said the raids would begin “fairly soon.”

“I say they came in illegally, and we’re bringing them out legally,” the president told reporters.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘A Constant Game of Musical Chairs’ Amid Another Homeland Security Shake-Up

Westlake Legal Group 25dc-Immig-facebookJumbo ‘A Constant Game of Musical Chairs’ Amid Another Homeland Security Shake-Up United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A Immigration Detention Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Homeland Security Department Deportation Customs and Border Protection (US)

WASHINGTON — Turmoil intensified on Tuesday inside the agency responsible for securing the nation’s borders as a top official was replaced by an immigration hard-liner and former Fox News contributor who last week pushed for nationwide deportations.

That hard-liner, Mark Morgan, will take over as the head of Customs and Border Protection in July, administration officials said Tuesday.

The move again overhauls leadership at the Department of Homeland Security, an agency that is responsible for cybersecurity, disaster relief and enforcing customs, border and immigration law, and that has already been destabilized by a purge of officials just two months ago.

“President Trump’s latest leadership change only worsens the chaos at the department,” said Representative Bennie Thompson, Democrat of Mississippi and the chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security. “D.H.S. is charged with keeping the nation secure, but the president is putting its leadership through a constant game of musical chairs to fit his political agenda.”

The White House in recent months has installed multiple officials at the department who have gone on television to support Mr. Trump’s more aggressive immigration policies, using certain officials to knock out others without any clear vision for homeland security. None of the homeland security agencies responsible for enforcing immigration policy — Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Protection and United States Citizenship and Immigration Services — have a permanent leader.

In the new position, Mr. Morgan — currently the ICE acting director who pushed for raids to deport undocumented families last week — will oversee an agency responsible for processing thousands of asylum-seeking families, including children, along the southwestern border. He is succeeding John Sanders, the acting commissioner, who will step down on July 5 as the government’s primary border enforcement executive.

The personnel changes come as Customs and Border Protection faces continuing public fury over the treatment of detained migrant children.

[The Trump administration says it is transferring migrant children back to a shelter in Clint, Tex., that had seen hundreds of children held in overcrowded and filthy conditions.]

Matthew Albence, the deputy director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, will lead that agency, officials said.

In an interview on Tuesday for a coming book about the president’s immigration policies, Mr. Trump acknowledged the turmoil among his top immigration officials.

“I do burn out on people, I do. If somebody’s not really great, I do,” the president said during the interview in the Oval Office. He did not directly address the changes at Customs and Border Protection, but said he had made “good changes” in the people who run his immigration agencies.

“I understand what I want,” he said. “And we’re starting to get there.”

The White House directed Kevin McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, to replace Mr. Sanders with Mr. Morgan after multiple White House officials expressed displeasure over Mr. Sanders not being aggressive enough at the southwestern border, administration officials said. Mr. McAleenan complied, hoping to diminish friction with the White House, officials said.

Mr. McAleenan resisted an earlier push by Stephen Miller, the architect behind Mr. Trump’s immigration policy, to appoint Mr. Morgan as the head of Customs and Border Protection, according to current and former homeland security officials.

In 2017, shortly after he took office, Mr. Trump forced Mr. Morgan out as Border Patrol chief. But Mr. Morgan won the approval of the White House after backing the president’s aggressive policies on television. In one appearance on Fox News, Mr. Morgan said that when he looked into the eyes of detained migrant children, he saw a “soon-to-be MS-13 gang member.”

In a letter to Customs and Border Protection employees on Tuesday, Mr. Sanders confirmed his departure.

“Although I will leave it to you to determine whether I was successful,” Mr. Sanders, a former chief technology officer at the Transportation Security Administration who helped spearhead the T.S.A. PreCheck program, wrote, “I can unequivocally say that helping support the amazing men and women of C.B.P. has been the most fulfilling and satisfying opportunity of my career.”

In the months since Mr. Trump forced out Kirstjen Nielsen as the secretary of homeland security, as well as other high-ranking officials in that department, the White House has installed officials aligned with Mr. Miller’s aggressive stance on immigration. The constant turnover comes as a record number of Central American families have entered the United States seeking asylum.

More than 144,200 migrants were taken into custody in May — the highest monthly total in 13 years — filling facilities managed by border agencies that have faced a public backlash over accusations that migrant children have been left hungry and unwashed.

Customs and Border Protection officials said that the facilities were never built to house children and that the migrants should be moved to shelters managed by the Department of Health and Human Services. Those facilities are also pushed beyond capacity.

Senator Richard J. Durbin of Illinois, the chamber’s No. 2 Democrat, expressed concern on Tuesday that Mr. McAleenan was caught in the White House’s political crossfire. He cited the issues at the border as reason to prioritize consistent leadership at the agency.

“Virtually everyone is in an acting capacity; it’s chaos,” Mr. Durbin said. “And we wonder why we’re having trouble at the border? Because we’re having trouble with border issues in this White House.”

Before he named Mr. Morgan to the agency overseeing the border, Mr. McAleenan had disputed with him over an operation that would send ICE agents into communities to detain and deport about 2,000 undocumented families who have been issued a deportation order or missed a court date.

After Mr. McAleenan pushed back against the nationwide raids this month, Mr. Morgan went around the acting secretary and directly communicated with the president, saying the raids were needed as a show of force to deter migration.

ICE agents and career officials in the Department of Homeland Security were then blindsided when Mr. Trump posted last week on Twitter that ICE would soon begin deporting “millions” of people — something logistically impossible. The roughly 6,000 deportation officers in ICE do not know the exact locations of each migrant.

Mr. McAleenan, in a meeting on Friday, again outlined the risks in the deportation operation, saying it could lead to the separation of undocumented parents from citizen children, according to Trump administration officials. ICE officials, including Mr. Albence, were also worried that the forecasting of the operation had put agents’ safety at risk.

After meeting with Mr. McAleenan, as well as after receiving a call from Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Mr. Trump tweeted on Saturday that he would delay the raids for two weeks. He said he would resume the operation if Democrats did not submit to changes in asylum law.

Mr. McAleenan, a former Obama administration official who led Customs and Border Protection, has watched in recent months as Mr. Trump forced out the heads of multiple agencies — ICE, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Secret Service, Customs and Border Protection and the Department of Homeland Security — and inserted officials aligned with his aggressive immigration policies.

Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, who once advocated an end to birthright citizenship and policies that would require employees to speak English, was picked last month to oversee United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the agency responsible for legal immigration. Mr. Trump tried this month to recruit Thomas D. Homan, a former ICE director who has praised Mr. Trump and criticized Mr. McAleenan on Fox News, to serve as border czar. (Mr. Homan has not yet accepted the position.)

“You’ve got the acting secretary of homeland security resisting what ICE is trying to do,” Mr. Homan said on Saturday morning.

Brandon Judd, the president of the National Border Patrol Council, who has Mr. Trump’s ear on immigration policy, wrote an op-ed article published by Fox News criticizing Mr. McAleenan as “anti-Trump.”

“His actions in office have been detrimental to both border security and President Trump’s expressed mandate to end illegal immigration and the catch-and-release program,” Mr. Judd wrote.

But Mr. McAleenan has also carried out some of Mr. Trump’s more pressing and controversial policies. As head of the Customs and Border Protection, he helped carry out Mr. Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy, which led to family separations.

This month, Mr. McAleenan helped negotiate a deal with Mexican officials after Mr. Trump threatened the country for not doing enough to quell migration to the border.

After the White House meeting on Friday, Mr. Trump was impressed that Mr. McAleenan stood his ground over the operation, one White House official said. But current and former homeland security officials say he once again faces the challenge of managing an agency in turmoil.

“This perverse game of musical chairs within D.H.S. of the incompetent and craven is extremely perilous for national security,” said Peter Vincent, a former top lawyer at ICE. “We should all be rightfully worried that this is all dangerously distracting from the sacred homeland security mission.”

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Mark Morgan to Lead Customs and Border Protection in Latest Shake-Up During Migrant Crisis

Westlake Legal Group 25dc-Immig-facebookJumbo Mark Morgan to Lead Customs and Border Protection in Latest Shake-Up During Migrant Crisis United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Morgan, Mark A Immigration Detention Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Homeland Security Department Deportation Customs and Border Protection (US)

WASHINGTON — Chaos intensified on Tuesday inside the agency responsible for securing the nation’s borders as a top official was replaced by an immigration hard-liner and former Fox News contributor who last week pushed for nationwide deportations.

Mark Morgan, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement acting director who pushed for raids to deport undocumented families, will lead Customs and Border Protection, administration officials said Tuesday.

In the new position, Mr. Morgan will be responsible for processing thousands of asylum-seeking families, including children, in facilities along the southwestern border. Before he was named acting director of ICE, Mr. Morgan made frequent appearances on Fox News supporting some of President Trump’s more aggressive immigration policies.

He is replacing John Sanders, the acting commissioner, who will step down in early July as the government’s primary border enforcement executive.

The personnel changes come as the agency faces continuing public fury over the treatment of detained migrant children.

Matt Albence, the deputy director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, will lead that agency, officials said.

“Although I will leave it to you to determine whether I was successful,” Mr. Sanders wrote in a letter to his agents made available by the Department of Homeland Security. “I can unequivocally say that helping support the amazing men and women of C.B.P. has been the most fulfilling and satisfying opportunity of my career.”

The move once again overhauls leadership at the Department of Homeland Security, an agency responsible for enforcing customs, border and immigration law that has already been destabilized by a purge of officials just two months ago.

The White House in recent months has inserted multiple officials who have taken to television to support Mr. Trump’s more aggressive immigration policies, using certain officials to knock out others without any clear vision for the agency.

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Emergency Aid for Migrants Badly Divides Democrats

WASHINGTON — Congress is trying to rush $4.5 billion in emergency humanitarian aid to the southwestern border while placing new restrictions on President Trump’s immigration crackdown, spurred on by disturbing images of suffering migrant families and of children living in squalor in overcrowded detention facilities.

But with a House vote on the package planned for Tuesday, some Democrats fear that the aid will be used to carry out Mr. Trump’s aggressive tactics, including deportation raids that he has promised will begin within two weeks. Republicans are objecting to restrictions in the measure that are meant to dictate better standards for facilities that hold migrant children and to bar the money from being used for enforcing immigration law.

Those twin challenges have left the fate of the measure up in the air, even as evidence of deplorable conditions at the border underscores both the urgent need for the money and the bitter rift over Mr. Trump’s policies.

“Democrats distrust this president because we have seen his cruel immigration policies and lawless behavior terrorize our constituents,” Representative Nita M. Lowey of New York, the chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, said on Monday evening as she pleaded with fellow Democrats to support the package. “That is why we have language to stop transfers of money for immigration raids and detention beds. But we cannot allow our anger at this president to blind us to the horrific conditions at facilities along the border as the agencies run out of money.”

The aid package poses a difficult dilemma for Democrats, who are torn between their desire to champion humanitarian help for migrants and their concern that any money they approve will be used by the Trump administration to advance what they consider to be a fundamentally inhumane set of policies. They are also loath to be seen as the ones holding up soap, diapers and food for babies, keenly aware that Mr. Trump and his team are eager to blame Democrats for the dire conditions.

“The administration chooses to direct the vast majority of funding toward enforcement, and then cries poverty when it comes to diapers and food,” said Heidi Altman, the policy director at the liberal National Immigrant Justice Center. “It’s a hostage-taking way of engaging in policy.”

Hispanic-American lawmakers are particularly split; some are arguing that it is crucial to get the aid to agencies and outside groups assisting migrants at the border, while others say they will not be complicit in sending any money to agencies that have carried out Mr. Trump’s harsh initiatives against immigrants.

Several members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus are pushing to attach stricter conditions to the money, including higher humanitarian standards for facilities that hold migrant children, according to a senior Democratic official familiar with the talks.

The behind-the-scenes dispute comes as the Trump administration on Monday transferred hundreds of migrant children who were being detained in filthy conditions at a border station in Texas into a shelter system maintained by the Department of Health and Human Services.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156797106_f55312e5-3016-449e-9bcc-443a70a63337-articleLarge Emergency Aid for Migrants Badly Divides Democrats United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Immigration Detention Immigration and Emigration Humanitarian Aid Human Rights and Human Rights Violations Deportation Democratic Party

A Border Patrol station in Clint, Tex., where hundreds of children were held for weeks without access to soap, clean clothes or adequate food.CreditCedar Attanasio/Associated Press

Concern about the funding bill swelled over the weekend, after Mr. Trump tweeted on Sunday that he was suspending the raids for two weeks to provide time for a bipartisan compromise on changing asylum laws and closing immigration “loopholes.” His abrupt reversal came after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrat of California, telephoned Mr. Trump to ask for a delay.

Ms. Pelosi praised the postponement, and in a strongly worded statement later on Sunday she called for passage of the emergency aid package, saying that it protects families and “does not fund the administration’s failed mass detention policy.” It would also do nothing to change asylum laws to meet Mr. Trump’s demands.

“As members of Congress and as Americans, we have a sacred moral responsibility to protect the human rights and the lives of vulnerable children and families,” she said. “To do anything less would be an outrageous and unacceptable violation of our oath and our morality.”

But even as the speaker was pressing to advance the bill, dozens of House Democrats were in revolt over it. In an emergency conference call on Sunday, more than 30 members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus aired their concerns, many of them arguing that the legislation did not set high enough standards for migrant shelters or do enough to block money from going toward enforcement.

“We all want to address the problems at the border, but we don’t know that there are enough sticks in this bill to make sure that the Trump administration actually spends the money the way they’re supposed to,” said Representative Pramila Jayapal, Democrat of Washington and the co-chairwoman of the Progressive Caucus. “He’s creating these crises and then trying to point a finger at Democrats to give him more money, which he then uses for his own purposes.”

Ms. Jayapal said there was no reason to believe that the Trump administration would abide by any restrictions included in the legislation or standards dictated by the measure, given its “lawless” behavior when it came to immigrants.

Ms. Pelosi was to huddle on Monday night with Representative Lucille Roybal-Allard of California, the chairwoman of the panel in charge of the aid package, and members of the Hispanic and progressive caucuses, according to an aide.

The conflict in the House stands in contrast to the Senate, where Republicans and Democrats on a key committee came together last week to approve a $4.6 billion border aid package that contained some limitations to bar the administration from using the resources for enforcement. It would, for instance, prohibit the Office of Refugee Resettlement, the division of the Department of Health and Human Services that houses unaccompanied migrant children, from sharing information with immigration officials about people who take custody of the children.

The House bill goes further than the Senate legislation in placing restrictions on the money. Facilities that house unaccompanied children would have a slightly shorter time frame — 12 months instead of 14 months — to meet existing legal standards for healthy, sanitary and humane conditions; they would have to allow oversight visits from members of Congress without warning; and the Department of Health and Human Services would have to report a child’s death in its custody to Congress within 24 hours.

Representative Chuck Fleischmann of Tennessee, the senior Republican on the panel overseeing the bill, said he opposed the measure as written by House Democrats. “You will see just about every Republican in the House vote against the Democratic supplemental bill,” Mr. Fleischmann said, citing the added restrictions and the lack of funding for back pay for Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Representative Pramila Jayapal said there was no reason to believe that the Trump administration would abide by any restrictions included in the legislation or standards dictated by it.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

And even if they are able to muscle it through, he added, doing so sets up a negotiation to resolve differences with the Senate that will only delay the aid. “The enemy right now is time,” said Mr. Fleischmann, who supports the Senate bill.

“It is agreeable to the White House,” he said, “so we have two-thirds of the puzzle complete there.”

The White House on Monday issued a statement threatening that Mr. Trump would veto the House measure because it “does not provide adequate funding to meet the current crisis” and “contains partisan provisions designed to hamstring the administration’s border enforcement efforts.”

Ms. Pelosi has told colleagues that while she understands their concerns about the aid measure, its demise in the House would essentially cede the issue to the Senate and its weaker bill, according to people familiar with the conversations who described them on the condition of anonymity.

Among some Democrats, the argument is starting to stick. “It’s either the status quo, the Senate bill or the House bill,” said Representative Veronica Escobar, a Texas Democrat whose El Paso district abuts the border. “If the House bill could be improved, that would be wonderful. But this is an emergency supplemental.”

“In my view, if we don’t get the money right away,” she added, “my fear is we’re going to see more children die.”

But many Democrats are pressing for more. They want to give the administration less time to comply with existing standards for facilities that house children, and to include higher health, nutritional, hygiene and sanitation standards for Customs and Border Protection facilities.

They would ban for-profit companies from running migrant shelters and would scrap funding for the United States Marshals that is specifically geared toward referring people who entered or re-entered the country illegally for criminal prosecution. And they want stronger prohibitions against sharing the immigration records of people who come forward to take custody of unaccompanied migrant children.

The measure has also exposed a rift among immigrant advocacy groups, with some of the most liberal organizations actively calling on lawmakers to oppose it and others privately saying the aid, however imperfect, is desperately needed. The grass-roots group Indivisible began a social media campaign to urge members of Congress to vote against the legislation as a way of starving “Trump’s deportation machine,” in a tweet with the hashtag #notonedollar.

For some lawmakers, no amount of restrictions could make the measure acceptable.

In a statement on Friday before Mr. Trump called off the raids, a group of progressive congresswomen announced their opposition to the funding bill, saying they could not “in good conscience” back legislation that sent money to Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement to “support a fundamentally cruel and broken immigration system.”

“These radicalized, criminal agencies are destroying families and killing innocent children,” said a statement by four freshman representatives, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. “It is absolutely unconscionable to even consider giving one more dollar to support this president’s deportation force that openly commits human rights abuses and refuses to be held accountable to the American people.”

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Trump Says He’ll Delay Deportation Operation Aimed at Undocumented Families

Westlake Legal Group 23dc-raids-facebookJumbo Trump Says He’ll Delay Deportation Operation Aimed at Undocumented Families Trump, Donald J Pelosi, Nancy Immigration and Emigration Illegal Immigration Deportation Democratic Party Asylum, Right of

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Saturday delayed plans for nationwide raids to deport undocumented families, but threatened to have Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents resume the raids in two weeks if Democrats do not submit to changes in asylum law they have long opposed.

Immigration agents were planning to sweep into immigrant communities in 10 major cities on Sunday in coordinated raids. Officials said on Friday that they would target about 2,000 families in a show of force aimed at enforcing immigration laws.

If the plans had gone forward, some immigrant children — many of whom are American citizens because they were born in the United States — would have faced the possibility of being forcibly separated from their families when ICE agents arrived to arrest and deport their undocumented parents.

Democratic lawmakers and immigration activists had demanded that the raids be stopped, calling them a cruel attack on minority communities whose only crime was illegally entering the country. Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Saturday called the raids “heartless” and urged Mr. Trump to “stop this brutal action.”

The president did that a few hours later, saying in his tweet that “at the request of Democrats, I have delayed the Illegal Immigration Removal Process (Deportation) for two weeks.”

But Mr. Trump made clear that he planned to use the looming threat of family deportations as a cudgel to try to extract concessions from Democratic lawmakers in his long-running battle over changes to immigration laws.

That threat has the potential to set up a fierce legislative battle during the next two weeks as the president and Democrats on Capitol Hill clash over Mr. Trump’s demands to drastically limit opportunities for migrants from Central America and other areas to apply for asylum in the United States.

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ICE Signals Mass Immigration Arrests, but Not the ‘Millions’ Trump Promised

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-immig-facebookJumbo ICE Signals Mass Immigration Arrests, but Not the ‘Millions’ Trump Promised United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Immigration and Emigration Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Homeland Security Department Deportation

WASHINGTON — Immigration and Customs Enforcement in recent days has bulked up the branch responsible for carrying out deportations in preparation for the mass arrests of undocumented immigrants, two Department of Homeland Security officials said on Tuesday, adding that the agency could not immediately deport “millions of illegal aliens” as President Trump had promised the night before.

Senior ICE officials, many of whom were blindsided by Mr. Trump’s tweet, have signaled for weeks that the agency would conduct raids targeting thousands of migrant families in homes and communities, something one of the homeland security officials confirmed on Tuesday was expected in the coming weeks.

ICE has requested that agents in Homeland Security Investigations — the branch of the agency that conducts long-term investigations into human trafficking and drug smuggling — assist Enforcement and Removal Operations, which deports undocumented immigrants, according to the two homeland security officials. They said the nationwide reallocation of resources was rare and a sign that ICE would soon conduct mass arrests.

But agents were not clear what specifically Mr. Trump was referring to in his tweet on Monday, which came less than 24 hours before he was scheduled to appear in Florida for a rally to kick off his 2020 re-election campaign.

On Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Trump repeated that immigration officials planned to conduct a deportation operation next week. “They know. They know,” Mr. Trump said as he left for Florida. “They’re going to start next week and when people come into our country and they come in illegally, they’ll have to go out.”

But immigration laws prevent the Trump administration from immediately deporting asylum-seeking Central American families, who make up a majority of the migrants arrested at the border. The operation planned by ICE officials would instead target those in the interior of the country who have been issued a final removal order or missed their court date.

A president releasing the timeline of such raids would be unprecedented because it could spread panic in communities and potentially threaten the success of the raids. An operation targeting families also would not immediately result in the deportation of millions of undocumented immigrants, according to officials who were not authorized to speak publicly about the details of the coming operation or Mr. Trump’s tweet.

ICE charters planes that carry only a couple of hundred migrants back to Central America daily.

While roughly a million undocumented immigrants have been issued removal orders, many of them may be appealing their cases and cannot be deported. The roughly 6,000 deportation officers in ICE also do not know the locations of many of the migrants.

Last fiscal year, Enforcement and Removal Operations deported more than 250,000 undocumented immigrants. Under President Barack Obama, whom critics nicknamed the “deporter in chief” for aggressively sending home criminals and recent border-crossers, the annual number of deportations peaked in 2012 at about 410,000.

ICE officials have changed their minds multiple times in recent days about when to begin the operation to target families, according to one of the homeland security officials. The agency has long been hesitant about such raids because of the bad optics they generate.

On Tuesday afternoon, ICE released a statement saying it was committed to enforcing immigration law, including “routine targeted enforcement operations, criminals, individuals subject to removal orders and work site enforcement.”

This month, in his first extensive comments with reporters as ICE’s acting director, Mark Morgan told reporters that the agency would increase efforts to deport migrants who missed a court hearing or otherwise received a deportation order.

He specified that this would include families, a sign that the agency was preparing to give in to White House pressure to raid migrant families’ homes and neighborhoods.

While ICE officials argue that undocumented adults who have been given a final order of removal should be deported quickly, the idea of rounding up and deporting those who have children in the United States has been fraught for years, even before Mr. Trump took office. Many families include an undocumented parent and a child who is a citizen of the United States and cannot be deported.

Ronald D. Vitiello, ICE’s former acting director, had warned that such an operation would generate public outrage. Mr. Trump pulled Mr. Vitiello’s nomination in April, saying he wanted the agency to go in a “tougher direction.”

The concern among law enforcement officials about backlash was heightened after last summer’s decision by the Trump administration to separate migrant families at the border. The images of the crying children and distraught parents ultimately forced Mr. Trump to back off the policy.

Widespread raids of families could provoke a similar outcry, much of it directed against the gun-wielding agents making the arrests. That has left homeland security’s leadership nervous about the potential consequences of the operation.

For Mr. Trump, the threat of imminent mass deportations is a stark reminder that he intends to seek re-election by doubling down on the central campaign theme that propelled him to the White House in 2016 — stoking fear of immigrants.

But Mr. Trump has largely failed to make good on his immigration promises. His demand for a wall along the southwestern border has been denied by Congress, and courts have blocked some of his more aggressive efforts to deny entry to migrants.

That has enraged Mr. Trump, who has at times come under fire from conservative activists and television hosts for not living up to his promises. His vaguely worded tweet on Monday night appeared to be intended to reassure his supporters that his plans for deporting undocumented immigrants are on track.

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