web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > Education (Page 5)

Andrew Gimson’s Conference sketch: Williamson promises to beat Germany at technical education

Westlake Legal Group L1050603 Andrew Gimson’s Conference sketch: Williamson promises to beat Germany at technical education ToryDiary technical education NHS Nation and patriotism Matthew Hancock MP Germany Gavin Williamson MP Education Boris Johnson MP

We are going to overtake Germany. Gavin Williamson, the Secretary of State for Education, said so this morning. It was the most striking line in his speech.

For he faced, before he spoke, a tricky question. How does one bring new life to a worthy and important subject – inferiority in technical education – which British politicians have been worrying about for well over a century?

Boris Johnson would know how to it. As Mayor of London, the humdrum details of municipal government were transmuted into a drama starring himself as the genius who was inspiring people to build the new sewer and the new bus, and indeed the new airport if only the Treasury and the Department of Transport were not so unimaginative.

Few other ministers know how to impart excitement to such tasks. Williamson decided to do so by stepping forward as the man who would at last remove the inferiority complex from which Britons have suffered since the late 19th century when contemplating the wonders of German technical education.

These pledges have to be finely calibrated. Tell people you will tranform everything by the middle of next week and they will not believe you. But offer them too distant a completion date and they may start to impugn your drive, ambition and fitness for high office.

Williamson steered a middle course, choosing a date when most of those in the hall could hope to be still alive, but one when he himself could hope no longer to be serving as Education Secretary:

“Today I am setting a new ambition over the next decade with an aim to overtake Germany in the opportunities we offer to those studying technical routes by 2029.”

Conscious, perhaps, that these words would not convince everyone, he went on:

“We do not always beat Germany at football but on this we most certainly will.”

And in order to remove any lingering doubt, he added that he will establish “an expert Skills and Productivity Board” which will “provide strategic advice on the skills and qualifications we need”.

Williamson is part of a pattern at this conference: the harnessing of patriotism to the attainment of great national goals by this Conservative government, which can be trusted to cherish great national institutions.

So Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, had declared earlier that “we have a deep and solemn responsibility to steer our beloved country through these troubled times”, and said the single most important thing on the doorstep was to “show and communicate that we love the NHS”.

Worthy social reform cannot always be made entertaining, but it can always be made a cause for national pride.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Loudoun County teacher Jennifer Rodgers named Region 4 Teacher of the Year

Westlake Legal Group jennifer-rodgers-region-4-teacher-of-the-year-with-governors-wife Loudoun County teacher Jennifer Rodgers named Region 4 Teacher of the Year teachers teacher spotlight Sterling public school Profiles loudoun county public schools loudoun county Education
First lady of Virginia, Pamela Northam (left), Jennifer Rodgers, Region 4 Teacher of the Year (right). (Photo courtesy of Loudoun County Public Schools)

“And the award goes to …”

A celebratory assembly in a high school gymnasium may look as if it has much less fanfare than a broadcast award show, but that doesn’t make the honors given any less significant.

Sterling’s Dominion High School had a its celebratory event of the school year on Sept. 5, exactly two weeks into the school year, and Jennifer Rodgers, a social sciences and global studies teacher, wasn’t surprised.

“Our students are really amazing, so that was not uncommon for us to be coming together to celebrate,” says Rodgers, who took note of the assembly on the school’s schedule without much of an afterthought. “I was like, ‘Oh, maybe it was for the state championship [last year], or maybe there were a bunch of kids who got perfect SAT scores.’ But then it became clear once it started that, because there were a lot of people from the county there, the school had earned some type of recognition.”

It wasn’t the school that was receiving an honor, it was Rodgers herself. After she was named Loudoun County Teacher of the Year in April, she had submitted paperwork to be considered for the Virginia Teacher of the Year award.

Announced by first lady of Virginia Pamela Northam, Jennifer Rodgers was named the Region 4 Teacher of the Year by the Virginia Department of Education, becoming one of eight teachers in consideration for the commonwealth’s Teacher of the Year award.

When she looks back on it now, she remembers the moments beforehand clearly, because she was focused on one thing: not falling in front of the crowd.

“I had a good couple of minutes where they sort of built up announcing my name that I realized it was me, and I became really worried that I would fall down the bleachers once I had to walk down them,” says Rodgers.

Luckily, she made it down with ease and accepted her second accolade of the year. We spoke with Rodgers about what the experience has been like thus far, and what it means to her to be teaching children about the world in today’s society. Highlights from our conversation are below.

What does it mean to you to have been selected as Region 4 Teacher of the Year, and up for the Teacher of the Year award in Virginia?
I consider myself really fortunate to teach in a community where people embrace these opportunities for students to engage in globally focused learning. You know, nine years ago when we put the idea out there [at the Loudoun International Youth Summit], we said, “Hey, let’s bring kids from around the world and create this great learning opportunity.” It would have never come together if it wasn’t for administrators, other teachers, families and students that also saw the value of that and decided to all work together to make it happen. So for me, I feel like I was just the person with an idea that was put in the right place at the right time to make a lot of beautiful student-learning opportunities come to life.

Can you talk a little more about the Loudoun International Youth Summit?
So I think a big reason that my application stood out for this recognition was this program that our school has worked to put together. With the Loudoun International Youth Summit, every year we bring kids from some of our partner schools around the world together for 10 days, and our students consider global issues. It was really a grassroots effort of my students nine years ago, and when it first started, there was a little bit of naivety, like, can we do this? Let’s bring kids from around the world for 10 days and we’ll all learn new perspectives and we’ll figure out how to change the world. We were a little uncertain if we would be successful. But for me, that first summer that we made happen was so student-driven and the student leaders were just so passionate about it, it was really the highlight of my teaching career.

What made you want to become a teacher?
I think for me, growing up, teaching was an appealing profession. But I think because my teachers were so great, they opened my eyes to so many other opportunities. When I went to college, I chose engineering as my major because I was pretty well-rounded and good at most subjects, and I kind of had big dollar signs in my eyes. I chose it very pragmatically based off what I thought my average income would be. But as the coursework got more difficult, I wasn’t as good at math and science as I was in high school, so I did a 180 and I switched my major to government and politics.

During that time, I worked a lot of my summer jobs at summer camps and stuff like that, so I started thinking about becoming a teacher when I thought more about the broad capacity I could have as a teacher to get young people excited about government and politics. And in an American democracy, having an engaged citizenry is so important.

So I became interested in civics education, and a watershed moment for me when I think my development of my philosophy as an educator came through was Sept. 11, 2001. I was just a couple years out of college and I was working for a civics education nonprofit and I realized how little I knew about the world, and that I was really off-base on some of the assumptions I had made about America’s role in the world. I realized, as an educator, I had an enormous responsibility not only to seek more understanding on other perspectives of the world, but to make sure that was also an integral part of my teaching.

How does your original “philosophy” still play into your teaching today?
I mean, I teach government, so it’d be really remiss if we didn’t use teachable moments. I think it’s important for students to see what happens in school isn’t just, you know, contained to these four walls. It really connects to the outside world, and any opportunity you have to make the learning authentic adds so much value.

What still draws you to teaching?
I have a deep appreciation of the role of public education in our society in general. I really think when you consider a lot of the biggest problems we face as a society, whether it’s income inequality, or any number of other issues, that in the end, if we’re going to make those things right, it’s going to be through a robust system of public education. I think that whenever I get bogged down and in the weeds of new educational initiatives or any other number of things that bog you down as a teacher, I step back and look at the big picture. That helps me refocus and remember that I have a strong belief in the efficacy and the ability of teachers to really make a difference in not only shaping individual young minds, but then, collectively, those young minds shaping society as a whole.

What are the most important lessons you teach, and that you hope your students carry with them after your classes?
The most important type of learning is learning to collaborate and communicate with people from around the world. There’s tremendous value in that for so many different reasons. I think an appreciation for global perspectives, so that students know the world is much bigger than Loudoun County, or much bigger than just the United States. It’s that, to solve problems of the future, they are going to need to be able to communicate and collaborate with people all over the world, and high school is the time to start developing those skills, and to be thinking about how we work with other people, and what perspectives they are bringing to the table, and what are the most efficient ways to communicate with them to solve problems.

Lastly, what do you want readers to know about teaching in Loudoun County?
I think in Loudoun County, we’re really lucky to be a forward-thinking school district that embraces opportunities for students. Part of our mission is to make meaningful contributions to the world, and really that’s more than just words. We, as teachers in the district, work hard to create these opportunities for students to think about their ability to make the world a better place and to help them develop the skills to do that.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sterling-based Cuisine Solutions expands K-12 lunch program in NoVA

Westlake Legal Group Yorktown-High-school-lunch-program Sterling-based Cuisine Solutions expands K-12 lunch program in NoVA Students school lunch school public schools lunch Health Food fast-casual dining Education Cuisine Solutions
Students wait in line at the Café + Tera in Yorktown High School in Arlington County. (Photo courtesy of Cuisine Solutions)

“Someone once told me that you can make a lunch as healthy as you want it, but at the end of the day, if it doesn’t taste good, kids won’t eat it and you’ll end up with healthy trash cans.”

That’s how manager of Cuisine Solutions K-12 program Bill Stablein explains the motivation for the Sterling-based company’s growing concept, Café+Teria, found solely in local school cafeterias.

The program began two years ago when the company decided to move away from catering to professional chefs and home cooks, and test out some of its sous-vide style recipes in three Arlington County public schools, ultimately gaining attention from board directors, nutritionists and dietitians alike. 

Westlake Legal Group Indian-bowl-cafe-tera Sterling-based Cuisine Solutions expands K-12 lunch program in NoVA Students school lunch school public schools lunch Health Food fast-casual dining Education Cuisine Solutions
Photo courtesy of Cuisine Solutions

That’s why when the academic year began in September, the customized lunch program debuted in four Virginia school districts, as well as one in Pickens County, South Carolina, expanding from eight school partnerships in 2018 to 16.    

“One of the biggest things people kept telling us was that participation in cafeteria programs tends to dip at the high school level, so that was really who we wanted to attract,” says Stablein of the program. “We’ve seen kids flock to fast-casual concepts after school, so we put two and two together and realized it’s an easy way to get them a credible, tasty meal following USDA guidelines.”    

At each Café+Teria site, students are able to choose their own base of grains, salad or a wrap, followed by a protein of antibiotic-free chicken, ground beef or paneer cheese. From there, a rotating menu of Asian, Mediterranean, Mexican and Caribbean-themed ingredients are available for students to pick from. 

The food also provides students with nutritious value not always offered at a typical public school cafeteria. And according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, students with healthy eating habits are better learners, with research reflecting that nutrition has an effect on academic achievement.

Westlake Legal Group cafe-tera-wrap Sterling-based Cuisine Solutions expands K-12 lunch program in NoVA Students school lunch school public schools lunch Health Food fast-casual dining Education Cuisine Solutions
Photo courtesy of Cuisine Solutions

“We really wanted to incorporate vegetables as a component of the meal,” says Stablein. “A lot of the time, kids are offered vegetables as a side, like roasted broccoli or asparagus, but they often won’t eat it, because it’s on the side of a better option.”

The Café+Teria concept is now part of cafeterias in Arlington, Alexandria, Loudoun and Frederick counties, with plans to expand nationwide in the future.

According to Stablein, the program thrives due to the enthusiasm from students, with favorite meals varying from district to district. But what is the most popular item in all counties?

“Hands down, it’s the taco,” says Stablein. “They can get a tortilla, salad or brown rice base and choose the toppings they want, and then the entire thing has taco seasoning. It’s really the most popular across the board.”

Stay up to date on education news with our semimonthly newsletter.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity

Westlake Legal Group islam-4399868_1280-620x413 Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity University of North Carolina Uncategorized security religion Muslim Middle East jay smith Israel Islam International Affairs henry reichman Front Page Stories Featured Story Education duke university donald trump Culture & Faith Christianity Betsy DeVos anti-semitism Allow Media Exception Academia

 

 

Duke University and the University of North Carolina jointly run a Middle East studies program, and the initiative is now under threat by the Trump administration.

The White House is threatening to pull taxpayer funding from the endeavor, amid allegations of federal funds misuse. What kind? The advancing an anti-Israel bias, aggressively promoting Islam, and ignoring Judaism and Christianity type.

On August 29th, the Department of Education sent a letter to the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies designating a due date by which the curriculum must be revised. Otherwise, funding will be pulled.

The program — which received a $235,000 grant last year — states its goal as “[supporting] the development of foreign language and international expertise for the benefit of U.S. national security and economic stability.”

Yet, earlier this year, the Duke-UNC CMES held a conference on the taxpayer’s dime with, according to Republican North Carolina Rep. George Holding, “severe anti-Israeli bias and anti-Semitic rhetoric.”

Fox News reports Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was “troubled” by the event.

As noted the investigation:

There is a considerable emphasis placed on understanding the positive aspects of Islam, while there is an absolute absence of any similar focus on the positive aspects of Christianity, Judaism, or any other religion or belief system in the Middle East.

Some academic papers linked to the program have included “Radical Love: Teaching from Islamic Mystical Tradition” and “Performance, Gender-Bending and Subversion in the Early Modern Ottoman Intellectual History.” Neither, in the view of the Education Department, serve the program’s official purpose.

In fact, as for project’s foreign language aspect, only 960 of the 6,800 participants are enrolled in Middle East language classes.

More from Fox:

Department officials instructed the Duke-UNC consortium, which was founded in 2005 and received the grant nearly a decade ago, to provide a “revised schedule of activities” for the next academic year and explain how each offering promotes foreign language learning and advances national security interest.

One UNC history professor thinks the D of E should mind its own business. VP of the school’s American Association of University Professors chapter, Jay Smith, told the Associated Press the official who signed the letter “should stay in his lane and allow the experts to determine what constitutes a ‘full understanding’ of the Middle East.”

Henry Reichman, chair of a committee on academic freedom under the American Association of University Professors, derided the probe as — here’s some novel joint terminology for ya — “right-wing political correctness.”

Education Dept. head Betsy doesn’t seem to be much of a favorite among Democrats, but some do want her to police things at times: In December, actress-turned-person-sayin’-political-stuff appeared to forget cops exist and asked her to be the new Commissioner Gordon (here).

As per DeVos’s commissioned letter, the schools have ’til September 22nd to turn the program around.

-ALEX

 

Relevant RedState links in this article: here.

See 3 more pieces from me:

Former Sex Educator: Planned Parenthood Is Grooming Girls For Abortion Via The Public Education System

Rashida Tlaib Reaches For The Heights Of UberDumb: Trump Is Afraid Of Her Because She’s A Woman…& Not White

Bill Maher Responds To David Koch’s Death: ‘F*** Him,’ ‘I Hope The End Was Painful.’ What Have We Become?

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. 

If you have an iPhone and want to comment, select the box with the upward arrow at the bottom of your screen; swipe left and choose “Request Desktop Site.” If it fails to automatically refresh, manually reload the page. Scroll down to the red horizontal bar that says “Show Comments.”

The post Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group islam-4399868_1280-300x200 Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity University of North Carolina Uncategorized security religion Muslim Middle East jay smith Israel Islam International Affairs henry reichman Front Page Stories Featured Story Education duke university donald trump Culture & Faith Christianity Betsy DeVos anti-semitism Allow Media Exception Academia   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity

Westlake Legal Group islam-4399868_1280-620x413 Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity University of North Carolina Uncategorized security religion Muslim Middle East jay smith Israel Islam International Affairs henry reichman Front Page Stories Featured Story Education duke university donald trump Culture & Faith Christianity Betsy DeVos anti-semitism Allow Media Exception Academia

 

 

Duke University and the University of North Carolina jointly run a Middle East studies program, and the initiative is now under threat by the Trump administration.

The White House is threatening to pull taxpayer funding from the endeavor, amid allegations of federal funds misuse. What kind? The advancing an anti-Israel bias, aggressively promoting Islam, and ignoring Judaism and Christianity type.

On August 29th, the Department of Education sent a letter to the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies designating a due date by which the curriculum must be revised. Otherwise, funding will be pulled.

The program — which received a $235,000 grant last year — states its goal as “[supporting] the development of foreign language and international expertise for the benefit of U.S. national security and economic stability.”

Yet, earlier this year, the Duke-UNC CMES held a conference on the taxpayer’s dime with, according to Republican North Carolina Rep. George Holding, “severe anti-Israeli bias and anti-Semitic rhetoric.”

Fox News reports Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was “troubled” by the event.

As noted the investigation:

There is a considerable emphasis placed on understanding the positive aspects of Islam, while there is an absolute absence of any similar focus on the positive aspects of Christianity, Judaism, or any other religion or belief system in the Middle East.

Some academic papers linked to the program have included “Radical Love: Teaching from Islamic Mystical Tradition” and “Performance, Gender-Bending and Subversion in the Early Modern Ottoman Intellectual History.” Neither, in the view of the Education Department, serve the program’s official purpose.

In fact, as for project’s foreign language aspect, only 960 of the 6,800 participants are enrolled in Middle East language classes.

More from Fox:

Department officials instructed the Duke-UNC consortium, which was founded in 2005 and received the grant nearly a decade ago, to provide a “revised schedule of activities” for the next academic year and explain how each offering promotes foreign language learning and advances national security interest.

One UNC history professor thinks the D of E should mind its own business. VP of the school’s American Association of University Professors chapter, Jay Smith, told the Associated Press the official who signed the letter “should stay in his lane and allow the experts to determine what constitutes a ‘full understanding’ of the Middle East.”

Henry Reichman, chair of a committee on academic freedom under the American Association of University Professors, derided the probe as — here’s some novel joint terminology for ya — “right-wing political correctness.”

Education Dept. head Betsy doesn’t seem to be much of a favorite among Democrats, but some do want her to police things at times: In December, actress-turned-person-sayin’-political-stuff appeared to forget cops exist and asked her to be the new Commissioner Gordon (here).

As per DeVos’s commissioned letter, the schools have ’til September 22nd to turn the program around.

-ALEX

 

Relevant RedState links in this article: here.

See 3 more pieces from me:

Former Sex Educator: Planned Parenthood Is Grooming Girls For Abortion Via The Public Education System

Rashida Tlaib Reaches For The Heights Of UberDumb: Trump Is Afraid Of Her Because She’s A Woman…& Not White

Bill Maher Responds To David Koch’s Death: ‘F*** Him,’ ‘I Hope The End Was Painful.’ What Have We Become?

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. 

If you have an iPhone and want to comment, select the box with the upward arrow at the bottom of your screen; swipe left and choose “Request Desktop Site.” If it fails to automatically refresh, manually reload the page. Scroll down to the red horizontal bar that says “Show Comments.”

The post Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group islam-4399868_1280-300x200 Trump Administration Threatens to Pull Funding from Duke University Program for Promoting Islam While Ignoring Christianity University of North Carolina Uncategorized security religion Muslim Middle East jay smith Israel Islam International Affairs henry reichman Front Page Stories Featured Story Education duke university donald trump Culture & Faith Christianity Betsy DeVos anti-semitism Allow Media Exception Academia   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Here are 12 ways to help.

Westlake Legal Group stop-domestic-violence October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Here are 12 ways to help. workshops Things to Do Features Things to Do Philanthropy mental health Health galas Education domestic violence awareness month domestic violence
© nito / stock.adobe.com

October is a time for local communities to come together and support one another, as it marks Domestic Violence Awareness Month. 

According to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, one in four women and one in seven men over the age of 18 have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner, which has long-term affects on both the body and the mind. While the problem is a common one, it is rarely discussed openly in public. That’s why this October, Northern Virginia residents will come together to support survivors of domestic violence, including sexual assault, intimate partner violence and psychological and physical abuse. 

From formal galas to community walks, here’s how to raise awareness in the region.   

Fill your calendar with more meaningful events by subscribing to our Things to Do newsletter.

Support Teenage Victims of Sexual Assault: Dinner by Nascent Solutions
Sept. 28, 8 p.m.
Nascent Solutions is a nonprofit organization dedicated to producing change in Africa through humanitarian and developmental efforts. This year, as part of the group’s “Girl Reach Initiative,” representatives are hosting a reception consisting of dinner, live entertainment and lectures from leaders around the world, all in support of survivors of sexual violence caught in the sociopolitical crisis in Cameroon. // Waterford at Springfield: 6715 Commerce St., Springfield; $100

Party for a Cause
Sept. 28, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.
At this evening event, Inca Social will be honoring survivors of domestic violence by raising money for local nonprofits that advocate for individuals affected by sexual assault and family abuse. Come out for a cocktail in support of a good cause. // Inca Social: 2670 Avenir Place, Vienna; donations encouraged

Rahma Gala
Oct. 4, 7-11 p.m.
This inaugural gala is meant to educate the Ethiopian Muslim community about domestic violence, and also celebrate the hard work of those who have committed to advocating on behalf of survivors. Be sure to don your finest attire and prepare for an evening of motivational speakers, prepared food and education. // Waterford at Springfield: 6715 Commerce St., Springfield; $50-$70

Family Abuse: What is it and What Can You Do About It?
Oct. 7, 6-9 p.m.
What exactly does family abuse look like? Has this happened to someone you know? At this special lecture, hosted by The Women’s Center in Vienna, you’ll learn to identify the signs and patterns of family abuse, as well as the proper ways to effectively handle situations of violence. Plus, a survivor will share her story and experiences with the group. // The Women’s Center: 127 Park St. NE, Room 32, Vienna; free

The Clothesline Project
Oct. 9, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
The Clothesline Project is a nationwide visual display of T-shirts showcasing the impact of domestic violence and sexual assault, primarily on college campuses. For one day only, come out to Northern Virginia Community College to read powerful, personal stories of survivors. // Northern Virginia Community College, Howsmon Hall: 6901 Sudley Road, Manassas; free

Personal Safety for Women Presentation
Oct. 8, 6-8 p.m.
Every October, members from the Fairfax County Police Department host a safety workshop to introduce women to self-protective options without bringing violence into the room. Topics discussed will include prevention strategies, ways to identify at-risk situations and methods of evaluating your own personal strengths. // West Springfield District Station: 6140 Rolling Road, West Springfield; free

2019 K9 Krawl 5K
Oct. 12, 9-11 a.m.
For the 13th year in a row, the Fairfax County Police Department is hosting a free walk to bring awareness to the link between domestic violence and animal cruelty. According to the Animal Legal Defense Fund, animal abusers are five times as likely to harm humans, too. This event will bring the community together for a walk with canines and humans alike, a pet costume contest, face painting, resource tables and so much more. // Fairfax County Public Safety Headquarters: 12099 Government Center Parkway, Fairfax; free 

The Struggle is Real: Pink and Purple Zumbanation
Oct. 19, 9 a.m.-noon
This month, bring awareness to the cause through discussion, physical exercise and overall mental healing at this morning event hosted by Naomi’s House, an organization dedicated to assisting women who have suffered from commercial sexual exploitation. Whether you choose to participate in the Zumba courses or simply want to seek out resources, the choice is yours. // The Osprey’s at Belmont Bay: 401 Belmont Bay Drive, Woodbridge; donations encouraged

Dolls Against Domestic Violence
Oct. 19, 2-5 p.m.
Join members of the Fredericksburg community for the second annual Dolls Against Domestic Violence event. While the event started with just a few survivors coming together for healing, it has since become an organized program featuring keynote speakers, breakout sessions and T-shirts from the Clothesline Project. // Salem Church Library Conference Area: 2607 Salem Church Road, Fredericksburg; free 

Break Through Summit & Fashion Show with Purple Runway
Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. & 5 p.m.
For the past five years, the organization Purple Runway has been pairing fashion and advocacy at an annual fashion show event to raise funds for survivors, thrivers and conquerors of domestic violence. In addition to the showcase featuring local designers and boutique vendors, the organization is hosting a summit throughout the day for survivors to come together and heal with workshops, lectures and engaging sessions. // Mercedes-Benz of Arlington: 585 N. Glebe Road, Arlington; $69-$89

CEO Training: Trauma, Violence and Abuse
Oct. 25, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
At the end of October, The Women’s Center will host a day-long event aiming to teach women and men alike about the cycle of violence, symptoms of trauma and skills needed when working with survivors of domestic abuse, violence and sexual assault. From hands-on, scenario-based workshops to talks by survivors and clinical experts, this event will leave you feeling informed and prepared to help. // Attain Training Room: 1600 Tysons Blvd., McLean; $25-$135

26th Annual Knock Out Abuse Gala
Nov. 7, 6:30 p.m.
Every year, locals and visitors alike travel to Washington, DC for the annual Knock Out Abuse Gala, which has raised more than $11 million to organizations with the mission of supporting survivors of domestic violence and their families. From the silent auction to the after-party, the entire evening is an affair to remember. // The Ritz-Carlton: 1150 22nd St. NW, Washington, DC; $750-$50,000  

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

7 writing classes for young adults to take in NoVA this October

Westlake Legal Group teenagers-writing 7 writing classes for young adults to take in NoVA this October young adults writing courses Writing writers workshops Things to Do teens teenagers literary experts Education
© goodluz / stock.adobe.com

When you’re young, there’s a strong interest in discovering what exactly you want to be when you grow up. From a superhero to a princess, the goals are never too far fetched to diminish hope. 

As you get into the teenage and young adult years, though, that initial dream will most likely have changed several times, eventually becoming an attainable passion that requires a skill set worth working toward. Writing, for example, is an essential skill to have when entering college and the workforce.

Whether you’re interested in becoming a doctor or a poet, having basic writing skills will take you far. And throughout the month of October, there are plenty of opportunities for teens, young adults and beginner-level writers to strengthen their craft in the Northern Virginia region.

Want more Education content? Subscribe to our semimonthly e-newsletter. 

World Building with Thierry Sagnier
Oct. 1, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Every story is set in a scene, yet as a writer, developing those intricate details of the setting can often be challenging. This October, you can practice the art of world building in a two-hour course right in Arlington. Whether you’ve just discovered your interest in writing or are a practicing novelist, this workshop will teach everyone how to construct an environment for characters to live in. // The Writer’s Passage: 4444 Arlington Blvd., Arlington; $45

Writing in Nature: Down by the Water
Oct. 5, 10 a.m.-noon
A large aspect of creative writing is honing in on the imagery of your tale. That’s why this fall, the Loudoun Wildlife Conservatory is taking interested writers out to the wilderness for a two-hour session focusing on the benefits of writing while being in nature. Led by two experts, you’ll learn to discover yourself through the surrounding imagery of NoVA’s ponds, fauna and animals. // Rust Nature Sanctuary: 802 Childrens Center Road SW, Leesburg; $20 for members, $30 for nonmembers    

Fiction Writing Workshop with Cortney Maum
Oct. 9, 4:30-6 p.m.
Led by novelist Courtney Maum, who recently published Before and After the Book Deal, this intensive workshop will shake that writer’s block right out of your system. While this class is open to all levels, be sure to come prepared to widen your imagination with playful prompts, partner activities and a Q&A session that will get help you remember why you started to love writing in the first place. // Atheneum: 201 Prince St., Alexandria; $45-$60

Fall for the Book Festival
Oct. 11-12, times vary
This October, come out for the 21st annual celebration of literary arts, hosted by nonprofit Fall for the Book at George Mason University. While the celebration starts on Oct. 10, with lectures, readings and workshops, there are three specific classes being held on the final two days that are great for new writers, listed below.

So You Want to Write for a National Magazine?
Oct. 11, 10:20-11:45 a.m.
Think you may be interested in pursuing a career in journalism? Then this workshop hosted by former editor of AARP and now author, Ken Budd, is the one to attend. In the last decade, Budd has written for The New York Times, Smithsonian, National Geographic and more, making him the perfect host to share what it takes to write for a widely read magazine. // GMU Research Hall, Room 163: 10401 River Road, Fairfax; free

First Words for Young Writers: A Workshop
Oct. 12, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Writers are faced with criticism all the time, but what is the appropriate way to manage it? At this one-of-a-kind workshop led by authors Christina June and Katy Upperman, middle and high school students will learn how to respectfully critique the work of others, as well as integrate positive and negative feedback into your own writing. But be sure to reserve your spot soon, as each participant is required to submit a piece of work prior to the event. // Alan and Sally Merten Hall: 4441 George Mason Blvd., Room 2500, Fairfax; $15 

Learn to Write Poetry with Mark Fitzgerald
Oct. 12, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
From haikus to narrative poems, this hands-on workshop will cover it all. For just one afternoon, experienced poet Mark Fitzgerald will lead participants in a discussion of poetic elements found in well-known pieces of work. Plus, you’ll be able to experience a poet’s critique of each individual’s original poem, based off of a writing prompt revealed on the day of. // Alan and Sally Merten Hall: 4441 George Mason Blvd., Room 2500, Fairfax; $35

Inside Job: The Art of Personal Essay Writing—The Sequel for Teens 14 to 17
Oct. 19, 12:30-3 p.m.
This October, take an afternoon to become confident in your personal narrative, with help from award-winning writer and performance artist Bomani Armah. While this event takes place in Washington, DC, it’s worth making the drive, as your teen will walk away with a better understanding of himself and his writing style, eventually benefiting the application process to university. // William O. Lockridge / Bellevue Neighborhood Library: 115 Atlantic St. SW, Washington, DC; free

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Robert Halfon: The Thomas Cook bosses should pay for their greed

Robert Halfon is MP for Harlow, Chair of the Education Select Committee and President of Conservative Workers and Trade Unionists.

The greatest democratic exercise of all…a general election

Whatever one’s view about the Supreme Court’s decision, it is worth noting that twice in the past three weeks, the Prime Minister has called a parliamentary vote for a general election – the greatest democratic exercise of all – and which could resolve these issues once and for all.

I have voted for a general election twice in the past month, as I wish to hold myself to account to the people of Harlow.  Both of these votes have been opposed in Parliament by Labour and the other opposition parties. Do they believe in democracy or not?

Thomas Crook

It seems extraordinary that, yet again, a long-standing, British company, founded 178 years ago, has crashed and burned because of the ineptitude and greed of the management. Figures published show that the senior directors carved up £47 million for their bonuses and wages over the past twelve years, all the while, the company’s assets were going from bad to worse.

Not only have hundreds of thousands of British holiday-makers had their holidays and lives ruined and disrupted, but spare a thought for the 21,000 Thomas Cook employees who, through no fault of their own, are suddenly out of their jobs.

Whilst the senior management will no doubt go back to their millionaire lifestyles, the ordinary employee will be at home without a salary and a risk to their pension.

This is all grist to the Corbyn, anti-capitalist mill. Conservatives must have an answer to the failure of incompetent management and corporate greed – especially when taxpayers’ money is involved. How about, rather than just the hard-pressed taxpayer having to pay for all the compensation, flights and insurance for Thomas Cook customers, why shouldn’t the company directors open their fat wallets and give some of their money back to the taxpayer?

It’s time that we looked at corporate laws and make sure that those responsible for the mess, are also responsible for clearing it up

We have an opportunity; let’s seize it

As Tom Watson has put it, this year’s Labour Party Conference has been like “a drive-by shooting”. Their civil war is out in the open for all to see. As happens with every hardline revolution, the revolutionaries eventually turn on each other, and “the revolution devours its own children”.

If this civil strife was not bad enough, the Opposition leadership has proposed a range of policies calculated to appeal to the few, rather than the many. Abolishing Ofsted, the four-day week – alongside billions of pounds of unfunded promises to be spent on anything and everything.

So, as Conservatives – even with the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision regarding the prorogation of Parliament – we have a real chance here to unify as a Party.

The truth is that around 80 to 90 percent of the Party are united behind the Brexit position and almost 100 percent of the Party is united behind policies to spend more on education, health and policing. We have a choice; either we can argue about leaving the EU, or we can set out policies on public services and social justice that really capture the public’s imagination.

Don’t be fooled by the polling data – complacency is the enemy

Despite our rise in the polls, many of the Corbyn messages on austerity still resonate. People are struggling with the cost of living. Nearly a million people are living in overcrowded accommodation. One in four have less than £95 in savings.

Complacency is the enemy.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s been wonderful to see the rise of the Conservatives in the polls and Labour’s decline. At the time of writing, the latest YouGov polling data states that we are 11 points ahead of Labour.

But we’ve been here before. If we think back to the 2017 election, we had a confident lead in the run-up – at times, 20-points ahead of Labour – and we all know what happened then.

It’s also worth remembering that only until recently Labour were ahead of us in some polls. The Brexit Party remains strong, and could potentially take millions of Conservative votes. Meanwhile, Labour Party is significantly close in many target/marginal seats.

The worst thing that could happen is if we, Conservatives, think this election will be a walk in the park. It’s true that, if we get Brexit sorted on October 31st, things could be a lot better, but it will still be probably one of the toughest elections to fight.

Conservatism must also find an attack-line against Corbyn which isn’t about him being a “Marxist” – as I have written about before on ConservativeHome. Tories have to look for a narrative that provides a meaningful way to explain to ordinary folk the damage that a Corbyn-Government would do to both our economy and our public services.

Williamson: A real vocational education reformer

Could Gavin Williamson be one of the real reforming Education Secretaries and transform vocation and skills? Alongside Sajid Javid, he is one of the very few cabinet ministers to have gone to an FE college and has a real passion and understanding for skills and apprenticeships.

Whilst some have criticised the fact that there is no longer a dedicated Skills Minister, I see it quite differently; skills and apprenticeships will now receive significant attention, playing a major role in the Education Secretary’s brief and having a significant voice in the Cabinet, for the first time.

It was good to see that in his address to the Universities UK Conference two weeks ago, Williamson spoke so passionately and set out a vision for skills in our country. He encouraged “collaboration” between higher education institutions, schools and colleges to “drive this country forward” in terms of skills, and recognised that we must “boost further education and its links with industry and business”.

Furthermore, Boris Johnson has announced an extra £400 million for 16-19 education which should make a significant difference. It certainly helps that both the Chancellor and Education Secretary are passionate about FE and will ensure that the sector is well looked after.

Williamson seems to understand vocational education and the need to build up its prestige, in a way that many in top Government positions often don’t. I’m hopeful that we could see, under his stewardship, a very exciting future for apprenticeships and skills in our country.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Black Teacher Who Blew the Whistle on Minority Students Being Allowed to Misbehave Wins Huge in Court

Westlake Legal Group crayons-1209804_1280-620x438 Black Teacher Who Blew the Whistle on Minority Students Being Allowed to Misbehave Wins Huge in Court Uncategorized Teaching St. Paul Social Justice school racism Race Public Education Politics Minnesota Front Page Stories Featured Story Education discipline democrats Culture cretin-derham hall children Allow Media Exception Academia aaron benner

 

 

Aaron Benner is a black elementary school teacher, formerly with the St. Paul School District in Minnesota.

And now, he’s also a guy with a giant chunk of cash.

The reason?

Well, the story began during the 2014-2015 schol year, when Aaron called out the school for letting minority students get away with misbehavior.

As reported by Minneapolis Star Tribune:

Benner, who is black, accused the district of failing black students by not holding them accountable for disruptive behavior. The district was being led then by Valeria Silva, who sought to reduce racial disparities in student discipline.

Resultantly, as per his 2015 federal lawsuit, the school system — despite him having never been reprimanded in 19 years as an educator — used four separate investigations to essentially force him to quit.

Well, on Tuesday night, a settlement was won. And it ain’t no little bag of coins, neither.

Aaron scored $525,000.

In an email, he expressed his gratitude toward a higher power:

I thank God for all the blessings in my life. I turned 50 this year, got married in July and now (there is) this settlement.

The system issued a statement, among which lay the absence of admitted guilt:

This agreement enables the district to avoid the time, expense and uncertainty of protracted legal proceedings regarding its previous policies, practices and expectations.

Of course, ultimately, it isn’t the district that’ll cough up the dough, but the taxpayers.

However, St. Paul seems cool with spending from the trough.

As noted by The O’Reilly Factor in 2015:

“For the past five years the St. Paul, Minnesota school district has spent nearly $3 million on ‘white privilege’ training done by a far-Left outfit called the Pacific Educational Group. That training tells teachers to overlook transgressions by minority students; to treat them differently than white students.”

Maybe they can save on that kind of instruction going forward.

Aaron now serves as an administrator for St. Paul’s Cretin-Derham Hall charter school.

-ALEX

 

Candace Owens Eviscerates White Dems Lecturing Her On White Supremacy – ‘I’ve Been Black In America My Whole Life’

Don Lemon And Guest: Obama Was Great For Them, But Trump Spits In Black People’s Faces

Beto O’Rourke’s Latest Goofy ‘Man Of The People’ Video Continues His Tone-Deaf Race To 2020 Obscurity

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

Thank you for reading! Please sound off in the Comments section below. 

If you have an iPhone and want to comment, select the box with the upward arrow at the bottom of your screen; swipe left and choose “Request Desktop Site.” If it fails to automatically refresh, manually reload the page. Scroll down to the red horizontal bar that says “Show Comments.”

The post Black Teacher Who Blew the Whistle on Minority Students Being Allowed to Misbehave Wins Huge in Court appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group crayons-1209804_1280-300x212 Black Teacher Who Blew the Whistle on Minority Students Being Allowed to Misbehave Wins Huge in Court Uncategorized Teaching St. Paul Social Justice school racism Race Public Education Politics Minnesota Front Page Stories Featured Story Education discipline democrats Culture cretin-derham hall children Allow Media Exception Academia aaron benner   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chris Skidmore: Creating the next Stanford or MIT of the future – right here in Britain

Chris Skidmore is Minister of State jointly at the Department for Education and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.  He is MP for Kingswood.

Britain’s universities are home to some of the world’s brightest and best minds. Scientists and researchers are hard at work cracking the toughest problems, from modelling the polar ice-sheets to developing new antibiotics. Their ground-breaking work inspires young people and changes people’s lives. We rank first or second on most metrics, coming only behind the US – a country with far bigger budgets. It’s a great British success story.

But other countries have taken note and are massively scaling up their own efforts. Just look at China: they’ve committed to spending a whopping five per cent of their GDP on R&D. South Korea has already reached 4.3 per cent. The UK lags way behind at just 1.7 per cent.

This isn’t just a twenty-first century ‘science race’, like the space race of the last century. It matters because investing in R&D is the best way for modern economies to raise productivity, especially in the face of increased global competition.  In 2016, the UK committed to reaching to 2.4 per cent by 2027. If we achieve this, it will revolutionise our economy. But it depends on getting two things right.

The first is about people. As we leave the EU, it is vital that the UK becomes even more attractive for international research talent. Earlier this year, we announced a new fast-track visa plan, designed to attract elite researchers and scientists to the UK.

And today, we are unveiling 78 new Future Leaders Fellows – helping early-career researchers to do their best work, benefitting from £78 million investment and access to our world-class universities.  These people are truly inspiring – relocating from all over the world to continue their amazing work right here in the UK, such as new research into ocean oxidisation, violence against women, quantum thermodynamics and self-driving cars.

And we want to go further – ensuring that job offers turn into lasting careers in research. This means cutting red tape, eliminating bullying and discrimination, and unlocking the creativity of everyone working in research, whether in universities or industry.

That brings me to my second point. Raising productivity is important for government. But it is arguably even more important for industry. Over two-thirds of our national R&D is paid for by private funds. That is a sign of its value to the market, proving that innovation is the path to growth.

I am determined that our private and public R&D systems should work together as effectively as possible. This means universities, government and industry working together to share risks and to convert great ideas into new businesses, new industries and new products and services.  Universities have shown themselves to be more than capable of playing their part. Just take the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund, where universities have secured over £2bn from industry and private sources into 54 projects right across the UK.

To build on this, I’m delighted that the government is today unveiling 20 new University Enterprise Zones. Established with £20 million of government funding, these new UEZs will be based in universities right across the country, from Falmouth to Sunderland.  These projects are all about creating a business-friendly environment, helping to build a bridge between academia and business. They will allow local start-ups to co-locate in universities, building the businesses of the future – inspired by university research.

In this way, the Government is supporting and encouraging strong relationships between our world-leading researchers and the business world that can best make use of their ideas.  By fostering effective university-business links, we too can create the Stanford or MIT of the future – right here in the UK – ensuring science and research remains a remarkable success story for many years to come.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com