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Westlake Legal Group > Endorsements

Past Remarks Are Challenging for Bloomberg, and Fair Game for Rivals

Westlake Legal Group 17bloomberg-past-2-facebookJumbo Past Remarks Are Challenging for Bloomberg, and Fair Game for Rivals Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Political Advertising Endorsements Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr

HOUSTON — It hadn’t even been a full day since a 12-year-old video surfaced of Michael R. Bloomberg showing him linking the 2008 financial crisis to the end of redlining, a practice that allowed banks to declare low-income, mostly minority neighborhoods off-limits for loans.

But as the criticism swelled, Mr. Bloomberg was in Houston introducing a new initiative for his presidential campaign called “Mike for Black America.” Mayor Sylvester Turner of Houston, whose endorsement Mr. Bloomberg had pursued for weeks, delivered an impassioned speech, as did the mayors of Columbia, S.C., and Washington, both of whom are also helping Mr. Bloomberg with his African-American outreach.

“You don’t judge people by the mistakes they have made,” Mr. Turner declared. “You judge them by their ability to fess up.”

For the past two months, Mr. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign has been lining up endorsements and expanding its reach across the country with an eye toward the moment it knew would come: when Mr. Bloomberg, the 78-year-old multibillionaire, would no longer be an afterthought in the race but a prime target, and his long record — including policy stances and decades worth of impolitic and insensitive remarks would face renewed scrutiny.

That moment is now here: Over the weekend, the concern about Mr. Bloomberg’s ascendancy was evident as rival Democrats campaigning in Nevada unleashed a barrage of attacks on the former mayor, including familiar laments that he was trying to buy an election and new criticism aided by resurfaced videos that invoked his past controversies.

Speaking in Las Vegas, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont devoted an entire portion of his speech to Mr. Bloomberg, accusing him of supporting “racist policies” like the so-called stop-and-frisk searches of young minority men and attacking him for opposing minimum wage increases in the past.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden said in an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday, “Sixty billion dollars can buy you a lot of advertising, but it can’t erase your record.” And he appeared relieved that the scrutiny had shifted from him to Mr. Bloomberg. “You all are going to start focusing on him like you have on me,” Mr. Biden said.

Mr. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, is skipping the first four nominating contests, including the Nevada caucuses on Saturday, and instead will join the race on Super Tuesday, on March 3. The two weeks leading up to those contests figure to be the most intense and trying for him so far — not just because of the attacks that are certain to keep coming but because they will test the resolve and restraint of a candidate who has never displayed much patience when confronted with criticism.

“He’s not a career politician,” said the Columbia mayor, Stephen Benjamin, who is also Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign co-chairman. Citing what he said was the campaign’s internal polling of Super Tuesday states, which showed Mr. Bloomberg leading in Arkansas and in second or third place in North Carolina and Texas, Mr. Benjamin said: “That’s when arrows start flying. That’s when the daggers come out.

“But you’ve got to be able to show the resilience to take the arrows.”

The excavation of Mr. Bloomberg’s past has accelerated as the former mayor’s unorthodox candidacy begins to appear more plausible. In just the past week four different sets of remarks have surfaced dealing with questions of racial discrimination.

Within 24 hours alone there were the comments on redlining and a second tape from 2015 in which he unapologetically defends stop-and-frisk policing in New York City’s minority neighborhoods — “Because that’s where all the crime is,” he said — and asserting that it made sense to deploy police to “throw them up against the wall and frisk them.” He apologized for the practice in November, a week before he entered the presidential race.

After each instance his team was ready. When news of the stop-and-frisk comments broke, a group of 20 African-American faith leaders happened to be at the Bloomberg campaign headquarters for a previously scheduled meeting. They agreed to release a joint statement defending him.

His rivals have spent nearly all of their time and resources battling one another in early-voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire, while Mr. Bloomberg has spent hundreds of millions of dollars building up his image with advertising and campaign rallies in states where has had the field largely to himself.

Mr. Bloomberg hopes the campaign he has built in less than three months will armor him against these kinds of attacks. Operating in what was essentially a vacuum for so long has allowed him to introduce himself on his own terms to voters who knew little about him.

“There was not a lot of well-defined understanding of Bloomberg outside of ‘He was once mayor of New York and he’s rich,’” said Cornell Belcher, a former aide to President Barack Obama who is advising Mr. Bloomberg on strategy and polling. “The campaign has done a good job of getting in early and defining him,” Mr. Belcher added, while Mr. Bloomberg “had all the March states to himself.”

With African-American voters specifically, his campaign has highlighted parts of his biography that are likely to resonate, like his relationship with Mr. Obama. Campaign ads feature Mr. Bloomberg’s work to expand My Brother’s Keeper, an initiative by the Obama administration supporting boys and young men of color, and his efforts to reduce gun violence by requiring more scrutiny for arms purchases. The campaign also emphasizes his apology for the stop-and-frisk program.

Mr. Bloomberg’s events across the South last week drew large crowds — more than 1,000 people were in attendance at separate events in Nashville and Chattanooga, Tenn.— and often included large numbers of African-Americans. In interviews, many voters were aware that the issue of his record on racial discrimination was in the news. But they also cited the former mayor’s work with Mr. Obama and his gun control campaigns. And while his record on policing was a sore spot, some gave him credit for apologizing.

“He came out and apologized and said that’s not the kind of policy I would support as president,” said Sheree Johnson, 35, an educator who attended Mr. Bloomberg’s event in Houston. “The Christian in me says to forgive him for that. He acknowledged it. He was wrong.”

Dwight Smith, who works with the N.A.A.C.P. in Chattanooga and attended Mr. Bloomberg’s rally there, said he believed many black voters were focused more on the bigger-picture goal of beating President Trump than they were on blemishes in any candidate’s past. “Everybody makes mistakes,” Mr. Smith said. “And if you look at the mistakes Donald Trump has made versus the mistakes Mike Bloomberg has made, I think people are willing to let it go.”

Not everyone, though. Benjamin Dixon, an African-American podcaster, has shared on Twitter Mr. Bloomberg’s previous comments supporting stop-and-frisk with the hashtag #BloombergIsARacist. That sort of criticism is indicative of the kind of resistance Mr. Bloomberg will most likely continue to encounter.

However, Mr. Belcher said the sentiments of the activist community and the political punditry were often not a good proxy for how a majority of black voters consider matters like these. “Lord knows if African-Americans had absolute purity tests for people who had problematic issues in the past, we would never advance as people,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Past Remarks Are Troublesome for Bloomberg, and Fair Game for Rivals

Westlake Legal Group 17bloomberg-past-2-facebookJumbo Past Remarks Are Troublesome for Bloomberg, and Fair Game for Rivals Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Political Advertising Endorsements Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr

HOUSTON — It hadn’t even been a full day since a 12-year-old video surfaced of Michael R. Bloomberg showing him linking the 2008 financial crisis to the end of redlining, a practice that allowed banks to declare low-income, mostly minority neighborhoods off-limits for loans.

But as the criticism swelled over his record on race and inequality, Mr. Bloomberg was in Houston cutting the ribbon on a new initiative for his presidential campaign called “Mike for Black America.” Mayor Sylvester Turner of Houston, whose endorsement Mr. Bloomberg had pursued for weeks, delivered an impassioned speech, as did the mayors of Columbia, S.C., and Washington, both of whom are also helping Mr. Bloomberg with his African-American outreach.

“You don’t judge people by the mistakes they have made,” Mr. Turner declared. “You judge them by their ability to fess up.”

For the past two months, Mr. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign has been lining up endorsements, adjusting its messages to voters and expanding its reach across the country with an eye toward the moment it knew would come: when Mr. Bloomberg, the 78-year-old multibillionaire and former mayor of New York, would no longer be an afterthought in the race but a prime target, and decades worth of impolitic and insensitive remarks — as well as problematic policy stances — would face renewed scrutiny.

That moment is now here, presenting Mr. Bloomberg with the kind of political crucible he has not faced since 2009, when he last ran for public office. Over the weekend, the concern about Mr. Bloomberg’s ascendancy was evident as rival Democrats campaigning in Nevada unleashed a barrage of attacks on the former mayor, including familiar laments that he was trying to buy an election and new criticism aided by resurfaced videos that invoked his past controversies.

Speaking in Las Vegas, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont devoted an entire portion of his speech to Mr. Bloomberg, accusing him of supporting “racist policies” like the so-called stop-and-frisk searches of young minority men and attacking him for opposing minimum wage increases in the past.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden said in an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday, “Sixty billion dollars can buy you a lot of advertising, but it can’t erase your record.” And he appeared relieved that the scrutiny had shifted from him to Mr. Bloomberg. “You all are going to start focusing on him like you have on me,” Mr. Biden said.

Mr. Bloomberg is skipping the first four nominating contests, including the Nevada caucuses on Saturday, and instead will join the race on Super Tuesday, on March 3. The two weeks leading up to those contests figure to be the most intense and trying for him so far — not just because of the attacks that are certain to keep coming but because they will test the resolve and restraint of a candidate who has never displayed much patience when confronted with criticism.

“He’s not a career politician,” said the Columbia mayor, Stephen Benjamin, who is also Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign co-chairman. Citing what he said was the campaign’s internal polling of Super Tuesday states, which showed Mr. Bloomberg leading in Arkansas and in second or third place in North Carolina and Texas, Mr. Benjamin said: “That’s when arrows start flying. That’s when the daggers come out.

“But you’ve got to be able to show the resilience to take the arrows.”

The excavation of Mr. Bloomberg’s past has accelerated as the former mayor’s unorthodox candidacy begins to appear more plausible. In just the past week four different sets of remarks have surfaced in which he demonstrates a lack of tact in dealing with questions of racial discrimination. Within 24 hours alone there were the comments on redlining and a second tape from 2015 in which he unapologetically defends stop-and-frisk policing in New York City’s minority neighborhoods — “Because that’s where all the crime is,” he said. He apologized for the practice in November, a week before he entered the presidential race.

After each instance he was ready with a retort. When news of the stop-and-frisk comments broke, a group of 20 African-American faith leaders happened to be at the Bloomberg campaign headquarters for a previously scheduled meeting. They agreed to release a joint statement defending him.

His rivals have spent nearly all of their time and resources battling one another in early-voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire, while Mr. Bloomberg has spent hundreds of millions of dollars building up his image with advertising and campaign rallies in states where has had the field largely to himself.

Mr. Bloomberg hopes the campaign he has built in less than three months will armor him against these kinds of attacks. Operating in what was essentially a vacuum for so long has allowed him to introduce himself on his own terms to voters who knew little about him.

“There was not a lot of well-defined understanding of Bloomberg outside of ‘He was once mayor of New York and he’s rich,’” said Cornell Belcher, a former aide to President Barack Obama who is advising Mr. Bloomberg on strategy and polling. “The campaign has done a good job of getting in early and defining him,” Mr. Belcher added, while Mr. Bloomberg “had all the March states to himself.”

With African-American voters specifically, his campaign has highlighted parts of his biography that are likely to resonate, like his relationship with Mr. Obama. Campaign ads feature Mr. Bloomberg’s work to expand My Brother’s Keeper, an initiative by the Obama administration supporting boys and young men of color, and his efforts to reduce gun violence by requiring more scrutiny for arms purchases. The campaign also emphasizes his apology for the stop-and-frisk program.

Mr. Bloomberg’s events across the South last week drew large crowds — more than 1,000 people were in attendance at separate events in Nashville and Chattanooga, Tenn.— and often included large numbers of African-Americans. In interviews, many voters were aware that the issue of his record on racial discrimination was in the news. But they also cited the former mayor’s work with Mr. Obama and his gun control campaigns. And while his record on policing was a sore spot, some gave him credit for apologizing.

“He came out and apologized and said that’s not the kind of policy I would support as president,” said Sheree Johnson, 35, an educator who attended Mr. Bloomberg’s event in Houston. “The Christian in me says to forgive him for that. He acknowledged it. He was wrong.”

Dwight Smith, who works with the N.A.A.C.P. in Chattanooga and attended Mr. Bloomberg’s rally there, said he believed many black voters were focused more on the bigger-picture goal of beating President Trump than they were on blemishes in any candidate’s past. “Everybody makes mistakes,” Mr. Smith said. “And if you look at the mistakes Donald Trump has made versus the mistakes Mike Bloomberg has made, I think people are willing to let it go.”

Not everyone, though. Benjamin Dixon, an African-American podcaster, has shared on Twitter Mr. Bloomberg’s previous comments supporting stop-and-frisk with the hashtag #BloombergIsARacist. That sort of criticism is indicative of the kind of resistance Mr. Bloomberg will most likely continue to encounter.

However, Mr. Belcher said the sentiments of the activist community and the political punditry were often not a good proxy for how a majority of black voters consider matters like these. “Lord knows if African-Americans had absolute purity tests for people who had problematic issues in the past, we would never advance as people,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bloomberg’s Money Machine: 5 Takeaways on His Political Spending

Westlake Legal Group merlin_165489180_0c7b33fb-1255-4109-a7ba-6d0166c051ca-facebookJumbo Bloomberg’s Money Machine: 5 Takeaways on His Political Spending United States Politics and Government Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Philanthropy Mayors Endorsements Democratic Party Bloomberg, Michael R Bloomberg LP

In a divided Democratic field, Michael R. Bloomberg has emerged as a last-minute candidate with an unusual strategy. He is leaning on his record as mayor of New York but also on the good he has done as a philanthropist, betting more than anything that his fortune will enable him to run a national campaign. His campaign is a test of the degree to which a candidate can use his vast wealth to impose himself on the political system.

The New York Times took an exhaustive look at his spending and found that Mr. Bloomberg had given away or spent more than $10 billion on a combination of charitable and political donations. Much of that has gone to important and largely apolitical ends, in fields like public health, but The Times’s examination revealed in new detail how it helped the candidate build an influence network on a scale rarely if ever seen.

Mr. Bloomberg gave away $3.3 billion in 2019. It was by far the most he had given away in a single year — more than in the previous five years combined — and most of it has not been publicly disclosed.

Only his family foundation has any public reporting requirements for its donations. His personal giving — money straight from his own checkbook — and donations made by his namesake company, Bloomberg L.P., do not have to be publicly disclosed.

His charitable and political spending have grown enormously since he left office as mayor of New York City at the end of 2013. Since then, he has built a national — and in some cases, international — network of causes, candidates and organizations that he supports.

Time and again, Mr. Bloomberg’s political spending followed nonprofit dollars and vice versa. In places like Washington State, he gave a mix of philanthropic and campaign funds for issues including gun control, carbon pricing, soda taxes and same-sex marriage. In Colorado, his support of gun control and education measures overlapped with huge charitable donations to an apprenticeship program, a school-choice organization and the Denver public schools.

His areas of concern are fairly consistent, focusing on gun control, education reform, the environment, the arts and public health, including smoking cessation and soda taxes.

The result is that Mr. Bloomberg can become an enveloping presence in the places where he concentrates his attention, instilling a sense of good will and raising his profile far beyond the city he led for a dozen years as mayor.

Unlike his fellow self-funded billionaire in the race, Tom Steyer, Mr. Bloomberg has paved the way for a slew of endorsements with his political and philanthropic activism.

He has been endorsed by dozens of Democratic politicians who have benefited from his spending. A number of them are members of Congress, but most are mayors, from cities like Houston, San Francisco, San Jose and Washington.

Mr. Bloomberg has given tens of millions of dollars to congressional candidates, helping Democrats seize the House in 2018. But in addition to his overtly political spending, he is a leading donor for many top left-wing priorities, including gun control and climate change, supporting organizations like the Sierra Club and Planned Parenthood.

That has created a complicated set of incentives for Democratic groups that either work with Mr. Bloomberg already or hope to work with him in the future. So far, most organizations and politicians that have received Mr. Bloomberg’s money have not endorsed his candidacy, but a number of them acknowledged that they are keenly sensitive to his interests and take pains not to alienate him needlessly.

There is no indication that Mr. Bloomberg has threatened or coerced people in order to get his way. But many people called his more than $60 billion fortune a force powerful enough to make coercion unnecessary.

Other candidates like Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts have accused Mr. Bloomberg of trying to buy the party’s nomination. It remains to be seen whether self-funding his campaign to the tune of $400 million and counting can get him past the likes of Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont or fellow former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.

His campaign has already proved that many party stalwarts will hold back criticism of stances and statements that typically trouble Democrats, including Mr. Bloomberg’s support for stop-and-frisk policing, charter schools and big banks, as well as his past skepticism about the #MeToo movement and crude comments on women.

Mr. Bloomberg has said he will use his fortune to defeat President Trump in 2020, no matter who the Democratic nominee is. But his campaign has indicated that he may spend more broadly if the party chooses him.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Battle for California’s 20 Million Voters Came Early This Year

Westlake Legal Group 00California-04-facebookJumbo The Battle for California’s 20 Million Voters Came Early This Year Villaraigosa, Antonio Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Endorsements Central Valley (Calif) California Bloomberg, Michael R

FRESNO, Calif. — “There’s nothing magical about California,” Michael R. Bloomberg declared after a day flying through the state — or Iowa, for that matter, he added.

But here he was in California, not any of the four early nominating states, trying to make the magic happen.

So there were free carne asada tacos in front of Fresno City College, along with free Mike 2020 T-shirts, designed to draw a lunchtime crowd to hear the former New York mayor speak in a courtyard lined with citrus trees.

“I have never backed down from a bully or run away from a fight,” Mr. Bloomberg said, standing in front of dozens of signs urging supporters to “vote early.” Then he turned to the core of his appeal: “I’m the un-Trump.”

It is simple math — with 415 delegates, California has more electoral power than all four early states combined. And while the political world waited for, then pored over, the partial results from not quite 170,000 voters in Iowa, there are currently about 20 million registered voters in California, and roughly 15 million of them received mail-in ballots this week.

Typically a late-spring afterthought in the nominating contests, and largely ignored in the general election because their state is so reliably blue, the voters of California aren’t accustomed to culling national candidates.

But this year, state officials moved voting day to Super Tuesday, the earliest the California primary has been since 2008.

California matters now. And the earlier primary means that presidential candidates are spending time and money in parts of the state that rarely see big-name politicians of any kind. Democratic Senate candidates and would-be governors often skip over the Central Valley, the agricultural heart of California, reasoning there are far more votes to be had outside the relatively rural and conservative part of the state.

“The Appalachia of California,” is how Antonio Villaraigosa, the former mayor of Los Angeles, referred to the Central Valley as he traveled with Mr. Bloomberg Monday in Fresno, the region’s largest city by population, after offering his endorsement and becoming a national political co-chair for the campaign.

While the coastal cities of Los Angeles and San Francisco have long been treated as political ATMs, the less wealthy Central Valley and Inland Empire have often struggled for attention and power.

But now California’s Inland Empire, as the region about 50 miles east of Los Angeles is known, is a must-stop. Senator Bernie Sanders and Mr. Bloomberg, the candidates who have devoted the most resources to California, have both come to campaign in person and opened up field offices in the area, as well as in the Central Valley.

“People here have been beaten down for so long that they feel like their vote doesn’t matter,” said Michael Gomez Daly, the executive director for Inland Empire United, a left-leaning political advocacy group.

Smaller communities in other parts of the country have gotten attention from politicians for years, he said. “Now it’s our turn to say: ‘These are the issues and what are you going to do about it?’”

Like many other local leaders, Mr. Gomez Daly lists homelessness, poverty, immigration and the environment as some of the most pressing concerns for the region. In an area packed with warehouses used to distribute imported goods all over the country, activists in the region have been focusing their ire on Amazon, blaming the behemoth for stagnant low wages and pollution.

When Mr. Sanders visited, he too spoke out against Amazon by pitching the Green New Deal, which would crack down on truck emissions that pollute the region.

Just as in other Super Tuesday states, Michael Bloomberg is spending lavishly to get on the airwaves here — so far paying nearly $34 million to advertise on television across the state, including roughly $1.8 million on Spanish-language stations, according to Advertising Analytics.

His money is by far eclipsing other candidates who remain focused elsewhere. Only the other billionaire in the race, Tom Steyer, has come anywhere close, spending nearly $15 million since last summer. Mr. Sanders’s campaign has spent roughly $3 million on television in California so far, and has said it plans to spend over $2.5 million more, spread between California and Texas, another delegate-rich Super Tuesday state. (None of the other top candidates have advertised on television so far.)

But the attention goes beyond the airwaves. The Sanders and Bloomberg campaigns are testing the theory that California is not a place that can be organized with foot soldiers.

So far, Mr. Bloomberg has 220 staff members throughout the state, a number his campaign expects to grow to 800 by the end of the month. Mr. Sanders’s campaign, which has operated several offices throughout the state, has about 90 organizers.

Though longtime political operatives in the state dismiss the notion that reaching out to individual voters is effective in a statewide election, the Sanders campaign boasts of knocking on 400,000 doors and making 3.5 million phone calls in California in the last year.

Both the Sanders and Bloomberg campaigns are specifically targeting the Inland Empire and Central Valley, two of the only regions in the state that still send Republicans to Congress. While Mr. Bloomberg’s supporters believe he can attract moderate voters from the area, Mr. Sanders’s staff is focusing on voters who backed Barack Obama and then switched to Donald J. Trump in those regions — especially white working-class men.

“Riverside is our Des Moines,” said Anna Bahr, a California spokeswoman for the Sanders campaign, describing efforts in the Inland Empire city.

Other campaigns seem to be taking a more traditional approach, waiting for more results to shake out in the early states before pouring money into California.

Senator Elizabeth Warren has held several large rallies in the state, but so far has a smaller staff operation. Advisers to former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. say that their internal polling shows that he consistently meets the 15 percent threshold — the number needed to secure delegates — in each of the state’s congressional districts.

Current polling shows Mr. Sanders leading, ahead of Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren. Both Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., and Mr. Bloomberg have yet to break into the top tier in the state.

A candidate needs to capture at least 15 percent of the vote in a congressional district or statewide in order to win delegates in California. Because the state has such a large number of delegates, it is possible for a candidate to rack up many delegates toward the nomination, even if he or she does not win the popular vote here. And if the race is tight, it is possible it will take days or weeks before the final results are clear.

Mr. Bloomberg, thanks to his resources, remains the biggest unknown factor. Campaign officials say they are confident they have more time to ramp up, with many voters still undecided and Mr. Biden’s top-tier standing in question after a weak performance in the Iowa caucuses.

Jerry Brown, the former governor who remains one of the state’s most popular political figures, said he believes the Democratic nomination may not be decided until the summer convention, but that Mr. Bloomberg could easily shift the dynamics with his spending alone. Though California has a history of rejecting self-funded candidates, Mr. Brown recalled watching his own internal polls steadily tick up during his 2010 race for governor, as he began spending heavily on television ads.

“I had been behind from May to September, then we started on television after Labor Day and I started going up a point or two every week,” he said. “California voters are swayed by what they see on their televisions.

At his rallies across the state Monday, several people in the crowds said they remained undecided, but were considering Mr. Bloomberg in part because of his willingness to spend lavishly to beat Mr. Trump and his experience in running the largest city in the country.

Still, there were signs of Mr. Bloomberg’s uphill battle, particularly among people of color, several of whom mentioned the stop-and-frisk policing tactic that he pursued for a decade and that disproportionately targeted black and Latino men. Mr. Bloomberg defended the policy for years before apologizing late last year.

“We’ve heard a lot of candidates make a lot of promises to the African-American community and then no follow through,” said Nina Childs, 36, a writer who lives in Compton. “A lot of people I know, a lot of black millennials are really excited by Sanders. Are they going to get excited by someone who supported stop and frisk, like Bloomberg? No.”

Latinos make up roughly 24 percent of likely voters in California, and the Sanders campaign has made getting their votes a cornerstone of its strategy here.

So far, Mr. Sanders’s campaign has spent roughly $1.7 million on Spanish-language television advertising, according to Advertising Analytics, about the same as Mr. Bloomberg. And Mr. Bloomberg is aggressively courting moderate Latino and black voters, touting the backing of Mr. Villaraigosa and Aja Brown, the mayor of Compton and one of several African-American leaders to endorse him in recent days.

“Central Valley issues are Latino issues, and Latino issues are American issues,” Mr. Bloomberg told voters in Fresno.

Mr. Bloomberg, who is known for his earnest but halting attempts to speak Spanish, shied away from speaking the language on the stump through his tour of the state. Then, in Compton, he riffed on the Super Bowl halftime show.

“I think we know which team put on the most impressive performance,” he said. “Shar-eek-ah and JLo.” The crowd laughed politely, seemingly forgiving the mangled pronunciation of the Colombian superstar Shakira’s name.

In some ways, the campaigns’ California plans seem to echo the “fishhook strategy” Republicans tried to use in the state decades ago, targeting the central region of the state and inland Southern California, said Karthick Ramakrishnan, a professor of public policy and politics at the University of California, Riverside.

“I think this region is getting to a stage where people here expect to be treated better, in terms of having candidates actually visit and paying attention to them,” Mr. Ramakrishnan said.

Rusty Bailey, the mayor of Riverside, describes himself as a moderate and is registered as “no party preference” but plans to vote in the Democratic primary. He was leaning toward Mr. Buttigieg until Mr. Bloomberg came to stump in Riverside in January.

The top issue in the region is homelessness, Mr. Bailey said, and he believes that Mr. Bloomberg understands the concerns.

Mr. Gomez Daly, the policy director of the Inland Empire advocacy group, said that the infusion of attention was a “dream for the local political infrastructure.”

And, he said, he sees other benefits too.

“Everybody I know seems to have been hired by the Sanders and Bloomberg campaigns.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

2020 Presidential Endorsements: Biden, Sanders, Warren, Buttigieg, Bloomberg, Klobuchar, Yang, Steyer

John Kerry is for Joe Biden. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is stumping for Bernie Sanders. And Julián Castro is for Elizabeth Warren. But whom does George Takei support? (Hint: A certain former mayor from Indiana …)

As nominating season prepares to open, we’ve gathered a snapshot of the endorsement race as it stands. Aside from garnering glittering photo opportunities, endorsements can be important because they can bring along a network of supporters and donors. And more broadly, they offer a validating effect for candidates hoping to demonstrate strength or inevitability.

This is not a comprehensive endorsement list. (Campaigns frequently send statements containing the names of dozens of local officials, activists and former office holders who have backed their candidate — far too many to include in this report.) Here’s a sense of which candidates have the largest number of endorsements from people you might have heard of, and which corners, in general, their support is coming from.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_165652746_54915fd7-5a4b-4d8f-adc7-e29ffec88361-articleLarge 2020 Presidential Endorsements: Biden, Sanders, Warren, Buttigieg, Bloomberg, Klobuchar, Yang, Steyer Yang, Andrew (1975- ) Warren, Elizabeth Steyer, Thomas F Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Klobuchar, Amy Endorsements Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Bloomberg, Michael R Biden, Joseph R Jr

Former Secretary of State John Kerry toured New Hampshire in support of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in December 2019.Credit…David Degner for The New York Times

The day that former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. announced that he was beginning his presidential campaign, he was instantly endorsed by a number of prominent Democrats.

Several months later, as Iowans prepare to caucus, Mr. Biden has the largest share of endorsements from Democratic Party standard-bearers, a broad and diverse coalition that includes members of Congress, governors, big-city mayors and more.

  • Khizr Khan, whose son, Army Capt. Humayun Khan, was killed in Iraq in 2004.

Establishing himself as the pillar of the progressive wing, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont has racked up a significant share of notable endorsements from unions and grass-roots organizations. He’s also won support from young, progressive elected officials and youth-led organizations that see him as the face of the next generation of politics, despite his age.

  • Cardi B and Emily Ratajkowski, a model, have both released endorsements videos with Mr. Sanders’s campaign. They’re part of a long list of celebrity endorsements that includes the director Michael Moore, the actors Mark Ruffalo and Shailene Woodley and musicians like Fatimah Nyeema Warner, known as Noname.

  • The stand-up comedian, mixed martial arts commentator and podcast host Joe Rogan

Senator Elizabeth Warren has drawn support from her home state of Massachusetts, fellow members of Congress, celebrities and liberal leaning grass-roots organizations. She’s starting to gather more support from other Democrats, but struggled early on to get prominent party members to support her.

On Tuesday, her campaign distributed a list of her Iowa backers, noting that she had amassed the support of more than 550 Iowa state legislators, party leaders and members.

  • Former Housing Secretary Julián Castro — a former 2020 presidential candidate — and his brother, Representative Joaquin Castro of Texas

  • Support from Massachusetts including the backing of Representatives Ayanna S. Pressley and Joe Kennedy III, Senator Ed Markey and former Gov. Michael Dukakis

  • Other members of Congress such as Representatives Raúl Grijalva of Arizona, Katie Porter of California and Deb Haaland of New Mexico

  • Megan Rapinoe of the United States women’s national soccer team

  • Jonathan Van Ness, a television and podcast host

  • John Legend and Chrissy Teigen

  • The actress and activist Ashley Judd

A relative newcomer to the national scene, Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., hasn’t gathered as much support from federal elected officials as some of the other candidates with more experience in Washington. He has, however, managed to get more than 60 endorsements from mayors around the country as well as the backing of many celebrities who have helped him raise a considerable war chest.

  • Representatives Don Beyer of Virginia, Anthony G. Brown of Maryland, Annie Kuster of New Hampshire, Dave Loebsack of Iowa, Kathleen Rice of New York and Pete Visclosky of Indiana

  • Dozens of mayors, including Steve Adler of Austin, Tex.; Nan Whaley of Dayton, Ohio; and Quentin Hart of Waterloo, Iowa

  • Actors like George Takei, Kevin Costner, Seth MacFarlane, Mandy Moore, Sharon Stone and Gwyneth Paltrow

  • Anna Wintour, the artistic director of Condé Nast

A large share of endorsements for Michael R. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, come from other mayors of cities big and small. He has also garnered the support of a few members of Congress.

Senator Amy Klobuchar often reminds voters that the people who know her best — the voters of Minnesota — keep electing her by wide margins. And indeed, an overwhelming share of Ms. Klobuchar’s most notable endorsements come from top officials in the state. She also has the support of more than a dozen Iowa state representatives and senators.

  • Former Vice President Walter Mondale

  • Senator Tina Smith of Minnesota

  • Representatives Angie Craig, Dean Phillips, Betty McCollum, and Collin Peterson of Minnesota

  • Governor Tim Walz of Minnesota

  • Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis and Mayor Melvin Carter of St. Paul

  • More than 50 Minnesota state senators and representatives

Andrew Yang’s campaign keeps a running list of endorsements that now tallies over 100. Most are celebrities, members of the Asian-American community, part of the tech world or all of the above. Though Mr. Yang, an entrepreneur, has received scattered support from local and state office holders, he does not appear to have endorsements from any current members of Congress or other current federal officeholders.

Tom Steyer, a former hedge-fund executive, has relatively few notable endorsements compared with other top candidates. The handful his campaign has publicly highlighted include only state and local elected officials and a number of former officeholders.

On Wednesday, the campaign provided a list of more than 100 people who had endorsed Mr. Steyer, including more than 70 climate professionals, experts and advocates. (Other campaigns have similarly sought to highlight broad support for a candidate from experts in one policy area or people in one community.)

Still, the list did not include current federal officeholders and high-profile newsmakers.

Jonathan Martin contributed reporting.

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‘Good Not to Be In Washington’: Senators Return to Iowa for Burst of Campaigning

Westlake Legal Group 25dems06-facebookJumbo ‘Good Not to Be In Washington’: Senators Return to Iowa for Burst of Campaigning United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 Midterm Elections (2018) Endorsements Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr Axne, Cindy

MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa — Senators Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar dashed back to Iowa for a frenzied burst of campaigning on Saturday after a week in which they were confined to Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump.

Their appearances took place amid signs of growing strength in Mr. Sanders’s candidacy, particularly a New York Times/Siena College poll of likely caucusgoers released Saturday that showed him leading the field in Iowa. Given the fears of some Democrats that he could be portrayed as too far to the left to defeat Mr. Trump, his show of strength is likely to alarm some of his detractors as much as it pleases his own supporters coming so close to the Feb. 3 caucuses.

Pete Buttigieg’s campaign sent a fund-raising email on Saturday warning that “Bernie Sanders could be the nominee of our party,” followed by another email that cast doubt on Mr. Sanders’s ability to beat Mr. Trump. And former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in a tweet took an implicit jab at Mr. Sanders over his campaign’s promotion of an endorsement from Joe Rogan, the popular podcast host who has been criticized for comments he has made on race and about transgender people.

Mr. Sanders, sounding a bit congested, made it to Iowa in time to attend a rally in Marshalltown with Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and the filmmaker Michael Moore.

He made no mention of his poll showing, but he didn’t have to.

“We’re taking on the establishment, and the establishment is getting a little bit nervous,” he told a modest but enthusiastic crowd.

But he did take a swipe at the impeachment trial for scrambling his campaign plans.

“As you well know, we have had to radically change our schedule in the last week — kind of toss it into the garbage can and begin anew,” he said. “But we are going to be back here in Iowa in the next week every moment that we possibly can.”

Mr. Sanders plans to hold events across the northwestern part of Iowa on Sunday before the trial resumes on Monday.

Before he settled into his familiar talking points, Mr. Sanders also issued something of a warning, suggesting he was aware of the renewed attacks from rivals as he continued to display strength in Iowa and other early voting states.

“In the last week of a campaign, a lot of stuff is going to be thrown around — that’s what happens in campaigns,” he said. “But I would hope that this state, New Hampshire and the country does not lose focus on what are the most important issues.”

The day also brought good news for Ms. Warren, who returned to Iowa for the first time since the impeachment trial with a town-hall-style event at a middle school in Muscatine. “Good not to be in Washington,” she told reporters.

She was working her way through her selfie picture line when the news broke that she had received the coveted endorsement of The Des Moines Register. In other endorsements Saturday, The New Hampshire Union Leader backed Ms. Klobuchar, and The Sioux City Journal in Iowa gave its support to Mr. Biden.

Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado, who has struggled to gain traction in the primary race and has also been tethered to Washington because of the impeachment trial, traveled to New Hampshire on Saturday and planned to campaign there through the weekend.

Two other leading contenders, Mr. Biden and Mr. Buttigieg, were not stuck in Washington this past week. Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., arrived in Iowa for the beginning of a 10-day sprint across the state before the caucuses. His first stop was a town-hall-style event before about 300 people inside of an old opera house in Fort Dodge.

Mr. Buttigieg began his remarks by reminding the audience that, after 13 months of candidate events, they were in “the final days” of the race in which he has outlasted a handful of adversaries who began the race better-known and better financed than the mayor of South Bend.

After a town-hall-style event in Storm Lake, he was asked about his campaign’s reference to Mr. Sanders in one of the fund-raising emails as “a risk we can’t take.”

“I believe that we should be very mindful that one of the worst risks we can take at a time like this is to recycle the same Washington-style political warfare that brought us to this point,” he said. “If we believe it’s important to win, then the best thing we can do is put forward a candidate who offers something new, something different and something that will break us through the dynamics that have gotten us into this era that’s just got to change.”

Mr. Biden flew to Iowa after beginning his day with an event in Salem, N.H. Speaking in an elementary school gym, Mr. Biden alluded to the impeachment trial that is playing out in Washington and reminded the crowd that he had come under relentless attack from Mr. Trump.

“My guess if you go back and turn your TV on today, you’re going to find the name ‘Biden’ mentioned many, many, many times,” Mr. Biden said. “I wonder why he doesn’t want to run against me.”

Mr. Biden also received a boost on Saturday when he picked up the endorsement of Representative Cindy Axne of Iowa, a freshman Democrat who unseated a Republican incumbent.

“He is who I believe is the one sure bet to beat Donald Trump,” Ms. Axne said in an interview.

Ms. Axne hails from the kind of swing district that was key to the party’s takeover of the House in the 2018 midterm elections, and will be crucial to its continued control of the chamber.

Ms. Axne appeared with Mr. Biden on Saturday night at an event in her district in Ankeny, a suburb of Des Moines.

“It’s not just that Joe’s been there, and he’s been in the Situation Room,” she told the crowd in Ankeny. “We also need somebody who’s running on a message of hope, a message of unification of this country.”

Mr. Biden has now been endorsed by two of Iowa’s three Democrats in Congress. Representative Abby Finkenauer, another freshman who flipped a Republican-held seat in 2018, endorsed him in early January. The state’s other House Democrat, Representative Dave Loebsack, has endorsed Mr. Buttigieg.

Ms. Axne’s district includes Iowa’s most populous city, Des Moines, and covers the southwestern corner of the state. President Barack Obama won the district in 2012, but Mr. Trump carried it in 2016. Two years later, in the midterm elections, Ms. Axne unseated a two-term Republican, David Young.

Ms. Axne said she believed that Mr. Biden would drive turnout in districts like hers, and emphasized the importance of protecting the Democratic majority in the House.

She also nodded to what she suggested was Mr. Biden’s broad appeal. “I truly believe that there are Iowans that would have some difficulty with some of the positions by other people running in this party,” she said.

Sydney Ember reported from Marshalltown, and Thomas Kaplan from Salem, N.H. Shane Goldmacher contributed reporting from Muscatine, Iowa; Reid J. Epstein from Fort Dodge, Iowa; and Maggie Astor from Ankeny, Iowa.

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Des Moines Register Endorses Elizabeth Warren as Iowa Caucuses Approach

Westlake Legal Group 25iowa-endorsement-warren-facebookJumbo Des Moines Register Endorses Elizabeth Warren as Iowa Caucuses Approach Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Iowa Endorsements Des Moines Register Democratic Party

DES MOINES — The Des Moines Register endorsed Senator Elizabeth Warren for the Democratic presidential nomination on Saturday night, calling her “the best leader for these times.”

The newspaper, Iowa’s largest and most influential, gave Ms. Warren a boost just over a week before the caucuses on Feb. 3, when Iowans will take part in the first nominating contest of the primary cycle.

In its editorial, the Register praised Ms. Warren as “a thinker, a policy wonk and a hard worker.”

“Warren’s competence, respect for others and status as the nation’s first female president would be a fitting response to the ignorance, sexism and xenophobia of the Trump Oval Office,” the editorial stated.

After more than a year of campaigning, the Democratic race is extraordinarily volatile in Iowa, as residents continue to fret over which candidate can beat President Trump.

In recent days, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont has shown momentum in the state, and he led a poll of likely caucusgoers published Saturday by The New York Times and Siena College, which showed him earning 25 percent support and his three top rivals clustered behind him.

His rise in Iowa has come at the expense of Ms. Warren, his fellow progressive, who dropped to 15 percent in the survey, down from 22 percent in the last survey conducted by the organizations, in late October, when she led the field.

Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., was at 18 percent in the poll, and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. was at 17 percent. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota was the only other candidate approaching double digits, at 8 percent.

The Register’s endorsement landed as Ms. Warren worked her way through her selfie line after a town-hall-style event in Muscatine, Iowa.

She did not find out until after she took the final picture, when her communications director, Kristen Orthman, pulled her aside to share the news.

Ms. Warren leapt back in excitement — pulling her hands to her chest, as if to say, “what, me?” — and then pumped both hands in the air and did a little dance. Ms. Orthman then appeared to show Ms. Warren the editorial on her phone.

Ms. Warren gulped down a sip of coconut water, one of her campaign trail staples, and headed over to a gathered group of reporters and microphones with a smile.

“I just heard and I’m delighted,” Ms. Warren said of the endorsement. “It really means a lot to me. I’m very happy.”

In a tweet thanking The Register for the endorsement, she wrote that “Iowans are ready to make big, structural change — and I’m going to fight my heart out for everyone in Iowa and across the country.”

In its editorial, the Register praised Ms. Warren’s approach to the economy, health care, climate change and other issues.

“She says corporations should have less Washington influence, children should be protected from gun violence, child care should be affordable, immigrants deserve compassion, mass incarceration should end and the wealthy should pay more in taxes,” the editorial stated. “Those ideas are not radical. They are right.”

It also argued that any of the Democrats campaigning in Iowa would be “more inclusive and thoughtful than the current occupant of the White House.”

In making its decision, The Register’s editorial board interviewed nine current Democratic candidates who have spent considerable time campaigning in Iowa, several candidates who have since left the race, and two Republicans who are challenging Mr. Trump. The Register is not endorsing in the Republican race.

The newspaper made clear that the endorsement was the product of its editorial board, and that its news staff, including the editors and reporters who cover the presidential race, had no involvement in the process.

The Register’s endorsements, which began in 1988, are not predictions and have had a mixed record of swaying the caucuses. In 2016, the paper backed Senator Marco Rubio of Florida in the Republican primary, and Hillary Clinton in the Democratic one, when she was in a tight race against Mr. Sanders.

Nevertheless, the endorsements make national news. The paper also sponsors a closely watched poll of Iowa caucusgoers — the last of which is set to be released on Feb. 1, two days before the caucuses.

The Register, along with CNN, also sponsored a Democratic debate this month, the last before caucusing and voting begin in February.

Sydney Ember reported from Des Moines, and Michael Levenson from New York. Shane Goldmacher contributed reporting from Muscatine, Iowa.

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Freed From Washington, Senators Return to Iowa for Burst of Campaigning

Westlake Legal Group 25dems06-facebookJumbo Freed From Washington, Senators Return to Iowa for Burst of Campaigning United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 Midterm Elections (2018) Endorsements Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr Axne, Cindy

MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa — Senators Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar dashed back to Iowa for a frenzied burst of campaigning on Saturday after a week in which they were confined to Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump.

Their appearances took place amid signs of growing strength in Mr. Sanders’s candidacy, particularly a New York Times/Siena College poll of likely caucusgoers released Saturday that showed him leading the field in Iowa. Given his base in the party’s most progressive wing, his show of strength was reflected equally in his camp and in that of his opponents ahead of the Feb. 3 caucuses.

Pete Buttigieg’s campaign sent a fund-raising email on Saturday warning that “Bernie Sanders could be the nominee of our party,” followed by another email that cast doubt on Mr. Sanders’s ability to beat Mr. Trump. And former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in a tweet took an implicit jab at Mr. Sanders over his campaign’s promotion of an endorsement from Joe Rogan, the popular podcast host who has been criticized for comments he has made on race and about transgender people.

Mr. Sanders, sounding a bit congested, made it to Iowa in time to attend a rally in Marshalltown with Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and the filmmaker Michael Moore.

He made no mention of his poll showing, but he didn’t have to.

“We’re taking on the establishment, and the establishment is getting a little bit nervous,” he told a modest but enthusiastic crowd.

But he did take a swipe at the impeachment trial for scrambling his campaign plans.

“As you well know, we have had to radically change our schedule in the last week — kind of toss it into the garbage can and begin anew,” he said. “But we are going to be back here in Iowa in the next week every moment that we possibly can.”

Mr. Sanders plans to hold events across the northwestern part of Iowa on Sunday before the trial resumes on Monday.

Before he settled into his familiar talking points, Mr. Sanders also issued something of a warning, suggesting he was aware of the renewed attacks from rivals as he continued to display strength in Iowa and other early voting states.

“In the last week of a campaign, a lot of stuff is going to be thrown around — that’s what happens in campaigns,” he said. “But I would hope that this state, New Hampshire and the country does not lose focus on what are the most important issues.”

The day also brought good news for Ms. Warren, who returned to Iowa for the first time since the impeachment trial with a town-hall-style event at a middle school in Muscatine. “Good not to be in Washington,” she told reporters.

She was working her way through her selfie picture line when the news broke that she had received the coveted endorsement of The Des Moines Register.

Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado, who has struggled to gain traction in the primary race and has also been tethered to Washington because of the impeachment trial, traveled to New Hampshire on Saturday and planned to campaign there through the weekend.

Two other leading contenders, Mr. Biden and Mr. Buttigieg, were not stuck in Washington this past week. Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., arrived in Iowa for the beginning of a 10-day sprint across the state before the caucuses. His first stop was a town-hall-style event before about 300 people inside of an old opera house in Fort Dodge.

Mr. Buttigieg began his remarks by reminding the audience that, after 13 months of candidate events, they were in “the final days” of the race in which he has outlasted a handful of adversaries who began the race better-known and better financed than the mayor of South Bend.

After a town-hall-style event in Storm Lake, he was asked about his campaign’s reference in one of the fund-raising emails to Mr. Sanders as “a risk we can’t take.”

“I believe that we should be very mindful that one of the worst risks we can take at a time like this is to recycle the same Washington-style political warfare that brought us to this point,” he said. “If we believe it’s important to win, then the best thing we can do is put forward a candidate who offers something new, something different and something that will break us through the dynamics that have gotten us into this era that’s just got to change.”

Mr. Biden flew to Iowa after beginning his day with an event in Salem, N.H. Speaking in an elementary school gym, Mr. Biden alluded to the impeachment trial that is playing out in Washington and reminded the crowd that he had come under relentless attack from Mr. Trump.

“My guess if you go back and turn your TV on today, you’re going to find the name ‘Biden’ mentioned many, many, many times,” Mr. Biden said. “I wonder why he doesn’t want to run against me.”

Mr. Biden also received a boost on Saturday when he picked up the endorsement of Representative Cindy Axne of Iowa, a freshman Democrat who unseated a Republican incumbent.

“He is who I believe is the one sure bet to beat Donald Trump,” Ms. Axne said in an interview, describing Mr. Biden as “a person who can bridge the divisiveness in this country.”

Ms. Axne hails from the kind of swing district that was key to the party’s takeover of the House in the 2018 midterm elections, and will be crucial to its continued control of the chamber.

Ms. Axne appeared with Mr. Biden on Saturday night at an event in her district in Ankeny, a suburb of Des Moines.

“It’s not just that Joe’s been there, and he’s been in the Situation Room,” she told the crowd in Ankeny. “We also need somebody who’s running on a message of hope, a message of unification of this country.”

Mr. Biden has now been endorsed by two of Iowa’s three Democrats in Congress. Representative Abby Finkenauer, another freshman who flipped a Republican-held seat in 2018, endorsed him in early January. The state’s other House Democrat, Representative Dave Loebsack, has endorsed Mr. Buttigieg.

Ms. Axne’s district includes Iowa’s most populous city, Des Moines, and covers the southwestern corner of the state. President Barack Obama won the district in 2012, but Mr. Trump carried it in 2016. Two years later, in the midterm elections, Ms. Axne unseated a two-term Republican, David Young.

Ms. Axne said she believed that Mr. Biden would drive turnout in districts like hers, and emphasized the importance of protecting the Democratic majority in the House.

She also nodded to what she suggested was Mr. Biden’s broad appeal. “I truly believe that there are Iowans that would have some difficulty with some of the positions by other people running in this party,” she said.

Sydney Ember reported from Marshalltown, and Thomas Kaplan from Salem, N.H. Shane Goldmacher contributed reporting from Muscatine, Iowa; Reid J. Epstein from Fort Dodge, Iowa; and Maggie Astor from Ankeny, Iowa.

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Des Moines Register Endorses Elizabeth Warren

Westlake Legal Group 25iowa-endorsement-warren-facebookJumbo Des Moines Register Endorses Elizabeth Warren Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Iowa Endorsements Des Moines Register Democratic Party

DES MOINES — The Des Moines Register endorsed Senator Elizabeth Warren for the Democratic presidential nomination on Saturday night, calling her “the best leader for these times.”

The newspaper, Iowa’s largest and most influential, gave Ms. Warren a boost just over a week before the caucuses on Feb. 3, when Iowans will take part in the first nominating contest of the primary cycle.

In its editorial, the Register praised Ms. Warren as “a thinker, a policy wonk and a hard worker.”

“Warren’s competence, respect for others and status as the nation’s first female president would be a fitting response to the ignorance, sexism and xenophobia of the Trump Oval Office,” the editorial stated.

After more than a year of campaigning, the Democratic race is extraordinarily volatile in Iowa, as residents continue to fret over which candidate can beat President Trump.

In recent days, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont has shown momentum in the state, and he led a poll of likely caucusgoers published Saturday by The New York Times and Siena College, which showed him earning 25 percent support and his three top rivals clustered behind him.

His rise in Iowa has come at the expense of Ms. Warren, his fellow progressive, who dropped to 15 percent in the survey, down from 22 percent in the last survey conducted by the organizations, in late October, when she led the field.

Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., was at 18 percent in the poll, and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. was at 17 percent. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota was the only other candidate approaching double digits, at 8 percent.

The Register’s endorsement landed as Ms. Warren worked her way through her selfie line after a town-hall-style event in Muscatine, Iowa.

She did not find out until after she took the final picture, when her communications director, Kristen Orthman, pulled her aside to break the news.

Ms. Warren leapt back in excitement — puling her hands to her chest, as if to say, “what, me?” — and then pumped both hands in the air and did a little dance. Ms. Orthman then appeared to show Ms. Warren the editorial on her phone.

Ms. Warren gulped down a sip of coconut water, one of her campaign trail staples, and headed over to a gathered group of reporters and microphones with a smile.

“I just heard and I’m delighted,” Ms. Warren said of the endorsement. “It really means a lot to me. I’m very happy.”

In a tweet thanking The Register for the endorsement, she wrote that “Iowans are ready to make big, structural change — and I’m going to fight my heart out for everyone in Iowa and across the country.”

In its editorial, the Register praised Ms. Warren’s approach to the economy, health care, climate change and other issues.

“She says corporations should have less Washington influence, children should be protected from gun violence, child care should be affordable, immigrants deserve compassion, mass incarceration should end and the wealthy should pay more in taxes,” the editorial stated. “Those ideas are not radical. They are right.”

It also argued that any of the Democrats running would be “more inclusive and thoughtful than the current occupant of the White House.”

In making its decision, The Register’s editorial board interviewed nine current Democratic candidates who have spent considerable time campaigning in Iowa, several candidates who have since left the race, and two Republicans who are challenging Mr. Trump. The Register is not endorsing in the Republican race.

The newspaper made clear that the endorsement was the product of its editorial board, and that its news staff, including the editors and reporters who cover the presidential race, had no involvement in the process.

The Register’s endorsements, which began in 1988, are not predictions and have had a mixed record of swaying the caucuses. In 2016, the paper backed Senator Marco Rubio of Florida in the Republican primary, and Hillary Clinton in the Democratic one, when she was in a tight race against Mr. Sanders.

Nevertheless, the endorsements make national news. The paper also sponsors a closely watched poll of Iowa caucusgoers — the last of which is set to be released on Feb. 1, two days before the caucuses.

The Register, along with CNN, also sponsored a Democratic debate this month, the last before caucusing and voting begin in February.

Sydney Ember reported from Des Moines, and Michael Levenson from New York. Shane Goldmacher contributed reporting from Muscatine, Iowa.

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Cindy Axne, Congresswoman From Iowa Swing District, Endorses Joe Biden

Westlake Legal Group 25dems-facebookJumbo Cindy Axne, Congresswoman From Iowa Swing District, Endorses Joe Biden United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 Midterm Elections (2018) Endorsements Democratic Party Biden, Joseph R Jr Axne, Cindy

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Representative Cindy Axne of Iowa is endorsing former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., giving him another prominent backer with just over a week until the state’s caucuses.

Ms. Axne, a freshman Democrat who unseated a Republican incumbent, hails from the kind of swing district that was key to the party’s takeover of the House in the 2018 midterm elections, and will be crucial to its continued control of the chamber.

“He is who I believe is the one sure bet to beat Donald Trump,” Ms. Axne said in an interview, describing him as “a person who can bridge the divisiveness in this country.”

Mr. Biden has now been endorsed by two of Iowa’s three Democrats in Congress. Representative Abby Finkenauer, another freshman who also flipped a Republican-held seat in 2018, endorsed him in early January. The state’s other House Democrat, Representative Dave Loebsack, has endorsed former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.

The endorsement comes as campaigning in the presidential primary resumes in force, after a week in which the senators who are running were confined to Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump. After an abbreviated impeachment session on Saturday, Senators Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar were scheduled to fly to Iowa to resume their courting of the state’s Democrats, who will start the nominating process on Feb. 3 with caucuses across the state.

Ms. Axne is set to appear with Mr. Biden on Saturday night when he holds a campaign event in her district in Ankeny, a suburb of Des Moines. Earlier Saturday, Mr. Biden was scheduled to hold an event in Salem, N.H., before flying to Iowa.

On the campaign trail, Mr. Biden stresses the importance of choosing a Democratic presidential nominee who will help candidates down the ballot, and he frequently cites his efforts campaigning for Democratic candidates in the 2018 midterm elections, when the party won control of the House.

“Who do they most want to run with?” Mr. Biden said in Claremont, N.H., on Friday, noting the importance of keeping control of the House. “Who will most help them from the top of the ticket? That’s for you to decide. Obviously, I think I’m the guy.”

Ms. Axne’s district includes Iowa’s most populous city, Des Moines, and covers the southwestern corner of the state. President Barack Obama won the district in 2012, but Mr. Trump carried it in 2016. Two years later, in the midterm elections, Ms. Axne unseated Representative David Young, a two-term Republican.

Ms. Axne said she believed that Mr. Biden would drive turnout in districts like hers, and emphasized the importance of protecting the Democratic majority in the House.

“Any message that doesn’t focus on hope and bringing this country together, that doesn’t have solid pragmatic solutions to solve the issues that we’re seeing today, if we don’t have somebody who has that type of message, I do believe it could hurt folks like us,” she said.

She also nodded to what she suggested was Mr. Biden’s broad appeal. “I truly believe that there are Iowans that would have some difficulty with some of the positions by other people running in this party,” she said.

Mr. Biden campaigned in Iowa this past week with another House member from a swing district, Representative Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania. This weekend, Ms. Finkenauer, Representative Colin Allred of Texas and Representative Chrissy Houlahan of Pennsylvania are scheduled to campaign for Mr. Biden in the state in what his campaign is billing as a “We Know Joe” tour.

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