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Head to The Palm Beaches for the Nats’ spring training games with these hotel deals

Westlake Legal Group scherzer-at-spring-training Head to The Palm Beaches for the Nats’ spring training games with these hotel deals Washington Nationals vacation travel Things to Do spring training mlb hotels hotel deals Florida Baseball
Photo courtesy of the Washington Nationals Baseball Club

Football season is officially over, which means the region is one step closer to opening day, welcoming back the Nats and baseball season with open arms. But first, the team has to head to The Palm Beaches in Florida for spring training.

Being held from Saturday, Feb. 22 to Sunday, March 22, the Nats will play their spring training games in Palm Beach County at FITTEAM Ball Park of The Palm Beaches and Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, kicking off with a rematch between the Nats and the Astros on Saturday, Feb. 22 at 6:05 p.m. at FITTEAM.

The Nats’ spring training includes 31 games, 23 of which are being held in Palm Beach County. Below, find special events being held during spring training, as well as information on two hotel packages for those planning on catching a spring training game in person. Single-game tickets to spring training are on sale at nationals.com/spring.

Special Events

  • Saturday, Feb. 22: Opening night and post-game fireworks
  • Sunday, March 8: Max Scherzer bobblehead giveaway to the first 500 fans
  • Thursday, March 12: Washington Nationals vs. New York Yankees
  • Wednesday, March 18: Adam Eaton bobblehead giveaway to the first 500 fans

Hotel Packages

Homewood Suites by Hilton
Available Feb. 20-March 22, three-night minimum stay
Located less than a mile from Roger Dean Stadium, Homewood Suites by Hilton is offering its newly launched Home Run at Homewood package for spring training. Baseball fans who book the package will enjoy complimentary breakfast and dinner (for stays Monday through Thursday); a complimentary beer or wine during the daily happy hour; a box of peanuts and Cracker Jack at check in; one souvenir foam finger to bring to the game; and complimentary transportation to Roger Dean Stadium. // 4700 Donald Ross Road, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida; rates begin at $354

Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa
Available Feb. 20- March 24
Located 43 miles north of FITTEAM Ball Park, Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa offers a quiet, beachfront vacation. Its Spring Training and Sandcastles package features up to 20% savings on best available rates; daily breakfast for two; and a welcome amenity, including a Hutchinson Shores beach bag, baseball and sharpie for autographs at the spring training games. Use code TRAIN to access the package’s deals. // 3793 NE Ocean Blvd., Jensen Beach, Florida; rates begin at $288

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Conservative States Seek Billions to Brace for Disaster. (Just Don’t Call It Climate Change.)

Westlake Legal Group 00cli-REDSTATES-1-facebookJumbo Conservative States Seek Billions to Brace for Disaster. (Just Don’t Call It Climate Change.) United States Politics and Government Texas south carolina North Carolina Louisiana Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Housing and Urban Development Department Greenhouse Gas Emissions Global Warming Florida Floods Federal Aid (US) environment Disasters and Emergencies California

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is about to distribute billions of dollars to coastal states mainly in the South to help steel them against natural disasters worsened by climate change.

But states that qualify must first explain why they need the money. That has triggered linguistic acrobatics as some conservative states submit lengthy, detailed proposals on how they will use the money, while mostly not mentioning climate change.

A 306-page draft proposal from Texas doesn’t use the terms “climate change” or “global warming,” nor does South Carolina’s proposal. Instead, Texas refers to “changing coastal conditions” and South Carolina talks about the “destabilizing effects and unpredictability” of being hit by three major storms in four years, while being barely missed by three other hurricanes.

Louisiana, a state taking some of the most aggressive steps in the nation to prepare for climate change, does include the phrase “climate change” in its proposal in one place, an appendix on the final page.

The federal funding program, devised after the devastating hurricanes and wildfires of 2017, reflects the complicated politics of global warming in the United States, even as the toll of that warming has become difficult to ignore. While officials from both political parties are increasingly forced to confront the effects of climate change, including worsening floods, more powerful storms and greater economic damage, many remain reluctant to talk about the cause.

The $16 billion program, created by Congress and overseen by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, is meant to help states better prepare for future natural disasters. It is the first time such funds have been used to prepare for disasters like these that haven’t yet happened, rather than responding to or repairing damage that has already occurred.

The money is distributed according to a formula benefiting states most affected by disasters in 2015, 2016 and 2017. That formula favors Republican-leaning states along the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts, which were hit particularly hard during that period.

Texas is in line for more than $4 billion, the most of any state. The next largest sums go to Louisiana ($1.2 billion), Florida ($633 million), North Carolina ($168 million) and South Carolina ($158 million), all of which voted Republican in the 2016 presidential election.

The other states getting funding are West Virginia, Missouri, Georgia and California, the only state getting money that voted Democratic in the presidential race of 2016. California hasn’t yet submitted its proposal, but in the past the state has spoken forcefully about the threat of climate change, in addition to fighting with the Trump administration to limit greenhouse gas emissions from cars.

Half the money, $8.3 billion, was set aside for Puerto Rico, as well as $774 million for the United States Virgin Islands. The Trump administration has delayed that funding, citing concerns over corruption and fiscal management.

Not every state has felt compelled to tiptoe around climate change. Florida’s proposal calls it “a key overarching challenge,” while North Carolina pledges to anticipate “how a changing climate, extreme events, ecological degradation and their cascading effects” will affect state residents.

The housing department has itself been careful about how it described the program’s goals. When HUD in August released the rules governing the money, it didn’t use the terms “climate change” and “global warming” but referred to “changing environmental conditions.”

Still, the rule required states that received money to describe their “current and future risks.” And when those risks included flooding — the most costly type of disaster nationwide — states were instructed to account for “continued sea level rise,” which is one consequence of global warming.

A spokeswoman for the housing department did not respond to requests for comment.

Stan Gimont, who as deputy assistant secretary for grant programs at HUD was responsible for the program until he left the department last summer, said the decision not to cite climate change was “a case of picking your battles.”

“When you go out and talk to local officials, there are some who will very actively discuss climate change and sea-level rise, and then there are those who will not,” Mr. Gimont said. “You’ve got to work with both ends of the spectrum. And I think in a lot of ways it’s best to draw a middle road on these things.”

Texas released a draft version of its plan in November. That draft said the state faced “changing coastal conditions,” as well as a future in which both wildfires and extreme heat were expected to increase. In response, the state proposes better flood control, buying and demolishing homes in high-risk areas and giving counties money for their own projects.

But state officials in Texas, where Republicans control the governor’s mansion and both chambers of the Legislature, were silent on what is causing the changes. The report does not cite climate change or global warming, though “climate change” pops up in footnotes citing articles and papers with that phrase in their titles.

Brittany Eck, a spokeswoman for the Texas General Land Office, which produced the proposal, did not respond to questions about the choice of language or the role of climate change in making disasters worse. In an email, she said Texas would distribute the funding based on “accepted scientific research, evidence and historical data to determine projects that provide the greatest value to benefit ratio to protect affected communities from future events.”

Some local politicians in hard-hit areas of Texas are outspoken. Lina Hidalgo, a Democrat and the top elected official in Harris County, which includes Houston and which suffered some of the worst effects of Hurricane Harvey in 2017, said that addressing the effects of climate change was a top issue for her constituents.

“Harris County is Exhibit A for how the climate crisis is impacting the daily lives of residents in Texas,” Ms. Hidalgo said in a statement. “If we’re serious about breaking the cycle of flooding and recovery we have to shift the paradigm on how we do things, and that means putting science above politics.”

In South Carolina, which like Texas is controlled by Republicans in both legislative chambers and the governor’s office, the state’s proposal likewise makes no mention of climate change. It cites sea-level rise once, and only to say that it won’t be addressed.

The state’s flood-reduction efforts “will only address riverine and surface flooding, not storm surge or sea-level rise issues,” according to its proposal.

That is despite the fact that sea levels and storm surges are increasing across the coastal southeastern United States because of climate change, federal scientists wrote in a sweeping 2018 report. The report’s authors noted that Charleston, S.C., broke its record for flooding in 2016, at 50 days, and that “this increase in high-tide flooding is directly tied to sea-level rise.”

Megan Moore, a spokeswoman for South Carolina’s Department of Administration, said by email that the proposal “is designed to increase resilience to and reduce or eliminate long-term risk of loss of life or property based on the repetitive losses sustained in this state.” She did not respond to questions about why the proposal did not address climate change.

One of the states acknowledged that weather conditions were changing and seas were rising, but still mostly avoided the term climate change. Louisiana, whose location at the mouth of the Mississippi River makes it one of the states most threatened by climate change, intends to use the $1.2 billion it will receive to better map and prepare for future flooding — a major peril for countless low-lying areas — said Pat Forbes, executive director of the state’s Office of Community Development, which is managing the money.

“We realize we’ve got to get better, because it’s going to get worse,” Mr. Forbes said.

The state, where both the House and Senate are controlled by Republicans but the governor is a Democrat, submitted a proposal that makes references to climate change, noting that the risks of flooding “will continue to escalate in a warming world.”

Still, the 91-page report uses the phrase “climate change” only once, at the end of an appendix on its final page.

Mr. Forbes called climate change “not that important a thing for an action plan,” and said that mostly leaving the phrase out of the document was not intentional. He said the purpose of the proposal was to demonstrate to the federal government that Louisiana knows what it wants to do with the money.

“Our governor has acknowledged on multiple occasions that we expect the flooding to be more frequent and worse in the future, not better,” Mr. Forbes said. “So we’ve got to have an adaptive process here that constantly makes us safer.”

Other states used their proposals to emphasize the centrality of climate change to the risks they face. “Climate change is a key overarching challenge which threatens to compound the extent and effects of hazards,” wrote officials in Florida, where Republicans control both legislative chambers and the governor’s office.

In North Carolina, which has a Democratic governor and a Republican-controlled Legislature, the proposal argued that the state was trying to anticipate “how a changing climate, extreme events, ecological degradation and their cascading effects will impact the needs of North Carolina’s vulnerable populations.”

Shana Udvardy, a climate resilience analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists, said the failure to confront global warming made it more important for governments to at least call the problem by its name.

“We really need every single state, local and federal official to speak clearly,” Ms. Udvardy said. “The polls indicate that the majority of Americans understand that climate change is happening here and now.”

Others were more sympathetic. Marion McFadden, who preceded Mr. Gimont as head of disaster-recovery grants at HUD during the Obama administration, said the department was responding to the political realities in conservative states. She described the $16 billion grant program as “all about climate change,” but said some states would sooner refuse the money than admit that global warming is real.

“HUD is requiring them to be explicit about everything other than the concept that climate change is responsible,” said Ms. McFadden, who is now senior vice president for public policy at Enterprise Community Partners, which worked with states to meet the program’s requirements. Insistence on saying the words raises the risk “that they may walk away.”

For more climate news sign up for the Climate Fwd: newsletter or follow @NYTClimate on Twitter.

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N.A.A.C.P. Tells Local Chapters: Don’t Let Energy Industry Manipulate You

Westlake Legal Group 00naacp1-facebookJumbo N.A.A.C.P. Tells Local Chapters: Don’t Let Energy Industry Manipulate You Politics and Government Philanthropy National Assn for the Advancement of Colored People Lobbying and Lobbyists Florida Power&Light Co Florida Electric Light and Power Blacks Alternative and Renewable Energy

When utilities around the country have wanted to build fossil-fuel plants, defeat energy-efficiency proposals or slow the growth of rooftop solar power, they have often turned for support to a surprisingly reliable ally: a local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

In 2014, the top officials of the N.A.A.C.P.’s Florida division threw their organization’s weight behind an effort to stymie the spread of solar panels on residential rooftops and cut energy efficiency standards at the behest of the energy industry. The group’s Illinois chapter joined a similar industry effort in 2017. And in January 2018, the N.A.A.C.P.’s top executive in California signed a letter opposing a government program that encourages the use of renewable energy.

Most Americans know the N.A.A.C.P. as a storied civil rights organization that has fought for equal access to public facilities, fairness in housing and equality in education. But on energy policy, many of its chapters have for years advanced the interests of energy companies that are big donors to their programs. Often this advocacy has come at the expense of the black neighborhoods, which are more likely to have polluting power plants and are less able to adapt to climate change.

The activities of the N.A.A.C.P. chapters, which operate with significant autonomy, have so unnerved the group’s national office that it published a report titled the “Top 10 Manipulation Tactics of the Fossil Fuel Industry” in April. It is also sending its staff to state and local chapters to persuade them to fight for policies that reduce pollution and improve public health even at the risk of losing donations from utilities and fossil fuel companies.

From New Orleans to San Diego, consumer and environmental groups have criticized power companies for using their largess in minority communities to get church pastors, nonprofit groups and organizations like the N.A.A.C.P. to back industry objectives.

“The utilities have essentially asked communities of color to be props for them,” said William Funderburk Jr., an environmental lawyer and former board member of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. “It appears utilities are turning back the clock a hundred years.”

From 2013 to 2017, 10 of the country’s largest utilities gave about $1 billion in donations. Those contributions often went to groups representing minority communities, and many of the recipients promoted the interests of utilities in front of government regulators, according to the Energy Policy Institute, an environmental group.

The N.A.A.C.P. has a long record on environmental issues, including fighting to reduce the health threats posed by lead paint and asbestos. But its national office has been slower to stake a clear position on climate change and the pollution caused by power plants. It established a group dedicated to environmental justice only a decade ago.

Derrick Johnson, the N.A.A.C.P.’s president, said the group had established a department dedicated to that work that is larger than any of its other programs, with 11 full-time staff members and three consultants.

“We care about the education of our children,” Mr. Johnson said. “But if the children are in unhealthy environments, we know that it impedes their learning. We care about health and access to health care, so we must care about the decisions that create mega health impacts.”

As solar panels and other renewable energy sources tumbled in price in recent years, making them attractive alternatives to coal and natural gas in power plants, electric utilities in Florida began pressing regulators and lawmakers to limit their growth.

Rooftop solar in particular posed a threat to the utilities. When the electric grid was designed, engineers did not foresee that consumers would generate their own power and even sell it to the utilities. That could reduce revenue for the companies.

Florida Power & Light, Duke Energy and other utilities argued that as more affluent homeowners installed solar panels and reduced their reliance on the electric grid, lower-income residents would be forced to pay higher rates to maintain power lines. Many energy experts have disputed that argument, saying energy-efficiency programs and increasingly affordable solar panels can reduce electricity costs for low-income households. But utilities have successfully made their case around the country, often with the help of the N.A.A.C.P. and other nonprofit groups that are advocates for communities of color.

In Florida, utilities found a ready partner — for a time — in Adora Nweze, the president of the N.A.A.C.P.’s Florida conference. She and her staff repeated industry talking points in newspaper opinion articles, written comments to state regulators and testimony in public hearings.

Utilities often sought the group’s support around the time that the state conference was in the middle of raising money for programs and its annual gathering, held in September, Ms. Nweze said.

Invoices obtained by The New York Times show that Florida Power & Light gave the N.A.A.C.P. at least $225,000 from 2013 to 2017 and that Duke Energy gave $25,000. Florida Power & Light’s annual donations doubled in 2014 just as the utility was pressing state regulators to restrict rooftop solar power and weaken the state’s energy efficiency goals.

For example, the N.A.A.C.P.’s Florida conference issued a $50,000 invoice to the utility on Sept. 11, 2014, a couple of months after Ms. Nweze wrote an essay in The Tallahassee Democrat opposing a solar-energy rebate program and in support of a utility-backed change to state efficiency goals.

“In many cases, nonparticipants tend to be the poor, creating a shockingly inequitable situation in which high-income households capture all of the benefits while low-income households shoulder all of the costs,” the essay said. Ms. Nweze said her staff wrote that article and similar ones, often copying verbatim from text sent by Florida Power & Light and other utilities.

In addition to the article, the conference filed comments with the state Public Service Commission. The commission later cited those comments in ruling for the utilities. The commission reduced the state’s energy-efficiency goals by about 90 percent.

The utilities’ policy victory in the 2014 case has had a lasting impact.

Florida utilities have some of the country’s least ambitious energy-efficiency goals. The Sunshine State also trails several states, including Massachusetts and New Jersey, in how much electricity it gets from solar panels.

Florida Power & Light declined to answer questions about its work with the N.A.A.C.P.’s state conference and other civil rights organizations. The utility said its primary focus had been to keep electricity rates as low as possible.

“We are proud of our longstanding relationship with the N.A.A.C.P. and of our ability to constructively work together on issues that benefit customers,” said Alys Daly, a company spokeswoman.

In an interview, Ms. Nweze said she had signed on because of the utilities’ financial support to her group, and because she believed what executives had told her about solar panels and energy efficiency.

“I felt that if we wanted the money, we had to do it,” she said. “The shortcoming on my part was that I didn’t have the necessary knowledge to know that it was a problem.”

Ms. Nweze, 77, said she decided about two years ago that her advocacy for the utilities was wrong. That was when the N.A.A.C.P.’s national office worked with her conference on a report about the impact that climate change and pollution have on low-income families. The report concluded that seven power plants had a disproportionate impact on people of color. It also found that Latino adults in Florida had the highest prevalence of asthma at some time in their lives and that African-American adolescents were the most likely to have ongoing asthma.

Jacqueline Patterson played an important role in Ms. Nweze’s conversion. Once focused on becoming a teacher, Ms. Patterson, 51, became interested in environmental issues while in Jamaica as a Peace Corps volunteer, in New Orleans as a relief worker after Hurricane Katrina and in sub-Saharan Africa as an official of a nonprofit group that works on health issues.

She often found that local residents were not involved in the discussions when officials debated and decided environmental and energy policy — white men frequently had the final say.

“What struck me after all of that was the number of rooms I went into where I was the only person of color,” Ms. Patterson said. “Too often, we’re just completely not there.”

As Ms. Patterson began recognizing the need for more African-Americans in the climate-change debate, so did the N.A.A.C.P.

The organization saw a growing need to address climate change and clean energy when it was drawn into a debate over a climate bill in Congress in 2009.

A lobbying firm working for the coal industry, Bonner & Associates, had sent out letters opposing the measure that seemed to be from the N.A.A.C.P.’s chapter in Charlottesville, Va. The group’s national office, in Baltimore, felt it had to make clear that it supported the legislation, which would have established a cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Jack Bonner, the founder of Bonner & Associates, declined to comment.

Then the organization began digging deeper, creating an environmental justice program and appointing Ms. Patterson to lead it.

Under her leadership, the group began connecting the dots between climate change and the impact of disasters like Katrina on African-American communities. The group also took a closer look at how rising sea levels and more intense storms might affect low-income, minority neighborhoods. And it started examining how air pollution from power plants affected nearby residents, many of them black.

“Seeing all of those intersections and more, we really saw this as a civil rights issue,” Ms. Patterson said. “The N.A.A.C.P. is now engaging around pushing for policies and pushing for access to clean energy.”

One of her priorities, Ms. Patterson said, is to educate state conferences and chapters. A milestone was the 2017 report with its Florida conference, which got the state organization to reverse its position on solar panels, energy efficiency and other clean-energy programs.

“I looked at it differently than I do now,” Ms. Nweze said. “The more you look at the issue, you realize this isn’t really working.”

But the national N.A.A.C.P. message has not found traction in every state.

The president of the group’s Illinois conference, Teresa Haley, said that her group typically got $5,000 to $10,000 a year from the energy industry and that the money did not influence the group’s activities. “They do have their lobbyist who contacts us and says, ‘We need your support.’”

Ms. Haley added that her group’s local branches held votes on which initiatives they support, sometimes backing utilities and sometimes opposing them. In 2012, for example, the Chicago branch successfully fought to close two coal-fired power plants in minority neighborhoods.

In California, the N.A.A.C.P. conference has more consistently taken positions that align with those of the state’s largest utilities.

Alice Huffman, the president of that state conference, has signed letters opposing government-run electricity providers known as Community Choice Aggregation, which allow consumers to choose solar power and wind with lower rates while leaving billing and transmission in the hands of investor-owned utilities. Ms. Huffman and the heads of other nonprofit organizations joined the utilities in sending a letter to state regulators contending that those programs could shift more of the grid’s cost to those who could least afford it. Studies have found that those in community choice programs typically have lower electric bills, but that state fees charged for grid maintenance could hurt low-income customers.

California’s three investor-owned utilities have donated about $180,000 to the N.A.A.C.P.’s state conference and its local chapters over the last five years, the companies said. Ms. Huffman and her conference did not respond to requests for comment.

Mr. Funderburk, the environmental lawyer, said the utility donations pressured nonprofit organizations to support the industry in ways undisclosed to members and the public.

“The only way to get real equity is to make things much more transparent,” he said.

Ms. Patterson said the N.A.A.C.P. was working on alternative revenue sources for chapters that stood to lose financial support from utilities.

In Florida, Ms. Nweze said that she realized that reversing support for fossil-fuel interests could jeopardize the state conference’s funding, but that she could no longer ignore the effect of climate change on her members.

“I’m not naïve,” she said. “I’m concerned, but I’m more concerned about the impact on the lives of the people throughout the country and this state in particular.”

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Saudi Linked to Florida Shooting Probed for Terrorism. He Had Clashed with Instructor.

The investigation into the fatal shooting last week at a Navy training center in Florida was officially characterized as a terrorism inquiry on Sunday, as new details emerged about the Saudi Air Force trainee who killed three sailors on the base where he was a visiting student.

As the F.B.I. continues to conduct interviews with everyone at the Pensacola Naval Air Station who may have had contact with the gunman, identified as Second Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani, a new report emerged that the Saudi trainee filed a formal complaint earlier this year against one of his instructors, who left him “infuriated” in class by tagging him with a derogatory nickname.

The complaint, quoted in a communication circulated among people connected to the flight training, said that the instructor referred to Lieutenant Alshamrani as “Porn Stash” in front of about 10 other aviation students, embarrassing and angering him.

”I was infuriated as to why he would say that in front of the class,” the Saudi trainee wrote in his complaint, as quoted in the summary. The document was reviewed by The New York Times and authenticated by a person who spoke with Lieutenant Alshamrani shortly after the incident.

The F.B.I. declined to comment on the April incident, and the special agent in charge of the agency’s Jacksonville office, Rachel Rojas, said on Sunday that investigators are still searching for a motive for the Friday morning attack. There has been nothing to suggest that the classroom incident had any connection to the shooting, which did not occur until more than seven months later.

Yet little is known of Lieutenant Alshamrani’s life in Florida during his months as a trainee, and the incident in April appears to have been upsetting enough that two American students in the class helped him file his complaint, according to the person who spoke with him about it.

Lieutenant Alshamrani reported that the confrontation came at the end of a meteorology class, when the instructor, James Day, asked whether students had any questions before he dismissed them.

The instructor then turned to Lieutenant Alshamrani and asked whether he had any questions, addressing him as “Porn Stash” — spelled that way in the complaint — in an apparent reference to the mustache of a porn actor.

“Laughing, he continued to ask, ‘What? Have you not seen a porn star before?’” the lieutenant wrote in his complaint, according to the summary. “After I did not respond, he just let go of the subject.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 08gunman3-popup Saudi Linked to Florida Shooting Probed for Terrorism. He Had Clashed with Instructor. United States Defense and Military Forces PENSACOLA, Fla. Naval Air Station Pensacola Military Bases and Installations mass shootings International Study and Teaching Foreign Students (in US) Florida Federal Bureau of Investigation Day, James Alshamrani, Mohammed Saeed

Second Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani, in an undated photo. Credit…Federal Bureau of Investigation, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Brian Busey, the president of the company that employs Mr. Day, Delaware Resource Group of Oklahoma, declined to discuss details of the classroom incident, but said the company had dealt with the matter in April. He said the company was cooperating with the F.B.I.’s investigation into the shooting.

“Appropriate personnel action was taken regarding the incident in question, corrective action was taken, the matter was closed back in April, and we have no further comment,” Mr. Busey said.

Mr. Day also declined, through Mr. Busey, to comment. Officials at the Navy base referred questions to the F.B.I., which also did not comment.

“We are unable to confirm this type of information due to the active and ongoing investigation,” Amanda Warford Videll, a spokeswoman for the bureau’s Jacksonville office, said in a statement.

Separately, F.B.I. officials said they are continuing to conduct interviews with anyone who may have had contact with the gunman, who was shot and killed by a sheriff’s deputy at the scene of the attack. They said they are operating on the assumption that he acted alone.

More details have emerged about the gunman’s actions in the days leading up to the shooting.

The night before the attack, Lieutenant Alshamrani showed videos of mass shootings at a dinner party, according to a person who was briefed on the investigation.

Days earlier, he and three other Saudi military trainees were in New York City, visiting several museums and Rockefeller Center. There has been no indication that the trip was more than a sightseeing tour.

Still, several dozen F.B.I. agents and New York Police Department detectives have been working to learn everything they can about the visit, which lasted for about four days, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. The agents and detectives have been tracing their movements through credit cards, surveillance video and other means, the person said.

It was not clear whether the April classroom incident will play any role in the investigation.

According to the communication describing the encounter, Lieutenant Alshamrani was visibly upset and reported what happened to managers of CAE USA, which provides instruction to civil and military aviation students. (Delaware Resource Group is a subcontractor to CAE.) The American student who helped the lieutenant draft the complaint was one of two who accompanied him when he went to file it, according to the person who spoke with the Saudi trainee about the complaint.

The CAE managers offered to have the instructor apologize, but Lieutenant Alshamrani turned that offer down, and instead spoke to the naval office that oversees international students, the person said.

Several government employees thought that disciplinary action should be taken against Mr. Day, but he continued to instruct students, the person said. About a week after the incident in April, Lieutenant Alshamrani was paired with Mr. Day for simulated flight training, according to a schedule reviewed by The Times. He again complained to CAE managers, and the session was canceled and rescheduled with a different instructor, the person said.

As part of a terrorism investigation, federal authorities will also be attempting to determine whether there was a political or ideological motive behind the shooting.

The SITE Intelligence Group has flagged a Twitter account that it believes is connected to the gunman, with a posting shortly before the attack that was critical of America’s support for Israel, as well as the “invasion” of other countries by United States troops. The statement, which quoted Osama bin Laden, accused the United States of “committing crimes not only against Muslims but also humanity.”

Lieutenant Alshamrani began training with the United States military in August 2017 and was scheduled to complete the training in August 2020, Pentagon officials said. He initially attended language school at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. He spent breaks back home in Saudi Arabia. When he returned to the United States in February, friends and colleagues noticed that he had become more religious, according to a person briefed on the investigation.

Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper said on “Fox News Sunday” that the Pentagon would review screening procedures for foreigners on American military bases but would maintain the training programs.

“The ability to bring foreign students here to train with us, to understand American culture, is very important to us,” he said. “We have something that our potential adversaries, such as Russia and China, don’t have.”

Mr. Esper confirmed that several friends of the gunman were detained during the military’s investigation of the shooting, and said that of those who were detained, “some one or two were filming” the shooting.

“I’m not trying to pass a judgment on this,” Mr. Esper said. “Today, people pull out their phones and film everything and anything that happens.”

Contributing reporting were Frances Robles, Patricia Mazzei, Eric Schmitt, Adam Goldman, Chris Cameron and William K. Rashbaum. Susan C. Beachy contributed research.

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Pensacola Gunman Said to Have Fumed Over Instructor Months Before Shooting

The investigation into the fatal shooting last week at a Navy training center in Florida was officially characterized as a terrorism inquiry on Sunday, as new details emerged about the Saudi Air Force trainee who killed three sailors on the base where he was a visiting student.

As the F.B.I. continues to conduct interviews with everyone at the Pensacola Naval Air Station who may have had contact with the gunman, identified as Second Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani, a new report emerged that the Saudi trainee filed a formal complaint earlier this year against one of his instructors, who left him “infuriated” in class by tagging him with a derogatory nickname.

The complaint, quoted in a communication circulated among people connected to the flight training, said that the instructor referred to Lieutenant Alshamrani as “Porn Stash” in front of about 10 other aviation students, embarrassing and angering him.

”I was infuriated as to why he would say that in front of the class,” the Saudi trainee wrote in his complaint, as quoted in the summary. The document was reviewed by The New York Times and authenticated by a person who spoke with Lieutenant Alshamrani shortly after the incident.

The F.B.I. declined to comment on the April incident, and the special agent in charge of the agency’s Jacksonville office, Rachel Rojas, said on Sunday that investigators are still searching for a motive for the Friday morning attack. There has been nothing to suggest that the classroom incident had any connection to the shooting, which did not occur until more than seven months later.

Yet little is known of Lieutenant Alshamrani’s life in Florida during his months as a trainee, and the incident in April appears to have been upsetting enough that two American students in the class helped him file his complaint, according to the person who spoke with him about it.

Lieutenant Alshamrani reported that the confrontation came at the end of a meteorology class, when the instructor, James Day, asked whether students had any questions before he dismissed them.

The instructor then turned to Lieutenant Alshamrani and asked whether he had any questions, addressing him as “Porn Stash” — spelled that way in the complaint — in an apparent reference to the mustache of a porn actor.

“Laughing, he continued to ask, ‘What? Have you not seen a porn star before?’” the lieutenant wrote in his complaint, according to the summary. “After I did not respond, he just let go of the subject.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 08gunman3-popup Pensacola Gunman Said to Have Fumed Over Instructor Months Before Shooting United States Defense and Military Forces PENSACOLA, Fla. Naval Air Station Pensacola Military Bases and Installations mass shootings International Study and Teaching Foreign Students (in US) Florida Federal Bureau of Investigation Day, James Alshamrani, Mohammed Saeed

Second Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani, in an undated photo. Credit…Federal Bureau of Investigation, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Brian Busey, the president of the company that employs Mr. Day, Delaware Resource Group of Oklahoma, declined to discuss details of the classroom incident, but said the company had dealt with the matter in April. He said the company was cooperating with the F.B.I.’s investigation into the shooting.

“Appropriate personnel action was taken regarding the incident in question, corrective action was taken, the matter was closed back in April, and we have no further comment,” Mr. Busey said.

Mr. Day also declined, through Mr. Busey, to comment. Officials at the Navy base referred questions to the F.B.I., which also did not comment.

“We are unable to confirm this type of information due to the active and ongoing investigation,” Amanda Warford Videll, a spokeswoman for the bureau’s Jacksonville office, said in a statement.

Separately, F.B.I. officials said they are continuing to conduct interviews with anyone who may have had contact with the gunman, who was shot and killed by a sheriff’s deputy at the scene of the attack. They said they are operating on the assumption that he acted alone.

More details have emerged about the gunman’s actions in the days leading up to the shooting.

The night before the attack, Lieutenant Alshamrani showed videos of mass shootings at a dinner party, according to a person who was briefed on the investigation.

Days earlier, he and three other Saudi military trainees were in New York City, visiting several museums and Rockefeller Center. There has been no indication that the trip was more than a sightseeing tour.

Still, several dozen F.B.I. agents and New York Police Department detectives have been working to learn everything they can about the visit, which lasted for about four days, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. The agents and detectives have been tracing their movements through credit cards, surveillance video and other means, the person said.

It was not clear whether the April classroom incident will play any role in the investigation.

According to the communication describing the encounter, Lieutenant Alshamrani was visibly upset and reported what happened to managers of CAE USA, which provides instruction to civil and military aviation students. (Delaware Resource Group is a subcontractor to CAE.) The American student who helped the lieutenant draft the complaint was one of two who accompanied him when he went to file it, according to the person who spoke with the Saudi trainee about the complaint.

The CAE managers offered to have the instructor apologize, but Lieutenant Alshamrani turned that offer down, and instead spoke to the naval office that oversees international students, the person said.

Several government employees thought that disciplinary action should be taken against Mr. Day, but he continued to instruct students, the person said. About a week after the incident in April, Lieutenant Alshamrani was paired with Mr. Day for simulated flight training, according to a schedule reviewed by The Times. He again complained to CAE managers, and the session was canceled and rescheduled with a different instructor, the person said.

As part of a terrorism investigation, federal authorities will also be attempting to determine whether there was a political or ideological motive behind the shooting.

The SITE Intelligence Group has flagged a Twitter account that it believes is connected to the gunman, with a posting shortly before the attack that was critical of America’s support for Israel, as well as the “invasion” of other countries by United States troops. The statement, which quoted Osama bin Laden, accused the United States of “committing crimes not only against Muslims but also humanity.”

Lieutenant Alshamrani began training with the United States military in August 2017 and was scheduled to complete the training in August 2020, Pentagon officials said. He initially attended language school at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. He spent breaks back home in Saudi Arabia. When he returned to the United States in February, friends and colleagues noticed that he had become more religious, according to a person briefed on the investigation.

Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper said on “Fox News Sunday” that the Pentagon would review screening procedures for foreigners on American military bases but would maintain the training programs.

“The ability to bring foreign students here to train with us, to understand American culture, is very important to us,” he said. “We have something that our potential adversaries, such as Russia and China, don’t have.”

Mr. Esper confirmed that several friends of the gunman were detained during the military’s investigation of the shooting, and said that of those who were detained, “some one or two were filming” the shooting.

“I’m not trying to pass a judgment on this,” Mr. Esper said. “Today, people pull out their phones and film everything and anything that happens.”

Contributing reporting were Frances Robles, Patricia Mazzei, Eric Schmitt, Adam Goldman, Chris Cameron and William K. Rashbaum. Susan C. Beachy contributed research.

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Trump Can’t Resist Campaigning for Governors. But They Can Resist Him.

Westlake Legal Group 00govs-memo1-facebookJumbo Trump Can’t Resist Campaigning for Governors. But They Can Resist Him. United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Midterm Elections (2018) Louisiana Loeffler, Kelly L Kentucky Kemp, Brian P Governors (US) Georgia Florida Elections, Governors DeSantis, Ron Bevin, Matthew

His grip on Republican senators has held in the lead-up to a historic impeachment trial. Members of the House have faced the prospect of retiring before going against him. And he frequently boasts about his strong approval ratings among Republican voters.

Yet for a party leader who inspires fear in Washington, President Trump has been bedeviled by governor’s races time and again, even after his aggressive campaigning has helped Republican candidates win.

Unable to modulate his excitement for other people’s political battles — and, according to advisers, not understanding the distinct incentives for governors who run their own states and senators who have to work with him in Washington — Mr. Trump has plunged headfirst into contests that have done little but expose his own political vulnerabilities.

In the last month, two Republican candidates the president supported lost their off-year races for governor, puncturing his self-proclaimed role as kingmaker. But even his successes in the 2018 governor’s races have left him disappointed: The winners he championed, once in office, have defied his wishes and cast aside his allies, as recently as this past week.

“Fundamentally, unlike members of the House and the Senate, there’s no element of dependency that goes with being in Washington” for governors, said Mark Sanford, a former governor of South Carolina who recently ended his quixotic bid to challenge Mr. Trump for the Republican nomination.

“There’s a degree of political autonomy” that governors have, he added.

Mike DuHaime, a Republican strategist who advised former Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, put it more bluntly: “Many members of Congress are scared of the president’s ability to take them out in a primary — governors are less so.”

The examples have piled up over the last 18 months, as some of Mr. Trump’s aides have winced at how aggressively he wanted to participate in particular campaigns despite their urging him to stay out of those races.

For those candidates who won their governor’s races, their own political needs have since overshadowed those of Mr. Trump, and they have less incentive to fear him once elected.

In Florida, Mr. Trump’s aides helped save the flailing candidacy of Ron DeSantis in the 2018 Republican primary, and then the general election. Also last year, in Georgia, Mr. Trump helped pull Brian Kemp over the finish line in both the primary and the general election. In both cases, Mr. Trump’s advisers implored him to stay out of the primaries, and he agreed to — only to surprise his aides by jumping in to support Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp.

Once that happened, Mr. Trump’s aides sought to make the best of it, trying to net victories in the states with an eye toward having allies there in 2020.

But since his election, Mr. DeSantis — once a congressman who frequently jabbed at Mr. Trump’s critics during the investigation by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III — has seemed fine bucking the president.

He has steered clear of public defenses of Mr. Trump, preferring not to spend his political capital by wading into national issues. He has indicated to reporters that he will be too busy to put much time toward helping Mr. Trump in his re-election battle.

And in a move that jolted Florida politics, the president’s campaign complied with a demand by Mr. DeSantis that Mr. Trump fire his own re-election campaign’s top Florida adviser, Susie Wiles, who has been credited with helping elect not only Mr. Trump in 2016 but also Mr. DeSantis in 2018.

Mr. DeSantis, who is seen as a possible Republican presidential candidate in 2024, viewed her as insufficiently loyal to him — and too close to another potential presidential candidate, former Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, whom she also helped elect, according to four people briefed on the events.

Her dismissal, in September, was agreed to by Mr. Trump and Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, but the move infuriated a number of Trump advisers, who believe Ms. Wiles was an asset and who think the campaign should not have bent to a demand from a governor whom Mr. Trump assisted.

More recently, Mr. Trump was ignored by Mr. Kemp as the president pressed for an ally to fill the seat of Senator Johnny Isakson of Georgia, who is retiring at the end of the year. Mr. Trump favored Representative Doug Collins, an appointment that would have given him an additional loyalist in the Senate as an impeachment trial looms in that chamber.

But Mr. Kemp on Wednesday chose Kelly Loeffler, a business executive who he believes will not turn off the suburban women whose support he needs.

Mr. Kemp took Ms. Loeffler to meet Mr. Trump at the White House at a secret gathering two weeks ago, trying to reassure him. Mr. Trump did not budge — but neither did Mr. Kemp.

Even with Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp walking a careful line with the president, Mr. Trump has seemed to relish playing kingmaker after getting a taste of it in 2018. So this year, he jumped into other races that offered him little benefit in his own re-election fight next year, or in Congress.

In Kentucky and Louisiana, where the Republican nominees for governor lost this year, the races were decided by a number of local factors, including negative perceptions of the incumbent Republican in Kentucky, Matt Bevin, and the moderate style of the incumbent Democrat in Louisiana, John Bel Edwards.

Still, Mr. Trump made heavily promoted visits to the states and touted the candidates on Twitter, personalizing the races almost every time he talked about them.

A loss would be damaging, Mr. Trump told the crowd at a rally in Kentucky the night before the election. “You can’t let that happen to me!” he implored.

Some of Mr. Trump’s advisers say they see fund-raising benefits in the president’s traveling to those states, even with the losses. And they believe that even if he had stayed out of the races, political reporters would have described them as losses for Mr. Trump.

But senior Republicans acknowledge that Mr. Trump still doesn’t understand the nuances between the types of races run by governors, who have to tend to voters back home, and senators and representatives, who must survive in Washington and have a different political balancing act.

Former Gov. Pat McCrory of North Carolina, a Republican, said that Mr. Trump shared something in common with his predecessor, Barack Obama, in that neither one had significant coattails in off-year elections. The two men developed a “personal relationship” with voters who turned out only for their presidential elections and could not be cajoled into supporting other candidates, he said.

Some Trump advisers have questioned why his aides have not pushed back more forcefully against his desire to inject himself into contests in solid-red states like Kentucky and Louisiana where there is no electoral benefit to him in 2020.

“The curse of Donald Trump is that he can’t help himself, and he always makes it about him,” Mr. Sanford said.

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Shamed Parkland Sheriff Scott Israel Voted Out by Florida Senate Despite Democrat’s Fight to Keep Him

Westlake Legal Group DanaLoeschScottIsrael-620x317 Shamed Parkland Sheriff Scott Israel Voted Out by Florida Senate Despite Democrat’s Fight to Keep Him Scott Israel Ron DeSantis republicans Politics Parkland Shooting News mass shootings Kyle Kashuv Front Page Stories Florida Featured Story democrats Dana Loesch corruption Broward County Allow Media Exception

National Rifle Association spokesperson Dana Loesch answers a question while sitting next to Broward Sheriff Scott Israel during a CNN town hall meeting, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, at the BB&T Center, in Sunrise, Fla. (Michael Laughlin/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

After the Parkland shooting which claimed the lives of many innocent high school students and teachers, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel sat on a stage next to radio show host and Second Amendment advocate Dana Loesch and proceed to blame her and the National Rifle Association for everything that happened on that fateful day.

The truth was later revealed that it was Israel and his department’s incompetence and failure to act on many occasions both before and while the shooting was occurring that was the real people at fault for the atrocity. He was suspended and Florida lawmakers began the long process of deciding if he should be kicked to the curb.

According to the Sun-Sentinal, the Florida Senate did just that, but it definitely wasn’t a unanimous vote. It would appear that despite Israel’s apparent blunders, Democrats wanted to keep him in office:

The 25-15 vote was mostly along party lines with Republicans, who are a majority in the Senate and loyal to the Republican governor, generally supporting removal while most Democrats voted to reinstate the Democratic sheriff. All five Broward senators voted for reinstatement, despite the wishes of Parkland parents.

“I can stand here and I can tell you how I empathize with the Parkland parents,” said Democrat Sen. Perry Thurston said. “I’m not disregarding them. None of us would.”

Thurstan added that “95% of Broward County feels differently about the attempt to remove the sheriff.” It’s unclear where he got that number.

“We are tasked between deciding about how we feel and the dangerous precedent we leave behind,” said Democrat Sen. Kevin Rader.

According to the Sun-Sentinal, the “high standard for proof for removal had not been met” according to Rader.

Democrat Sen. Gary Farmer believed that Parkland parents and Republicans were being ruled by emotion and not rationality when it came to their desire to see Israel gone.

“Because of the horrendous and ghastly nature of that event, it’s easy to be moved by the emotion and the pleas of the parents who are still grieving and who forever will be grieving for the loss of their children,” Farmer said. “We are a country founded on rule of law. We cannot base our decision on emotion.”

Israel himself also believed that reason didn’t win the day.

“Politics won,” he told the Sun-Sentinal, adding that the “process was as a sham. It was a farce.”

Dana Loesch, whom Israel used as a scapegoat while on the infamous CNN Townhall that followed the Parkland shooting, told RedState that this is a fitting outcome for Israel.

“Scott Israel thinks he’s the victim and that his job was “stolen.” The lives of 17 innocent people were what was stolen,” Loesch told RedState. “He isn’t the victim here — the people he failed to protect are the victims. It’s why the families and his own deputies stood against him. No amount of his thuggish bullying will change that and I’ll be there at his every step to call him out every single time.”

Kyle Kashuv, one of the Parkland students who survived the shooting, told RedState that this was a just end to Israel’s career, and thanked the Parkland families who did lose family members for helping bring it about.

“Thanks to the tireless work of Andrew Pollack, Ryan Petty and the Parkland families, Scott Israel finally got some semblance of the justice he deserved for his deep corruption and incompetence that enabled the tragedy at my school,” Kashuv told RedState.

Kashuv also applauded the Republicans who voted to remove Israel from office and slammed the Democrats who defended him.

“Good on those in the Florida Senate who voted for his removal, and it’s an absolute shame on those who voted against. I cannot thank Governor DeSantis enough for continuing to stand by his promises to Parkland and the Parkland families,” he added.

Israel seems to believe that he’s going to retake his office during an election in 2020, but judging by the number of people who have turned against him after the truth about the shooting came out, especially the Parkland parents and students, it’s unlikely he’ll see office again.

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Francis Rooney, G.O.P. Lawmaker Who Won’t Rule Out Impeachment, Is to Retire

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162926466_493f0f06-ca09-4d48-b1bf-120f0f147826-facebookJumbo Francis Rooney, G.O.P. Lawmaker Who Won’t Rule Out Impeachment, Is to Retire United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Rooney, Francis (1953- ) Republican Party impeachment House of Representatives Florida

WASHINGTON — Representative Francis Rooney, Republican of Florida, who has refused to rule out voting to impeach President Trump, said on Saturday that he would not be seeking re-election.

Mr. Rooney, who first won his district in southwest Florida in 2016, said on Fox News that he believed he had accomplished what he wanted to do in Congress and had grown frustrated with aspects of legislative service.

Asked if he was interested in a third term, Mr. Rooney said, “I don’t really think I do, and I don’t really think I want one.”

“I’ve done what I came to do,” he added, noting that he also wanted to set a model in the House for adhering to term limits.

A day earlier, Mr. Rooney became the first House Republican to indicate that he was willing to consider supporting articles of impeachment over the president’s attempts to pressure Ukraine to investigate his political rivals, but he said on Saturday that his decision to retire was unrelated. (He emphasized to reporters that the allegations did not rise to the level of the Watergate scandal.)

“I’m going to do at all stages what I think is right to do,” Mr. Rooney told reporters on Friday when asked if he was more outspoken because he was considering retirement. “You’ve got to do the right thing at every stage. Whether I run again is a totally different can of worms, that has to do with family things, business, wanting to do some different things.”

“This is kind of a frustrating job for me,” he added. “I come from a world of actions, decisions, putting your money down and seeing what happens. This is a world of talk.”

As a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Mr. Rooney has had access to the closed-door interviews conducted during the open impeachment inquiry, which has brought a parade of career diplomats and senior officials to the Capitol to give hourslong testimony. A former ambassador to the Holy See, he defended the career diplomats who have testified, telling reporters on Friday that “it’s painful to me to see this kind of amateur diplomacy, riding roughshod over our State Department apparatus.”

He also offered some of the bluntest criticism of a top White House official’s efforts to walk back earlier statements saying that Mr. Trump had sought a quid pro quo in withholding American aid from Ukraine.

“I couldn’t believe it — I was very surprised that he said that,” he said, referring to the president’s acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney.

“It’s not an Etch a Sketch,” he added, miming the gesture that erases the toy board.

He acknowledged that some of his Republican colleagues had concerns about incurring Mr. Trump’s wrath, as the president continues to lash out at outspoken conservative critics like Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah.

But Mr. Rooney said he had no such reservations, noting, “I didn’t take this job to keep it.”

“What’s he going to do to me?” Mr. Rooney said of the president. “I mean, he could say bad things, but it just is what it is. Let’s just let the facts speak.”

“I want to get the facts and do the right thing,” he added, “because I’ll be looking at my children a lot longer than I’m looking to anybody in this building.”

Mr. Rooney, a businessman and one of the wealthiest members in Congress, has long been a part of the Republican establishment.

One of the subsidiaries of Rooney Holdings, the company Mr. Rooney and his family started in 1984, has been responsible for the construction of the presidential libraries for Presidents George and George W. Bush in Texas, football stadiums for the Dallas Cowboys and Houston Texans, the Capitol Visitor Center in Washington, and the Walter Reed Army Institute for Research outside the capital.

But he has also cultivated a reputation as one of the few elected Republicans who acknowledges the science of climate change and has pressed for a tax on carbon dioxide pollution to address the problem.

In September, the House passed a bill he wrote that would ban offshore drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico — something he said on Saturday he had not been able to achieve when Republicans controlled the House.

Mr. Trump won Mr. Rooney’s affluent district, which includes Fort Myers, Naples and Marco Island, by more than 20 points in 2016.

Asked in an interview on Friday with The New York Times about reaction from constituents over his criticism of the administration, Mr. Rooney said, “They don’t understand how anyone could say anything remotely at variance with President Trump.”

“I’m sorry,” he said, “but I’m just going to call ‘em like I see ‘em.”

Lisa Friedman contributed reporting.

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Hillary Plops Out Another: She was Robbed of Her Rightful Presidency by Hacking 10-Year-Old Children

Westlake Legal Group HillaryClintonAPimage-620x317 Hillary Plops Out Another: She was Robbed of Her Rightful Presidency by Hacking 10-Year-Old Children Uncategorized Hillary Clinton hacking Government Front Page Stories Florida Featured Story fake news democrats David Plouffe Campaigns Allow Media Exception 2016

Hillary Clinton speaks during the TIME 100 Summit, in New York, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

 

 

I don’t recall any other presidential election where the loser continued on for months and months and months claiming to not really have lost.

The reason I don’t remember could be that my memory is bad or that I’m not old enough. Another possible culprit: The fact that it would be incredibly foolish to do so, so no one does.

Hillary Clinton went her own way.

And she’s still going. Only one year away from the end of the term, she’s still expending time, effort, and the energy of her thoughts on her loss. What she doesn’t seem to understand is it only means she’s continuing to lose: Rather than doing something new and winning, she’s stuck failing in the past.

And I mean that, not critically, but empathetically.

It’s tough to watch.

And speaking of winceworthiness, Hillary recently sat down on the Campaign HQ with David Plouffe podcast to push out more explanation as to why she’s not president, none of which will likely ever be “America voted.”

And a really big one topped the pile.

As it turns out, a reason she was robbed of her rightful place at the head of the nation’s table was stinking kids.

Ten-year-olds, to be exact.

They’ve been hacking our elections.

And, apparently, fourth graders are big Trump supporters.

#ItTakesAVillain

Here’s Hil:

“You know, we don’t really know to what extent the election was interfered in because nobody will look for it. We do know that in Florida a lot more happened than has been admitted publicly.”

And on we go…

“We know we’re really vulnerable.”

Get ready for it…

“Every, you know, every Hackathon that happens, you know, 10-year-olds are hacking our voting systems and the networks that connect them.”

And the federal government likes all the elections being stolen:

“So we have four big problems, and we don’t have a government that is interested in protecting our elections.”

Well there ya go.

Oh, I just thought of this — if you want to know if that’s actually true, it ain’t.

The Daily Wire explains:

Clinton’s claim comes from an August 2018 story about a Florida hacking competition, during which a [11-year-old] boy hacked into a replica election system. The story was widely shared in the media as evidence of America’s vulnerability to hackers.

However, even Politifact rated the vote hacking claim “mostly false” after Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard repeated a similar claim over the summer.

Here’s Politifact:

First, there wasn’t hacking into a replica of the election system — but rather a website made to look like Florida’s Secretary of State website that reports preliminary election results. In other words, not the system that receives and counts actual votes.

And second, what was hacked into was not even a replica — as in an exact copy of the website — because it did not contain the proprietary security features that the Secretary of State website has.

Furthermore, this statement came from Florida’s National Association of Secretaries of State:

“While it is undeniable websites are vulnerable to hackers, election-night reporting websites are only used to publish preliminary, unofficial results for the public and the media. The sites are not connected to vote counting equipment and could never change actual election results.”

But if you’re prone to conspiracy subscription, and if Hillary’s loss is really stuck in your craw, then you should take action.

The little mongrels are probably holing up with swiped Macbooks, unbeknownst to mom or dad. They’re so small at that age — maybe they’re hiding in the cabinet while they steal all the elections.

Trump’s evil must’ve lured them away from their parents. We’ve got to shout down the devil.

If you wanna make a difference, the next time you see a decade-old dude or chick — at a restaurant, at a school, at the mall, at church, or anywhere else, confront that little deplorable.

And give ’em a little bit o’ What For.

And tell ’em Maxine sent ya:



-ALEX

 

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NYT Editorial Board Member Accidentally Provides Rationale for Why Trump Shouldn’t Cave to Media Mobs

Westlake Legal Group ny-times-620x349 NYT Editorial Board Member Accidentally Provides Rationale for Why Trump Shouldn’t Cave to Media Mobs washington D.C. Social Media republicans progressives Politics NY Times North Carolina New York Times Media journalism Front Page Stories Front Page Florida Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Allow Media Exception

On Monday, Brad Slager wrote about the controversial video that aired at a recent gathering of President Trump’s supporters at a Trump resort in Miami and how the mainstream media and Democrats erupted in outrage over it.

Through his press secretary Stephanie Grisham, we learned Trump “strongly condemns” the doctored video that shows Trump shooting members of the media, even though he wasn’t responsible for creating it, having it created, sharing it, or in any other way promoting it.

But that wasn’t enough for media firefighters like New York Times editorial board member Mara Gay, who stated Monday afternoon that it was hard to believe he didn’t actually see the video and enjoy what he saw:

Gay, who got blasted by Sen. Ted Cruz in July over after she acted stupidly by telling the Senator that “Frederick Douglass’ name … has no business in your mouth”, was not the only member of the mainstream media who blamed Trump for a video he had nothing to do with. CNN’s Brooke Baldwin also took to the airwaves, anded demand Trump issue a statement himself condemning the video rather than through his press secretary.

Note below that CNN labeled the video a “Trump video” even though, again, Trump had nothing to do with its creation or dissemination:

This just goes to show you’re danged if you do and danged if you don’t if you’re a Republican. Trump condemned the video before he even saw it, according to his press secretary, but that wasn’t enough for the same mainstream media who have worked in concert with Democrats to amplify calls for his impeachment since before he was even elected president.

Even had he condemned it directly it still wouldn’t be enough for the media mobs, who would have spent days dissecting what he said to prove he didn’t really mean it, didn’t really own up to “his part” (though he had none as it relates to this video), and/or deliberately left out things that should have been said.

Republicans simply can’t win with the left wing media, which is why Trump doesn’t even bother trying.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

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