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Humans will never live on another planet, Nobel Laureate says. Here’s why.

Here’s the reality: We’re messing up the Earth and any far-out ideas of colonizing another orb when we’re done with our own are wishful thinking. That’s according to Michel Mayor, an astrophysicist who was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in physics this year for discovering the first planet orbiting a sun-like star outside of our solar system.

“If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: We will not migrate there,” he told Agence France-Presse (AFP). He said he felt the need to “kill all the statements that say, ‘OK, we will go to a livable planet if one day life is not possible on Earth.'”

All of the known exoplanets, or planets outside of our solar system, are too far away to feasibly travel to, he said. “Even in the very optimistic case of a livable planet that is not too far, say a few dozen light years, which is not a lot, it’s in the neighbourhood, the time to go there is considerable,” he added.

Related: 8 Ways Global Warming Is Already Changing the World

Mayor shared half of the Nobel Prize this year along with Didier Queloz for discovering the first exoplanet in October 1995. Using novel instruments at the Haute-Provence Observatory in southern France, they detected a gas giant similar to Jupiter, which they named 51 Pegasi b. (The other half of the prize was awarded to James Peebles of Princeton University for his work in dark matter and dark energy).

Since then, over 4,000 other exoplanets have been found in the Milky Way, but apparently, none of them can be feasibly reached.

Stephen Kane, a professor of planetary astrophysics at the University of California in Riverside, agrees with Mayor. “The sad reality is that, at this point in human history, all stars are effectively at a distance of infinity,” Kane told Live Science. “We struggle very hard as a species to reach the Earth’s moon.”

We might be able to send people to Mars in the next 50 years, but “I would be very surprised if humanity made it to the orbit of Jupiter within the next few centuries,” he said. Since the distance to the nearest star outside of our solar system is about 70,000 times greater than the distance to Jupiter, “all stars are effectively out of reach.”

Well, you might say, plenty of things seemed out of reach until we reached them, such as sending aircraft on intercontinental flights. But “in this case, the required physics to reach the stars, if it exists, is not known to us and it would require a fundamental change in our understanding of the relationship between mass, acceleration and energy.”

“So that’s where we stand, firmly on the Earth, and unlikely to change for a very, very long time,” he said.

Mayor told the AFP: “We must take care of our planet, it is very beautiful and still absolutely livable.”

Andrew Fraknoi, emeritus chair of the astronomy department at Foothill College in California agreed that we won’t be able to travel to these stars in the near future. But “I would never say we can never reach the stars and possible habitable planets,” he said. “Who knows how our technology will evolve after another million years of evolution.”

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group humans-never-on-another-planet Humans will never live on another planet, Nobel Laureate says. Here's why. Yasemin Saplakoglu LiveScience fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fnc/science fnc article 3c85de80-82e4-5812-9ca5-61e4c97d6940   Westlake Legal Group humans-never-on-another-planet Humans will never live on another planet, Nobel Laureate says. Here's why. Yasemin Saplakoglu LiveScience fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fnc/science fnc article 3c85de80-82e4-5812-9ca5-61e4c97d6940

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Humans will never live on another planet, Nobel Laureate says. Here’s why.

Here’s the reality: We’re messing up the Earth and any far-out ideas of colonizing another orb when we’re done with our own are wishful thinking. That’s according to Michel Mayor, an astrophysicist who was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in physics this year for discovering the first planet orbiting a sun-like star outside of our solar system.

“If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: We will not migrate there,” he told Agence France-Presse (AFP). He said he felt the need to “kill all the statements that say, ‘OK, we will go to a livable planet if one day life is not possible on Earth.'”

All of the known exoplanets, or planets outside of our solar system, are too far away to feasibly travel to, he said. “Even in the very optimistic case of a livable planet that is not too far, say a few dozen light years, which is not a lot, it’s in the neighbourhood, the time to go there is considerable,” he added.

Related: 8 Ways Global Warming Is Already Changing the World

Mayor shared half of the Nobel Prize this year along with Didier Queloz for discovering the first exoplanet in October 1995. Using novel instruments at the Haute-Provence Observatory in southern France, they detected a gas giant similar to Jupiter, which they named 51 Pegasi b. (The other half of the prize was awarded to James Peebles of Princeton University for his work in dark matter and dark energy).

Since then, over 4,000 other exoplanets have been found in the Milky Way, but apparently, none of them can be feasibly reached.

Stephen Kane, a professor of planetary astrophysics at the University of California in Riverside, agrees with Mayor. “The sad reality is that, at this point in human history, all stars are effectively at a distance of infinity,” Kane told Live Science. “We struggle very hard as a species to reach the Earth’s moon.”

We might be able to send people to Mars in the next 50 years, but “I would be very surprised if humanity made it to the orbit of Jupiter within the next few centuries,” he said. Since the distance to the nearest star outside of our solar system is about 70,000 times greater than the distance to Jupiter, “all stars are effectively out of reach.”

Well, you might say, plenty of things seemed out of reach until we reached them, such as sending aircraft on intercontinental flights. But “in this case, the required physics to reach the stars, if it exists, is not known to us and it would require a fundamental change in our understanding of the relationship between mass, acceleration and energy.”

“So that’s where we stand, firmly on the Earth, and unlikely to change for a very, very long time,” he said.

Mayor told the AFP: “We must take care of our planet, it is very beautiful and still absolutely livable.”

Andrew Fraknoi, emeritus chair of the astronomy department at Foothill College in California agreed that we won’t be able to travel to these stars in the near future. But “I would never say we can never reach the stars and possible habitable planets,” he said. “Who knows how our technology will evolve after another million years of evolution.”

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group humans-never-on-another-planet Humans will never live on another planet, Nobel Laureate says. Here's why. Yasemin Saplakoglu LiveScience fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fnc/science fnc article 3c85de80-82e4-5812-9ca5-61e4c97d6940   Westlake Legal Group humans-never-on-another-planet Humans will never live on another planet, Nobel Laureate says. Here's why. Yasemin Saplakoglu LiveScience fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/planets fnc/science fnc article 3c85de80-82e4-5812-9ca5-61e4c97d6940

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Bone fragments sent for DNA testing to determine possible link to Amelia Earhart

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5746938680001_5746934904001-vs Bone fragments sent for DNA testing to determine possible link to Amelia Earhart fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article ab399a08-47e0-540a-aa67-2ea334dbe648

A researcher at the University of South Florida is working to determine if newly discovered bones from a museum on an island in the Pacific belong to Amelia Earhart, the famed aviator who vanished after her plane crashed in 1937.

Three years after Earhart disappeared, bones were discovered on the Pacific Island of Nikumaroro, 1,200 miles from the Marshall Islands, in “the area where they think she might have had an emergency landing,” Dr. Erin Kimmerle, the researcher, told Fox 13 News.

1,000-YEAR-OLD ARROW DISCOVERED IN NORWAY

The bones were examined, but—adding to the mystery—vanished while in Fiji. Kimmerle was contacted recently by National Geographic after reports that the bones may have been found in Te Umwanibong Museum and Cultural Centre on the island of Tarawa, Kirbati.

National Geographic wants Kimmerle to determine if the bones could be the ones that vanished so many years ago.

“They had four or five large boxes of remains that were co-mingled,” she said. “The skulls that were there, there was one set of female remains that matched that description.”

The bones fragments were sent for DNA testing to see if they match any of Earhart’s relatives, the report said. She has a living niece.

Earhart, who was attempting to fly around the world, disappeared with navigator Fred Noonan on July 2, 1937, during a flight from Papua New Guinea to Howland Island in the Pacific.

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The first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, Earhart was one of the most famous people in the world at the time of her disappearance. Thus, a number of theories have emerged about her fate.

Fox News’ James Rogers and Edmund DeMarche contributed to this report

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1,000-year-old arrowhead discovered in Norway

A well-preserved iron arrowhead was found up in the mountains of Hardanger in Norway by a local resident.

In September, Ernst Hagen was out for a walk near his cabin and came across the 1,000-year-old arrowhead in the snow.

“I immediately realized that it was something special, something from before they used rifles,” Hagen told the blog Life in Norway.

He brought the unique discovery to the Hordaland county leadership so that it could be examined by an expert.

ANCIENT EARTHEN VESSEL REVEALS DRAWING OF POSSIBLE FEMALE SHAMAN

Westlake Legal Group arrowhead-norway 1,000-year-old arrowhead discovered in Norway fox-news/science/archaeology fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone c6fc888a-f9d2-51b9-b1a6-b08a8543c563 article

The arrowhead is about 12 centimeters long. (Hordaland fylkeskommune)

SUPERNOVA MORPHS IN STUNNING NEW NASA VIDEO

An archaeologist said that no similar items had been found in Hordaland before.

“This is an unusual finding and a bit of a hit. It’s like finding a needle in the haystack. Such discoveries may emerge as climate change melts the ice and changes the form of the land. This arrowhead would have been covered by snow in the winter had it not been found,” archaeologist Tore Slinning said.

According to experts, if the iron arrowhead had been exposed, it would have gradually erode before disappearing completely.

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Huge 111-foot asteroid to skim past Earth at 22,000 mph, space rock’s ‘closest encounter for 115 years’

A huge asteroid is about to skim past Earth at its closest approach in 115 years.

Astronomers have warned that the space rock 2019 TA7 will be 50 times closer to us than our closest neighboring planet Mercury.

The asteroid will be making its close approach at around 6:53 pm today.

CLICK ON THE SUN FOR MORE

It should skim past Earth at over 22,500 miles per hour, according to data collected by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The space rock is estimated to measure up to 111 feet in diameter, making it around three times larger than a double-decker bus.

It usually passes Earth about once a year but this evening will see it at a closer distance of 930,000 miles.

Any fast-moving space object that comes within around 4.65 million miles is considered to be “potentially hazardous” by cautious space organizations.

The asteroid is a similar size to the Chelyabinsk meteor, which exploded over Russia back in 2013.

Its impact smashed windows and injured more than 1,000 people.

Experts did not predict the impact, sparking concern that Earth could be surprised with a more devastating incident in the future.

The last time asteroid 2019 TA7 came as close to Earth as it will be this evening was on October 14, 1904.

It will return for another close approach in 2021.

This story originally appeared in The Sun.

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Moon ice could be billions of years old, study suggests

It has long been established that the Moon contains significant amounts of ice and water, including frozen water found on the lunar surface last year. Now, a new study suggests that the ice could be billions of years old and come from different sources.

The study, published in the scientific journal Icarus, suggests that some ice could be almost as old as the Moon itself. Other ice deposits could be much younger, perhaps put there by comets and asteroids, or even underground volcanic activity.

“We quantify the amount of available cold-trapping surface area that is occupied by water ice in order to examine the relationship between the patchiness of ice within each crater and the age of each host crater,” the study’s abstract states. “The majority of surface ice is contained in old craters [greater than 3.1 billion years], where the majority of cold-trapping area on the pole exists.”

Westlake Legal Group black-moon-2019 Moon ice could be billions of years old, study suggests fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 761ec6df-1a98-559f-9fce-5f8e9b9940ca

(Credit: EarthView, Arizona State University Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Team from imagery returned by the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter)

MOON AND MERCURY MAY HAVE THICK DEPOSITS OF ICE, STUDY SUGGESTS

“Just because the crater is old doesn’t mean that the ice within it is also that old too, but in this case, there’s reason to believe the ice is indeed old,” the researchers said in a statement.

The scientists, led by Brown University researcher Ariel Deutsch, used data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (which was recently used to make a 3D map of the Moon) to come up with their conclusions.

“There have been models of bombardment through time showing that ice starts to concentrate with depth. So if you have a surface layer that’s old, you’d expect more underneath,” Deutsch said.

The newer, smaller craters, which also hold ice, were a “surprise,” she added. “There hadn’t really been any observations of ice in younger cold traps before.”

The age of the ice could have implications for space travel, including NASA’s return to the Moon in 2024 and the exploration of deep space.

WATER MAY BE ALL OVER THE MOON, GIVING NEW HOPE FOR SUSTAIN LIFE

“When we think about sending humans back to the Moon for long-term exploration, we need to know what resources are there that we can count on, and we currently don’t know,” Brown University professor and the study’s co-author, Jim Head, said in the statement. “Studies like this one help us make predictions about where we need to go to answer those questions.”

A study published in August theorized that there may be more ice water on Earth’s natural satellite and Mercury than previously thought. Until recently, it was believed that the water was trapped in “cold traps” at the Moon’s poles, but a 2018 discovery found that there is frozen water on the lunar surface.

Water was first discovered on the Moon in 2009.

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Alien life possibly found on Mars in 1970s, ex-NASA scientist says

In a stunning op-ed, a former NASA scientist says he is convinced that the space agency “found evidence of life” on Mars in the 1970s.

In the article, Gilbert Levin, who worked on the Viking missions to the Red Planet during that decade, makes it clear that he believes data from the Labeled Release (LR) in 1976 was supportive of finding life.

“On July 30, 1976, the LR returned its initial results from Mars,” Levin wrote in the op-ed, entitled “I’m Convinced We Found Evidence of Life on Mars in the 1970s.”

“Amazingly, they were positive. As the experiment progressed, a total of four positive results, supported by five varied controls, streamed down from the twin Viking spacecraft landed some 4,000 miles apart.”

Westlake Legal Group mars-ocean Alien life possibly found on Mars in 1970s, ex-NASA scientist says fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/mars fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 9595b8b8-b66d-5fa9-8635-c5535140e8f3

This artist’s impression shows how Mars may have looked about 4 billion years ago when almost half the planet’s northern hemisphere could have been covered by an ocean up to a mile (1.6 kilometers) deep in some places. (ESO/M. Kornmesser)

NASA: ANCIENT MARS OASIS COULD HAVE SUPPORT LIFE

He continued: “The data curves signaled the detection of microbial respiration on the Red Planet. The curves from Mars were similar to those produced by LR tests of soils on Earth. It seemed we had answered that ultimate question.”

The LR, which was led by Levin, took samples of Martian soil that contained organic compounds and looked for carbon dioxide. Astonishingly, the results seemed to indicate that the carbon dioxide was “being regenerated, possibly by microorganisms as on Earth.”

Fox News has reached out to NASA for comment for this story.

However, Levin seemed to criticize the space agency for not following up on the LR findings, even if NASA concluded that it “found a substance mimicking life, but not life.”

“Inexplicably, over the 43 years since Viking, none of NASA’s subsequent Mars landers has carried a life detection instrument to follow up on these exciting results,” he continued. “Instead the agency launched a series of missions to Mars to determine whether there was ever a habitat suitable for life and, if so, eventually to bring samples to Earth for biological examination.”

NASA has made subsequent visits to Mars, including the InSight lander, which landed in November 2018. The Curiosity rover, which has been on Mars since August 2012, detected a surprising spike in the level of methane that it has not yet been able to explain.

Last November, NASA announced that it had picked a landing spot for its upcoming Mars 2020 mission, a rover that will not include “a life-detection test,” Levin wrote.

“With our current measurements, we have no way of telling if the methane source is biology or geology, or even ancient or modern,” said SAM Principal Investigator Paul Mahaffy of NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center in a June statement. On Earth, methane is produced both biologically and geologically.

Levin pleaded for the space agency to put “life detection experiments on the next Mars mission possible” to be more precise in their hunt for life, but in also keeping “with well-established scientific protocol.” He also wants an independent group of scientists to review the Viking LR data.

“Such an objective jury might conclude, as I did, that the Viking LR did find life,” Levin concluded. “In any event, the study would likely produce important guidance for NASA’s pursuit of its holy grail.”

The newly published op-ed is not the first time Levin has suggested that life was found on Mars. In 1997, he published “his conclusion that the LR had, indeed, discovered living microorganisms on the Red Planet,” according to his website.

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Ancient Egyptian ‘industrial zone’ uncovered in Luxor’s ‘Valley of the Monkeys’

New archaeological discoveries have been made in Luxor, Egypt, -including an “industrial zone,” according to the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities.

Archaeologists found 30 workshops in an area “composed of houses for storage and the cleaning of the funery furniture with many potteries dated to Dynasty 18,” reports Reuters.

One finding was in the West Valley, also referred to as the Valley of the Monkeys, reports Ahram Online, and the other was in the East Valley, which is home to the country’s famous pharaonic tombs.

Westlake Legal Group egyptian-ministry-of-antiquities-3 Ancient Egyptian 'industrial zone' uncovered in Luxor's 'Valley of the Monkeys' fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 323b0780-948e-553b-8493-401cc8cbbb4f

The excavation site in the Valley of the Monkeys. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

Well-known Egyptologist Zahi Hawass told Ahram Online that the area contains an oven used for clay products, a water storage tank used by thirsty workers, and hundreds of inlay beads and golden objects that were used to decorate royal coffins.

IN POMPEII, SCIENTISTS UNEARTH GLADIATOR FRESCO

Westlake Legal Group egyptian-ministry-of-antiquities-1 Ancient Egyptian 'industrial zone' uncovered in Luxor's 'Valley of the Monkeys' fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 323b0780-948e-553b-8493-401cc8cbbb4f

An assortment of artifacts found in Luxor. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

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The excavation is reportedly looking for overlooked tombs, and for those of the wives and sons of the kings of the eighteenth dynasty buried in the Valley of the Kings.

Westlake Legal Group Egyptian Ancient Egyptian 'industrial zone' uncovered in Luxor's 'Valley of the Monkeys' fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 323b0780-948e-553b-8493-401cc8cbbb4f

Some of the newly uncovered objects. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities)

Westlake Legal Group Egyptian Ancient Egyptian 'industrial zone' uncovered in Luxor's 'Valley of the Monkeys' fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 323b0780-948e-553b-8493-401cc8cbbb4f   Westlake Legal Group Egyptian Ancient Egyptian 'industrial zone' uncovered in Luxor's 'Valley of the Monkeys' fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 323b0780-948e-553b-8493-401cc8cbbb4f

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Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, Purdue football players will wear a moonwalk-inspired helmet and commemorative astronaut-themed patch during Saturday’s homecoming game against Maryland.

Purdue is the alma mater of a host of astronauts, including Neil Armstrong, Gus Grissom, who was the second American in space, and Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the Moon. The West Lafayette, Ind. school, dubbed ‘the cradle of astronauts,’ counts 25 former and current astronauts among its alumni.

Designed to resemble an astronaut’s helmet, the Boilermakers will take the field on Saturday wearing white helmets with a chrome gold mask. A gray and white Moon pattern on the helmets honors Armstrong and Cernan, and a center stripe commemorates Armstrong’s famous first steps on the lunar surface.

APOLLO 11: WHAT NEIL ARMSTRONG AND BUZZ ALDRIN SAW DURING DRAMATIC MOON LANDING

The helmet stripe also features the numbers 2, 25 and 64 — two Purdue alum walked on the Moon;  25 total Purdue astronauts; and 64 space missions completed by the school’s alums.

Westlake Legal Group purduesports2 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

Purdue players will wear the moon-inspired helmets for the homecoming game against Maryland. (Purdue University)

Additionally, a mission sticker with the Griffin from Purdue’s crest placing the school’s flag on the surface of the Moon will be featured on the back of the helmet. The school’s anniversary motto “150 years of giant leaps” is also incorporated into the sticker design.

A patch with the same design will also be on the players’ jerseys for the game against the Terrapins.

APOLLO 11: HOW ‘DUMB LUCK’ SAVED ICONIC MOON PHOTOS FROM BEING DESTROYED

In 2012, Purdue honored Neil Armstrong with a special helmet decal during a game at Notre Dame.

Westlake Legal Group purduesports3 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

The Boilermakers will take the field wearing white helmets with a chrome gold mask, which is designed to resemble an astronaut’s helmet. (Purdue University)

Some 13 Purdue astronaut alums will be attending Saturday’s homecoming game, including NASA astronaut Drew Feustel, who is a veteran of three spaceflights. Beth Moses, who became the first female commercial astronaut on Virgin Galactic’s spaceplane earlier this year, will also attend.

During a recent interview, Feustel told Fox News that America’s return to the Moon could unlock a vast trove of space resources.

NASA ASTRONAUT EYES MOON JACKPOT, RANGING FROM SPACE MINING TO POLAR ICE

NASA’s Artemis program aims to land American astronauts on the Moon by 2024 and establish a sustainable human presence on Earth’s natural satellite.

Westlake Legal Group purduesports1 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

The helmet stripe celebrates Purdue alums’ contribution to space exploration. (Purdue University)

After Apollo 11 astronauts Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set foot on the Moon on July 20, 1969, only 10 more men, all Americans, walked on the lunar surface.  Apollo 17 Mission Cmdr. Cernan became the last NASA astronaut to set foot on the Moon on Dec. 14, 1972.

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Westlake Legal Group purduesports-1 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

Purdue players will also wear a specially-designed commemorative patch for the homecoming game. (Purdue University)

Purdue’s game against Maryland kicks off at noon ET Saturday.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group purduesports2 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article   Westlake Legal Group purduesports2 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

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Antarctica ice shelves’ edges being attacked by warm ocean water, new study reveals

Upside-down “rivers” of warm ocean water are attacking the edges of Antarctic ice shelves from below, creating conditions ripe for break-ups and sea-level rise, according to scientists.

A study published Thursday in Science Advances examines this process, which could affect the continent’s future.

“Warm water circulation is attacking the undersides of these ice shelves at their most vulnerable points,” said Karen Alley, a visiting assistant professor of Earth Sciences at The College of Wooster in Ohio, in a statement. “These effects matter,” she said. “But exactly how much, we don’t yet know. We need to.”

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Westlake Legal Group antarctica-ice-shelf-pic-NASA Antarctica ice shelves' edges being attacked by warm ocean water, new study reveals fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc fbe49ad1-0407-5675-beed-d917b199c677 Christopher Carbone article

Satellite images show polynyas (open-water regions) forming at the ends of basal channels beneath shear margins of the East Getz Ice Shelf. (Karen Alley/The College of Wooster and NASA MODIS/MODIS Antarctic Ice Shelf Image Archive at the National Snow and Ice Data Center, CU Boulder.)

Ice shelves float out on the ocean at the edges of land-based ice sheets, according to scientists, and about 75 percent of the Antarctic continent is surrounded by these extensions of the sheet.

The shelves can be hemmed in by bumps and walls in the ocean floor. When restrained, the ice shelves slow down the flow of ice from the interior of the continent toward the ocean.

However, if an ice shelf retreats or breaks apart, ice on land flows much more quickly into the ocean, increasing rates of sea-level rise.

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Westlake Legal Group antarctica-ice-shelf-pic-NASA Antarctica ice shelves' edges being attacked by warm ocean water, new study reveals fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc fbe49ad1-0407-5675-beed-d917b199c677 Christopher Carbone article   Westlake Legal Group antarctica-ice-shelf-pic-NASA Antarctica ice shelves' edges being attacked by warm ocean water, new study reveals fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc fbe49ad1-0407-5675-beed-d917b199c677 Christopher Carbone article

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