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Westlake Legal Group > fnc/science (Page 19)

California photographer snaps sea lion ‘trapped’ in humpback whale’s mouth: ‘The true Jonah experience’

Westlake Legal Group sea-lion-iStock California photographer snaps sea lion ‘trapped’ in humpback whale’s mouth: ‘The true Jonah experience’ Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc article 2100992e-ce6d-5d91-8692-a1b358e783b2

A wildlife photographer in California recently snapped a photo of the moment a humpback whale surfaced and appeared to gobble up an unsuspecting sea lion in its mouth.

Chase Dekker, who works for whale-watching company Sanctuary Cruises, wrote he was in Monterrey Bay when he spotted a pod of humpbacks “lunge feeding” on a school of anchovies. However, a sea lion failed to move out of the leviathan’s way as it engulfed the fish and became “trapped” in its mouth.

DOLPHIN ‘MEGA POD’ OFF CALIFORNIA COAST STUNS ONLOOKERS, VIDEO SHOWS

“As soon as I saw this photograph, I knew it may be one of the rarest shots I’ve ever taken,” Dekker told National Geographic. “Not the most beautiful, not the most artistic, but probably something I would never see again.”

When lunge feeding, whales charge toward food and sweep up a large mouthful. The mammals then filter their food through comb-like structures in their mouths called baleen, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Small seabirds have been at the receiving end of most recorded close calls, with experts telling National Geographic that it’s remarkably rare for larger species like sea lions to have what Dekker calls the “Jonah Experience.”

HUMPBACK WHALES, DOLPHINS SEEN ‘SOCIALIZING’ OFF IRISH COAST IN STUNNING VIDEO

Despite the sea lion’s perceived peril in the photo, wildlife experts told the outlet that the sea lion wasn’t in any danger and most likely swam away when onlookers lost view of the whale’s mouth.

“At some point the sea lion escaped and the whale seemed fine too as it continued to feed, but it must have been a strange experience for both parties,” Dekker wrote.

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Dekker followed up a day later with another photo, describing the scene of 5 humpbacks lunge feeding in close quarters with around 300 sea lions. But this time no sea lions got in the way, he wrote.

Westlake Legal Group sea-lion-iStock California photographer snaps sea lion ‘trapped’ in humpback whale’s mouth: ‘The true Jonah experience’ Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc article 2100992e-ce6d-5d91-8692-a1b358e783b2   Westlake Legal Group sea-lion-iStock California photographer snaps sea lion ‘trapped’ in humpback whale’s mouth: ‘The true Jonah experience’ Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc article 2100992e-ce6d-5d91-8692-a1b358e783b2

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‘World’s fastest seagull’ stuns experts

A seagull that traveled more than 500 miles from Britain to Spain in just seven days has stunned experts.

The lesser black-backed gull was recorded by the Alderney Bird Observatory in the Channel Islands on July 17, the Observatory explained, in a Facebook post. The same bird was spotted at Ares Beach in A Coruna Spain, on July 24.

BIZARRE ‘BRIGHT ORANGE’ BIRD IS NOT SO EXOTIC, WILDLIFE HOSPITAL DISCOVERS

“The individual has travelled 838km [520.7 miles] in 7 days!,” the Bird Observatory wrote, in its Facebook post.

The bird had originally been ringed at Burhou Island in the Channel Islands, enabling researchers to record its movements.

‘DIVE-BOMBING’ BIRD ATTACKS COLORADO JOGGERS, DISTURBING VIDEO SHOWS

Alderney Bird Observatory warden John Horton said that the distance traveled by the bird in such a short period of time was unusual. “It could be wind direction. It could have known there was a safe place with plenty to eat so it just headed straight there,” he told SWNS. “They have stop-off points along their migration.”

Westlake Legal Group SeagullSWNS1 'World’s fastest seagull' stuns experts James Rogers fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc article 60312130-dd91-5dc8-a8de-c03ccfbd7bc6

The seagull which was ringed on Burhou in the Channel islands and was later found in Spain more than 500 miles away. (SWNS/Isai Ogando)

Horton explained that the gulls come to Burhou Island off Alderney to breed during the summer. They have been known to migrate as far as Morocco.

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Westlake Legal Group SeagullSWNS2 'World’s fastest seagull' stuns experts James Rogers fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc article 60312130-dd91-5dc8-a8de-c03ccfbd7bc6

The seagull was photographed on a beach in Spain. (SWNS/Isai Ogando)

The Channel Islands, which British Crown Dependencies, are located in the English Channel off the coast of Northern France.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group SeagullSWNS1 'World’s fastest seagull' stuns experts James Rogers fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc article 60312130-dd91-5dc8-a8de-c03ccfbd7bc6   Westlake Legal Group SeagullSWNS1 'World’s fastest seagull' stuns experts James Rogers fox-news/science/wild-nature/birds fox-news/science/wild-nature fox news fnc/science fnc article 60312130-dd91-5dc8-a8de-c03ccfbd7bc6

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Florida beachgoers, wildlife officials rescue 5 stranded pilot whales

Florida wildlife officials — with the help of marine biologists, the Coast Guard, and beachgoers — this week rescued five beached pilot whales on Redington Beach.

The whales were first spotted around 6:30 a.m. Monday by a beachgoer who said the sea creatures we “splashing in the shallows” and ejecting water from their blowholes, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

GEORGIA BEACHGOERS RESCUE WHALES MASS STRANDED ON SHORE, WILDLIFE OFFICIALS SAY 

Clearwater Marine Aquarium veterinarians, along with officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Coast Guard members, a number of volunteers and marine biologists from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), according to the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office, worked to rescue the whales.

After protecting the whales from the sun with shades, rescuers used canvas slings to hoist the animals out of the water and relocate them. According to the Tampa Bay Times, three of the whales were taken by boats back out to sea, while the remaining two were taken to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium for “medical treatment and testing.” They will be returned to sea if they are determined to be healthy.

AT LEAST 50 DEAD PILOT WHALES WASH UP ON REMOTE BEACH IN ICELAND

“It was really hard work but it was so great to see people who didn’t even know each other come together and work together to help,” Thomas Nuhfer, a 27-year-old student from Clearwater who was on the scene, told the newspaper.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-pilot-whale Florida beachgoers, wildlife officials rescue 5 stranded pilot whales Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc article 9ecc60ee-3140-5dff-a5c6-7906056cf9d0

Pilot whales seen swimming in the ocean. (iStock)

“Something is obviously wrong here. It could be that one whale is sick and beached and the others followed, or they could all be sick,”  Clearwater Marine Aquarium spokesperson Carlee Wendell told the Tampa Bay Times of why the whales may have swum so far inland.

The news comes after at least 50 dead pilot whales were found on a remote beach in Iceland. 

Westlake Legal Group iStock-pilot-whale Florida beachgoers, wildlife officials rescue 5 stranded pilot whales Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc article 9ecc60ee-3140-5dff-a5c6-7906056cf9d0   Westlake Legal Group iStock-pilot-whale Florida beachgoers, wildlife officials rescue 5 stranded pilot whales Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc article 9ecc60ee-3140-5dff-a5c6-7906056cf9d0

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Clean energy? Researchers develop technology to harness power from freshwater and seawater

Researchers have developed a cheap technology that could become a major source of renewable energy in the future.

Stanford University scientists have tested a prototype of a battery that could tap into the mix of salty seawater and freshwater — known as “blue energy” — at wastewater treatments plants. Globally, according to the scholars, the recoverable energy from coastal wastewater treatment plants is about 18 gigawatts, which would be enough to power 1,700 homes for a full year.

“Blue energy is an immense and untapped source of renewable energy,” said study coauthor Kristian Dubrawski, a postdoctoral scholar in civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, in a statement. “Our battery is a major step toward practically capturing that energy without membranes, moving parts or energy input.”

STUNNING IMAGE UNCOVERS ‘HIDDEN LIGHT’ OF LIFE DEEP IN THE OCEAN

Westlake Legal Group water-reclamation-plant-flickr Clean energy? Researchers develop technology to harness power from freshwater and seawater fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox-news/science/planet-earth/energy fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone bb599b18-107b-5cc2-ad25-02662fe9676f article

The Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant on Santa Monica Bay in Los Angeles is an example of a coastal wastewater treatment operation that could recover energy from the mixing of seawater and treated effluent. (Doc Searls / Flickr)

HACKERS COULD GRIDLOCK ENTIRE CITIES USING CONNECTED CARS, RESEARCHERS SAY

As the researchers explain in their paper, they monitored the battery prototype’s energy production while flushing it with wastewater effluent from the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant and seawater collected nearby from Half Moon Bay. The battery materials maintained 97 percent effectiveness in capturing the salinity gradient energy, according to Stanford University.

Wastewater treatment plants are known to be energy-intensive and vulnerable to power grid shutdowns which have happened in California amid its wildfire crisis; however, as the researchers note, making them energy independent would cut down on emissions and free them from potential blackouts.

According to the researchers, the process of capturing “blue energy” releases sodium and chloride ions from the battery’s electrodes into the solution, making a current flow from one electrode to another; after that, a quick exchange of wastewater effluent with seawater leads the electrode to reincorporate sodium and chloride ions and reverse the current flow.

Energy gets recovered during the freshwater and seawater flushes, with no upfront investment or charging required. However, the researchers cautioned that the concept needs to be tested more.

“It is a scientifically elegant solution to a complex problem,” Dubrawski said. “It needs to be tested at scale, and it doesn’t address the challenge of tapping blue energy at the global scale – rivers running into the ocean – but it is a good starting point that could spur these advances.”

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Westlake Legal Group water-reclamation-plant-flickr Clean energy? Researchers develop technology to harness power from freshwater and seawater fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox-news/science/planet-earth/energy fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone bb599b18-107b-5cc2-ad25-02662fe9676f article   Westlake Legal Group water-reclamation-plant-flickr Clean energy? Researchers develop technology to harness power from freshwater and seawater fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox-news/science/planet-earth/energy fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone bb599b18-107b-5cc2-ad25-02662fe9676f article

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Iron Age Celtic woman buried in ‘tree coffin’

The grave of a Celtic female who was buried in approximately 200 B.C. has revealed a surprising find — she was buried in a tree coffin and adorned with precious jewelry.

According to a translated statement from the Office for Urban Development in Zurich, Switzerland, the woman was approximately 40 years old when she was buried and “draws a fairly accurate picture of the deceased.”

Westlake Legal Group celtic-woman-3 Iron Age Celtic woman buried in 'tree coffin' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia b5dd82f3-b795-5d6f-aed9-a28a3560529f article

This illustration shows what the woman’s grave might have looked like in 200 B.C. Credit: Amt für Städtebau, Stadt Zürich (Office for Urban Development, City of Zurich)

“The examination of the skeleton and especially of the teeth shows, among other things, that she died at the age of about 40 years,” had performed little physical labor during her lifetime and had likely eaten a lot of starchy or sweetened foods, according to the translated statement.

MYSTERIOUS MEDIEVAL WARRIOR FOUND IN VIKING GRAVEYARD WASN’T ACTUALLY A VIKING

“A specialist determined the order of the layers of clothing on the basis of the textile, fur and leather scraps preserved in the grave,” the statement continued. “So the woman wore probably a dress made of fine sheep’s wool, about another woolen cloth and a coat of sheepskin.”

The coffin, which still had bark on the exterior, was discovered in March 2017 during construction work on the Schulhaus Kern.

Although Celts who lived during the Iron Age are often thought of as living in the British Isles, they actually lived throughout Europe. Switzerland’s Office for Urban Development found that the woman was likely a local to the area, using an isotope analysis of her bones.

Westlake Legal Group celtic-woman-1 Iron Age Celtic woman buried in 'tree coffin' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia b5dd82f3-b795-5d6f-aed9-a28a3560529f article

Excavation of a Celtic grave at the Kernschulhaus 2017 (Credit: Office for Urban Development, City of Zurich)

The statement added that the Celtic woman may have known a Celtic man whose grave was discovered in 1903, as she was buried just 260 feet from him. The Celtic man’s grave was adorned with a sword, shield and lance. “His full warrior outfit also identifies him as a higher-level personality,” the release said.

Westlake Legal Group celtic-woman-2 Iron Age Celtic woman buried in 'tree coffin' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia b5dd82f3-b795-5d6f-aed9-a28a3560529f article

Restored found objects, including a belt chain, bracelet, brooches, glass and amber beads. (Credit: Martin Bachmann, Kantonsarchäologie Zürich)

Researchers are still unearthing secrets about the Celts. Earlier this year, researchers found more than 100 fragmented human skulls buried in an open area of Le Cailar, France– a 2,500 year–old town on the Rhone River.

ANCIENT CARVED ‘DRUMS’ GIVE EXACT STONEHENGE MEASUREMENTS, SAY ARCHAEOLOGISTS

The skulls, which were discovered among ancient weapons in the walled village, date back to the 3rd century B.C., when Le Cailar was a Celtic settlement. The skulls had cuts, indicating decapitation, as well as tongue and brain removal– signs that they may have been put on display until the area was covered in dirt around 200 BC.

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Fox News’ Walt Bonner contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group celtic-woman-3 Iron Age Celtic woman buried in 'tree coffin' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia b5dd82f3-b795-5d6f-aed9-a28a3560529f article   Westlake Legal Group celtic-woman-3 Iron Age Celtic woman buried in 'tree coffin' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia b5dd82f3-b795-5d6f-aed9-a28a3560529f article

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Stunning photo uncovers ‘hidden light’ of life deep in the ocean

Photographer Louise Murray witnessed a stunning series of neon and flourescent colors during a trip into the darkest depths of the ocean.

This type of shimmering, candy-colored light is typically difficult to see with the naked eye, but the photographer was able to change that.

Murray, who has been photographing marine life for more than 25 years, writes in Smithsonian that the addition of the concentrated blue light from the flashlights and flashguns attached to her camera rig helped to “stimulate the strongest response from the fluorescing proteins.”

According to the photographer, scientists are still learning more about marine fluorescence and discovering that the proteins could be vital to the health of the reef ecosystem and how it responds to stress.

SCIENTISTS FIND STUNNING 310-MILE CORAL REEF IN GULF OF MEXICO

Westlake Legal Group undersea-fish-Louise-Murray Stunning photo uncovers 'hidden light' of life deep in the ocean fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone cdd990cf-7958-5c79-ba63-49d4b5a5db8f article

Marine species with fluorescent proteins absorb, transform and reemit light, generating a spectacular display of color in the process. ((Image by Louise Murray))

DRAWING FOUND IN THRIFT STORE TURNS OUT TO BE ORIGINAL EGON SCHIELE

Researchers don’t know as much about the role of fluorescence in fish.

In addition, not all corals produce the same amount of fluorescent protein.

“There is a great deal of variation in pigment production between individuals of the same species,” Jörg Wiedenmann, head of the Coral Reef Laboratory at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom, explained to Murray in Smithsonian. “One might fluoresce strongly while the other produces little or no color.”

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Westlake Legal Group undersea-fish-Louise-Murray Stunning photo uncovers 'hidden light' of life deep in the ocean fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone cdd990cf-7958-5c79-ba63-49d4b5a5db8f article   Westlake Legal Group undersea-fish-Louise-Murray Stunning photo uncovers 'hidden light' of life deep in the ocean fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone cdd990cf-7958-5c79-ba63-49d4b5a5db8f article

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Worse than Chernobyl: Parts of Marshall Islands have radiation ‘higher’ than catastrophic ’86 disaster, studies say

A series of studies have concluded that the radiation levels in parts of the Marshall Islands, where nuclear weapons were tested more than 60 years ago, is “higher than Chernobyl.”

The studies, published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrate that the concentration of nuclear isotopes on some of the islands “was well above the legal exposure limit” in agreements that were coordinated between the U.S. and Republic of the Marshall Islands. Soil samples, ocean sediment and various fruit were measured by the studies.

Westlake Legal Group marshall-island Worse than Chernobyl: Parts of Marshall Islands have radiation 'higher' than catastrophic '86 disaster, studies say fox-news/world/disasters/nuclear fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a5f877bd-169b-59be-a6a5-0567fd9f7de8

The United States used the Marshall Islands as a testing ground for 67 nuclear weapon tests from 1946 to 1958, causing human and environmental catastrophes that persist to this day. (Credit: World Future Council)

“Based upon our results, we conclude that to ensure safe relocation to Bikini and Rongelap Atolls, further environmental remediation… appears to be necessary to avoid potentially harmful exposure to radiation,” wrote the study authors, including Columbia University associate professor Ivana Nikolic Hughes.

Westlake Legal Group 0701091140_M_bikini_hbomb_blast Worse than Chernobyl: Parts of Marshall Islands have radiation 'higher' than catastrophic '86 disaster, studies say fox-news/world/disasters/nuclear fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a5f877bd-169b-59be-a6a5-0567fd9f7de8

July 25, 1946: Nuclear test ‘Baker’ detonates underwater at Bikini Atoll in the western Pacific, creating a huge water-vapor shockwave cloud. (Department of Defense)

CHERNOBYL’S RADIOACTIVE ‘WILDLIFE PRESERVE’ SPAWNS GROWING WOLF POPULATION

The Marshall Islands are situated between Hawaii and Australia and many of them are still uninhabitable as a result of the nuclear tests.

“High-yield thermonuclear explosions cause enormous radioactive contamination to the environment,” according to one of the study’s abstracts. “These ‘hydrogen bombs,’ when tested on small islands in the ocean, vaporize the land and produce radionuclides that settle in the ocean sediment. Even decades later, significant contamination may remain in the sediment surface and deep into the sediment layers.”

According to the studies, the gamma radiation levels found on Bikini and Naen Islands were as high as 648 millirems and 460 millirems, respectively.

The Environmental Protection Agency says that exposure of “a one-time uniform whole-body exposure of 100 millirems (10 rem) or lower” would be considered safe for approximately 99 percent of individuals.

Sixty-seven nuclear bombs from the U.S. were detonated on the islands between 1946 and 1958, including the largest, known as “Castle Bravo.” This occurred in 1954, during the early part of the Cold War, at Bikini Atoll.

“Castle Bravo” was “1,000 times more powerful than either of the bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” according to a statement from Columbia University. When the Castle Bravo test was performed, it caused a 15-ton explosion and left a crater 0.9 miles wide and 246 feet deep.

Radioactive fallout spread more than 6,800 square miles; traces of radioactive material were found in Australia, India, Japan, the U.S. and as far away as Europe, according to the CTBTO Preparatory Commission.

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Westlake Legal Group 0701091140_M_bikini_hbomb_blast Worse than Chernobyl: Parts of Marshall Islands have radiation 'higher' than catastrophic '86 disaster, studies say fox-news/world/disasters/nuclear fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a5f877bd-169b-59be-a6a5-0567fd9f7de8   Westlake Legal Group 0701091140_M_bikini_hbomb_blast Worse than Chernobyl: Parts of Marshall Islands have radiation 'higher' than catastrophic '86 disaster, studies say fox-news/world/disasters/nuclear fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article a5f877bd-169b-59be-a6a5-0567fd9f7de8

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Nuclear crocodiles? Florida power plant helps protect reptiles once nearly extinct

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-70909d7edf2748e4a21ce5a21f7f054e Nuclear crocodiles? Florida power plant helps protect reptiles once nearly extinct Phil Keating fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 26dc6678-7d6d-577f-9098-8a54ff9429c5

South Florida’s big nuclear power plant, Turkey Point, provides electricity for a million customers.

Yet it’s the plant’s other customers that are getting special attention right now – they are just hatching out of their shells.

Baby American crocodiles, once on the brink of extinction, are crawling back and thriving at, of all places, the nuclear power plant operated by Florida Power & Light.

“Total length…25.7,” said Mike Lloret, wildlife biologist, crocodile specialist and member of FPL’s “Croc Team,” as he measured a 4-day-old hatchling. 

“They’re NOT radioactive,” he added, which is a question he gets asked all the time.

FORMER MARINE FROM FLORIDA WORKS WITH ALLIGATORS AND CROCODILES, SAYS THEY’RE HER ‘BEST FRIENDS’

During the hatching season, which happens in July and August, the team hops on airboats, cruising up and down Turkey Point’s 168 miles of cooling canals, looking for crocodile nests. This month, they found 27 nests and rescued 300 little crocodiles, which are awfully cute – at least for the moment.

In the lab, they’re measured and weighed and receive a microchip inserted in their tails. They will be tracked for their entire lives.

American crocodiles only live in South Florida. Back in the 1970s, there were only about 500, and the species was listed as “endangered.” Since then, they’ve rebounded, crawling up to the better listing of “threatened,” with an estimated 2,000 roaming Turkey Point, Crocodile Lake and Everglades National Park.

FLORIDA CROCODILE SPOTTED USING POOL NOODLE TO CROSS CANAL

About 25 percent of the crocs call the nuclear power plant, which is also a crocodile sanctuary, home.

Biologist Lloret lives and breathes crocodiles and finds FPL’s program incredibly fulfilling.

“It’s basically just seeing the fruits of your labor, you know,” he said. “You go throughout the whole year waiting for this moment, waiting for those babies to hatch, collecting those babies and then releasing them back, which is just the ultimate satisfaction.”

The crocodiles thrive at this unlikely nuclear location because of the canals, the berms between them and the very minimal human encounters, since it is a high-security facility.

Once the hatchlings emerge into the world, the croc team then rescues them, takes them back to the lab and then returns them to the wild.

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“As soon as they hit the water, they know exactly what to do,” said Lloret.  From there, the little crocs are ready for the world.

Each of the nests contain 30 to 50 eggs but most of the hatchlings won’t survive, due to predation by birds, fish and even other crocodiles.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-70909d7edf2748e4a21ce5a21f7f054e Nuclear crocodiles? Florida power plant helps protect reptiles once nearly extinct Phil Keating fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 26dc6678-7d6d-577f-9098-8a54ff9429c5   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-70909d7edf2748e4a21ce5a21f7f054e Nuclear crocodiles? Florida power plant helps protect reptiles once nearly extinct Phil Keating fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 26dc6678-7d6d-577f-9098-8a54ff9429c5

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Reducing air pollution could save thousands of lives, researchers say

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e735f4abaf1e49cabb0949d6d1cae460 Reducing air pollution could save thousands of lives, researchers say fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 68ba69f7-14ed-5eef-9deb-1e874d17d520

Although air quality has improved significantly since the 1990s, a new study claims that pollution still causes lung cancer, heart attacks and strokes that kill more than 30,000 Americans a year.

Researchers examined the concentration of fine pollution particles across the country from 1999 to 2015. The particles, which according to the EPA are 30 times smaller than the width of a human hair, come from coal-fired power plants, cars and other sources.

When humans inhale the particles, they become lodged in the small blood vessels in the lungs and can lead to lung disease over time. They can also reach the bloodstream, leading to heart attacks, according to the researchers.

“In every county, some people are dying too early at current levels of air pollution, which would make further improvements a truly national priority,” Majid Ezzati, professor of global environmental health at Imperial College London and the senior author of the PLOS Medicine paper, said in a press release on Science Daily.

INDIAN FARMERS SHOCKED AS ‘FIREBALL-LIKE’ OBJECT LANDS IN RICE FIELD

GOLD PROSPECTOR’S MYSTERIOUS ROCK TURNED OUT TO BE SUPER-RARE METEORITE

The scientists’ work revealed a drop in life expectancy for men and women. That drop was highest in areas where poor people lived and lowest in wealthy areas, according to UPI.

“The ubiquitous and involuntary nature of exposures, and the broadly-observed effects across sub-populations, underscore the public-health importance of breathing clean air,” said Arden Pope, professor of economics at Brigham Young University and the lead author of the Environmental Health Perspectives paper, in a press statement.

The study, which was published in Environmental Health Perspectives, used public data from 28 years of National Health Interview Surveys linked with the National Death Index to create a large cohort of 1.6 million U.S. adults.

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Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e735f4abaf1e49cabb0949d6d1cae460 Reducing air pollution could save thousands of lives, researchers say fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 68ba69f7-14ed-5eef-9deb-1e874d17d520   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e735f4abaf1e49cabb0949d6d1cae460 Reducing air pollution could save thousands of lives, researchers say fox-news/science/planet-earth/pollution fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 68ba69f7-14ed-5eef-9deb-1e874d17d520

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Apollo 11: How ‘dumb luck’ saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed

The Apollo 11 Moon landing produced some of the most iconic photographs ever taken. However, a processing glitch in Houston when the films were returned to Earth nearly caused a “photographic catastrophe” of truly epic proportions.

“One of the 20th century’s defining moments was almost lost to posterity,” explains Zeiss, the company that provided camera lenses for Apollo 11, on its website. The Apollo 11 images, it adds, arrived in Houston shortly after the crew’s return from the Moon.

“However, before the moon photos were developed, the processing equipment was checked one more time with a test film,” Zeiss said. During this inspection the film processor suddenly started leaking ethylene oxide, destroying the test film.

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“This turned out to be a blessing: thanks to this final test, the development team quickly fixed the defect and could successfully develop the images of the first Moon landing,” the lens maker explained. “The photographs taken during the moon missions were published around the world and made history.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f4b692333824a04bc621cc319728faa Apollo 11: How 'dumb luck' saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4bc9afd-58cd-5842-88cf-31fbc9c1069a article

In this July 20, 1969 photo made available by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. (Neil Armstrong/NASA via AP)

It is not clear how many Apollo 11 photos would have been impacted if the ethylene oxide had leaked onto actual film from the mission. A vast array of photographs was captured during the historic mission. These include Neil Armstrong’s iconic shot of Buzz Aldrin on the lunar surface, with the Apollo 11 mission commander reflected in Aldrin’s visor, and also the famous image of Aldrin’s boot print.

“The orbital and surface lunar photographs obtained during Apollo 11 the Apollo 11 mission were of good quality, resolution, and contrast,” explained NASA, in a report released in 1970. This included 1,359 frames of 70-mm photography and 17 pairs of lunar surface stereoscopic photographs.

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Neither NASA nor Kodak, which provided film for Apollo 11, was able to shed any light on the incident when contacted by Fox News.

Westlake Legal Group NASAAldrinFootprint Apollo 11: How 'dumb luck' saved iconic Moon photos from being destroyed James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4bc9afd-58cd-5842-88cf-31fbc9c1069a article

Buzz Aldrin’s footprint on the lunar surface. (NASA)

However, in Billy Watkins’ book “Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes,” Richard Underwood, NASA’s chief of photography during the Apollo 11 mission, described how the ethylene oxide had leaked onto the test film and melted it.

“The spacecraft was about to splashdown, and we were running through one final test on the film processor, which had been checked hundreds of times before,” he said.

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“It was just pure dumb luck that we decided to do one more test on that processor. Had Armstrong’s film been put in there without that last test, it would’ve eaten it up,” Underwood added. “It would’ve been the greatest photographic catastrophe in the history of the planet.”

A stainless steel cover, he explained, was built to prevent any future leaks on the precious film.

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July 20, 2019 marked the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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