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Westlake Legal Group > fnc/science (Page 20)

Mysterious destroyed temple and treasure discovered in underwater ‘Egyptian Atlantis’

A mysterious temple has been discovered in the sunken Ancient Egyptian city of Thônis-Heracleion, which has been described as the “Egyptian Atlantis.”

Archaeologists have found a Greek-style temple, as well as several sunken treasures, such as coins or jewelry in Thônis-Heracleion, which was discovered in 2001. The temple slid into a canal running south of it and ultimately, destroyed the city, according to a statement from the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology obtained by Fox News.

“Only a small portion of the canal was excavated, but it seems that the remains of the temple filled it for around 300 feet (c. 90 m), indicating both the size of this temple and the scale of its destruction,” the statement reads. “The excellent preservation conditions suggests that future excavations here hold in store the potential for other discoveries of importance.”

Westlake Legal Group column-Hilti-Foundation Mysterious destroyed temple and treasure discovered in underwater 'Egyptian Atlantis' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 45518d97-6ce1-58b7-be79-d3301ac544e5

(Credit: Christoph Gerigk © FranckGoddio/Hilti Foundation)

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN FORTRESS BUILT BY RAMSES II REVEALS ITS SECRETS

In addition to gold coins and jewelry, silver and bronze ritual artifacts, along with ceramics, were discovered at the site. The Institute noted that “most of these objects were intact despite the catastrophe and their 2,200 years in the clay.”

Westlake Legal Group coins-Hilti-Foundation Mysterious destroyed temple and treasure discovered in underwater 'Egyptian Atlantis' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 45518d97-6ce1-58b7-be79-d3301ac544e5

(Credit: Christoph Gerigk © FranckGoddio/Hilti Foundation)

The main temple, as well as the small, Greek-style temple (also known as a “tholos”) date back to the 4th century BC.

Westlake Legal Group jewelry-Hilti-Foundation Mysterious destroyed temple and treasure discovered in underwater 'Egyptian Atlantis' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 45518d97-6ce1-58b7-be79-d3301ac544e5

(Credit: Christoph Gerigk © FranckGoddio/Hilti Foundation)

The landslide that caused the temple to slide into the canal was the result of an earthquake, which also caused a tidal wave that leveled most of the city.

Once a center of religious power, Thônis-Heracleion contained the temple where all the new Pharaohs had to go to receive the titles of their power as the universal sovereign from the God Amun, the statement added.

Mentioned in a number of ancient texts, according to The Sun, Heracleion was beset by a number of natural disasters over the years that eventually caused the remaining islets to be swallowed by the sea in the 8th century A.D.

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Westlake Legal Group column-Hilti-Foundation Mysterious destroyed temple and treasure discovered in underwater 'Egyptian Atlantis' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 45518d97-6ce1-58b7-be79-d3301ac544e5   Westlake Legal Group column-Hilti-Foundation Mysterious destroyed temple and treasure discovered in underwater 'Egyptian Atlantis' fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/science/archaeology/ancient-egypt fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 45518d97-6ce1-58b7-be79-d3301ac544e5

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Apollo 11 splashdown heroes remember recovery efforts: ‘Proud to have been part of it’

Out in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, descending from the sky, were three orange parachutes carrying a burned-up space capsule, three Americans and the bookend to the most momentous event in human history.

Minutes later, Apollo 11 splashed down in the water, fulfilling the goal of a nation: perform a manned lunar landing and return.

The day was July 24, 1969, 50 years ago today. Inside the Apollo 11 capsule were the first two men to ever set foot on the moon, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Also with them was Michael Collins, the astronaut who piloted the command module and orbited the moon for two hours and 36 minutes while Armstrong and Aldrin were leaving lunar footprints. All three were alive and healthy, returning to Earth after being off in space for nine days.

But the story wasn’t over yet. The astronauts had to be rescued from the ocean.

That’s where the USS Hornet comes in.  The aircraft carrier had left California on a mission they just learned about: recover Apollo 11.

REMEMBERING AMERICA’S HISTORIC MISSION TO THE MOON

That meant removing the men from the capsule, getting them in a small boat, hoisting them up to a helicopter and bringing them aboard the Hornet, where President Nixon and numerous other dignitaries were proudly waiting.

“We were just very, very focused,” said Rolf Sabye, who served on the Hornet in the navigation department as a quartermaster second class petty officer.

Westlake Legal Group rolf-2 Apollo 11 splashdown heroes remember recovery efforts: ‘Proud to have been part of it’ Phil Keating fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc c937bbad-c0d7-52f4-bae1-b95f27dbc870 article

Rolf Sabye served on the Hornet in the navigation department as a quartermaster second class petty officer. (Courtesy of Rolf Sabye)

“Well, we had worked hard for several weeks after leaving Hawaii. We had 16 training exercises where our main job on the ship was to pull up next to the capsule and recover the capsule after the astronauts had been recovered by the helicopter,” he recalled.

“It was a pretty important event. But then, we realized that people around the world were watching it,” Saybe said. “I always felt being on the bridge was really close to the heartbeat of the ship. It was pretty special. I’m pretty proud of having been part of it.”

Tim Wilson said he felt the same.

APOLLO 11: FORMER OFFICER ON RECOVERY SHIP USS HORNET RECALLS WATCHING ASTRONAUTS’ ‘AMAZING’ RETURN WITH PRESIDENT NIXON

He, too, was on board the USS Hornet as a lieutenant and public affairs officer.

“This was a really big deal and, after coming back from Vietnam, it was almost like getting an extra-rich dessert or something like that,” Wilson remembered. “We were getting to do something really, really neat.”

Being that it was 1969 and the sailors had been living on their ship, in the middle of a war, Wilson recalled the ship’s crew kind of being in the dark about the whole thing.

Westlake Legal Group Tim-wilson-pic Apollo 11 splashdown heroes remember recovery efforts: ‘Proud to have been part of it’ Phil Keating fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc c937bbad-c0d7-52f4-bae1-b95f27dbc870 article

Tim Wilson was on board the USS Hornet as a lieutenant and public affairs officer. “This was a really big deal and, after coming back from Vietnam, it was almost like getting an extra-rich dessert or something like that,” Wilson said. (Courtesy of Tim Wilson )

“We didn’t really know what was going on,” he said. “We didn’t have a sense of what sort of emotions were going on at the mainland or with our families or things like that because we did not have access to any television feeds or anything in terms of the launch of Apollo 11 or the trip to the moon or the walking on the moon.”

And 50 years later, Wilson still feels just as proud as he did back then.

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“I think everybody just feels very, very attached to what we did here and our place in history,” he said. “[We’re] very lucky to have been a part of it.”

Saybe said the Hornet’s crew all performed professionally and patriotically.

Westlake Legal Group NASAApollo11MissionControl2 Apollo 11 splashdown heroes remember recovery efforts: ‘Proud to have been part of it’ Phil Keating fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc c937bbad-c0d7-52f4-bae1-b95f27dbc870 article

Flight controllers at Mission Control applaud the splashdown and success of the Apollo 11 lunar mission on July 24, 1969. (NASA)

“It was only on the day of splashdown, really, when all these dignitaries appeared on board, President Nixon, and everybody else that we knew,” he said, remembering feeling a little awestruck.

“Wow. This is the real thing here, today’s the day and this is really cool. I did not sense any anxiety whatsoever from the people that I was involved in here.  I’d say (there is) a tremendous amount of pride in that. In terms of the United States and in terms of our role in this thing.”

The three astronauts they rescued from the Pacific went on to become world famous and instant national heroes – all with a little help from the crew of the USS Hornet.

Westlake Legal Group Apollo11RecoveryGetty1969 Apollo 11 splashdown heroes remember recovery efforts: ‘Proud to have been part of it’ Phil Keating fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc c937bbad-c0d7-52f4-bae1-b95f27dbc870 article   Westlake Legal Group Apollo11RecoveryGetty1969 Apollo 11 splashdown heroes remember recovery efforts: ‘Proud to have been part of it’ Phil Keating fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc c937bbad-c0d7-52f4-bae1-b95f27dbc870 article

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This may be the face of a Pictish chieftain who was brutally murdered 1,400 years ago

A Pictish man with a rugged face who was brutally murdered 1,400 years ago may have been royalty, new research finds.

After his murder, the approximately 30-year-old man’s remains sat undisturbed in a cave on the Black Isle of the Scottish Highlands for more than a millennia. Archaeologists found the man’s skeleton in a strange position; rocks pinned down his arms and legs, his skull was fractured, and his legs were crossed. Forensic artists published a virtual reconstruction of his face in 2017, catapulting him into internet fame.

Now, a new analysis indicates that this fellow, known as Rosemarkie Man, was likely a prominent person in his community, perhaps a member of royalty or a chieftain, according to news sources. [Photos: See the Ancient Faces of a Man-Bun-Wearing Bloke and a Neanderthal Woman]

The Picts were a group of tribes that lived in what is now Scotland during the Iron Age and Medieval times. They routinely fought against the Romans, who dubbed these tribes “Picts,” likely from the Latin word “picti,” which means “painted ones,” as the Picts had distinctive tattoos and war paint.

More From LiveScience

This particular Pict was well off, according to an analysis of his remains. “He was a big, strong fella — built like a rugby player — very heavily built above the waist,” Simon Gunn, a professor of urban history at the University of Leicester, who is studying the man’s remains, told The Scotsman.

The 5-foot-6-inch-tall (167 centimeters) man ate a high-protein diet (it’s almost like he was “eating nothing but suckling pigs,” Gunn said), which was rare for people in that region during that time, The Scotsman reported.

A radiocarbon-dated bone sample shows that the man died between A.D. 430 and 630, Gunn said. Moreover, piles of animal bones found near the man’s remains suggest that there was a celebration or ritual in honor of his passing, Gunn said.

There were other clues that Rosemarkie Man was royal. Besides his head wounds, there were no other injuries on his body, suggesting that he wasn’t a warrior or someone who labored for his livelihood. What’s more, his burial in the cave may have been purposeful; perhaps his undertakers placed him at a place they believed was an entrance to the underworld, Gunn said.

Gunn said he and his colleagues plan to continue looking for new finds, as part of the Rosemarkie Caves Project. So far, they have evidence that these caves were used as long as 2,300 years ago, he said.

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group pictish-man-hair This may be the face of a Pictish chieftain who was brutally murdered 1,400 years ago LiveScience Laura Geggel Associate Editor fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc e59215c7-6356-59f5-a04c-a7a8b555931b article   Westlake Legal Group pictish-man-hair This may be the face of a Pictish chieftain who was brutally murdered 1,400 years ago LiveScience Laura Geggel Associate Editor fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc e59215c7-6356-59f5-a04c-a7a8b555931b article

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Explorer who discovered Titanic wants to learn Amelia Earhart’s fate

The deep-sea explorer who discovered the Titanic will set out next month on a mission to solve the disappearance of famous aviator Amelia Earhart.

Robert Ballard, the oceanographer who found the Titanic in 1985 during a secret military operation, will begin to search for signs of Amelia Earhart, the pilot who disappeared from her attempted around-the-world flight more than 80 years ago.

Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan vanished on July 12, 1937, after taking off from Lae, New Guinea, in a Lockheed Electra 10E plane bound for Howard Island, located just north of the Equator.

AMELIA EARHART MYSTERY: NEWLY DISCOVERED FOOTAGE MAY SHED LIGHT ON AVIATOR’S DISAPPEARANCE

Westlake Legal Group earhart Explorer who discovered Titanic wants to learn Amelia Earhart's fate fox-news/science fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace bb475a50-5615-553d-a743-2d5a02e238b7 article

FILE – In this Jan. 13, 1935, file photo, American aviatrix Amelia Earhart climbs from the cockpit of her plane at Los Angeles, Calif. (AP Photo, File)

Her disappearance prompted years of search efforts and conspiracy theories, including beliefs Earhart was captured and killed by the Japanese, settled with the natives of a Pacific island and even returned to New Jersey where she secretly lived out the rest of her days as a housewife.

Ballard and a National Geographic expedition will search for her plane near a Pacific Ocean atoll that’s part of the Phoenix Islands.

His team will use remotely operated underwater vehicles in their search, the National Geographic channel said Tuesday. An archaeological team will also investigate a potential Earhart campsite with search dogs and DNA sampling.

Westlake Legal Group earhart-2 Explorer who discovered Titanic wants to learn Amelia Earhart's fate fox-news/science fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace bb475a50-5615-553d-a743-2d5a02e238b7 article

FILE – In this June 26, 1928, file photo, American aviatrix Amelia Earhart poses with flowers as she arrives in Southampton, England,  (AP Photo, File)

National Geographic will air a two-hour special on Oct. 20. “Expedition Amelia” will include clues gathered by the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery that led Ballard to the atoll, named Nikumaroro.

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Ballard also is responsible for finding pieces of John F. Kennedy’s World War II patrol boat in the Solomon Sea, the German battleship Bismarck in the Atlantic, and many ancient ships in the Black Sea, as well as hydrothermal vents near the Galapagos, the channel said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group earhart Explorer who discovered Titanic wants to learn Amelia Earhart's fate fox-news/science fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace bb475a50-5615-553d-a743-2d5a02e238b7 article   Westlake Legal Group earhart Explorer who discovered Titanic wants to learn Amelia Earhart's fate fox-news/science fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace bb475a50-5615-553d-a743-2d5a02e238b7 article

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Neil Armstrong’s family received $6 million in malpractice settlement 2 years after astronaut’s death: report

Westlake Legal Group NeilArmstrongTechnicianGetty1969 Neil Armstrong's family received $6 million in malpractice settlement 2 years after astronaut's death: report fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace article 4d1ccbb0-558c-593f-8654-419803cca7f8

An Ohio hospital agreed to pay $6 million to Neil Armstrong’s surviving family members to settle allegations that medical malpractice after an emergency heart surgery caused the astronaut’s death, a report said.

The New York Times first reported Tuesday about the secret settlement after the paper received an anonymous 93-page document related to Armstrong’s treatment and the legal case.

The newspaper was able to confirm the documents were authentic using public records in Hamilton County Probate Court in Ohio.

Armstrong, the astronaut known for taking the first steps on the moon in 1969, died at the age of 82 on Aug. 25, 2012—two weeks after undergoing cardiac bypass surgery at Cincinnati’s Mercy Health-Fairfield Hospital.

APOLLO 11’S MICHAEL COLLINS RECOUNTS THE CREW’S THREE-WEEK QUARANTINE ON THEIR RETURN FROM THE MOON

At the time of his death, the family announced publicly that Armstrong had died from “complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures.”

Privately, Armstrong’s two sons, Mark and Rick Armstrong, accused the hospital of flawed postsurgical treatment that ultimately killed their father, launching a two-year-long legal battle between the family and the medical institution.

Armstrong underwent cardiac bypass surgery on Aug. 7, 2012. As a standard part of the procedure, doctors implanted temporary wires to help pace his heartbeat as he recovers, the Times reported. “But when a nurse removed those wires, Mr. Armstrong began to bleed internally and his blood pressure dropped.”

Doctors took Armstrong to a catheterization lab to drain blood from around his heart instead of immediately bringing him into the operating room, a decision ruled by medical professionals hired by both the Armstrong family and the hospital to investigate the death concluded ultimately killed him.

Wendy Armstrong, a lawyer and the wife of Mark Armstrong, suggested in a July 2014 email that the astronaut’s two sons would speak publicly about the medical malpractice claims at an event at Kennedy Space Center commemorating the 45th anniversary of the first moon landing if the hospital did not pay up.

“No institution wants to be remotely associated with the death of one of America’s greatest heroes,” lawyer Bertha G. Helmich, who represented Armstrong’s grandchildren in the suit, wrote the hospital, according to documents obtained by the Times.

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Mercy Health denied the malpractice claim but agreed to pay the Armstrong estate $6 million “to avoid the publicity of litigation,” according to a motion filed by Wendy Armstrong.

Mark and Eric Armstrong were granted $5.2 million from the settlement, the Times reported. Armstrong’s brother and sister, Dean A. Armstrong and June L. Hoffman, each received $250,000. Six grandchildren received $24,000 each. Armstrong’s widow and second wife, Carol, was not involved in the settlement.

News of the settlement broke this Tuesday, just days after the 50th anniversary of Armstrong’s moon landing was celebrated on Saturday.

Westlake Legal Group NeilArmstrongTechnicianGetty1969 Neil Armstrong's family received $6 million in malpractice settlement 2 years after astronaut's death: report fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace article 4d1ccbb0-558c-593f-8654-419803cca7f8   Westlake Legal Group NeilArmstrongTechnicianGetty1969 Neil Armstrong's family received $6 million in malpractice settlement 2 years after astronaut's death: report fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc Danielle Wallace article 4d1ccbb0-558c-593f-8654-419803cca7f8

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French sub that vanished in the Mediterranean in 1968 discovered, ending 51-year mystery

The wreck of a French Navy submarine that disappeared in the Mediterranean in 1968 has been found, ending a 51-year mystery.

The Minerve vanished on Jan. 27, 1968 with the loss of her 52-strong crew. Officials announced Tuesday that the wreck of the Daphne-class submarine was discovered off France’s Var coast.

RUSSIA LAUNCHES HUGE ‘DOOMSDAY’ SUPERSUB

“We have just found the Minerve,” tweeted French defense minister Florence Parly on Tuesday. “It’s a success, a relief and a technical feat. I think of the families who have been waiting for this moment so long.”

Agence France Presse reports that the sub was discovered 18.5 nautical miles (21.3 miles) off Toulon, which is France’s main naval base. The sub has broken into three pieces on the seabed at a depth of 7,776 feet, according to AFP.

SCIENTISTS DISCOVER RADIATION LEAK ‘100,000 TIMES NORMAL LEVEL’ FROM RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUB WRECK

The French Navy, the French Research Institute for Sea Exploration (Ilfremer) and the ship Seabed Constructor, which is operated by U.S. exploration company Ocean Infinity, all took part in the search for the sub.

Westlake Legal Group MinerveGetty1960 French sub that vanished in the Mediterranean in 1968 discovered, ending 51-year mystery James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article add056f4-c8c1-5683-84cc-6c01a54aa45e

File photo of the French Navy’s submarine Minerve, which disappeared on Jan.27, 1968. (STF/AFP/Getty Images)

“Our thoughts go out to the families of the 52 missing sailors,” tweeted the French Embassy in Washington, D.C.

LAST US WARSHIP SUNK BY GERMAN SUB DURING WWII DISCOVERED OFF MAINE

Admiral Christophe Prazuck tweeted an image of the submarine’s wreck on the seabed. The sub’s name is clearly visible in red letters on the mangled hull. “Here rest our 52 comrades who disappeared on January 27, 1968,” he wrote.

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Just over two years after the Minerve’s disappearance, another Daphne-class French submarine, Eurydice, was lost off France’s Mediterranean coast. The New York Times writes that an explosion was reported during a practice dive in calm seas off Cape Camarot. The sub’s 57-strong crew all died in the disaster.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group MinerveGetty1960 French sub that vanished in the Mediterranean in 1968 discovered, ending 51-year mystery James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article add056f4-c8c1-5683-84cc-6c01a54aa45e   Westlake Legal Group MinerveGetty1960 French sub that vanished in the Mediterranean in 1968 discovered, ending 51-year mystery James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article add056f4-c8c1-5683-84cc-6c01a54aa45e

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Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95

Behind America’s late leap into orbit and triumphant small step on the moon was the agile mind and guts-of-steel of Chris Kraft, making split-second decisions that propelled the nation to once unimaginable heights.

Kraft, the creator and longtime leader of NASA’s Mission Control, died Monday in Houston, just two days after the 50th anniversary of what was his and NASA’s crowning achievement: Apollo 11’s moon landing. He was 95.

Christopher Columbus Kraft Jr. never flew in space, but “held the success or failure of American human spaceflight in his hands,” Neil Armstrong, the first man-on-the-moon, told The Associated Press in 2011.

Westlake Legal Group AP19203853451735-e1563847709902 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

Christopher Kraft, flight director during Project Mercury, working at his console inside the Flight Control area at Mercury Mission Control in Houston, in an undated photo. (NASA via AP, File)

Kraft founded Mission Control and created the job of flight director — later comparing it to an orchestra conductor — and established how flights would be run as the space race between the U.S. and Soviets heated up. The legendary engineer served as flight director for all of the one-man Mercury flights and seven of the two-man Gemini flights, helped design the Apollo missions that took 12 Americans to the moon from 1969 to 1972 and later served as director of the Johnson Space Center until 1982, overseeing the beginning of the era of the space shuttle.

Armstrong once called him “the man who was the `Control’ in Mission Control.”

“From the moment the mission starts until the moment the crew is safe on board a recovery ship, I’m in charge,” Kraft wrote in his 2002 book “Flight: My Life in Mission Control.”

“No one can overrule me. … They can fire me after it’s over. But while the mission is under way, I’m Flight. And Flight is God.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19203856337631 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

Then-President Ronald Reagan being briefed by Kraft in Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control Center in Houston, in November 1981. (NASA via AP, File)

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine Monday called Kraft “a national treasure,” saying “We stand on his shoulders as we reach deeper into the solar system, and he will always be with us on those journeys.”

Kraft became known as “the father of Mission Control” and in 2011 NASA returned the favor by naming the Houston building that houses the nerve center after Kraft.

“It’s where the heart of the mission is,” Kraft said in an April 2010 AP interview. “It’s where decisions are made every day, small and large … We realized that the people that had the moxie, that had the knowledge, were there and could make the decisions.”

That’s what Chris Kraft’s Mission Control was about: smart people with knowledge discussing options quickly and the flight director making a quick, informed decision, said former Smithsonian Institution space historian Roger Launius. It’s the place that held its collective breath as Neil Armstrong was guiding the Eagle lunar lander on the moon while fuel was running out. And it’s the place that improvised a last-minute rescue of Apollo 13 — a dramatic scenario that later made the unsung engineers heroes in a popular movie.

Soon it became more than NASA’s Mission Control. Hurricane forecasting centers, city crisis centers, even the Russian space center are all modeled after the Mission Control that Kraft created, Launius said.

Westlake Legal Group AP19203833876667 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

Chris Kraft at the old Mission Control at Johnson Space Center in Houston, in July 2011. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Leading up to the first launch to put an American, John Glenn, in orbit, a reporter asked Kraft about the odds of success and he replied: “If I thought about the odds at all, we’d never go to the pad.”

“It was a wonderful life. I can’t think of anything that an aeronautical engineer would get more out of, than what we were asked to do in the space program, in the `60s,” Kraft said on NASA’s website marking the 50th anniversary of the agency in 2008.

In the early days of Mercury at Florida’s Cape Canaveral, before Mission Control moved to Houston in 1965, there were no computer displays, “all you had was grease pencils,” Kraft recalled. The average age of the flight control team was 26; Kraft was 38.

“We didn’t know a damn thing about putting a man into space,” Kraft wrote in his autobiography. “We had no idea how much it should or would cost. And at best, we were engineers trained to do, not business experts trained to manage.”

NASA trailed the Soviet space program and suffered through many failed launches in the early days, before the manned flights began in 1961. Kraft later recalled thinking President John F. Kennedy “had lost his mind” when in May 1961 he set as a goal a manned trip to the moon “before this decade is out.”

“We had a total of 15 minutes of manned spaceflight experience, we hadn’t flown Mercury in orbit yet, and here’s a guy telling me we’re going to fly to the moon. … Doing it was one thing, but doing it in this decade was to me too risky,” Kraft told AP in 1989.

“Frankly it scared the hell out of me,” he said at a 2009 lecture at the Smithsonian.

APOLLO 11 HERO MICHAEL COLLINS RECALLS CREW’S RETURN FROM MOON

One of the most dramatic moments came during Scott Carpenter’s May 1962 mission as the second American to orbit the earth. Carpenter landed 288 miles off target because of low fuel and other problems. He was eventually found safely floating in his life raft.  Kraft blamed Carpenter for making poor decisions. Tom Wolfe’s book “The Right Stuff” said Kraft angrily vowed that Carpenter “will never fly for me again!” But Carpenter said he did the best he could when the machinery malfunctioned.

After the two-man Gemini flights, Kraft moved up NASA management to be in charge of manned spaceflight and was stunned by the Apollo 1 training fire that killed three astronauts.

Gene Kranz, who later would become NASA’s flight director for the Apollo mission that took man to the moon, said Kraft did not at first impress him as a leader. But Kranz eventually saw Kraft as similar to a judo instructor, allowing his student to grow in skills, then stepping aside.

“Chris Kraft had pioneered Mission Control and fought the battles in Mercury and Gemini, serving as the role model of the flight director. He proved the need for real-time leadership,” Kranz wrote in his book, “Failure Is Not An Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond.”

Born in 1924, Kraft grew up in Phoebus, Virginia, now part of Hampton, about 75 miles southeast of Richmond. In his autobiography, Kraft said with the name Christopher Columbus Kraft Jr., “some of my life’s direction was settled from the start.”

After graduating from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1944, Kraft took a job with aircraft manufacturer Chance Vought to build warplanes, but he quickly realized it wasn’t for him. He returned to Virginia where he accepted a job with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, not far from Phoebus.

Kraft’s first job was to figure out what happens to airplanes as they approach the speed of sound.

After his retirement, Kraft served as an aerospace consultant and was chairman of a panel in the mid-1990s looking for a cheaper way to manage the shuttle program.

Later, as the space shuttle program was being phased out after 30 years, Kraft blasted as foolish the decision to retire the shuttles, which he called “the safest machines ever built.”

Kraft said he considered himself fortunate to be part of the team that sent Americans to space and called it a sad day when the shuttles stopped flying.

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“The people of Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo are blossoms on the moon. Their spirits will live there forever,” he wrote. “I was part of that crowd, then part of the leadership that opened space travel to human beings. We threw a narrow flash of light across our nation’s history. I was there at the best of times.”

Kraft and his wife, Betty Anne, were married in 1950. They had a son, Gordon, and a daughter, Kristi-Anne.

Westlake Legal Group AP19203853451735 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48   Westlake Legal Group AP19203853451735 Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dead at 95 fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fnc/science fnc Associated Press article 57174f44-277a-5e49-baae-e9b08c902c48

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Bizarre ‘bird of prey’ airliner concept design revealed

Aircraft manufacturer Airbus has revealed an airliner concept design that bears a striking resemblance to a ‘bird of prey.”

The design aims to motivate the next generation of aeronautical engineers, according to Airbus. “The theoretical design is a hybrid-electric, turbo-propeller aircraft for regional air transportation,” it said in a statement. “Inspired by efficient mechanics of a bird, it has wing and tail structures that mimic those of a bird of prey, while featuring individually controlled feathers that provide active flight control.”

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Westlake Legal Group AirbusBirdofPrey Bizarre 'bird of prey' airliner concept design revealed James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc bcafb4e2-ca4d-5e98-8a29-c5e658b2a38d article

The ‘bird of prey’ concept design. (Airbus)

The design is not meant to look like an actual aircraft, according to Airbus, which says that the concept is based on realistic ideas. “It includes a blended wing-to-fuselage joint that mirrors the graceful and aerodynamic arch of an eagle or falcon,” the company explains. This, it adds, underscores the importance of biomimicry, where nature inspires the development of materials, structure and systems.

The concept design was launched at The Royal International Air Tattoo event at RAF Fairford in England.

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Airbus has also looked to nature for inspiration for its A350 XWB family of passenger jets. “We know from our work on the A350 XWB passenger jet that through biomimicry, nature has some of the best lessons we can learn about design,” it explained, in a statement. This includes, for example, an adaptive wing design inspired by birds.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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‘Storm Area 51 event’ spawns rival ‘Storm the Bermuda Triangle event: ‘It can’t swallow us all’

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If creating a Facebook event to “storm Area 51” wasn’t ridiculous enough, perhaps storming the Bermuda Triangle will be humanity’s coup de grace.

More than 40,000 people are either interested in going or will actually “storm” the Bermuda Triangle as “it can’t swallow all of us,” Fox 5 NY reports. The event’s creator, Anthony Dominick Carnovale, told the outlet it was not a joke and has even created a GoFundMe in an effort to raise money for a party.

“I’m contractually obligated to only use the money for the event. If I somehow can’t, I have to give everyone their money back,” he added.

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“Attendees must dress as [Spongebob] characters or pirates,” the “about” section of the page states, adding that “food and drink will be provided for purchase.”

Any additional funds that are raised and unused will go towards cancer research, in memory of Carnovale’s grandfather, who died of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2017.

Carnovale noted that the event, scheduled for Oct. 1 at 8 a.m, was created because he was worried that people will actually attend the Area 51 event, something he said is “dangerous.”

“I honestly just don’t want people to attend the Area 51 event because I don’t want people getting shot or arrested,” he said.

U.S. Air Force spokeswoman Laura McAndrews recently issued a statement saying the Air Force “would discourage anyone from trying to come into the area where we train American armed forces,” adding that it [the U.S. Air Force] “always stands ready to protect America and its assets.”

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Also known as the Devil’s Triangle, the Bermuda Triangle has claimed over 1,000 lives in the last 100 years, according to The Sun. However, researchers in the U.K. believe it does not deserve its “mysterious” reputation, as a natural “rogue wave” phenomenon could play a part in the Bermuda Triangle’s reputation.

“Rogue waves are one explanation and they do occur in the Bermuda region but by no means uniquely here — they are far more common off the Cape of Good Hope (off the South tip of Africa),” explained Dr. Simon Boxall, an oceanographer and principal teaching fellow at the U.K.’s University of Southampton. “They were things of myth and sailors’ tales, but since the introduction of satellite systems capable of measuring waves there have been a number as big as 30 m (100 feet) measured and verified.”

The rogue waves come and go very randomly and quickly but are always part of a storm, according to Boxall. “The thriller movie of a flat calm sea with a 100ft wave hitting the cruise liner out of the blue is myth,” he told Fox News via email last year. The rogue waves, he added, would not deter him from taking a cruise.

“The area covered by the triangle accounts for nearly a third of all privately owned vessels in the U.S.,” he said. “The 2016 Coastguard annual report shows that in this area 82 percent of all incidents involving marine traffic of any kind was caused by people with no experience or training. The numbers speak for themselves as to why so many incidents occur here.”

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A similar factor likely played a part in the famous disappearance of Flight 19, a group of five U.S. torpedo bombers that went missing on Dec. 5, 1945, according to Boxall. “The infamous bomber squadron that went missing in 1945 was actually a training flight with new and inexperienced crews. In those days nav[igation] was very much by eye and it is easy to get it wrong,” says Dr. Boxall. “The evidence shows this was the case. Taking that out, there are no more plane disappearances [in the Bermuda triangle] than anywhere else in the world.”

The Sun notes that a seaplane deployed to search for the aircraft also went missing.

Boxall is keen to debunk the myth of the Bermuda Triangle as a mysterious place where strange things happen. “Along with Scotland’s Loch Ness Monster there is no mystery,” he told Fox News. “But it does sell books and creates great discussion.”

Fox News’ James Rogers contributed to this story.

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Rescued turtle manages to return to the group that saved the animal nearly 2 decades ago

It could be described as fate, luck or good timing when a woman found a small turtle crossing the street in Stone Harbor, New Jersey, and brought it to the nearby Wetlands Institute to keep it safe from the busy streets.

The female turtle had been rescued by that very same institute as an egg, and the woman happened to return it on July 12, almost 19 years to the day from when the group had released the animal back into the wild, officials said.

The group initially released the terrapin in 2000 and hadn’t seen the animal since, according to a post by the Wetlands Institute Facebook page this past Monday.

Westlake Legal Group turtle-crossing-1 Rescued turtle manages to return to the group that saved the animal nearly 2 decades ago fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/science fnc David Aaro article 082de26f-2bb5-59ce-a8f8-111ffd7a23b0

A turtle rescued by a conservation group as an egg was miraculously returned to the same New Jersey wetlands group that had released the animal nearly 19 years ago. (iStock, File)

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The animal was a “head-starter,” which the institute described as a turtle usually hatched from eggs recovered from a mother struck by a vehicle on its way to lay eggs.

In the 19 years after its initial release, the terrapin had more than doubled in size and showed the scars of past injuries that may have been caused by boat propellers. One member of the institute said he was still perplexed by how it ended up on the road.

“When she was found, there was no obvious access to the marsh on either side of the road,” Devin Griffiths, a marketing and communications specialist with the institute, told NJ.com. “So we’re not sure why she was there. She was in a really odd place.”

Researchers were able to identify the turtle by a Passive Integrated Transponder tag the institute would place under the skin of rescued turtles after they’re incubated and kept for a year. The tags had data showing the animals’ age and other identifiable information. The tag showed July 13, 2000, which could have been the date it was tagged or released into the wild.

Many terrapins in the wild don’t make it. Griffiths told NJ.com that drivers should be cautious when traveling near the marshes in Stone Harbor, southwest of Atlantic City.

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“Things can happen very, very quickly,” he told the outlet. “When you’re driving through marsh on both sides, slow down and keep your eyes open.”

The institute had some fun with its “very special visitor” before releasing it safely back into the marsh.

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“For all the terrapins who don’t make it, this beautiful girl represents hope,” the institute wrote on its Facebook page. “Her journey is a testament to the value of the critical conservation work we do and the role we all play in ensuring a future for these incredible creatures.”

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