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Westlake Legal Group > fnc/science (Page 40)

Men’s beards contain more harmful bacteria than dogs’ fur, small study suggests

A small European study has found that the average man’s beard is more replete with human-pathogenic bacteria than the dirtiest part of a dog’s fur.

For the study, published in the February 2019 issue of the journal European Radiology, researchers analyzed skin and saliva samples from 18 bearded men (whose ages ranged from 18 to 76), and fur and saliva samples from 30 dogs (whose breeds ranged from schnauzer to German shepherd), at several European hospitals.

The researchers were looking for colonies of human-pathogenic bacteria in both man and dog — not in an attempt to beard-shame the hirsute masses, but rather to test whether it was safe for humans to use the same MRI scanners that dogs had previously used. [6 Superbugs to Watch Out For]

In fact, it was the humans who were the dirtier patients. Not only did the men’s beards contain significantly more potentially-infectious microbes than the dogs’ fur, but the men also left the scanners more contaminated than the animals.

More From LiveScience

“As the MRI scanner used for both dogs and humans was routinely cleaned after animal scanning, there was substantially lower bacterial load compared with scanners used exclusively for humans,” the researchers wrote in the study.

To scan a dog

In their new paper, the researchers analyzed dogs that were scheduled for “routine” MRI scanner appointments to look for brain and spine disorders, the authors wrote. Because MRI scanners are too expensive for most veterinary clinics to own and operate, these tests were conducted at the radiology department of a European hospital that performs about 8,000 MRI scans of human patients every year.

The researchers swabbed each dog’s mouth for bacteria samples, then took a simple fur sample by rubbing a special bacteria-collecting plate between each dog’s shoulder blades (a “particularly unhygienic” spot where skin infections are regularly encountered, the researchers wrote). After the pooches completed their MRI scans, the researchers took samples from three spots in the scanner, too.

Meanwhile, the team also collected bacterial samples from the beards of hospital patients who were due for MRI scans of their own. The beardos were in relatively good health, and had not been hospitalized any time in the previous year.

My beard contains multitudes

The tests showed that all 18 men showed “high microbial counts” on their skin and in their saliva, whereas only 23 of the 30 dogs did, the researchers wrote.

Seven of the men and four of the dogs tested positive for human-pathogenic microbes — the kind of bacteria that can make a person ill if they colonize the wrong part of the host’s body. These microbes included Enterococcus faecalis, a common gut bacteria that is known to cause infections (especially urinary tract infections) in humans, and several cases of Staphylococcus aureus , a common skin/mucous-colonizing bacteria that may live on up to 50% of all human adults, but can cause serious infections if it enters the blood stream.

Despite the comparatively higher microbial counts in this small sample of bearded men, the takeaway from this study isn’t, “reach for that electric razor NOW, Rasputin!”; as the authors wrote, “there is no reason to believe that women may harbor less bacteriological load than bearded men.”

Instead, it’s that humans leave way more potentially-infectious bacteria behind in hospitals than you’d like to imagine — and simply sanitizing a surface is apparently not enough to solve the problem.

“The estimated number of healthcare associated infections (HAIs) in US hospitals was calculated to be approximately 1.7 million patients per year,” the authors wrote. Around 100,000 people died as a result of those infections every year, the authors wrote.

“The central question should perhaps not be whether we should allow dogs to undergo imaging in our hospitals,” the team concluded, “but rather we should focus on the knowledge and perception of hygiene and understand what poses real danger and risk to our patients.”

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group beardy-with-dog Men's beards contain more harmful bacteria than dogs' fur, small study suggests LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fnc/science fnc f956eb18-c2b9-5d1c-b8e1-06fc08cfb103 Brandon Specktor, Senior Writer article   Westlake Legal Group beardy-with-dog Men's beards contain more harmful bacteria than dogs' fur, small study suggests LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fnc/science fnc f956eb18-c2b9-5d1c-b8e1-06fc08cfb103 Brandon Specktor, Senior Writer article

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Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70 trillion impact, new study says

Westlake Legal Group melting-permafrost-in-arctic-will-have-70-trillion-impact-new-study-says Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70 trillion impact, new study says fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 50c4153a-3e36-5094-a075-6dd116121edf
Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-arctic-ice-melt Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70 trillion impact, new study says fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 50c4153a-3e36-5094-a075-6dd116121edf

Thawing permafrost in the Arctic will accelerate global warming and could add $70 trillion to the world’s climate change bill, according to a new Nature Research study.

The report claims that a feedback mechanism, along with the failure of countries to live up to the Paris Climate Agreement goals and the loss of heat-deflecting white ice — will cause an almost 5 percent increase of global warming.

That scenario could push up the global cost of climate change to $70 trillion between now and 2300, according to the study, which was published in Nature.

In addition, researchers say the $70 trillion figure is 10 times higher than any projected benefits from the melting Arctic, such as access to minerals or better ship navigation routes.

MAJORITY OF AMERICANS THINK CLIMATE CHANGE WILL CAUSE HUMANITY’S EXTINCTION 

For comparison, the United States nominal GDP, representing the value of all the goods and services, is estimated to top $20 trillion this year. The European Union’s GDP was $18.8 trillion last year, representing more than one-fifth of the global economy.

Scientists have warned for years that an increasingly warm climate will have global consequences that could include rising sea levels, powerful hurricanes, and more widespread wildfires and droughts.

“It’s disheartening that we have this in front of us,” Dmitry Yumashev of Lancaster University told The Guardian. “We have the technology and policy instruments to limit the warming but we are not moving fast enough.”

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Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-arctic-ice-melt Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70 trillion impact, new study says fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 50c4153a-3e36-5094-a075-6dd116121edf   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-arctic-ice-melt Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70 trillion impact, new study says fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 50c4153a-3e36-5094-a075-6dd116121edf

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There are toxic fungi in space and no one knows if they’re dangerous

Westlake Legal Group there-are-toxic-fungi-in-space-and-no-one-knows-if-theyre-dangerous There are toxic fungi in space and no one knows if they're dangerous LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/bacteria fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fnc/science fnc article Adam Mann, Live Science Contributor 3a333b19-4494-5150-87ef-576d0a1c8a8a

Potentially dangerous fungi are living on space stations and spacecraft right now — but we have no idea if they’re harmful for astronauts and scientists need to do much more research to figure that out. That’s the takeaway from a new study published April 11 in the journal Astrobiology reviewing what’s known about mycotoxins — fungal compounds that can harm humans — in space.

The Earth is teeming with microscopic inhabitants such as bacteria and single-celled fungi. So it’s no surprise that these constant companions have managed to hitchhike with humans aboard the International Space Station and other space-going vessels.

While scientists have done a fair amount of research on bacteria in space, fungi remain relatively understudied. Part of the reason is that these microbial mushroom cousins typically cause health problems only in people who live under stressful conditions or who have severely compromised immune systems. [6 Superbugs to Watch Out For]

But the prolonged stress of spaceflight has been shown to affect astronauts’ immune systems. Therefore, a team at Ghent University in Belgium wondered how fungi might affect astronauts’ health. In a review of the scientific literature, the little that came up was mostly related to the detection of different fungal species.

More From LiveScience

“But about mycotoxins we found almost nothing,” Sarah de Saeger, a pharmaceutical scientist at Ghent University and co-author of the new paper, told Live Science.

This is problematic because the specific fungi that have been found on spacefaring vessels, such as Aspergillus flavus and members of the genus Alternaria, are known to produce carcinogenic and immune-depressing compounds, she said, and these molecules often form when fungi are stressed. (If space is a stressful environment for humans, it may be stressful for fungi as well.) Whether or not astronauts are actually being affected by such toxins remains unknown, she added.

De Saeger’s team recommends that space agencies do a better job of detecting and researching mycotoxins in spacecraft. In particular, they suggest that new methods should be developed for monitoring the surfaces and atmospheres of spacecraft. Currently, most fungal detections are made by sending samples back to laboratories on Earth, but that won’t be possible for long-duration missions, such as a crewed flight to Mars.

De Saeger stressed that the presence of mycotoxins doesn’t necessarily mean danger to astronauts. Here on Earth, people are often exposed to these compounds but their specific contribution to different diseases is not always easy to trace. On the other hand, nobody quite knows how fungi might grow and evolve in the enclosed environment of a long-lasting space mission, de Saeger said.

“I think the biggest message is that fungi and bacteria are an integral part of human bodies,” Adriana Blachowicz, who has investigated fungi on the International Space Station but was not involved in the recent study, told Live Science. “Wherever we go, fungi and bacteria will follow.”

Bacteria have been shown to become more virulent in space, and so there is some worry that fungi could as well, she added.

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group international-space-station There are toxic fungi in space and no one knows if they're dangerous LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/bacteria fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fnc/science fnc article Adam Mann, Live Science Contributor 3a333b19-4494-5150-87ef-576d0a1c8a8a   Westlake Legal Group international-space-station There are toxic fungi in space and no one knows if they're dangerous LiveScience fox-news/science/wild-nature/bacteria fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fnc/science fnc article Adam Mann, Live Science Contributor 3a333b19-4494-5150-87ef-576d0a1c8a8a

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Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub

Westlake Legal Group wreck-of-australian-wwii-ship-discovered-77-years-after-it-was-torpedoed-by-a-japanese-sub Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

The wreck of an Australian freighter has been discovered 77 years after it was sunk by a Japanese submarine during World War II.

The SS Iron Crown was found in the Bass Strait between mainland Australia and Tasmania, about 62 miles off Victoria’s coast south of the border with the neighboring state of New South Wales. The ship was heavily loaded with manganese ore when she struck by a torpedo off the Australian coast on June 4, 1942, sinking just 60 seconds later. The attack claimed the lives of 38 members of the ship’s 43-strong crew.

Experts on the CSIRO research vessel Investigator used multibeam sonar equipment and a special drop camera to find the wreck off the coast of the Australian state of Victoria. An image captured by the camera shows the ship’s intact bow with railings, anchor chains and the Iron Crown’s anchors still in position.

WRECK OF US WWII B-24 BOMBER DISCOVERED 74 YEARS AFTER IT PLUNGED INTO THE SEA OFF BERMUDA

“The Iron Crown is historically significant as one of only four World War II shipwrecks in Victorian waters and is the only ship to have been torpedoed by a submarine in Victorian waters,” said Peter Harvey, a maritime archaeologist with Heritage Victoria, in a statement. “Locating the wreck after 77 years of not knowing its final resting place will bring closure for relatives and family of those that were lost at sea, as well as for Australia’s maritime community.”

Westlake Legal Group SSIronCrown Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

The SS Iron Crown’s bow and the ship’s anchor chains were caught on camera (CSIRO)

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization is Australia’s national science agency.

“The wreck of Iron Crown appears to be relatively intact and the ship is sitting upright on the seafloor in about 700m [2,297 feet] of water,” Emily Jateff, curator of ocean science and technology at Australia’s National Maritime Museum, who led the search effort, said, in the statement.

WRECK OF WWII AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS WASP DISCOVERED IN THE CORAL SEA

“We have mapped the site and surrounding seafloor using sonar but have also taken a lot of close up vision of the ship structure using a drop camera,” Jateff added. “This will allow us to create a composite image of the whole site to assist in follow up surveys for its conservation and management.”

Westlake Legal Group SSIronCrown2 Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

File photo of the SS Iron Crown (left) alongside the SS Hagen (National Library of Australia)

The discovery has been reported to the Australian and Victorian governments and a memorial service is planned at the site.

In 2017, the Investigator solved a 74-year mystery when it found the wreck of the SS Macumba, a merchant ship sunk during a Japanese air raid off Australia’s Northern Territory.

MAJOR WWII SHIPWRECK DISCOVERED: JAPANESE BATTLESHIP SUNK BY US FOUND

Researchers across the globe are working to locate sites of World War II wrecks. The wreck of a World War II U.S. B-24 bomber that plunged into the sea off Bermuda in February 1945 was recently discovered by a team of researchers from the University of Delaware.

Westlake Legal Group SSIronCrown3 Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

The SS Iron Crown’s port side deckhouse and open cargo hold. (CSIRO)

Last month, the wreck of World War II aircraft carrier USS Wasp was found in the Coral Sea more than 70 years after the ship was sunk during the Guadalcanal campaign.

Wasp was spotted on the seabed by experts from the vessel RV Petrel, which is part of a research organization set up by the late billionaire Paul Allen.

WRECK OF THE USS JUNEAU, FAMOUS FOR THE DEATHS OF THE 5 SULLIVAN BROTHERS, DISCOVERED IN PACIFIC

Earlier this year, the RV Petrel discovered one of the first Japanese battleships to be sunk by U.S. forces during World War II. Imperial Japanese Navy ship Hiei sank on Nov. 14, 1942, in the Solomon Islands.

Westlake Legal Group SSIronCrown4 Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

File photo of the SS Iron Crown (South Australian Maritime Museum)

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen died in October 2018 from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. His research organization has discovered a host of historic military shipwrecks, such as the wrecks of the USS Helena, the USS Lexington and the USS Juneau.

The group’s biggest discovery, however, came in 2017, when Allen and his team found the long-lost wreck of the USS Indianapolis in the Philippine Sea.

WORLD WAR II FIGHTER PLANE FLOWN BY ‘GREAT ESCAPE’ PILOT DISCOVERED ON NORWEGIAN MOUNTAIN

In a separate project, the wreckage of U.S. B-24 bomber, for example, was found in Papua New Guinea. The plane’s wreck was found in 2018, 74 years after it was shot down during a fierce battle with Japanese forces.

Westlake Legal Group SSIronCrown5 Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

Debris can be seen on the SS Iron Crown’s bow near the ship’s open cargo hold​​​​. ((CSIRO))

Last summer, a team of scientists from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of Delaware located the missing stern of the destroyer USS Abner Read, which was torn off by a Japanese mine in the remote Aleutian Islands.

Also last year, a decades-long mystery about the fate of a ship that disappeared during a World War II rescue mission was finally solved.

STERN OF US WW II DESTROYER DISCOVERED NEAR REMOTE ALASKAN ISLAND: SURVIVOR RECOUNTS HARROWING DAY

Westlake Legal Group SSIronCrown6 Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

A map showing the position of SS Iron Crown on the seafloor. (CSIRO)

The wreck of the Empire Wold, a Royal Navy tug, was discovered by coastguards off the coast of Iceland. The ship sank on Nov. 10, 1944, with the loss of her 16 crewmembers.

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An extremely rare World War II Spitfire fighter plane flown by a pilot who later took part in the “Great Escape” was also recovered from a remote Norwegian mountainside last year.

Fox News’ Nicole Darrah contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6029029935001_6029031840001-vs Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6029029935001_6029031840001-vs Wreck of Australian WWII ship discovered 77 years after it was torpedoed by a Japanese sub James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b88b71a6-a052-5070-9fdd-b61f909be980 article

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What’s the controversy over the baby T. Rex listed on eBay?

Westlake Legal Group whats-the-controversy-over-the-baby-t-rex-listed-on-ebay What's the controversy over the baby T. Rex listed on eBay? LiveScience Laura Geggel Associate Editor fox-news/science/archaeology/dinosaurs fnc/science fnc article 5cdb04f4-f833-5115-973e-f155b0354cc9

The partial skeleton of a baby Tyrannosaurus rex is for sale on eBay for nearly $3 million. And while it’s anyone’s guess who (if anyone) will buy the “king of the dinosaurs,” the seller is certain of one thing: The specimen will inevitably end up in a museum, he said.

“I’ll guarantee you it will” eventually land in a museum, Alan Detrich, a sculpturist and professional fossil hunter in Kansas who is auctioning the T. rex, told Live Science. According to Detrich, if some billionaire purchases the specimen, he or she will likely — for tax purposes — gift the dinosaur to a museum one day.

In that case, “everybody is happy because the [T. rex] is in a museum, and the billionaire got patted on the back and rode off into the sunset on the back of a dinosaur,” Detrich said. [In Images: A New Look at T. Rex and Its Relatives]

Detrich listed the baby T. rex on eBay on Feb. 26, and the paleontological community has been in an uproar ever since. Legality has nothing to do with the anger. Detrich’s brother Bob found the beast’s fossilized bones near Jordan, a town in eastern Montana, in 2013. Detrich was leasing the land, which was private property, meaning anything found on the land belonged to Detrich.

Rather, paleontologists are upset because if a private individual buys the baby dinosaur king, that person is under no obligation to share it with the scientists who are keen to study juvenile T. rex specimens. Moreover, even if the predator’s remains were lent to an institution or made available for study, most paleontologists don’t like to study fossils unless they’re donated, meaning the specimen would be available for study in perpetuity, and not just when the owner feels like making it accessible.

That’s precisely what happened in 2016, when a privately owned, 120-million-year-old specimen from Brazil drew controversy: A group of scientists called it the first four-legged snake on record, and another group announced that it wasn’t a snake at all, but likely a dolichosaurid, an extinct snake-like marine lizard. It’s anyone’s guess what the creature really is, as the specimen’s owner has declined to let anyone else study the fossil.

Finding Baby Bob

After digging up the bones, Detrich immediately knew they belonged to a theropod (a group of bipedal, mostly meat-eating dinosaurs), but he didn’t know it was a T. rex until he took it to Peter Larson, a paleontologist and president of the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota.

Excited, Detrich took the fossils home to Kansas and cleaned them up. Then, in honor of his late mentor, Larry Martin, a vertebrate paleontologist and curator of the Natural History Museum at the University of Kansas, he lent it to the museum.

“In honor of Larry, I thought it would be a good thing if I loaned this thing to the museum,” Detrich said. “They could study it, they could show thousands of people this specimen, and they have.” Paleontologists contacted by Detrich looked at the bones and estimated that the dinosaur, initially named “Baby Bob” and later “Son of Samson,” was about 4 years old when it died during the late Cretaceous, about 68 million years ago. [Gory Guts: Photos of a T. Rex Autopsy]

But after Son of Samson was on display for two years, Detrich felt like “I did my fair share of giving,” and he posted it on eBay for $2.95 million. He didn’t initially tell the museum about his plans, but when museum officials found out, they asked that he remove their name from the eBay posting, so they wouldn’t be associated with the auctioning of dinosaur fossils.

In a statement, museum director Leonard Krishtalka said, “The KU Natural History Museum does not sell or mediate the sale of specimens to private individuals. Accordingly, the specimen on exhibit-loan to us has been removed from exhibit and is being returned to the owner. We have asked that the owner remove any association with us from his sale listing.”

The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology also decried the sale: “Vertebrate fossils are rare and often unique,” the society said in a statement. “Scientific practice demands that conclusions drawn from the fossils should be verifiable: scientists must be able to reexamine, remeasure and reinterpret them (such reexamination can happen decades or even centuries after the fact).”

What’s the big deal?

Studying privately owned specimens is so discouraged that Robert Boessenecker, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, who isn’t involved with the T. rex specimen, said he wouldn’t study any, even if the owner offered to lent it to him or a museum.

In fact, it’s common for people to try to drop off privately owned specimens for Boessenecker to identify, shed light on or even put on temporary display.

“That has already happened, and I have thanked them for their generosity, but explained that because museums serve as a center of research, that any fossil that enters the museum for a long-term period should be owned by the museum,” Boessenecker said. “If we’re going to put it on display, it has to be a fossil that has been donated or otherwise permanently accessioned [added] into our collection.”

He added that most museums don’t have the budget to purchase high-priced specimens. (An exception is Sue, the most complete T. rex on record , who was sold to the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago for $8.4 million in 1997.) Instead, most research institutions opt to spend less money by sending their own researchers out into the field to find fossils, or rely on the generosity of donors, Boessenecker said. [Photos: Velociraptor Cousin Had Short Arms and Feathery Plumage]

Boessenecker added that many paleontologists have good relationships with fossil collectors, who often clue in researchers to fossil hotspots and exciting finds. But if they want to loan a specimen, it’s just not worth it, Boessenecker said, in part because the museum is responsible for the housing and safety of any fossils in its possession. (He detailed other challenges in this Twitter thread.)

Moreover, Detrich’s eBay listing hints that the juvenile T. rex might solve the Nanotyrannus mystery once and for all. In short, some experts think that Nanotyrannus is a separate species, but most paleontologists think it’s simply a baby T. rex. However, while the teeth of such a specimen would shed light on the mystery one way or the other, Boessenecker noted that Son of Sampson’s jaw is highly fragmented and part of it may be missing — so it likely wouldn’t solve the case.

In the meantime, the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology discouraged institutions from putting loaned items on display.

“We strongly recommend that repositories, exhibitions and scientists stay at arm’s length from specimens that are not yet permanently in the public trust,” the society said in the statement. To give an example, “The Museum für Naturkunde [Natural History Museum] in Berlin is currently exhibiting and studying a privately owned tyrannosaur skull, a specimen that could just as easily be removed from the public trust as Detrich’s juvenile,” the society said.

While there are no bids on the T. rex yet, as Detrich told Live Science, “All you need is one.”

Originally published on Live Science.

Westlake Legal Group baby-t-rex-cast What's the controversy over the baby T. Rex listed on eBay? LiveScience Laura Geggel Associate Editor fox-news/science/archaeology/dinosaurs fnc/science fnc article 5cdb04f4-f833-5115-973e-f155b0354cc9   Westlake Legal Group baby-t-rex-cast What's the controversy over the baby T. Rex listed on eBay? LiveScience Laura Geggel Associate Editor fox-news/science/archaeology/dinosaurs fnc/science fnc article 5cdb04f4-f833-5115-973e-f155b0354cc9

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Insect annihilation: What we can do about its threat to Earth

Westlake Legal Group insect-annihilation-what-we-can-do-about-its-threat-to-earth Insect annihilation: What we can do about its threat to Earth Stephanie Bedo news.com.au fox-news/science/wild-nature/insects fnc/science fnc article 5e0a46ca-5e55-5525-935a-5eda9525d25c

They’re the things that often bug us the most — quite literally.

But with warnings insects could disappear within the century, suddenly the critters we first think to squish have made us think differently.

A global scientific review of insect decline has warned insects will “go down the path of extinction” in a few decades, with “catastrophic” repercussions for the planet’s ecosystems.

The biodiversity crisis is said to be even deeper than that of climate change.

Scientists have already warned the earth’s sixth mass extinction event is underway through biological annihilation.

“Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions,” researchers wrote in 2017.

They said decimation needed to be addressed immediately.

“Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions.

“Population extinctions, however, are a prelude to species extinctions, so Earth’s sixth mass extinction episode has proceeded further than most assume.

“The massive loss of populations is already damaging the services ecosystems provide to civilization. When considering this frightening assault on the foundations of human civilization, one must never forget that Earth’s capacity to support life, including human life, has been shaped by life itself.”

In the Puerto Rican rainforest, 98 percent of ground insects were reported to have vanished in 35 years.

A study earlier this year found more than 40 percent of insect species are declining and a third are endangered.

So what can we do other than stop squishing them if we want to do our bit and (ultimately) save the planet?

Intensive use of pesticides has been found to be the worst culprit in the demise of insects.

Researchers say humanity must change the ways it produces food to arrest the decline and “save the planet as we know it”.

Macquarie University entomologist Dr. Matthew Bulbert says we can all do something to help save them.

The lecturer and researcher in animal behavior points out ecosystems rely on insects as the pollinators of plants and crops, recyclers of waste into nutrients and as a food source themselves for freshwater, food and, ultimately, oxygen.

We effectively cannot survive without them.

But with Australia having so many insects, it’s estimated 80 percent of species are yet to be identified.

“As scientists we know the decline is happening,” Dr. Bulbert says.

“In Australia, we’re potentially losing animals that we don’t even know are there, and there is relatively little investment in that area of research.

“The good thing is that with insects, more so than if we were trying to save snow leopards or rhinos, every individual has it in their power to do something to try and mitigate further loss.”

For anyone trying to do their bit, Dr. Bulbert has come up with a list of things you can do:

BUILD INSECT HOTELS

Think a bird nesting box — but for bugs.

“I think they’re awesome,” Dr Bulbert says.

“You create art-inspired habitats for insects, often made out of lots of different shapes and types of wood — so you might have cylinders of wood that have different size diameter holes that would cater for different animals.

“The concept is not that far removed from a bird nest box.

“The cool thing is you can put a lot more structural diversity in there, and you can build it in a way that looks great in the garden, and tailor it, through the dimensions of holes and the types of materials, to the kinds of insects you would like to see in your garden.

“It’s a great exercise to include the kids.”

While the best hotel designs are dominated by the Europeans, he says the principles for an Australian environment are the same.

Westlake Legal Group 1abe3111-cockroach Insect annihilation: What we can do about its threat to Earth Stephanie Bedo news.com.au fox-news/science/wild-nature/insects fnc/science fnc article 5e0a46ca-5e55-5525-935a-5eda9525d25c

SAY NO TO PESTICIDES

Find chemical-free ways of controlling insects you don’t want in your house and garden.

Dr. Bulbert says many pest species have become resistant to the pesticides we use, which is problematic in itself, but the spread of pesticides from crop areas takes out the suite of species diversity around that crop — even the ones that naturally occur to control pests.

“This effect is occurring beyond just commercial enterprise; if you think of the build-up of household sprays across the populace, that’s a lot of chemicals out there that can have effects beyond just the animal you’re trying to target.“

People can consider these alternatives to grabbing a can of spray:

Direct animals outside — for flying insects open a window and make other parts of the house dark to direct the insect towards the light. For crawling ones capture and release.

Ensure food scraps are secured in a way that doesn’t attract insects you don’t want — especially cockroaches. Of the 550 species of cockroaches in Australia, only six are considered pests, two of which are native.

“The cockroaches that are commonly invasive to households are introduced,” Dr. Bulbert says.

“They give Australia’s wonderful cockroaches a bad name, but native species are incredibly important in the breaking down of plant waste and thereby recycling the nutrients plants need.”

In your garden, be proactive rather than reactive. Use natural fertilizers and netting, and consider the ancient art of companion planting.

“This is about understanding what species you can put with the plants that you want to protect that can act as a natural deterrent,” Dr. Bulbert says.

Local councils may offer workshops in this area.

Actively encourage natural predators, such as spiders both inside and out, and in the garden, insects such as ladybirds, praying mantids, lacewings and assassin bugs.

The last resort, if you truly feel threatened by the insect invading your home and feel the need to kill it, stomp on it rather than spraying.

PLANT NATIVES

Plant a diversity of native species, including ones that flower year-round.

“If you plant natives, you will harbor or attract a higher diversity of insects,” Dr. Bulbert says.

“We have this thing about having brightly colored flowers, but often those flowers are not native and while you will still get pollinators, it has been found that the diversity of insects that interact with non-natives is a lot lower — even if the plants are closely related to the native.

“In saying that, having plants that flower all year round is beneficial irrespective of whether they are native or not, especially in urban landscapes.”

Dr. Bulbert recommends checking out A planting guide for European Honeybees and Australian Native Pollinators by the Australian government.

BRING BACK WATER FEATURES

While they might have gone out of fashion with modern design, Bulbert says “Bring them back!”

These can include ponds and fountains, anything where the water keeps moving to avoid stagnation and mosquito breeding.

“If you want to find a depressing piece of literature it’s the decline of freshwater species overall, so making unpolluted freshwater available can promote animals like water beetles and water bugs.”

USE LED LIGHT GLOBES

And turn the lights off when you don’t need them, or use sensor lights.

Research into light pollution caused by urbanization shows major disruption to the goings-on of insects.

“A study in Sweden, for instance, has shown artificial lights disrupt nocturnal pollination leading to a 62 percent reduction in nocturnal visits to plants in artificially lit areas when compared to dark areas, leading to a significant decline in seed set,” Dr. Bulbert says.

Insects are attracted to the wavelengths emitted by incandescent light globes, which redirects them away from the activities they are supposed to be doing.

The beam of light can also impair the effectiveness of illumination methods flowers may use to attract pollinators.

Recent research has shown warm LEDs are best.

If you don’t like their slight yellow/orange color, then go for white LEDs, which are still better than traditional incandescents.

INVEST IN A WORM FARM

These recycling factories have many roll-on benefits aside from helping invertebrates: they are recycling waste that would otherwise go to landfill, and making natural fertilizer for your plants, thereby reducing the need for chemicals.

“It’s important to invest in a nice secure environment so you can control what enters and what doesn’t — you’ve got a lovely food source for animals so it may attract things you don’t want, like rats, for instance,” Dr. Bulbert says.

You can check in with your local council about any workshops they might run.

CREATE SHADE OASES

Dr. Bulbert says maintaining vegetation is crucial for thermal buffering, particularly as episodes of extreme heat become more common.

“If you remove trees and other vegetation, you automatically start to get an increase in temperature at the ground level,” he says.

“There are temperature thresholds at which insects gets nuked, so you need the shade and cooling effects of vegetation and trees to avoid that.”

A lack of vegetation also hardens soil, making it less accessible to insects and other critters whose job it is to recycle material in the soil.

STOP TELLING THEM TO BUG OFF

Just be fascinated by them, Dr. Bulbert says.

Take some time to observe and understand what they’re doing and why they do it, and relate that to your own wellbeing.

“People have trouble connecting with insects because they are small, we don’t see very much of them, they can be freaky looking and have attributes that bear no similarity to us, unlike, say, gorillas or giraffes, but the contribution they make to our wellbeing far surpasses anything else that we are investing money in terms of conservation,” he says.

“Look at pandas — I love them, they have lots of cultural significance, and lots of roll-on attributes in terms of attracting people to zoos that may then have money for conservation for a range of things, but in reality the contribution a panda makes to society’s wellbeing is minimal in comparison to the worms in your garden.”

This story originally appeared in news.com.au.

Westlake Legal Group Mantis-Nest-iStock Insect annihilation: What we can do about its threat to Earth Stephanie Bedo news.com.au fox-news/science/wild-nature/insects fnc/science fnc article 5e0a46ca-5e55-5525-935a-5eda9525d25c   Westlake Legal Group Mantis-Nest-iStock Insect annihilation: What we can do about its threat to Earth Stephanie Bedo news.com.au fox-news/science/wild-nature/insects fnc/science fnc article 5e0a46ca-5e55-5525-935a-5eda9525d25c

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Hawaii’s islands are under threat from rising sea levels, experts warn

Westlake Legal Group hawaiis-islands-are-under-threat-from-rising-sea-levels-experts-warn Hawaii’s islands are under threat from rising sea levels, experts warn fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fnc/science fnc ddc954ef-3d94-556f-a1a8-5ea3a7f80c53 Associated Press article

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii’s iconic Waikiki Beach could soon be underwater as rising sea levels caused by climate change overtake its white sand beaches and bustling city streets.

Predicting Honolulu will start experiencing frequent flooding within the next 15 to 20 years, state lawmakers are trying to pass legislation that would spend millions for a coastline protection program aimed at defending the city from regular tidal inundations.

The highest tides of recent years have sent seawater flowing across Waikiki Beach and onto roads and sidewalks lining its main thoroughfare, and interactive maps of the Hawaiian Islands show that many parts of the state are expected to be hit by extensive flooding, coastal erosion and loss of infrastructure in coming decades.

That’s an alarming scenario for a state where beach tourism is the primary driver of the economy, leading some lawmakers to insist that planning for rising tides should start now.

“The latest data on sea level rise is quite scary and it’s accelerating faster than we ever thought possible,” said state Rep. Chris Lee, a Democrat and lead author of a bill calling for the creation and implementation of the shoreline protection plan. The project would focus on urban Honolulu but act as a pilot program for other coastal communities around the state.

While Hawaii is rarely subjected to direct hurricane hits, Lee’s bill says warmer oceans will increase that risk by creating “more hurricanes of increasing intensity” — and estimates the impact of a major hurricane making landfall at $40 billion.

Westlake Legal Group 477e9425-hawaii-climate-change Hawaii’s islands are under threat from rising sea levels, experts warn fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fnc/science fnc ddc954ef-3d94-556f-a1a8-5ea3a7f80c53 Associated Press article

In this June 23, 2017 photo, sand bags line the beach at Ala Moana Beach Park in Honolulu as record high tides hit the islands. (Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Bruce Asato via AP)

“The loss of coastal property and infrastructure, increased cost for storm damage and insurance, and loss of life are inevitable if nothing is done, which will add a significant burden to local taxpayers, the state’s economy, and way of life,” says Lee’s bill, which is similar to action taken by New York City after a storm surge from Superstorm Sandy led to $19 billion in damage in 2012.

The Hawaii measure proposes sinking $4 million into the program’s development over the next two years. The bill also seeks more research into a carbon tax that might raise funds and lower the state’s dependence on fossil fuels.

Lee said urban areas such as Waikiki are often “built in such a way that it forms a protective barrier against the kind of storm events that are inevitable.”

But in more rural areas, he said, new construction could be restricted close to shore “to preserve dune systems and build in a lot of natural solutions that are much more cost effective and provide a much more resilient result than simply building out concrete infrastructure or anything of the sort.”

In a state dominated by Democrats that is regularly at the vanguard of U.S. efforts to address climate issues, Lee said the legislation proved popular. A version of the bill has passed both chambers of Hawaii’s Legislature. House and Senate leaders will convene in the coming weeks to discuss final changes before sending the bill to Gov. David Ige, a Democrat. His office has declined comment on whether he will sign it.

The bill is moving forward two years after a state-mandated sea level rise adaptation reportwas made public to act as a guideline for future legislative action and planning.

Research included in the report suggests Hawaii will see a 3-foot (0.9 meters) rise in ocean levels by the end of this century. It predicts that more than 6,000 of the state’s buildings and 20,000 people across all of Hawaii’s islands will experience chronic flooding. Dozens of miles of roadways, utility infrastructure and beaches will be washed away, the report said. The state’s ports and low-laying airports are also highly vulnerable.

The report was updated in September to included newly published research warning that previous estimates of inundation areas in Hawaii were underestimated by 35% to 54%.

University of Hawaii researcher Tiffany Anderson, who led the study, said traditional sea level forecasts use what is known as the “bathtub model” to measure where water will rise and flood land. But she was surprised by the dramatic increase revealed when she factored in more variables such as beach erosion and wave energy fluctuations, which are not used in traditional climate change flooding predictions.

“We’ve long suspected processes like shoreline erosion, waves overtopping and inundation would be additional factors for Hawaii,” Anderson said. “We found out it covers a lot more land … I wasn’t expecting such a large increase due to these other two processes.”

State Rep. Nicole Lowen, a bill backer and Democrat, said people hoping to build near the coast should already be wary.

“It would make sense already to say, ‘If we know this is a sea level rise inundation area, then why would we permit a new structure,'” said Lowen, who was the lead author of separate legislation that would have changed construction permitting standards across the state.

That measure died when it was referred to the Senate Ways and Means Committee and not scheduled for a hearing.

“I think sea level rise and climate change impacts globally are going to have a huge disruptive effect on economies,” Lowen said. “And having an economy that’s so heavily based on tourism and so easily impacted by something like the cost of oil rising, for example, it’s not resilient.”

Westlake Legal Group hawaii-climate-change-2 Hawaii’s islands are under threat from rising sea levels, experts warn fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fnc/science fnc ddc954ef-3d94-556f-a1a8-5ea3a7f80c53 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group hawaii-climate-change-2 Hawaii’s islands are under threat from rising sea levels, experts warn fox-news/science/planet-earth/climate fnc/science fnc ddc954ef-3d94-556f-a1a8-5ea3a7f80c53 Associated Press article

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Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades

Westlake Legal Group crusader-skeletons-discovery-sheds-new-light-on-the-crusades Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 5c7eea85-e29a-52e2-949f-4a103a384e75

A medieval burial pit in Lebanon is shedding new light on the Crusader era in the Middle East.

The Crusades were a series of religious wars that began in the 11th century and lasted until the 13th century when the Christian crusaders were forced out of their last strongholds in what is now Israel and Lebanon.

Scientists studied the DNA of nine Crusaders buried in a 13th-century burial pit near a crusader castle close to the Lebanese city of Sidon. The study, which is published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, found that the Crusaders were genetically diverse and that they had children with the local population.

LAST SUPPER SITE REVEALS ITS SECRETS IN STUNNING 3D LASER SCANS

Three of the crusaders were European, four were Near Easterners and two had mixed ancestry, according to the researchers.

Westlake Legal Group CrusaderGetty1900 Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 5c7eea85-e29a-52e2-949f-4a103a384e75

Chromo illustration (from the Liebig figurine series) of Duke of Lower Lorraine, Goffredo di Buglione (1061 – 1100), Italy, circa 1900. As Goffredo III (between 1089 – 1100), he participated in the first Crusade (1096 – 1099). (Photo by Fototeca Gilardi/Getty Images)

“Our findings give us an unprecedented view of the ancestry of the people who fought in the Crusader army. And it wasn’t just Europeans,” said the study’s first authorMarc Haber of the U.K.’s Wellcome Sanger Institute, in a statement. “We see this exceptional genetic diversity in the Near East during medieval times, with Europeans, Near Easterners, and mixed individuals fighting in the Crusades and living and dying side by side.”

“We know that Richard the Lionheart went to fight in the Crusades, but we don’t know much about the ordinary soldiers who lived and died there, and these ancient samples give us insights into that,” said Chris Tyler-Smith, a genetics researcher at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the study’s senior author.

AMAZING CRUSADER DISCOVERY: GOTHIC HALL FOUND AT KNIGHTS’ HILLTOP CASTLE

However, traces of Crusader DNA are “insignificant” among modern Lebanese people. The researchers noted that other mass migrations, such as the Spanish and Portuguese colonization of South America, have impacted the genetic makeup of those regions.

Westlake Legal Group CrusaderBones Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 5c7eea85-e29a-52e2-949f-4a103a384e75

The Crusader bones found in the 13th-century burial pit. (Claude Doumet-Serhal)

In contrast, the Crusaders’ relatively short-lived presence in the Middle East, has had less of a genetic impact. “They made big efforts to expel them, and succeeded after a couple of hundred years,” said Tyler-Smith.

The scientists found that the DNA of modern Lebanese people has more in common with people living in the region when it was part of the Roman Empire 2,000 years ago.

CRUSADER-ERA HAND GRENADE SURPRISES ARCHAEOLOGISTS

Other stunning Crusader-era discoveries have been garnering attention recently. The room venerated as the site of Jesus’ Last Supper, for example, has been revealed in stunning detail thanks to remarkable 3D laser scanning technology. The Cenacle is part of a church built by the Crusaders over an earlier 4th-century Byzantine church.

Westlake Legal Group CrusaderBones3 Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 5c7eea85-e29a-52e2-949f-4a103a384e75

The bones highlight the Crusaders’ genetic diversity. (Claude Doumet-Serhal)

Last year, experts discovered a Gothic hall at a medieval Crusader fortress in northern Israel. The ceremonial hall found in Galilee’s Montfort Castle offers a fascinating glimpse into the turbulent Crusader era in the Holy Land, which began in the 11th century and lasted until the 13th century.

In 2017, amazing medieval jewelry was found during the excavation of a Crusader castle on Tittora Hill in the town of Modi’in-Maccabim-Re’ut.

In 2016, a centuries-old hand grenade that may date back to the time of the Crusaders was among a host of treasures retrieved from the sea in Israel. The hand grenade was a common weapon in Israel during the Crusader era.

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Over decades, archaeologists have also uncovered the ruins of the once-thriving Crusader city in the modern Israeli city of Acre.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group e6bc0a46-CrusaderBones2 Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 5c7eea85-e29a-52e2-949f-4a103a384e75   Westlake Legal Group e6bc0a46-CrusaderBones2 Crusader skeletons discovery sheds new light on the Crusades James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 5c7eea85-e29a-52e2-949f-4a103a384e75

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Snake devours huge frogmouth outside woman’s window, disturbing video shows

Westlake Legal Group snake-devours-huge-frogmouth-outside-womans-window-disturbing-video-shows Snake devours huge frogmouth outside woman's window, disturbing video shows Jennifer Earl fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 1725267e-d055-546c-9877-b8c95dce0b9a
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027896397001_6027896180001-vs Snake devours huge frogmouth outside woman's window, disturbing video shows Jennifer Earl fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 1725267e-d055-546c-9877-b8c95dce0b9a

An Australian woman was sipping her coffee when she noticed some feathers flying around outside. As she looked out of a window behind her, she was shocked to discover a large snake coiled around a tawny frogmouth — a stocky bird that resembles an owl.

Nicola Moore quickly took to Facebook to share photos of the horrific sight, noting in one picture you can see the jaw of the snake, identified as a carpet python, around the bird’s head.

“Tawny Frogmouth is like an owl. The snake is a constrictor, so not venomous, but pretty fond of squeezing,” Moore explained to curious Facebook users earlier this month. “This guy is pretty big, probably close to 2 metres. We have other very venomous snakes.”

INDIANA HIKER SPOTS HUGE SNAKE HANGING FROM TREE BRANCH

Dozens of people praised Moore’s “fantastic capture,” encouraging her to post more footage.

“Pretty big coastal python to take on the owl it wont need to [eat] again for a bit and will go off in a food coma for a while. Hubby has one as a pet its amazing watching them dislocate their jaws to devour their prey ours is just under 2 mtrs long and chugs down on 8 inch rats & wont be long before they go into brumation for the winter months. Hope you get some more great photos i know my hubby would love seeing them,” one friend replied.

Moore agreed that it would likely be devouring the frogmouth for “a good while.”

“We have lots of photos. No need to even zoom, we can take touch them both,” she replied, in part.

BLOODSUCKING WORMS FOUND IN FLORIDA RATTLESNAKE SPECIES ALARM RESEARCHERS: ‘IT’S A NASTY SITUATION’

The woman from New South Wales then went outside to capture some video of the bizarre battle. A minute-long clip shows the snake tightening its grip around the bird’s neck as it bites down on its head.

She then put her hand on the window to show viewers just how big the snake’s prey really was.

And for those who were curious if the snake managed to finish its meal — Moore confirmed the snake’s eyes really were bigger than its stomach.

“In the end it didn’t manage to completely swallow the bird, so cats, dogs and kids would be too big. They are often kept as pets, and seen as being quite harmless. We do get a few very venomous snakes, but everyone is raised knowing how to deal with them,” she explained.

A carpet snake is a non-venomous snake with a thick body covered in yellow and white speckles. It’s one of the largest snakes in Australia and is a popular choice for a pet in the region, Northern Territory Government states online.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027896397001_6027896180001-vs Snake devours huge frogmouth outside woman's window, disturbing video shows Jennifer Earl fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 1725267e-d055-546c-9877-b8c95dce0b9a   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6027896397001_6027896180001-vs Snake devours huge frogmouth outside woman's window, disturbing video shows Jennifer Earl fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox news fnc/science fnc article 1725267e-d055-546c-9877-b8c95dce0b9a

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Hiker discovers cute ‘abandoned puppy,’ gets big surprise

Westlake Legal Group hiker-discovers-cute-abandoned-puppy-gets-big-surprise Hiker discovers cute 'abandoned puppy,' gets big surprise James Rogers fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/science fnc article 83a1f628-df7c-5e0f-9b6b-4adaa4a930b9

A hiker in Southern California thought he had found an abandoned puppy in a canyon recently. The cute animal, however, was not all that it seemed.

The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the man was walking his dog when he spotted what he thought was an abandoned puppy. The hiker picked the animal up and took it home, where he called the San Diego Humane Society.

Wildlife officers then went to the man’s home, where they examined the animal.

‘WOLF INSIDE’ PET DOGS HELPS THEM COOPERATE WITH HUMANS, STUDY FINDS

“Our Humane Officers recently received a call about an abandoned puppy in a canyon in Tierrasanta. To their surprise, the little creature was actually a coyote pup!” explained the San Diego Humane Society, in a Facebook post. “The officers took the adorable pup to Project Wildlife for care before being transferred to The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center.”

Citing an officer at Project Wildlife, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports that took much time had elapsed since the pup’s “rescue” for the animal to be returned to the canyon where she was found. Coyotes often move their dens, something that the pup’s mother may have been doing when the well-meaning hiker scooped the animal up and brought her home.

DOGS WERE DOMESTICATED IN NORTH AMERICA 10,000 YEARS AGO, STUDY SAYS

The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center, which cares for native California predatory species, says that the coyote is doing well. “Our goal is always to raise orphans with other conspecifcs and eventually return them to their native habitat once they reach natural dispersal age,” it explained, in a Facebook post. “The hard part with this little girl is that she came in so early in the season, we were unable to pair her up with another orphaned pup.”

“Though our goal is always to release ill, injured or orphaned wildlife – the final status of the pup is yet to be determined,” the Center added.

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Earlier this year, dam workers in Estonia rescued what they thought was a dog from a frozen river, only to discover that it was a wolf.

Fox News’ Anna Hopkins contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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