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The Latest: Coroner names 4 reservation shooting victims

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news The Latest: Coroner names 4 reservation shooting victims YAKIMA, Wash. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 6d31ba47-d5a0-5983-b575-ce395d150892

The Latest on the killings on the Yakama Indian Reservation in Washington state (all times local):

2 p.m.

The Yakima County coroner has released the names of four of the five people who were found shot to death on the Yakama Indian Reservation in Washington state.

The coroner on Tuesday identified the victims as 49-year-old Catherine Eneas; 61-year-old Dennis Overacker; 51-year-old Michelle Starines; and 36-year-old Thomas Hernandez.

The coroner says all four suffered fatal gunshot wounds at a home in the town of White Swan.

The identity of a fifth victim has not been released as officials are still trying to notify next of kin.

Authorities have not disclosed a possible motive for the killings.

Two people have been arrested in connection with the slayings.

___

11:30 a.m.

Court records say a homeowner told police that two men linked to the killing of five people on an Indian reservation in Washington state approached his residence and briefly took a child hostage at gunpoint before they were captured later.

The documents obtained Monday said the child managed to escape as the two men demanded keys and took a vehicle.

The men face assault charges related to the Saturday killings on the Yakima Indian Reservation.

The FBI, which has jurisdiction on reservations, hasn’t released much information about the slayings near the town of White Swan.

Two other people have also been arrested.

Sheriff Robert Udell says some of the victims were known for being involved in illegal drug activities.

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Florida man arrested after hiding meth in container of ‘hot, fresh potato wedges,’ police say

A Florida man’s order was up after deputies discovered a bag of meth inside a styrofoam container of “hot, fresh potato wedges,” authorities said.

James Simpson, 48, was arrested Saturday afternoon after police conducted a traffic stop, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office said.

FLORIDA MAN CAUGHT WITH COCAINE ON HIS NOSE INSISTS DRUGS WERE NOT HIS: DEPUTIES

Police said Simpson was wanted on an active drug warrant for alleged possession of drug paraphernalia in Polk County.

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A deputy searching the vehicle found six grams of methamphetamines inside a container mixed in with potato wedges, the sheriff’s office said.

Simpson was arrested and faces an additional charge of possession of a controlled substance.

Westlake Legal Group simpson-potato-wedges-sbs Florida man arrested after hiding meth in container of 'hot, fresh potato wedges,' police say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox news fnc/us fnc article 2056aa48-3ce8-5bb5-9eed-66971daf6e4c   Westlake Legal Group simpson-potato-wedges-sbs Florida man arrested after hiding meth in container of 'hot, fresh potato wedges,' police say Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox news fnc/us fnc article 2056aa48-3ce8-5bb5-9eed-66971daf6e4c

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Helicopter pilot who crashed atop Manhattan high-rise not licensed for foul-weather flying: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6046730100001_6046734307001-vs Helicopter pilot who crashed atop Manhattan high-rise not licensed for foul-weather flying: report Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/us fnc article 4516bece-bbde-54d3-8972-2ec74cb3eaf2

The helicopter pilot who died when his craft crash-landed atop a New York City high-rise on Monday was not licensed to be in the air during bad weather, officials said.

A spokesperson with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said Tuesday that pilot Timothy McCormack did not have the required certificate allowing him to fly when visibility was less than three miles, NBC reported.

The 58-year-old veteran pilot, a former volunteer fire chief in northern New York state, was not “instrument rated,” meaning he could not use the instruments on his chopper to guide him through the rain that enveloped Manhattan on Monday.

McCormack was the only fatality reported from the crash on top of the 750-foot AXA Equitable building in Midtown Manhattan. The crash occurred about 11 minutes after he’d taken off from a heliport along the East River, a little more than a mile away. The building at 787 Seventh Avenue did not a helipad on the roof.

VIDEO APPEARS TO SHOW HELICOPTER FLYING ERRATICALLY BEFORE HIGH-RISE CRASH IN NEW YORK CITY

Doug Brazy, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), told reporters on Tuesday it’s still working on pinpointing what caused the crash, but would not speculate. He said a fire after the crash consumed much of the wreckage, and investigators are trying to ID whatever could be salvaged.

“We have much more work to do before this investigation is complete,” he said, adding that a preliminary report would be released in about two weeks. He said the report would not include the cause of the crash.

NY LAWMAKERS PUSH FOR TOUGHER HELICOPTER RESTRICTIONS IN WAKE OF DEADLY CRASH

It was not immediately clear what caused the crash, or why McCormack was flying the Augusta A109E in a driving downpour with a low cloud cover.

The airspace around Manhattan is tightly controlled; a flight restriction is in effect since President Trump took office, banning flights below 3,000 feet within a mile of Trump Tower.

A dramatic video circulating on social media shows a helicopter flying erratically over the East River. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio appeared to confirm that that helicopter was the same aircraft piloted by McCormack.

He told CNN authorities need to find out more about the pilot at the time he decided to take off.

A spokesman for the NTSB told Fox News earlier Tuesday that it would not be able to confirm if the craft in the video was, in fact, the one that crashed. Brazy said he has not seen the video but officials suspect it was the chopper that came down.

Brazy told reporters that McCormack had flown a previous flight with one passenger before it departed from the helipad on the East River. He said investigators have spoken to the passenger in that flight as part of their probe.

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FAA records show that McCormack was a certified instructor and commercial pilot, but that air traffic controllers “did not handle” his flight, NBC reported.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6046730100001_6046734307001-vs Helicopter pilot who crashed atop Manhattan high-rise not licensed for foul-weather flying: report Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/us fnc article 4516bece-bbde-54d3-8972-2ec74cb3eaf2   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6046730100001_6046734307001-vs Helicopter pilot who crashed atop Manhattan high-rise not licensed for foul-weather flying: report Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/us fnc article 4516bece-bbde-54d3-8972-2ec74cb3eaf2

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Cleveland to pay $225G to American flag burner at 2016 GOP convention

The city of Cleveland has agreed to pay $225,000 to a well-known flag-burning protester who was arrested after setting fire to an American flag at the 2016 Republican National Convention, it was reported Tuesday.

Gregory “Joey” Johnson of San Francisco, sued, claiming his arrest by Cleveland cops violated his First Amendment rights to burn the flag.

Johnson was convicted of burning an American flag at the 1984 Republican National Convention in Dallas, leading to a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling sanctioning flag-burning in a case in which he was the plaintiff.

ARMY SERGEANT BATTLES HOA OVER AMERICAN FLAG DISPLAY

Cleveland settled the case without any admission of liability. City Law Director Barbara Langhenry said, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer Tuesday.

Westlake Legal Group Joey-Johnson-Mug Cleveland to pay $225G to American flag burner at 2016 GOP convention Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc article 64f3cebe-8181-5f39-a0e6-58b39d256907

Mugshot for Gregory “Joey” Johnson after his flag-burning protest arrest during the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. (Cleveland Police Department)

The city previously agreed to pay $50,000 to another man who sued over his arrest during the flag-burning protest, the paper reported.

“Instead of protecting RNC protestors’ constitutional rights, Cleveland police stalked them, literally extinguished their speech rights, and then arrested and prosecuted them – violating 30-year-old Supreme Court precedent taught to schoolchildren,” Johnson’s attorney Subodh Chandra said in a news release announcing the settlement.

Johnson and other members of the Revolutionary Communist Party held the flag-burning protest the day after the convention nominated Donald Trump for president, according to the Plain Dealer.

SOLDIER SEEN PLACING FLAG AT TOMB OF UNKNOWN SOLDIER DURING TORRENTIAL RAIN

Cops arrested 18 protesters and claimed they interceded after Johnson set himself on fire.

Westlake Legal Group gregory-johnson Cleveland to pay $225G to American flag burner at 2016 GOP convention Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc article 64f3cebe-8181-5f39-a0e6-58b39d256907

Image taken from video of flag burning protest that led to arrest of Gregory “Joey” Johnson. (The Chandra Law Firm)

The charges against Johnson were dropped by prosecutors, the paper reported. Cases against 15 others were dismissed.

As president-elect in November 2016, Trump tweeted his support for jailing flag-burners.

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“Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag – if they do, there must be consequences – perhaps loss of citizenship or year in jail!” Trump said.

Westlake Legal Group gregory-johnson Cleveland to pay $225G to American flag burner at 2016 GOP convention Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc article 64f3cebe-8181-5f39-a0e6-58b39d256907   Westlake Legal Group gregory-johnson Cleveland to pay $225G to American flag burner at 2016 GOP convention Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc article 64f3cebe-8181-5f39-a0e6-58b39d256907

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El Paso border official on enormous jump in family apprehensions: Every day it continues, ‘security threats increase’

Westlake Legal Group hemmerBP El Paso border official on enormous jump in family apprehensions: Every day it continues, 'security threats increase' fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/us fnc David Montanaro article 04998ccc-8779-5f28-8bfe-3fa0d5a9001e

A U.S. Border Patrol official said Tuesday that “border security threats” remain as his officers deal with a staggering increase in the number of migrants arriving in the area.

More than 104,000 family unit apprehensions have been made in the El Paso Sector through May of this fiscal year, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. In the same period of 2018, there were 4,733 apprehensions, a more than 2,100 percent rise.

Aaron Hull, Chief Border Patrol Agent in the El Paso Sector, was asked on “America’s Newsroom” about the “enormous” increase, explaining the toll it has taken on authorities.

“The border security threats remain. In addition to the family unit aliens and unaccompanied children we’re catching, we continue to catch criminals, pedophiles, people with contagious diseases,” he explained.

TRUMP DEFENDS DEAL WITH MEXICO TO STEM MIGRANT FLOWS, PREVENT TARIFFS

GUTFELD ON TRUMP’S TARIFFS AND THE DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE

Hull said, “every day that it continues, every day our border security threats increase,” since agents are having to perform “stewardship” duties for children and families, rather than focusing on securing border areas between the ports of entry.

Bill Hemmer, citing statistics from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, asked how agents can sort through the more than 200,000 who have claimed to be part of a family unit since December.

Hull said each person “is a human being” with their own “individual background and health conditions.” He said each one must be subject to their own “immigration inspection” and often those who claim to be part of a family unit are not being truthful.

“There are very serious security threats and we catch people from all around the world and their intentions for entering this country are not always good,” he said.

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The number of migrants apprehended at America’s southern border skyrocketed in May to levels not seen in over a decade, with U.S. Customs and Border Protection reporting nearly 133,000 arrests for the month.

The number surpassed 144,000 when counting migrants deemed inadmissible — more than a 30 percent increase from the prior month and double the influx recorded at the beginning of the year.

“We are in full-blown emergency,” a CBP official said last week.

Westlake Legal Group hemmerBP El Paso border official on enormous jump in family apprehensions: Every day it continues, 'security threats increase' fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/us fnc David Montanaro article 04998ccc-8779-5f28-8bfe-3fa0d5a9001e   Westlake Legal Group hemmerBP El Paso border official on enormous jump in family apprehensions: Every day it continues, 'security threats increase' fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/us fnc David Montanaro article 04998ccc-8779-5f28-8bfe-3fa0d5a9001e

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White yoga teacher holding class for white people to learn how white supremacy is in their ‘body, mind and heart’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5723656034001_5723653164001-vs White yoga teacher holding class for white people to learn how white supremacy is in their 'body, mind and heart' Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox-news/us/education/controversies fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox news fnc/us fnc bebb77c9-24f9-5e6b-9ebc-cc7f91a2874a article

A white Seattle yoga instructor is holding a class geared exclusively towards white people to teach how white supremacy is prevalent in their “body, mind and heart.”

Laura Humpf, a 39-year-old yoga teacher since 2004, publicized an “Undoing Whiteness” yoga class this spring in which white people would learn to “unpack the harmful ways white supremacy is embedded” in the society and how they continue to perpetuate it.

AMERICANS WHO PRACTICE YOGA CONTRIBUTE TO WHITE SUPREMACY, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR CLAIMS

“I do stand behind white people needing to talk to other white people on how to undo whiteness. Can I keep refining it and doing it differently and better? Yeah, and I will forever and ever. But I believe in this space as one tool,” she told the Seattle Times.

“I do stand behind white people needing to talk to other white people on how to undo whiteness. Can I keep refining it and doing it differently and better? Yeah, and I will forever and ever. But I believe in this space as one tool.”

— Laura Humpf

She added that her class includes yoga postures and readings from a book aimed at helping white people to deal with race-based conversations.

The inspiration for the new classes came after noticing how white people appeared in yoga spaces “in racist ways.”

“I was seeing white people show up in yoga spaces in racist ways,” Humpf told the Times, pointing to white yoga instructors who apparently made racially-charged jokes, as well as saying “all lives mattered in yoga, so why see color.”

She also said an Indian meditation master was controversially removed from the Northwest Yoga Conference.

‘WHITE RACISM’ COURSE AT FLORIDA UNIVERSITY TEACHES THAT AMERICA IS ‘WHITE SUPREMACIST SOCIETY’

Her class tries to neutralize defensiveness, perfectionism and the “white savior complex” as participants try to physically interpret words such as “oppression” and “liberation.”

“I was seeing white people show up in yoga spaces in racist ways.”

— Laura Humpf

Multiple people, including local radio hosts, have already mocked Humpf over the class, especially for gearing it towards exclusively for white people, according to the Times.

This also isn’t the first time Humpf’s yoga classes have come under fire. Four years ago, she was criticized for discrimination after organizing a class for only people of color only while excluding white people. Due to the backlash, she canceled the classes.

She told the newspaper that her class didn’t discriminate and was just a practice of voluntarily congregating by race to dismantle white supremacy.

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Despite the backlash, Humpf said she will continue moving with the new class.

“The truth is that we all are one. There’s a divinity that connects us as human beings. But the reality is that we’re in different bodies so we experience the world in very different ways.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5723656034001_5723653164001-vs White yoga teacher holding class for white people to learn how white supremacy is in their 'body, mind and heart' Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox-news/us/education/controversies fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox news fnc/us fnc bebb77c9-24f9-5e6b-9ebc-cc7f91a2874a article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5723656034001_5723653164001-vs White yoga teacher holding class for white people to learn how white supremacy is in their 'body, mind and heart' Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox-news/us/education/controversies fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox news fnc/us fnc bebb77c9-24f9-5e6b-9ebc-cc7f91a2874a article

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Big Tech on the hot seat; Investigators seek clues in NYC helicopter crash

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know today …

Big Tech on a rare bipartisan hot seat
Big Tech and its practices will be under a bipartisan microscope as the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday will launch its investigation into the market dominance of Silicon Valley’s biggest names. It will begin with a look at the impact of the tech giants’ platforms on news content, the media and the spread of misinformation online. The House Judiciary Committee’s investigation of tech market power stands out because it’s bipartisan and the first review by Congress of industry that dominated with generally little interference from federal regulators.

But with regulators at the Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission apparently pursuing antitrust investigations of Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon, and several state attorneys general exploring bipartisan action of their own, the tech industry finds itself being increasingly accused of operating like monopolies. Rep. David Cicilline, D-RI, will lead Tuesday’s subcommittee hearing and vowed that the panel will broadly investigate the digital marketplace and “the dominance of large technology platforms,” with an eye toward legislative action to increase competition.

Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_NYC_HELICOPTER_CRASH_PROBE Big Tech on the hot seat; Investigators seek clues in NYC helicopter crash fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc c8b7fc0c-c249-5ff5-ae0c-99a53ceb4a03 article

Investigators seek clues behind NYC helicopter crash
The helicopter pilot killed in Monday’s crash in New York City has been identified as a former volunteer fire chief and a “dedicated, highly professional and extremely well trained firefighter,” as well as a skilled pilot. Tim McCormack died Monday after he made a “crash landing” on the roof of 787 Seventh Avenue in Midtown Manhattan around 2 p.m. as rain and strong winds hammered the city, the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) said. Investigators believe he was conducting “executive travel” and was headed to the “home airport in Linden, N.J.” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio later told reporters that there appeared to be no connection to terrorism.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the National Transportation Safety Board was in charge of the investigation and “will determine probable cause of the incident.” McCormack had been involved in a bird strike-related emergency landing for a helicopter in 2014.

Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_BROAD_INVESTIGATION Big Tech on the hot seat; Investigators seek clues in NYC helicopter crash fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc c8b7fc0c-c249-5ff5-ae0c-99a53ceb4a03 article

DOJ casts wide net in probe of surveillance abuses in Russia investigation
As part of its ongoing “multifaceted” and “broad” review into potential misconduct by U.S. intelligence agencies during the 2016 presidential campaign, the Justice Department revealed Monday it is also investigating the activities of several “non-governmental organizations and individuals.” In addition, the DOJ announced that the probe, let by Connecticut U.S. Attorney John Durham, was looking into the involvement of “foreign intelligence services.”

The DOJ’s announcement came as House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler announced Monday that he plans to hit pause on efforts to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt, after reaching a deal with the Justice Department for access to evidence related to former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report. Separately, John Dean, the former White House counsel to Richard Nixon, testified Monday that he sees “remarkable parallels” between Watergate and the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report – at a dramatic Capitol Hill hearing that Republicans panned as a political “show.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-720b72abb945473f8983bf32483b7992 Big Tech on the hot seat; Investigators seek clues in NYC helicopter crash fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc c8b7fc0c-c249-5ff5-ae0c-99a53ceb4a03 article

Kim Jong Un’s half-brother was CIA informant: Report
Kim Jong Un’s half-brother was working as a CIA informant before he was brazenly murdered in a Malaysian airport in 2017, according to a report Monday. Kim Jong Nam, the late North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il’s eldest son, “met on several occasions with agency operatives,” according to the Wall Street Journal. “There was a nexus” between Kim Jong Nam and the intelligence agency, according to the Journal’s source. Little else is known about what Kim Jong Un’s older brother told the feds; however, the report did state he “was almost certainly in contact with security services of other countries, particularly China’s.”

Ortiz back in Boston
Retired Red Sox player David Ortiz landed in Boston in an air ambulance Monday night after a targeted shooting at a bar in Santo Domingo forced doctors in his home nation of the Dominican Republic to remove his gallbladder and part of his intestine. Ortiz, 43, arrived in Boston around 10:30 p.m. after the Red Sox sent a plane to transport him to Massachusetts General Hospital.

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TODAY’S MUST-READS
Dems halt effort to secure pay increase for lawmakers, as contempt votes, funding drama loom.
Justin Amash gone from House Freedom Caucus after saying Trump’s conduct was ‘impeachable.’
Jonathan Morris: My decision to leave the Catholic priesthood.

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
Walmart vs. Amazon: Who is ahead in battle for retail dominance?
Makan Delrahim, Ajit Pai met Friday to discuss T-Mobile-Sprint deal as DOJ decision looms.
Why Americans should get into the housing market now.

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”

SOME PARTING WORDS

Addressing California’s decision to pay for tens of thousands of illegal immigrants to have full health benefits, Laura Ingraham wondered the government is helping illegal immigrants instead of its own citizens.

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CLICK HERE to find out what’s on Fox News today!

Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for joining us! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Wednesday morning.

Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_BIG_TECH_ON_THE_HOT_SEAT Big Tech on the hot seat; Investigators seek clues in NYC helicopter crash fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc c8b7fc0c-c249-5ff5-ae0c-99a53ceb4a03 article   Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_BIG_TECH_ON_THE_HOT_SEAT Big Tech on the hot seat; Investigators seek clues in NYC helicopter crash fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc c8b7fc0c-c249-5ff5-ae0c-99a53ceb4a03 article

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Bishops meeting on sex abuse clouded by state investigations

Hundreds of boxes. Millions of records. From Michigan to New Mexico this month, attorneys general are sifting through files on clergy sex abuse, seized through search warrants and subpoenas at dozens of archdioceses.

They’re looking to prosecute, and not just priests. If the boxes lining the hallways of Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel’s offices contain enough evidence, she said, she is considering using state racketeering laws usually reserved for organized crime. Prosecutors in Michigan are even volunteering on weekends to get through all the documents as quickly as possible.

For decades, leaders of the Roman Catholic Church were largely left to police their own. But now, as American bishops gather for a conference to confront the reignited sex-abuse crisis this week, they’re facing the most scrutiny ever from secular law enforcement.

A nationwide Associated Press query of more than 20 state and federal prosecutors last week found they are looking for legal means to hold higher ups in the church accountable for sex abuse. They have raided diocesan offices, subpoenaed files, set up victim tip lines and launched sweeping investigations into decades-old allegations. Thousands of people have called hotlines nationwide, and five priests have recently been arrested.

“Some of the things I’ve seen in the files makes your blood boil, to be honest with you,” Nessel said. “When you’re investigating gangs or the Mafia, we would call some of this conduct a criminal enterprise.”

If a prosecutor applies racketeering laws, also known as RICO, against church leaders, bishops and other church officials could face criminal consequences for enabling predator priests, experts say. Such a move by Michigan or one of the other law enforcement agencies would mark the first known time that actions by a diocese or church leader were branded a criminal enterprise akin to organized crime.

“That would be an important step because it would set the standard for pursuing justice in these cases,” said Marci Hamilton, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and CEO of CHILD USA, a Philadelphia-based think tank that tracks statute of limitations reforms.

Monsignor G. Michael Bugarin, who handles sex abuse accusations for the Detroit Archdiocese, said they too are committed to ending abuse and cover-ups. Bugarin said they cooperate with law enforcement, and that won’t change if the attorney general is considering organized crime charges.

“The law is the law, so I think we just have to respect what the current law is,” he said.

Some defenders of the church bristle at the notion of increased legal action, saying the Catholic institution is being singled out by overzealous prosecutors. A spokesperson for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops did not respond to requests for an interview Monday. The church has said it is already taking steps to address clergy abuse.

Seventeen years after U.S. bishops passed a “zero tolerance” policy against sexually abusive priests, they will consider new measures for accountability over abuse at their gathering this week in Baltimore. The meeting follows a global order issued by Pope Francis last month requiring all Catholic priests and nuns around the world to report clergy sexual abuse and cover-ups by their superiors to church authorities.

The meeting also follows a grand jury report that documented decades of clergy abuse and cover-ups in Pennsylvania, which thrust the Catholic Church’s sex assault scandal back into the mainstream last fall and spurred prosecutors across the U.S. to launch investigations of their hometown dioceses.

Since then, many states have launched telephone hotlines or online questionnaires for confidential complaints including Virginia, Nebraska and California.

Pennsylvania has been flooded with calls, some 1,800 from victims and families over the last three years. In Iowa, 11 people who identified themselves as victims and their relatives came forward in the hotline and questionnaire’s first three days. New Jersey and Michigan’s tip lines have received about 500 calls each, while Illinois has received nearly 400 calls and emails, including 160 from survivors.

In contrast, Delaware’s attorney general tip line has had four calls since November, 2018, a spokesperson said. Officials in Vermont say they can’t comment because the investigation is ongoing, but that they are aware of dozens of victims of alleged criminal misconduct.

While priests have been prosecuted in the past, top law enforcement scrutiny of church authorities has been relatively rare. In 2012, Bishop Robert Finn of the Kansas City-St. Joseph diocese in Missouri was the first and only American prelate convicted for his role in aiding a priest, when he was found guilty of failing to report child pornography on a cleric’s laptop to authorities.

AP reached out to attorneys general in 18 states, federal prosecutors in three jurisdictions and the U.S. Justice Department to learn more about the new round of investigations. Some of the accused priests in Pennsylvania had ties to other states, prompting those attorneys general, such as New Mexico, for example, to take a fresh look.

Before Pennsylvania’s attorney general got involved, cases against predator priests were largely the purview of local police and prosecutors, or private attorneys bringing lawsuits and civil claims. Although Pennsylvania’s attorney general office says prosecutors have spoken with their counterparts from almost every state, most attorneys general in the U.S. have not taken public action.

In Kentucky, Attorney General Andy Beshear wanted to investigate but lacked jurisdiction. He worked to change state law, but the bill failed to make it through the legislature.

Attorneys general who are investigating are using a range of tools. Michigan executed search warrants, which means police show up and raid the offices. Delaware, West Virginia and Nebraska have issued subpoenas, which is a less assertive approach, making a legal request for the records. New Jersey officials have started to make arrests, while Washington D.C.’s attorney general is weighing civil charges.

Asked whether the office would consider charges under Iowa’s far-reaching RICO statute, Attorney General spokesman Lynn Hicks said that nothing is off the table but that it’s premature to say. And in Virginia, spokesman Michael K. Kelly said they are using “every tool, authority, and resource” to investigate not only priests, but also “whether leadership in the dioceses may have covered up or abetted any such crimes.”

Iowa’s Attorney General Tom Miller said that he took action late last month after his office met with abuse survivors, including some whose stories have never become public.

Tim Lennon, who grew up in Sioux City, Iowa, said he was among the survivors who corresponded with Miller’s office and in recent months sent over new material about priests accused of abuse.

“The priest who had raped and abused me when I was 12 had gotten caught at three parishes before they moved him to my parish. The bishop knew and kept moving him along,” said Lennon, the president of the board of directors for the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, who now lives in Arizona.

Statute of limitation rules differ, and are being tested, in different states. In Michigan, for example, the clock stops if a priest moved out of state for a period.

New York, California and Florida refused to comment, citing ongoing investigations.

In recent years, civil lawsuits have used racketeering laws leading to large settlements. Delaware-based attorney Stephen Neuberger, who has successfully sued the church on behalf of clergy abuse victims, said questions inevitably arise about church authorities covering up and facilitating for accused priests. He said organized crime statutes seem appropriate.

“It’s not piling on,” he said. “In fact I think it’s long overdue.”

Associated Press writers Eric Tucker in Washington; Reese Dunklin in Dallas; Maryclaire Dale in Philadelphia; Lisa Rathke in Burlington, Vermont; Grant Schulte in Lincoln, Nebraska; Ryan Foley in Iowa City, Iowa; Anthony Izaguirre in Charleston, West Virginia; Matt Sedensky in New York; Alan Suderman in Richmond, Virginia; Jim Salter in St. Louis; Claudia Lauer in Philadelphia and Justin Pritchard in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-c1b0f812b1b34e2082cf549ee6106444 Bishops meeting on sex abuse clouded by state investigations JULIET LINDERMAN GARANCE BURKE AND MARTHA MENDOZA fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 3d4f4964-b05d-5312-a2c0-91a74a3494c6   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-c1b0f812b1b34e2082cf549ee6106444 Bishops meeting on sex abuse clouded by state investigations JULIET LINDERMAN GARANCE BURKE AND MARTHA MENDOZA fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 3d4f4964-b05d-5312-a2c0-91a74a3494c6

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Florida man tells deputy cocaine powder on nose, ‘not his’: police

A Florida man who was riding in the passenger-side seat in a vehicle that was pulled over early Sunday told the officer that the cocaine powder on his nose didn’t belong to him, according to investigators.

Fabricio Jimenez, 20, had been riding in the car that an officer pulled around 4:30 a.m. in suburban Tampa.

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The deputy who pulled over the vehicle that Fabricio Jimenez was riding in said she “immediately noticed (he) had a white powdery substance on his nose.” (Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office)

Investigators said the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office deputy “immediately noticed Jimenez had a white powdery substance on his nose she recognized to be cocaine.”

‘LOVE ISLAND’ STAR MIKE THALASSITIS DIED BY SUICIDE AFTER COCAINE, ALCOHOL BINGE: REPORT

A swab test by police came back positive for cocaine, officials cited by Fox 13 News said. Deputies said they found a small bag of cocaine on Jimenez and 250 grams of marijuana and 13 Xanax pills in the car.

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Jimenez was arrested on drug charges, police said. He also faces probation violation charges stemming from a conviction last year for cocaine and marijuana charges, according to the Smoking Gun.

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Former UCLA gynecologist faces sexual battery charge as school launches probe: report

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-5883268760ce4b96b6985b88503f49da Former UCLA gynecologist faces sexual battery charge as school launches probe: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 471ad6f0-5d2b-5f35-8b30-1d31aeff932b

A former staff gynecologist at the University of California Los Angeles turned himself into authorities Monday after being charged with sexual battery and exploitation in connection with the treatment of two patients at a university facility.

Dr. James Mason Heaps, an obstetrician-gynecologist who worked part-time at UCLA Health since 1983, plead not guilty to the charges against him in a Los Angeles courtroom later in the day.  UCLA received a complaint against Heaps in 2017 and placed him on leave the following year, but did not publicize the reason until Monday, according to the Los Angeles Times.

USC WAS REPORTEDLY TOLD GYNECOLOGIST COULD BE TARGETING ASIAN STUDENTS

“Sexual abuse in any form is unacceptable and represents an inexcusable breach of the physician-patient relationship,” UCLA Chancellor Gene D. Block said in a joint statement. “We are deeply sorry that a former UCLA physician violated our policies and standards, our trust and the trust of his patients.”

Heaps is charged with with two counts of sexual battery, fraud and one count of sexual exploitation of a patient, Ricardo Santiago of the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office, told USA Today.  UCLA Health spokesperson Rhonda Curry said the school first received a complaint about the doctor in December 2017 and launched an investigation.

During the course of the investigation, the school discovered two previous complaints against Heaps from 2014 and 2015. Heaps, however, was not placed on leave until June 2018 and was reportedly seeing patients in the interim. UCLA paid an undisclosed settlement to another student who saw Heaps during this time period and filed a complaint against him accusing him of inappropriately touching her, the Los Angeles Times reported.

“We are deeply sorry for this,” Curry told the Los Angeles Times.  “We know we could have done better. … We want and need to hear from other possible patients.”

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Heaps’ arrest comes a year after the University of Southern California came under fire for allowing former campus gynecologist Dr. George Tyndall to allegedly sexual abuse hundreds of patients over the course of three decades. UCLA is now conducting a broader internal investigation over how it handles sexual assault claims and is urging other students who may have been abused by Heaps to come forward.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-5883268760ce4b96b6985b88503f49da Former UCLA gynecologist faces sexual battery charge as school launches probe: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 471ad6f0-5d2b-5f35-8b30-1d31aeff932b   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-5883268760ce4b96b6985b88503f49da Former UCLA gynecologist faces sexual battery charge as school launches probe: report fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 471ad6f0-5d2b-5f35-8b30-1d31aeff932b

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