web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > fnc/us (Page 147)

Petition calling for terminal to be named after Fort Hood’s ‘hug lady’ gains steam

More than 82,000 signatures have been collected by late Monday for a petition to rename the Fort Hood air terminal after the “hug lady,” whose embrace boosted the spirits of thousands of American soldiers over nearly a decade as they shipped out for Iraq and Afghanistan.

JOY BEHAR: STAFF WHO KEPT HILLARY CLINTON FROM ‘THE VIEW’ SHOULD HAVE ‘BEEN FIRED’

Elizabeth Laird died on Christmas Eve 2015. She was known for attending almost every Fort Hood deployment from 2003 until her death; it’s estimated she hugged 500,000 soldiers, the Killeen Daily Herald reported.

Criss Dougherty, from Nolanville, signed the petition and left a heartwarming note: “I was so selfish as a young soldier… I was so selfish. I thought ‘why do I have to hug her.’ As I deployed more, she was so vital to my mental health. I signed this, and I have spoken to many who believe that (r)egardless of who the terminal is currently named after, it’s only fitting it be named after Mrs. Laird!”

Ivan Martinez added: “I was one of the thousands of soldiers hugged on their way to (an uncertain) fate. Her hug did more for me than you could imagine. On the way back her hug signifies an end to a long watch. She deserves it more than I could ever express.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The terminal currently is named after Army Sgt. George Larkin, one of the noncommissioned officers who flew in the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo during World War II.

Larkin died in Burma after his B25 crashed during the raid.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Laird-Hug-Lady-AP Petition calling for terminal to be named after Fort Hood's 'hug lady' gains steam Frank Miles fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox news fnc/us fnc f42a8ac0-5127-5b20-b083-3471e50b7aa5 article   Westlake Legal Group Elizabeth-Laird-Hug-Lady-AP Petition calling for terminal to be named after Fort Hood's 'hug lady' gains steam Frank Miles fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox news fnc/us fnc f42a8ac0-5127-5b20-b083-3471e50b7aa5 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Judge rejects Congress’ challenge of border wall funding

A federal judge on Monday denied a House request to prevent President Donald Trump from tapping Defense Department money for his proposed border wall with Mexico, saying Congress lacked authority to sue.

Trump’s victory is muted by a federal ruling in California last month that blocked construction of key sections of the wall. The California case was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of the Sierra Club and Southern Border Communities Coalition.

U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden, a Trump appointee, wrote that the House’s lawsuit was “about whether one chamber of Congress has the ‘constitutional means’ to conscript the Judiciary in a political turf war with the President over the implementation of legislation.”

McFadden said Congress didn’t have authority in this case but that he didn’t mean to imply the legislative body could never challenge the president in court over separation of powers.

“An old maxim in politics holds that, ‘Where you stand depends on where you sit,'” he wrote. “At law too, whether a plaintiff has standing often depends on where he sits. A seat in Congress comes with many prerogatives, but legal standing to superintend the execution of laws is not among them.”

The Justice Department welcomed the decision, saying the judge “rightly ruled that the House of Representatives cannot ask the judiciary to take its side in political disputes and cannot use federal courts to accomplish through litigation what it cannot achieve using the tools the Constitution gives to Congress.”

Lawyers for the House didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment, including whether they will appeal.

A federal judge in Oakland, California, ruled May 24 that Trump overstepped his authority and blocked work from beginning on two of the highest-priority, Pentagon-funded wall projects — one spanning 46 miles (74 kilometers) in New Mexico and another covering 5 miles (8 kilometers) in Yuma, Arizona. The administration plans to appeal the ruling by Haywood Gilliam Jr., an appointee of President Barack Obama.

At stake is billions of dollars that would allow Trump to make progress on a signature campaign promise heading into his bid for a second term. The administration faces several lawsuits over the emergency declaration but only two sought to block construction during the legal challenge.

Trump declared a national emergency in February after losing a fight with the Democratic-led House that led to a 35-day government shutdown and identified up to $8.1 billion for wall construction. The funds include $3.6 billion from military construction funds, $2.5 billion from Defense Department counterdrug activities and $600 million from the Treasury Department’s asset forfeiture fund.

The Defense Department has already transferred the counterdrug money. Patrick Shanahan, the acting defense secretary, is expected to decide any day whether to transfer the military construction funds.

___

Spagat reported from San Diego.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-2d32263fa6c04474af02281315a49a5a Judge rejects Congress' challenge of border wall funding fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc ELLIOT SPAGAT and COLLEEN LONG Associated Press article 98b50ab8-5dde-5b72-b806-875b472e566e   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-2d32263fa6c04474af02281315a49a5a Judge rejects Congress' challenge of border wall funding fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc ELLIOT SPAGAT and COLLEEN LONG Associated Press article 98b50ab8-5dde-5b72-b806-875b472e566e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

1 shot at major Southern California shopping mall

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news 1 shot at major Southern California shopping mall TORRANCE, Calif. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 3dd5143a-95df-5d4c-a32b-efc8de2a7887

Police were searching Monday for a gunman in Southern California who shot a person at one of the nation’s largest malls.

Stores in the sprawling Del Amo Fashion Center in Torrance, south of Los Angeles, were locked down and dozens of shoppers evacuated.

Torrance police Officer Craig Durling said authorities believe the attacker fled the mall but they were still searching the site.

TV footage showed customers fleeing the mall into a parking lot as officers on SWAT vehicles rushed toward it.

Officers responded to the mall shortly before 3 p.m. following reports of shots fired, police said.

Officers found one person with a gunshot wound inside the mall and don’t believe there are additional victims.

Fire officials said one person was taken to a hospital in unknown condition.

The suspect was described as having a shaved head and wearing a black shirt and checkered shorts.

The incident prompted the lockdown of a nearby middle school.

The mall has more than 250 stores.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Congress finally sends $19B disaster aid bill to Trump

A long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill sailed through the House on Monday and headed to President Donald Trump for his expected signature, overcoming months of infighting, misjudgment and a feud between Trump and congressional Democrats.

Lawmakers gave the measure final congressional approval by 354-58 in the House’s first significant action after returning from a 10-day recess. It was backed by all 222 voting Democrats and 132 Republicans, including the GOP’s top leaders and many of its legislators from areas hit by hurricanes, floods, tornadoes and fires. Fifty-eight Republicans voted “no,” including many of the party’s most conservative members.

Conservative Republicans held up the bill during the break, objecting on three occasions to efforts by Democratic leaders to pass the bill by a voice vote requiring unanimity. They said the legislation — which reflects an increasingly permissive attitude in Washington on spending to address disasters that sooner or later hit every region of the country — shouldn’t be rushed through without a recorded vote.

Along the way, House and Senate old-timers seemed to outmaneuver the White House, though Trump personally prevailed upon Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., to drop a bid to free up billions of dollars for dredging and other harbor projects. The Senate passed the bill by a sweeping 85-8 vote on its way out of Washington May 23, a margin that reflected a consensus that the bill is long overdue.

The measure was initially held up over a fight between Trump and Democrats over aid to Puerto Rico that seems long settled.

“Some in our government refused to assist our fellow Americans in Puerto Rico who are still recovering from a 2017 hurricane. I’m pleased we’ve moved past that,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y. “Because when disaster strikes, we shouldn’t let a ZIP code dictate our response.”

The measure also faced delays amid failed talks on Trump’s $4 billion-plus request to care for thousands of mostly Central American migrants being held at the southern border. The sides narrowed their differences but couldn’t reach agreement in the rush to go on recess, but everyone agrees that another bill will be needed almost immediately to refill nearly empty agency accounts to care for migrants.

“We must work together quickly to pass a bill that addresses the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border and provides law enforcement agencies with the funding they need,” said top Appropriations Committee Republican Kay Granger of Texas. “The stakes are high. There are serious — life or death — repercussions if the Congress does not act.”

The measure is largely the same as a version that passed the House last month. Republicans opposed it for leaving out the border funding.

Among the reasons was a demand by House liberals to block the Homeland Security Department from getting information from federal social welfare authorities to help track immigrants residing in the U.S. illegally who take migrant refugee children into their homes.

As the measure languished, disasters kept coming — with failed levees in Arkansas, Iowa and Missouri and tornadoes across Ohio just the most recent examples. The measure is supported by the bipartisan party leadership in both House and Senate.

The legislation is also being driven by Florida and Georgia lawmakers steaming with frustration over delays in delivering help to farmers, towns and military bases slammed by hurricanes last fall. Flooding in Iowa and Nebraska this spring added to the coalition behind the measure, which delivers much of its help to regions where Trump supporters dominate.

The bill started out as a modest $7.8 billion measure passed in the last days of House GOP control. A $14 billion version advanced in the Democrat-led chamber in January and ballooned to $19.1 billion by the time it emerged from the floor last month, fed by new funding for community rehabilitation projects, Army Corps of Engineers water and flood protection projects, and rebuilding funds for several military bases, including Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska.

Many Republicans opposed funding to mitigate future disasters as part of rebuilding projects when Superstorm Sandy funding passed in 2013, only to embrace it now that areas such as suburban Houston need it. Democrats, for their part, held firm for what ended up as roughly $1.4 billion for Puerto Rico, letting Trump feud with the U.S. territory’s Democratic officials for weeks and deflecting political blame for stalling the bill.

__

This story corrects that more than 130 Republicans voted for bill, rather than “more than 50.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-6ce86cf7682649cda58ec04676c23318 Congress finally sends $19B disaster aid bill to Trump fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article ANDREW TAYLOR 00f84045-539d-59f0-a4d0-4140fd5f00c7   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-6ce86cf7682649cda58ec04676c23318 Congress finally sends $19B disaster aid bill to Trump fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article ANDREW TAYLOR 00f84045-539d-59f0-a4d0-4140fd5f00c7

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Latest: Jurors to continue deliberating in dad’s trial

The Latest on a death penalty trial for a South Carolina father (all times local):

7:05 p.m.

A jury in South Carolina has deliberated about 90 minutes without reaching a verdict in the trial of a father charged with five counts of murder in the deaths of his children.

The Lexington County jurors started discussing Timothy Jones Jr.’s fate Monday evening. They will be back to resume deliberations at 9 a.m. Tuesday.

Jurors can find Jones guilty, guilty but mentally ill, not guilty by reason of insanity or just not guilty.

Any guilty verdict would mean a second phase to Jones’ trial where the same jurors decide if he faces the death penalty.

A not guilty by reason of insanity verdict would require Jones to stay in a mental hospital until a judge rules he has regained his sanity.

Authorities say the 37-year-old Jones killed his children, ages 1 to 8, in their Lexington home in 2014.

___

5:30 p.m.

A jury in South Carolina has started deliberating on whether a father is guilty of five counts of murder in the deaths of his children.

The Lexington County jurors have four choices in Timothy Jones Jr.’s trial. They can find him guilty, guilty but mentally ill, not guilty by reason of insanity or just not guilty.

Any guilty verdict would mean a second phase to Jones’ trial where the same jurors decide if he faces the death penalty.

A not guilty by reason of insanity verdict would require Jones to stay in a mental hospital until a judge rules he has regained his sanity.

Jurors in the case decided to start deliberations about 5:30 p.m. Monday.

Authorities say the 37-year-old Jones killed his children, ages 1 to 8, in their Lexington home in 2014.

___

3:55 p.m.

A lawyer for a father facing a death penalty trial in the slayings of his five children in South Carolina says his diseased, damaged brain led him to think he was killing the kids out of love.

Boyd Young said in his closing statement Monday that prosecutors didn’t tell the whole story about Timothy Jones Jr. because they didn’t want to show he couldn’t tell right from wrong in August 2014 when he exercised one child to death and strangled the other four.

Young says stress from a failed marriage and trying to raise the children alone made his undiagnosed schizophrenia worse and then trying to medicate himself with alcohol and synthetic marijuana pushed him over the edge.

Jones admitted killing the children, ages 1 to 8, in their Lexington home.

___

2:40 p.m.

A prosecutor says a South Carolina father who admitted he killed his five children isn’t insane, but a selfish, evil man.

In closing arguments during a death penalty trial Monday, Solicitor Rick Hubbard said Timothy Jones Jr. didn’t hear voices, but made choices when he strangled four of the children after the fifth died from abuse and excessive exercise as punishment in their Lexington home in August 2014.

Hubbard says Jones knew right from wrong because he didn’t call 911 and took steps to try to hide all his children’s bodies. The children were found in trash bags on an Alabama hillside nine days after their deaths. They ranged in age from 1 to 8.

Defense lawyers are arguing Jones is not guilty by reason of insanity.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-53a48cfea2274fef894a965c70281d28 The Latest: Jurors to continue deliberating in dad's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc COLUMBIA, S.C. Associated Press article 61d6609c-49e4-5158-a641-cb62a8b0db8c   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-53a48cfea2274fef894a965c70281d28 The Latest: Jurors to continue deliberating in dad's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc COLUMBIA, S.C. Associated Press article 61d6609c-49e4-5158-a641-cb62a8b0db8c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Latest: Chief: ‘Signs of homicidal violence’ in death

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news The Latest: Chief: 'Signs of homicidal violence' in death fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc dallas Associated Press article 8b6f09bb-bcdf-5164-b1f2-491d7541c98c

The Latest on the death of a transgender woman whose body was found in a Dallas lake (all times local):

5:25 p.m.

Dallas homicide detectives are investigating the death of a transgender woman after her body was pulled from a lake in the North Texas over the weekend.

Police Chief U. Renee Hall says there were “obvious signs of homicidal violence” in the death 26-year-old Chynal Lindsey, but did not describe how she died. The department has asked the FBI to assist in the investigation.

Hall says police don’t currently have evidence to connect Lindsey’s death to the killings of other transgender women in the North Texas city over the last several months.

Maj. Vincent Weddington says Dallas police have four open homicide cases involving black transgender women dating back to 2015, including Lindsey’s.

___

4:30 p.m.

Dallas police say a transgender woman’s body was pulled from a lake over the weekend, the latest death of a transgender person to attract the attention of law enforcement officers in the North Texas city.

Police say a game warden retrieved the woman’s body Saturday from White Rock Lake after a passer-by reported it around 5:45 p.m. Police did not immediately release the woman’s name and age or say how she died.

The discovery of the body follows a string of violent crimes against transgender women in Dallas over the last several months. Police are already investigating whether the shooting deaths of two transgender women and the nonfatal stabbing of a third are connected.

In May, someone killed 23-year-old Muhlaysia Booker a month after a cellphone video showed her being brutally beaten in a seemingly separate attack.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Body cam video: Tennessee deputy saves two people from rattlesnake

Body camera video captured a Tennessee sheriff’s deputy saving two people, who were both sleeping, from a rattlesnake.

The close encounter was recorded on Thursday on the body camera of Deputy Adam Sisk with the Maury County Sheriff’s Department in middle Tennessee.

The video was posted on the Maury County Sheriff’s Department Facebook’s page on Friday with the caption, “So many life lessons to be learned in this video!”

Dash cam video first shows Deputy Sisk pulling up to a dead-end gravel lot, where two people are sprawled. A snake can be seen slithering right near their heads.

The video then switches to a body camera view when Sisk gets out of the car. He then quickly alerts the pair to the nearby danger and can be heard on video saying, “Don’t move there’s a rattlesnake right next to you.”

Sisk then says, “Go toward me, go toward me.”

The man is seen running in a different direction than the deputy, the woman gets up slowly.

HUGE VENOMOUS SNAKE ‘HIDING’ NEAR PLAYGROUND CAPTURED AFTER BRIEF STRUGGLE, VIDEO SHOWS

Chief Deputy Ray Jeter with the Maury County Sheriff’s Department told Fox News he thought Sisk “did a great job keeping them calm the best he could.”

Jeter said the deputy’s main priority was to make sure the man and woman were okay. He added that Sisk wanted to get them awake and alert and then tried to keep them calm.

“That’s what we do every day, keep everybody safe and everyone gets to go home to their families,” he asaid.

Jeter said Sisk was called to the area around 9 a.m. Thursday because the Maury County Sheriff’s Department received a complaint of the two people on the gravel road.

“He was shocked by what he pulled up on seeing here,” Jeter said when describing Sisk’s reaction. “He was shocked by what he saw and just wanted to keep those individuals safe.”

He said the department’s protocol when it comes to encountering a snake is to “avoid contact.” Jeter said the incident is “not common,” adding that it was the “first time I have ever seen anything like that.”

RARE VENOMOUS SNAKE RIDES ON MICHIGAN COUPLE’S KAYAK PADDLE, PICTURES SHOW: ‘HE WAS JUST TOTALLY CHILL’

He said the department decided to post the video on its Facebook page because “after watching it, we felt it was something our community would like to see.” He added that the video showed, “our people doing good and helping folks” and that the close encounter is “not something you see every day.”

He added that the lessons that can be learned from the video include, “be observant of your surroundings” and “listen to law enforcement when they tell you you’re in danger.”

The video got more than 1,000 shares and nearly 250 comments.

Westlake Legal Group Couple-Video- Body cam video: Tennessee deputy saves two people from rattlesnake Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 51747b98-9b06-54ca-99d3-968dfa9fb271

(Maury County Sheriff’s Department)

One woman wrote, “thank god the police officer came.”

Another commented, “Lesson… do not canoodle in field or wooded area, this time of year. Invest in a tent. Lol.”

Jeter said the man and woman, who were not identified, will not face any charges and no criminal activity took place. When asked why the pair was sleeping in the area, Jeter said, “they really didn’t give an answer for that.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

He said Deputy Sisk gave them a ride home.

Westlake Legal Group Couple-Video- Body cam video: Tennessee deputy saves two people from rattlesnake Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 51747b98-9b06-54ca-99d3-968dfa9fb271   Westlake Legal Group Couple-Video- Body cam video: Tennessee deputy saves two people from rattlesnake Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 51747b98-9b06-54ca-99d3-968dfa9fb271

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Prosecutor: Father who killed kids is selfish, evil man

Timothy Jones Jr. was a selfish, evil man who wanted to inflict revenge on the mother of his five children and tried to hide their bodies after killing them, a prosecutor said Monday in closing statements in his death penalty trial.

But the South Carolina man’s lawyers say all of that came from the broken brain of a man with undiagnosed schizophrenia. Stress from a failed marriage and struggling to raise his children alone exacerbated his mental illness and then trying to medicate himself with alcohol and synthetic marijuana pushed him over the edge, the lawyers say.

Prosecutors want jurors to find Jones guilty of five counts of murder and move on to a second stage of the trial where they will decide if the crime is horrible enough for the death penalty. The jury began deliberating late Monday afternoon.

Jones’ lawyers said he didn’t know right from wrong when he killed his five kids, ages 1 to 8, in their Lexington home in August 2014 and should be found not guilty by reason of insanity . In that case, he would be held in a mental hospital until a judge determined his mental illness was treated.

There are two other choices — not guilty or guilty but mentally ill. Defense lawyer Boyd Young didn’t mention those choices in his closing. Prosecutor Rick Hubbard said not guilty is out of the question because Jones confessed to the killings and his lawyers haven’t disputed that. Hubbard said guilty but mentally ill is a poor choice because Jones was angry and vengeful , not suffering mental problems.

“This man knew right from wrong. He chose wrong,” Hubbard said.

Hubbard spent more than an hour Monday unwinding what happened . Jones spanked and forced 6-year-old Nahtahn into hours of vigorous exercise after he wouldn’t admit he broke an electrical outlet, Hubbard said.

Jones then strangled 8-year-old Mera and 7-year-old Elias with his hands and, in his confession, said he used a belt to choke 2-year-old Gabriel and 1-year-old Abigail because his hands were too big, Hubbard said.

“A child should feel safe in his father’s arms,” Hubbard said.

After killing the children, Jones gathered his passport and other items, including letters the children’s mother wrote to them and drove with the five bodies in his SUV around the Southeast for nine days before dumping five garbage bags on a hillside near Camden, Alabama. Jones was arrested at a traffic checkpoint in Smith County, Mississippi, after an officer smelled a horrible odor of decomposition.

Hubbard showed the jury a surveillance photo of Jones at a Walmart near his home after he put the bodies in the SUV.

“His kids are dead in the car while he is walking through Walmart. He looks like a regular shopper. But instead in his cart, he had saws, acid — not a shovel,” Hubbard said.

During his closing argument, defense lawyer Young said the prosecution ignored plenty of evidence that proved Jones was insane. The full picture included a mother with schizophrenia who has been in a mental institution for more than two decades. Jones killed his children because he grew up without a mother and in his “crazy” mind thought their mother would refuse to raise them and they would end up institutionalized too, Young said.

“Killing someone out of hatred is murder. Killing children out of love is insanity,” Young said.

Boyd also played about a five minute sermon from a preacher Jones used for child raising advice. The minister cited Proverbs 23: 13-14 in the Bible which says: “Withhold not correction from the child: for if thou beatest him with the rod, he shall not die. Thou shalt beat him with the rod, and shalt deliver his soul from hell.”

That’s why Jones kept spanking his children, even after the Department of Social Services threated to take them away. “He’s been told by God he needs to spank. He isn’t going to listen to a DSS safety plan,” Young said.

Jones’ devout, stubborn beliefs ruined his marriage and his relationship because he demanded he be treated as the head of the household, his wife be totally subservient and everyone else bend to his beliefs, Young said. And when Jones heard voices or had other symptoms of his mental illness, Boyd said, the speaking in tongues or quoting the Bible “calmed that fire in his mind.”

The trial is being livestreamed from the Lexington County courthouse.

___

Follow Jeffrey Collins on Twitter at https://twitter.com/

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-96711e71a2f140dea1afcb0706bdd4e3 Prosecutor: Father who killed kids is selfish, evil man JEFFREY COLLINS fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc f7672771-e059-5abf-b56a-5b99da515af7 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-96711e71a2f140dea1afcb0706bdd4e3 Prosecutor: Father who killed kids is selfish, evil man JEFFREY COLLINS fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc f7672771-e059-5abf-b56a-5b99da515af7 Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Police: Blood found in missing Connecticut mom’s home

The blood of a Connecticut mother of five who has been missing for 11 days was found in several locations where two people matching the description of her estranged husband and his girlfriend were recorded on surveillance video disposing of trash bags, according to arrest warrants released Monday.

The warrants also show blood spatter and evidence of cleanup attempts were also found at the New Canaan home of Jennifer Dulos, 50, who remains missing after her May 24 disappearance.

“Investigators came to the consensus that a serious physical assault had occurred at the scene, and Jennifer Dulos was the suspected victim,” police wrote in the warrants.

The warrants were released Monday after Dulos’ estranged husband, 51-year-old Fotis Dulos, and his 44-year-old girlfriend, Michelle Troconis, made their first appearances in Norwalk Superior Court.

They were charged Saturday night with evidence tampering and hindering prosecution . They did not enter pleas.

Fotis Dulos’ lawyer, Eugene Riccio, said his client was not expected to post bail. Troconis’ attorney, Andrew Bowman, said she was expected to post bail Monday afternoon and be released with a GPS monitoring device. Both lawyers said their clients had no criminal records.

Judge Stephanie McLaughlin rejected requests by both Fotis Dulos and Troconis to lower their $500,000 bail after a prosecutor cited the seriousness of the allegations and said more charges are expected.

Jennifer Dulos went missing May 24 after dropping her kids off at school and missing appointments that day. She has not been found. She and Fotis Dulos have been embroiled in a contentious divorce and child custody case for the past two years.

Police have searched locations in several towns including a park in New Canaan where Jennifer Dulos’ vehicle was found and a home about 60 miles (97 kilometers) away in Farmington, where Jennifer Dulos and her children — who range in age from 8 to 13 and include two sets of twins — had lived until about two years ago when she filed for divorce. Fotis Dulos and Troconis were living at the Farmington house.

The arrest warrants said the items with Jennifer Dulos’ blood, including kitchen sponges, were found at various locations in Hartford in garbage bags police believe were dumped by Fotis Dulos and Troconis, based on surveillance videos and cellphone location data.

New Canaan police have said they are investigating her disappearance both as a missing person case and a criminal matter.

Court documents filed in the divorce case say Jennifer Dulos feared Fotis Dulos would harm her in some way in retaliation for her filing for divorce, and she noted he had a gun. Jennifer Dulos has primary custody of the children, with their father getting to see them every other weekend.

After Jennifer Dulos went missing, Fotis Dulos asked the divorce case judge to grant him custody of the children. In a motion filed last week, he said the five children are staying with Jennifer Dulos’ 85-year-old mother in New York City and are being protected by an armed bodyguard.

A hearing in the divorce case is scheduled for Wednesday after being postponed last week.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-49a6a81474ce42dcbf1d96a4239f11fb Police: Blood found in missing Connecticut mom's home NORWALK, Conn. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0e71cd94-7de2-5724-bb4d-9b563f4e62f3   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-49a6a81474ce42dcbf1d96a4239f11fb Police: Blood found in missing Connecticut mom's home NORWALK, Conn. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0e71cd94-7de2-5724-bb4d-9b563f4e62f3

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chicago has most violent weekend this year: 52 shot, 10 dead

Days after officials touted a slight decrease in crime, Chicago saw its most violent weekend of the year, with 52 people reportedly shot — including 10 fatally.

The violent spree occurred just days after authorities highlighted a nine percent drop in crime compared to the first five months of 2018.

BABY CUT FROM CHICAGO MOM’S WOMB IMPROVING IN HOSPITAL

Department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said Monday that Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson ordered targeted patrols in certain areas in response to several gang-related incidents since Friday. Guglielmi says those efforts have netted 18 arrests and 92 seized guns since Friday evening.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot has said she’s considering replacing Johnson, but will not decide until after a more thorough study of the city’s problems, according to WGN-TV.

COMPUTER FINDS STRIKING SIMILARITIES IN CHICAGO COLD CASES

Guglielmi said police are questioning several people of interest in some of the incidents and detectives have good leads in others. Police have asked anyone with information to contact them.

Westlake Legal Group f45d2f50-ContentBroker_contentid-a7c548d02a0d495882e7678f92221864 Chicago has most violent weekend this year: 52 shot, 10 dead fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/chicago fox-news/entertainment/genres/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente dc1b300e-f08e-5c47-8603-bab201c21b99 article

A memorial of flowers, balloons, a cross and photo of victim Marlen Ochoa-Lopez, are displayed on the lawn, Friday, May 17, 2019 in Chicago, outside the home where Ochoa-Lopez was murdered last month. Assistant State’s Attorney James Murphy says a pregnant Ochoa-Lopez, who was killed and whose baby was cut from her womb, was strangled while being shown a photo album of the late son and brother of her attackers. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

On Twitter, Guglielmi assailed a program known as I-Bond that allows Cook County offenders to be released on a no-cash bond. The program was implemented in 1982 to address jail overcrowding.

But critics long have said it provides criminals a fast way to get back on the streets.

“Letting gun offenders out on I-Bonds shows there is absolutely no repercussion for carrying illegal guns in Chicago,” Guglielmi tweeted Sunday.

Northwestern University reportedly sent an alert to students and faculty Saturday after several people were shot near the Gold Coast campus.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Homicide numbers in Chicago had been continuing a downward trend over the last two years. There were more than 200 fewer homicides in 2018 compared with 2016.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Chicago Chicago has most violent weekend this year: 52 shot, 10 dead fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/chicago fox-news/entertainment/genres/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente dc1b300e-f08e-5c47-8603-bab201c21b99 article   Westlake Legal Group iStock-Chicago Chicago has most violent weekend this year: 52 shot, 10 dead fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/chicago fox-news/entertainment/genres/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente dc1b300e-f08e-5c47-8603-bab201c21b99 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com