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Westlake Legal Group > fnc/world (Page 44)

Steep Spanish slide shut after user hurt at high speed

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Steep Spanish slide shut after user hurt at high speed MADRID fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 4ad68413-8306-5d29-95e4-7b255ad4ce8e

A local authority in Spain says it has temporarily closed a steep municipal slide known as an “urban toboggan run” after social media videos showed a user injuring herself when zipping down it at high speed.

The 38-meter (125-feet) stainless steel slide has a gradient of up to 34 degrees. The council in Estepona, in southern Spain, advertised it as a useful fast way of getting between two streets which could be used by people of any age.

But video posted on social media showed one user hurtling down the slide and landing hard.

The council said it was an isolated incident and that hundreds of other users were unhurt. The slide remains closed Monday after being shut for a safety review Friday, a day after it opened.

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EU fines AB Inbev for restricting cross-border beer sales

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news EU fines AB Inbev for restricting cross-border beer sales fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Brussels Associated Press article 9a207822-021f-575b-8438-babaff071d52

European Union anti-trust regulators are fining AB Inbev, the world’s biggest brewer, more than 200 million euros ($225 million) for abusing its dominant position in the Belgian beer market.

The EU’s executive commission said Monday that the Belgium-based brewer is selling its popular Jupiler brand at lower prices to supermarkets and wholesalers in the neighboring Netherlands.

The commission, which polices anti-trust issues, says AB Inbev is trying to keep prices high in Belgium by stopping those Dutch outlets from exporting Jupiler back across the border more cheaply.

EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager says “attempts by dominant companies to carve up (Europe’s) single market to maintain high prices are illegal.”

She says Belgian consumers have been paying more for Jupiler “because of AB Inbev’s deliberate strategy to restrict cross border sales.”

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Cyprus: detention for confessed serial killer extended

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Cyprus: detention for confessed serial killer extended NICOSIA, Cyprus fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 9f1e1ece-435a-5661-9c44-cf87123aa242

A Cyprus court has extended for another eight days the detention of an army captain who confessed to killing seven foreign women and girls.

The court granted a police request to keep the 35 year-old suspect in custody and give investigators more time to complete their probe.

The suspect faces possible charges including premeditated murder and kidnapping in the slayings of three Filipino women and the daughter of one, a Romanian mother and daughter and a woman believed to be from Nepal.

The suspect, who represented himself in court Monday and wore a bulletproof vest, said he didn’t object to his detention.

He had confessed to the killings in a 10-page handwritten note and led police to where he dumped the bodies including a lake.

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The Latest: Sweden reopens rape case against Assange

The Latest on Swedish prosecutors’ decision whether to reopen a rape case against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (all times local):

11:15 a.m.

Swedish prosecutors are reopening a rape case against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange after he was removed from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

Eva-Marie Persson, Sweden’s deputy director of public prosecutions, told a news conference in Stockholm that “there is still a probable cause to suspect that Assange committed a rape.” She added: “It is my assessment that a new questioning of Assange is required.”

Swedish prosecutors filed preliminary charges against Assange after he visited the country in 2010.

Seven years later, a case of alleged sexual misconduct was dropped when the statute of limitations expired. That left a rape allegation, which couldn’t be pursued while Assange was living at the embassy. The statute of limitations on that case expires in August 2020.

___

9:25 a.m.

Swedish prosecutors plan to say Monday whether they will reopen a rape case against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, a month after he was removed from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

Eva-Marie Persson, Sweden’s deputy director of public prosecutions, is scheduled to hold a news conference in Stockholm. If Sweden relaunches the case, that could leave Britain deciding whether to extradite him to the Scandinavian country or the United States.

Swedish prosecutors filed preliminary charges against Assange after he visited the country in 2010.

Seven years later, a case of alleged sexual misconduct was dropped when the statute of limitations expired. That left a rape allegation, which couldn’t be pursued while Assange was living at the embassy. The statute of limitations on that case expires in August 2020.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-8e47cb6735114553a4a3f1bba40b19f9 The Latest: Sweden reopens rape case against Assange STOCKHOLM fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world fnc/world fnc f8e4d5d7-775c-595b-9334-f608258a1106 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-8e47cb6735114553a4a3f1bba40b19f9 The Latest: Sweden reopens rape case against Assange STOCKHOLM fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world fnc/world fnc f8e4d5d7-775c-595b-9334-f608258a1106 Associated Press article

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EU powers to discuss Iran deal as Pompeo heads to Brussels

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news EU powers to discuss Iran deal as Pompeo heads to Brussels fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world fox-news/us fnc/world fnc Brussels Associated Press article 00af7c26-dada-59f8-9d86-dc20be65a57e

The European Union’s top diplomat says EU backers of the Iran nuclear deal will meet in Brussels to discuss ways to keep the pact afloat as U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo heads to the Belgian capital.

Ahead of talks Monday with the foreign ministers of Britain, France and Germany, EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said: “We continue to fully support the nuclear deal with Iran.”

Mogherini says talks will focus on “how to continue to best support the full implementation of the nuclear deal.”

The Europeans have struggled to keep financial supply lines open to Tehran since the United States abandoned the deal last year.

Mogherini says “we will see how and if we manage to arrange a meeting” with Pompeo.

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After caliphate’s fall, IS insurgents still spread fear

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a5214decedbc482e8646305498ae6ea9 After caliphate's fall, IS insurgents still spread fear fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world fnc/world fnc BRAM JANSSEN bad1eaad-609a-56f5-b872-1ee6be5256b4 Associated Press article

It was a chilly January evening, and Khadija Abd and her family had just finished supper at their farm when the two men with guns burst into the room.

One wore civilian clothes, the other an army uniform. They said they were from the Iraqi army’s 20th Division, which controls the northern Iraqi town of Badoush. In fact, they were Islamic State group militants who had come down from the surrounding mountains into Badoush with one thing on their mind: Revenge.

Around 13 more gunmen were waiting outside. The fighters pulled Khadija’s husband and his two brothers into the yard and shot them dead, leaving them in a pool of blood — punishment for providing information to the Iraqi military.

“How can we live after this?” Khadija said. The three brothers were the providers for the entire family. “They left their children, their livestock, their wives, and their elderly father who doesn’t know what to do now.”

A year and a half after the Islamic State group was declared defeated in Iraq, the militants still evoke fear in the lands of their former so-called caliphate across northern Iraq. The fighters, hiding in caves and mountains, emerge at night to carry out kidnappings, killings and roadside ambushes, aimed at intimidating locals, silencing informants and restoring the extortion rackets that financed IS’s rise to power six years ago.

It is part of a hidden but relentless fight between the group’s remnants waging an insurgency and security forces trying to stamp them out, relying on intelligence operations, raids and searches for sleeper cells among the population.

The militants’ ranks number between 5,000 and 7,000 fighters around Iraq, according to one Iraqi intelligence official.

“Although the territory once held by the so-called caliphate is fully liberated, Daesh fighters still exhibit their intention to exert influence and stage a comeback,” said Maj. Gen. Chad Franks, deputy commander-operations and intelligence for the U.S.-led coalition, using the Arabic acronym for the group.

In towns around the north, Iraqi soldiers knock on doors in the middle of the night, looking for suspects, based on intelligence tips or suspicious movements. They search houses and pull people away for questioning.

Anyone is seen as a potential IS collaborator or sympathizer. In February, Human Rights Watch accused authorities of torturing suspects to extract confessions of belonging to IS, an accusation the Interior Ministry has denied. Detainees are pushed by the thousands into what critics call sham trials, with swift verdicts — almost always guilty — based on almost no evidence beyond confessions or unaccountable informants ‘ testimony. The legacy of guilt weighs heavily especially on women and children, who face crushing discrimination because of male relatives seen as supporting IS.

AP journalists embedded with a battalion of the 20th Division last month and witnessed several of its raids at Badoush.

Badoush, on the Tigris River just outside the city of Mosul, is a key battleground because it was once one of the most diehard IS strongholds.

In the summer of 2014, it was a launching pad for the militants’ blitz that overran Mosul and much of northern Iraq. IS built a strong financial base by extorting money from the owners of Badoush’s many industrial facilities. Security officials estimate two-thirds of its population — which numbered around 25,000 before the war — were at one point members or supporters of the group.

Now the population is divided. Residents who suffered at the hands of IS or lost loved ones to the group are suspicious of neighbors they believe still support the militants. Within families, some members belonged to the group and others opposed it.

The Badoush area alone has seen 20 IS attacks, from bombings to targeted killings, since it was retaken from the militants in March 2017, according to the Kurdish Security Council. The militants brag about the attacks in videos that show fighters storming houses and killing purported “apostates” and spies.

“The operations that we do now rely on intelligence by following up the families of Daesh,” said Maj. Khalid Abdullah Baidar al-Jabouri, commander of a battalion in the 20th Division, speaking at his base just outside Badoush.

Distrust runs deep among the residents.

In one raid witnessed by the AP, troops banged on the door of a man who had returned to Badoush a day earlier. He had fled town just before the IS takeover in the summer of 2014 and stayed in the Kurdish town of Sulaimaniyah throughout their rule. But his father and one of his brothers remained and joined IS.

When the man returned, a local sheikh immediately notified the military. In the raid, the soldiers searched the house and checked his phone records for any suspicious calls abroad.

They asked him about his father and brother. “I swear, they destroyed my life,” the man said. When asked about IS, he insisted, “I never came face to face with them.”

The soldiers took him away for questioning, as his three little sisters shook and cried with fear. He was later released.

On another occasion, an informant told the army he had spotted explosives-laden suicide belts in the mountains while out picnicking and looking for truffles. Presumably, they had been dropped off there for attackers to retrieve and use. Wearing a balaclava to keep his identity secret, he led the army to the spot, where they found the belts and detonated them remotely.

“People in the town are very cooperative,” says Mohammed Fawzi, an intelligence officer. “But don’t forget that in one house one person was with Daesh and another member was killed by them. It’s very complicated.”

Among the most chilling IS attacks was the Jan. 3 killing of the three Abd brothers, carried out with brutal precision.

The strangers claiming to be soldiers who entered the Abd’s house said they just wanted to ask a few questions and that it wouldn’t take long.

Khadija Abd was immediately suspicious. Her husband, Inad Hussein Abd and two of his brothers, Abdulmuhsin and Mohammed, were informants for the Iraqi military and knew the 20th Division’s soldiers personally. So why didn’t they recognize these men?

After searching the house, the intruders turned aggressive. They dragged the three brothers outside and beat them. When Khadija tried to stop them, she was beaten too. The fighters put her, the other wives on the farm and their children in a room and told them, “If anyone comes out, we shoot you in the forehead.”

Khadija could hear the men murmuring outside until 10 p.m. in a dialect of Arabic she couldn’t understand. Then it was silent. All they heard was the barking of dogs. Khadija thought the men had taken the three brothers away.

At dawn, she went to get water from the well. She spotted her husband’s yellow sleeve in the grass. All three brothers lay on the blood-soaked ground. The militants had used silencers, so the family never heard the gunshots.

Instinctively, she looked for a mobile to call for help. “Honestly, I couldn’t even cry. I didn’t cry or scream,” she said.

Memories of the attack return to Khadija in her dreams — how her daughters screamed “Dad! Dad!” when they saw his body, how one tried to pull out a bullet out of her dead father’s cheek. “Mom, it won’t come out,” she told Khadija. Her son is now too afraid to leave his room.

To the children, it’s the army that killed their father, she said. “They don’t understand anything that’s going on.”

___

Associated Press writers Salar Salim in Irbil, Iraq, and Zeina Karam in Beirut contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a5214decedbc482e8646305498ae6ea9 After caliphate's fall, IS insurgents still spread fear fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world fnc/world fnc BRAM JANSSEN bad1eaad-609a-56f5-b872-1ee6be5256b4 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a5214decedbc482e8646305498ae6ea9 After caliphate's fall, IS insurgents still spread fear fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world fnc/world fnc BRAM JANSSEN bad1eaad-609a-56f5-b872-1ee6be5256b4 Associated Press article

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Poland cancels Israeli visit over Holocaust restitution

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Poland cancels Israeli visit over Holocaust restitution WARSAW, Poland fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 0f2c9af0-9f8e-5771-9fc8-b4004a2fda9c

The Polish government says it has canceled a visit by an Israeli delegation because the Israeli government made last-minute changes that suggested they would raise the issue of the restitution of former Jewish property.

The visit had been originally scheduled for Monday but the Foreign Ministry announced Sunday that it was being called off.

The issue of former Jewish property in Poland is emerging as an emotional issue ahead of European elections this month and national elections in the fall.

Poland was once home to 3.3 million Jews, most them were murdered by Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. Their properties were often looted by Germans and later nationalized by the communist regime. Some Jewish organizations have been seeking restitution of the properties.

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Saudi Arabia says 2 oil tankers damaged by sabotage attacks

Saudi Arabia said Monday two of its oil tankers were sabotaged off the coast of the United Arab Emirates in attacks that caused “significant damage” to the vessels, one of them as it was en route to pick up Saudi oil to take to the U.S.

Khalid al-Falih’s comments came as the U.S. issued a new warning to sailors and the UAE’s regional allies condemned the reported sabotage Sunday of four ships off the coast of the port city of Fujairah. The announcement came just hours after Iranian and Lebanese media outlets aired false reports of explosions at the city’s port.

Emirati officials have declined to elaborate on the nature of the sabotage or say who might have been responsible. However, the reports come as the U.S. has warned ships that “Iran or its proxies” could be targeting maritime traffic in the region, and as America is deploying an aircraft carrier and B-52 bombers to the Persian Gulf to counter alleged threats from Tehran.

Tensions have risen in the year since President Donald Trump withdrew the United States from the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, restoring American sanctions that have pushed Iran’s economy into crisis. Last week, Iran warned it would begin enriching uranium at higher levels in 60 days if world powers failed to negotiate new terms for the deal.

In his statement, al-Falih said the attacks on the two tankers happened at 6 a.m. Sunday.

“One of the two vessels was on its way to be loaded with Saudi crude oil from the port of Ras Tanura, to be delivered to Saudi Aramco’s customers in the United States,” al-Falih said. “Fortunately, the attack didn’t lead to any casualties or oil spill; however, it caused significant damage to the structures of the two vessels.”

Saudi Arabia did not identify the vessels involved, nor did it say whom it suspected of carrying out the alleged sabotage.

Underling the regional risk, the general-secretary of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council described the alleged sabotage as a “serious escalation” in an overnight statement.

“Such irresponsible acts will increase tension and conflicts in the region and expose its peoples to great danger,” Abdullatif bin Rashid al-Zayani said. Bahrain, Egypt and Yemen’s internationally recognized government similarly condemned the alleged sabotage.

A statement Sunday from the UAE’s Foreign Ministry put the ships near the country’s territorial waters in the Gulf of Oman, east of the port of Fujairah. It said it was investigating “in cooperation with local and international bodies.” It said there were “no injuries or fatalities on board the vessels” and “no spillage of harmful chemicals or fuel.”

The U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet, which oversees the region, did not immediately offer comment. Emirati officials declined to answer questions from The Associated Press, saying their investigation is ongoing.

Earlier Sunday, Lebanon’s pro-Iran satellite channel Al-Mayadeen, quoting “Gulf sources,” falsely reported that a series of explosions had struck Fujairah’s port. State and semi-official media in Iran picked up the report from Al-Mayadeen, which later published the names of vessels it claimed were involved.

The AP, after speaking to Emirati officials and local witnesses, found the report about explosions at the port to be unsubstantiated.

Fujairah’s port is about 140 kilometers (85 miles) south of the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow mouth of the Persian Gulf through which a third of all oil at sea is traded. The facility handles oil for bunkering and shipping, as well as general and bulk cargo. It is seen as strategically located, serving shipping routes in the Persian Gulf, the Indian subcontinent and Africa.

Sunday’s incident comes after the U.S. Maritime Administration, a division of the U.S. Transportation Department, warned Thursday that Iran could target commercial sea traffic.

“Since early May, there is an increased possibility that Iran and/or its regional proxies could take action against U.S. and partner interests, including oil production infrastructure, after recently threatening to close the Strait of Hormuz,” the warning read. “Iran or its proxies could respond by targeting commercial vessels, including oil tankers, or U.S. military vessels in the Red Sea, Bab-el-Mandeb Strait or the Persian Gulf.”

Early Sunday, the agency issued a new warning to sailors about the alleged sabotage, while stressing “the incident has not been confirmed.” It urged shippers to exercise caution in the area for the next week.

Publicly available satellite images of the area taken Sunday showed no smoke or fire.

It remains unclear if the previous warning from the U.S. Maritime Administration is the same perceived threat that prompted the White House to order the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier strike group and B-52 bombers to the region on May 4.

Westlake Legal Group UAE-oil-sabotage Saudi Arabia says 2 oil tankers damaged by sabotage attacks fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 88bde7e0-dc19-5886-8240-5be08e930206   Westlake Legal Group UAE-oil-sabotage Saudi Arabia says 2 oil tankers damaged by sabotage attacks fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 88bde7e0-dc19-5886-8240-5be08e930206

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Nearly 3 dozen bodies found buried in western Mexico, likely linked to gang-related violence, officials say

Mexican investigators have discovered 35 bodies buried in and around the city of Guadalajara, state prosecutors announced over the weekend.

The grisly discovery was another reminder of the undertaking facing President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who took office in December. The new president promised to reduce the gang-related violence that was responsible for a record of about 29,000 murders in Mexico last year, according to Reuters.

Prosecutors revealed Saturday that most of the remains were found buried at a ranch in Zapopan, a city in central Mexico next to Guadalajara.

TRUMP DEFENDS NATIONAL EMERGENCY DECLARATION AT MEXICO BORDER, SAYS DEMS ‘DON’T MIND CRIME’

Among the dead, 27 had been tied up and two had been identified, the attorney general of Jalisco, Gerardo Octavio Solis, reportedly said at a news conference. Solis added that the number could still rise as the investigation continued.

Westlake Legal Group clandestine-grave-Mexico Nearly 3 dozen bodies found buried in western Mexico, likely linked to gang-related violence, officials say Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/location-mexico fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world/crime fox news fnc/world fnc article 1995471e-1385-5140-b6be-47a6b07ea88a

Mexican police members guarding the area where forensic service personnel worked at a clandestine grave inside a farm Saturday in Zapopan, Mexico. (ULISES RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Solis said the skulls of seven other people and other human remains were discovered on the property of a house located in Guadalajara, Mexico’s second most densely populated city. Solis added that another body was recovered from the Tlajomulco municipality, in Jalisco in central-western Mexico.

EX-MISS URUGUAY FOUND DEAD IN MEXICO CITY HOTEL

Investigators did not reveal how long they believed the 35 recently discovered bodies had been buried.

Families with missing relatives reportedly rushed to officials in Jalisco asking for details on the bodies found. The state is home to one of Mexico’s most powerful and dangerous drug gangs, the Jalisco New Generation Cartel.

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More than 40,000 people reportedly have vanished and have been presumed dead since Mexico’s war on drugs was militarized with federal troops about 13 years ago.

Lopez Obrador said he working to control the problem, but Reuters reported according to official data, murders in the first four months of his government surpassed those recorded a year earlier.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group clandestine-grave-Mexico Nearly 3 dozen bodies found buried in western Mexico, likely linked to gang-related violence, officials say Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/location-mexico fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world/crime fox news fnc/world fnc article 1995471e-1385-5140-b6be-47a6b07ea88a   Westlake Legal Group clandestine-grave-Mexico Nearly 3 dozen bodies found buried in western Mexico, likely linked to gang-related violence, officials say Talia Kaplan fox-news/world/world-regions/location-mexico fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world/crime fox news fnc/world fnc article 1995471e-1385-5140-b6be-47a6b07ea88a

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Magnitude 6.1 earthquake shakes Panama area near Costa Rica

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Magnitude 6.1 earthquake shakes Panama area near Costa Rica MEXICO CITY fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 59475396-c046-5e44-859c-2fa57eca4736

A strong earthquake has struck as a lightly populated area of Panama near its border with Costa Rica. There are no immediate reports of damages or injuries.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake had a 6.1 preliminary magnitude and was centered seven kilometers (four miles) southeast of the town of Plaza de Caisan. The quake occurred at a depth of about 37 kilometers (22 miles).

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