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Westlake Legal Group > fnc/world (Page 65)

26 wounded in missile attack by Houthi rebels at Saudi airport: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6036777585001_6036775779001-vs 26 wounded in missile attack by Houthi rebels at Saudi airport: report fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 982cc642-4334-56b5-b21e-287b0066edb0

The Saudi-led coalition in Yemen says 26 people have been wounded in a missile attack as Yemen’s Houthi rebels targeted an airport in the kingdom’s southwestern town of Abha.

The attack on Wednesday comes as Japan’s prime minister is expected in Iran to mediate between Tehran and Washington amid escalating tensions in the Persian Gulf regions.

YEMEN’S HOUTHI REBELS LAUNCH ATTACK DRONES INTO SAUDI ARABIA

Coalition spokesman Turki al-Malki says a projectile struck the arrival hall of Abha’s airport in the southern part of the kingdom near its border with Yemen on Wednesday. That’s according to Saudi Arabia’s state-run Al-Ekhabriya news channel.

He says three women and two children are among the 26 hurt in the attack. Eight have been hospitalized and the rest sustained minor injuries. The Houthis earlier on Wednesday claimed they’d launched a cruise missile at the Abha airport.

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Saudi Arabia has been at war against the Iranian-allied Houthis in Yemen since 2015. The kingdom accuses Iran of arming the rebels, which Iran denies.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6036777585001_6036775779001-vs 26 wounded in missile attack by Houthi rebels at Saudi airport: report fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 982cc642-4334-56b5-b21e-287b0066edb0   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6036777585001_6036775779001-vs 26 wounded in missile attack by Houthi rebels at Saudi airport: report fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 982cc642-4334-56b5-b21e-287b0066edb0

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The Latest: Yemen rebels target Saudi airport, 26 wounded

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news The Latest: Yemen rebels target Saudi airport, 26 wounded fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Dubai (United Arab Emirates) Associated Press article 2283740e-8fb0-5902-b460-77d70c60525e

The Latest on Mideast developments amid rising tensions in the Persian Gulf region (all times local):

1:05 p.m.

The Saudi-led coalition in Yemen says 26 people have been wounded as Yemen’s Houthi rebels targeted an airport in kingdom’s southwestern town of Abha.

The attack on Wednesday comes as Japan’s prime minister is expected in Iran to mediate between Tehran and Washington amid escalating tensions in the Persian Gulf regions.

Coalition spokesman Turki al-Malki says a projectile struck the arrival hall of Abha’s airport in the southern part of the kingdom near its border with Yemen on Wednesday. That’s according to Saudi Arabia’s state-run Al-Ekhabriya news channel.

He says three women and two children are among the 26 hurt in the attack. Eight have been hospitalized and the rest sustained minor injuries. The Houthis earlier on Wednesday claimed they’d launched a cruise missile at the Abha airport.

Saudi Arabia has been at war against the Iranian-allied Houthis in Yemen since 2015. The kingdom accuses Iran of arming the rebels, which Iran denies.

___

10:45 a.m.

A hard-line Iranian newspaper has printed a front page image showing the mushroom cloud of a nuclear blast, meant to criticize the Japanese prime minister’s close ties with the U.S. ahead of his historic visit to Iran.

The daily Farheekhtegan, or Educated, followed it up with a large headline in both English and Farsi, saying: “How Can You Trust A War Criminal, Mr. Abe?”

The picture appeared to refer to America dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II.

Hard-line news outlets in Iran immediately picked up the front page from the paper, published by students of Islamic Azad University, which has campuses across the nation.

On Wednesday, Abe will become the first Japanese prime minister to visit Iran since its 1979 Islamic Revolution.

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End of prison hostage standoff in France, 2 guards freed

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news End of prison hostage standoff in France, 2 guards freed Paris fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 258ad2e9-766e-534d-9a8d-d0fbdcfe49e0

The French justice ministry says two guards have been freed after a hostage-taking by an inmate armed with a hand-made weapon at a top security French prison in Normandy.

The inmate surrendered overnight to special intervention forces called to the scene at Conde-Sur-Sarthe Penitentiary, the ministry said Wednesday.

The prisoner had taken the two guards hostage at dinner time Tuesday.

Prison union representatives described the 35-year-old inmate as “professor of hostage-taking” as he was previously involved in five similar incidents.

The man, convicted for rape and the murder of a prison cellmate, has a history of psychiatric problems, the ministry said.

Conde-Sur-Sarthe was also the site of a hostage-taking in March.

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Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f9cfc23d332c49ceafe116cde2e389a4 Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests YANAN WANG fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc eea8f5bf-b639-5022-b843-355d5d18f6ff Associated Press article

Thousands of protesters blocked entry to Hong Kong’s government headquarters Wednesday, delaying a debate over a legislative proposal that would allow criminal suspects to be extradited to mainland China. The protest, which follows a weekend demonstration that drew hundreds of thousands of people opposed to the extradition amendments, reflects growing apprehension about relations with the Communist Party-ruled mainland.

A closer look at the issue:

___

WHY WERE PEOPLE PROTESTING?

Opponents of the proposed extradition amendments say the changes would significantly compromise the territory’s legal independence, long viewed as one of the key differences between Hong Kong and mainland China.

Critics believe the legislation would put Hong Kong residents at risk of being entrapped in China’s murky judicial system, in which political opponents have been charged with economic crimes or ill-defined national security transgressions. Opponents say once charged, the suspects may face unfair proceedings in a system where the vast majority of criminal trials end in conviction.

The legislation’s opponents include members of legal, business and human rights organizations, as well as scores of ordinary citizens who cherish Hong Kong’s reputation for the rule of law.

Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, has said that safeguards have been added to the legislation to ensure human rights are protected.

___

WHAT ARE THE DETAILS OF THE LEGISLATION?

Hong Kong currently limits extraditions to jurisdictions with which it has existing agreements and to others on an individual basis. China has been excluded from those agreements because of concerns over its judicial independence and human rights record.

The proposed amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Ordinance would expand the scope of criminal suspect transfers to include Taiwan, Macau and mainland China.

Lam has said the changes are necessary for Hong Kong to uphold justice and meet its international obligations. Without them, she said Hong Kong risks becoming a “fugitive offenders’ haven.”

Supporters have pointed to the case of Chan Tong-kai, a Hong Kong man who admitted to Hong Kong police that he killed his girlfriend during a trip to Taiwan. Because Hong Kong and Taiwan don’t have an extradition agreement, he has not been sent to Taiwan to face charges there, though he has been jailed in Hong Kong on money laundering charges.

___

WHAT IS HONG KONG’S RELATIONSHIP TO MAINLAND CHINA?

Hong Kong was a British colony that was returned to China in 1997 under the framework of “one country, two systems.”

The agreement guaranteed Hong Kong the right to retain its own social, legal and political systems for 50 years. As a result, residents of the semiautonomous territory enjoy far greater freedoms than people on the mainland, such as the freedom to protest or publicly criticize the government.

Nevertheless, the Communist Party exerts influence on the Hong Kong government.

Hong Kong voters are not allowed to directly elect their chief executive. Lam was elected in 2017 by a committee dominated by pro-Beijing elites and is widely seen as the Communist Party’s favored candidate.

The Legislative Council, Hong Kong’s parliament, includes a sizable camp of pro-Beijing lawmakers.

Beijing has made substantial efforts in recent years to integrate Hong Kong with the mainland. Last October, China opened the world’s longest sea-crossing bridge, connecting Hong Kong and Macau to the city of Zhuhai in southern Guangdong province. The government has named the three combined locales the “Greater Bay Area,” which it aims to turn into a center for technological innovation and advanced manufacturing.

___

HAVE FREEDOMS BEEN ERODING?

Those in Hong Kong who anger China’s central government have come under greater pressure since Chinese President Xi Jinping came to power in 2012.

The detention of several Hong Kong booksellers in late 2015 intensified worries about the erosion of Hong Kong’s rule of law. The booksellers vanished before resurfacing in police custody in mainland China. Among them, Swedish citizen Gui Minhai is currently being investigated for leaking state secrets after he sold gossipy books about Chinese leaders.

In April, nine leaders of a 2014 pro-democracy protest movement known as the “Umbrella Revolution” were convicted on public nuisance and other charges.

In May, Germany confirmed it had granted asylum to two people from Hong Kong who, according to media reports, were activists fleeing tightening restrictions at home. It was the first known case in recent years of a Western government accepting political refugees from Hong Kong.

___

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE EXTRADITION BILL?

Lam declared her resolve to move forward with the legislation, though it was no longer clear when the legislative debate would take place. A vote was expected this summer.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f9cfc23d332c49ceafe116cde2e389a4 Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests YANAN WANG fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc eea8f5bf-b639-5022-b843-355d5d18f6ff Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f9cfc23d332c49ceafe116cde2e389a4 Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests YANAN WANG fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc eea8f5bf-b639-5022-b843-355d5d18f6ff Associated Press article

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NKorea sending condolences for SKorea’s former first lady

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-4e9624f2a37f4360a9cf30268ec2deb0 NKorea sending condolences for SKorea's former first lady SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 603032c8-9627-51c1-8280-def55de7fbe7

South Korea says North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will send flowers and a message of condolence for the funeral of former South Korean first lady Lee Hee-ho, whose late husband held a historic summit with Kim’s father in 2000.

Seoul’s Unification Ministry said North Korean officials led by Kim’s sister plan to deliver the flowers and message to South Korean officials at a border village Wednesday afternoon.

Lee, the wife of late South Korean President Kim Dae-jung, died on Monday at 97. Kim Dae-jung won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2000 for his pro-democracy struggle and his rapprochement policies with North Korea, months after he met then-North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-4e9624f2a37f4360a9cf30268ec2deb0 NKorea sending condolences for SKorea's former first lady SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 603032c8-9627-51c1-8280-def55de7fbe7   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-4e9624f2a37f4360a9cf30268ec2deb0 NKorea sending condolences for SKorea's former first lady SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 603032c8-9627-51c1-8280-def55de7fbe7

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f9cfc23d332c49ceafe116cde2e389a4 Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests YANAN WANG fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc eea8f5bf-b639-5022-b843-355d5d18f6ff Associated Press article

Thousands of protesters blocked entry to Hong Kong’s government headquarters Wednesday, delaying a debate over a legislative proposal that would allow criminal suspects to be extradited to mainland China. The protest, which follows a weekend demonstration that drew hundreds of thousands of people opposed to the extradition amendments, reflects growing apprehension about relations with the Communist Party-ruled mainland.

A closer look at the issue:

___

WHY WERE PEOPLE PROTESTING?

Opponents of the proposed extradition amendments say the changes would significantly compromise the territory’s legal independence, long viewed as one of the key differences between Hong Kong and mainland China.

Critics believe the legislation would put Hong Kong residents at risk of being entrapped in China’s murky judicial system, in which political opponents have been charged with economic crimes or ill-defined national security transgressions. Opponents say once charged, the suspects may face unfair proceedings in a system where the vast majority of criminal trials end in conviction.

The legislation’s opponents include members of legal, business and human rights organizations, as well as scores of ordinary citizens who cherish Hong Kong’s reputation for the rule of law.

Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, has said that safeguards have been added to the legislation to ensure human rights are protected.

___

WHAT ARE THE DETAILS OF THE LEGISLATION?

Hong Kong currently limits extraditions to jurisdictions with which it has existing agreements and to others on an individual basis. China has been excluded from those agreements because of concerns over its judicial independence and human rights record.

The proposed amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Ordinance would expand the scope of criminal suspect transfers to include Taiwan, Macau and mainland China.

Lam has said the changes are necessary for Hong Kong to uphold justice and meet its international obligations. Without them, she said Hong Kong risks becoming a “fugitive offenders’ haven.”

Supporters have pointed to the case of Chan Tong-kai, a Hong Kong man who admitted to Hong Kong police that he killed his girlfriend during a trip to Taiwan. Because Hong Kong and Taiwan don’t have an extradition agreement, he has not been sent to Taiwan to face charges there, though he has been jailed in Hong Kong on money laundering charges.

___

WHAT IS HONG KONG’S RELATIONSHIP TO MAINLAND CHINA?

Hong Kong was a British colony that was returned to China in 1997 under the framework of “one country, two systems.”

The agreement guaranteed Hong Kong the right to retain its own social, legal and political systems for 50 years. As a result, residents of the semiautonomous territory enjoy far greater freedoms than people on the mainland, such as the freedom to protest or publicly criticize the government.

Nevertheless, the Communist Party exerts influence on the Hong Kong government.

Hong Kong voters are not allowed to directly elect their chief executive. Lam was elected in 2017 by a committee dominated by pro-Beijing elites and is widely seen as the Communist Party’s favored candidate.

The Legislative Council, Hong Kong’s parliament, includes a sizable camp of pro-Beijing lawmakers.

Beijing has made substantial efforts in recent years to integrate Hong Kong with the mainland. Last October, China opened the world’s longest sea-crossing bridge, connecting Hong Kong and Macau to the city of Zhuhai in southern Guangdong province. The government has named the three combined locales the “Greater Bay Area,” which it aims to turn into a center for technological innovation and advanced manufacturing.

___

HAVE FREEDOMS BEEN ERODING?

Those in Hong Kong who anger China’s central government have come under greater pressure since Chinese President Xi Jinping came to power in 2012.

The detention of several Hong Kong booksellers in late 2015 intensified worries about the erosion of Hong Kong’s rule of law. The booksellers vanished before resurfacing in police custody in mainland China. Among them, Swedish citizen Gui Minhai is currently being investigated for leaking state secrets after he sold gossipy books about Chinese leaders.

In April, nine leaders of a 2014 pro-democracy protest movement known as the “Umbrella Revolution” were convicted on public nuisance and other charges.

In May, Germany confirmed it had granted asylum to two people from Hong Kong who, according to media reports, were activists fleeing tightening restrictions at home. It was the first known case in recent years of a Western government accepting political refugees from Hong Kong.

___

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE EXTRADITION BILL?

Lam declared her resolve to move forward with the legislation, though it was no longer clear when the legislative debate would take place. A vote was expected this summer.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f9cfc23d332c49ceafe116cde2e389a4 Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests YANAN WANG fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc eea8f5bf-b639-5022-b843-355d5d18f6ff Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f9cfc23d332c49ceafe116cde2e389a4 Q&A: Why bill proposed in Hong Kong set off huge protests YANAN WANG fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc eea8f5bf-b639-5022-b843-355d5d18f6ff Associated Press article

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Cyclone Vayu poised to hit India as year’s 2nd major storm

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Cyclone Vayu poised to hit India as year's 2nd major storm NEW DELHI fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/environment fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 7f228cf1-2a8a-58fb-be80-bd107e73dfb1

Indian authorities are bracing for a severe cyclone strengthening in the Arabian Sea that’s set to make landfall in the western state of Gujarat as India’s second major storm of the season.

The India Meteorological Department said Wednesday that Cyclone Vayu was due to hit the Gujarat coast early Thursday with winds gusting up to 170 kilometers (106 miles) per hour.

Gujarat’s chief minister, Vijay Rupani, requested on social media that tourists leave coastal areas by Wednesday afternoon. Authorities said more than a quarter of a million people living in low-lying areas would be evacuated.

By contrast more than a million people were evacuated ahead of Cyclone Fani, which hit India’s eastern coast on the Bay of Bengal in May, killing 34 people.

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Hong Kong delays debate on extradition bill amid intensifying protests

Westlake Legal Group AP19163088047018 Hong Kong delays debate on extradition bill amid intensifying protests fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 1f694cbd-5f93-50b2-881c-b3e0e36f0465

Hong Kong’s city legislature has postponed debating a controversial extradition bill after thousands of protesters blocked entry to a government building Wednesday out concern the measure would allow Beijing to exert greater authority over the semiautonomous territory.

The crowd of mostly young demonstrators filled nearby streets, overturned barriers and tussled with police outside the government headquarters and offices of the Legislative Council.

Several protestors cited by The Associated Press said they hoped the action would persuade the government to shelve the proposed amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Ordinance.

“We won’t leave till they scrap the law,” said one protester cited by Reuters.

Q&A: WHY HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS PROTESTED IN HONG KONG

“The President of the Legislative Council has directed that the council meeting of June 12 scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. today be changed to a later time to be determined by him,” the council said in a statement. “Members will be notified of the time of the meeting later.”

Staff members were advised not to go into work and those already on the premises were told to “stay at their working place until further notice.”

Under its “one country, two systems” framework, Hong Kong was supposed to be guaranteed the right to retain its own social, legal and political systems for 50 years following its handover from British rule in 1997. However, many regard China’s ruling Communist Party as having reneged on that agreement by forcing through unpopular legal changes.

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Despite overwhelming opposition, Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam defended the legislation as necessary to close legal loopholes with other countries and territories, Reuters reported. A vote was scheduled on June 20.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19163088047018 Hong Kong delays debate on extradition bill amid intensifying protests fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 1f694cbd-5f93-50b2-881c-b3e0e36f0465   Westlake Legal Group AP19163088047018 Hong Kong delays debate on extradition bill amid intensifying protests fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 1f694cbd-5f93-50b2-881c-b3e0e36f0465

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Australian opposition calls for review of press freedom

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Australian opposition calls for review of press freedom fox-news/world/world-regions/pacific fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc CANBERRA, Australia Associated Press article 82a21fa3-d909-5ee0-9b1f-74f768e08596

Australia’s opposition has called for a parliamentary inquiry into press freedom after police raids on a media organization’s Sydney headquarters and a journalist’s Canberra home last week.

A government minister, meanwhile, is defending the nation’s potent array of security laws, which have come under criticism since the raids on Australian Broadcasting Corp. in Sydney and News Corp. Australia reporter Annika Smethurst’s home.

Opposition home affairs spokeswoman Kristina Keneally on Wednesday called for a bipartisan committee to investigate whether the balance between press freedom and national security was right in legislation passed since the conservative government was first elected in 2013.

Australia’s prime minister and communications minister have been meeting with editors and media executives to discuss concerns following the raids.

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Nepal court says Canadian guilty of sexual abuse of children

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Nepal court says Canadian guilty of sexual abuse of children KATHMANDU, Nepal fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 2ebfd5e8-52d4-578e-85dd-93009f3be9ab

A Nepal court official says a Canadian aid worker has been found guilty of sexually abusing two boys who were found at his home last year.

Kavre District Court official Thakur Chandra Trital said the judge issued a guilty verdict this week against Peter Dalglish, a year after he was arrested at his home with the boys, who were aged 12 and 14.

Sentencing has been scheduled for July 8. He faces up to 13 years in prison.

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