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Think You’ve Heard the Stupidest Thing Ever? I Disagree. Witness the Woke’s New Condemnation of Ikea

Westlake Legal Group meatballs-1994807_1280-620x399 Think You’ve Heard the Stupidest Thing Ever? I Disagree. Witness the Woke’s New Condemnation of Ikea woke virtual signaling Uncategorized Sweden Social Justice outrage Ikea Front Page Stories Food Featured Story environment Culture cultural appropriation Allow Media Exception

 

 

So there you are, thinking you’ve heard of the stupidest thing possible. But then I swoop in with this.

Do you appreciate affordable, well-designed furniture? Are you a fan of modern, minimalist decor? Do you hanker for a hunka Ikea?

Well, your favorite Swedish slinger of Lingonberry soda is in trouble.

In fact, its worse than you may imagine. The assembly-required home goods haven recently had the nerve to…**Trigger Warning**…serve peas.

Yes — it’s that horrible.

Peas, I said.

Calm yourself…

It all started when the backer of the Billy Bookcase decided to be a jerk and serve similar chicken.

Jerk chicken, in case you didn’t know, is a marinated Caribbean dish, and the maker of your favorite fake-fur rug paired it with white rice and the aforementioned panic-inducing spherical seeds.

You see, Ikea should be sensitive to the fact that the Scotch-bonnet-peppered meat isn’t traditionally teamed with dadgum green peas! It’s supposed to be kidney beans in coconut milk, ya neanderthals:

Shame on Ikea for feigning a penchant for diversity.

Let the outrage begin!

It’s shameful cultural appropriation, and they didn’t even hire any Caribbeans to guide them in their theft:

As you can see above, the store’s repented.

How could those white people have ever thought this was okay??

At least one person defended the home of the Klippan loveseat, Färgrik mug, Riktig Ögla curtain rings, Flärdfull candle, Knutstorp chair, and Ödmjuk teapot:

The store can use the support; it just can’t seem to catch a break with the Painfully Conscious — Ikea even made CheatSheet’s list of “5 Stores Where You Should Not Buy Furniture.”

The SuperWoke list excoriated the furniture retailer for having the nerve to:

  • Use wood
  • Not be located as pervasively as McDonalds

See for yourself:

However, the larger concerns around Ikea have more to do with environmental and other costs, not necessarily the furniture itself. “Can we afford to keep shopping at places where an item’s price reflects only a fraction of its societal costs?” one Atlantic column asked in 2009.

Seven years and counting after the article was published, it appears we can. But it doesn’t necessarily mean we should. For one, IKEA has pushed many transportation costs onto the consumers themselves, likely without them even thinking about it. The average consumer drives 50 miles round trip to make it to the assembly-required mecca, often far away from city centers so the business can avoid higher taxes. At the time the article was written, the retailer was also the third-largest consumer of wood, used in the particleboard now ubiquitous with the brand.

But the bigger issue, as the Atlantic points out, is that the cheaper furniture invites us not to invest or repair the items. When a bookcase breaks or a dresser becomes unusable, we throw it away instead of repairing it, like we would an heirloom armoire. It might get recycled, or it might not. Either way, we’re using more natural resources without adding lasting value. For those reasons, “IKEA is the least sustainable retailer on the planet,” said Wig Zamore, a Massachusetts environmental activist who worked with IKEA and supports some of the company’s regional green initiatives.

Did the person who wrote that article stop to think that perhaps people drive far to get to Ikea because they love it so much?

Perhaps the author could’ve also considered that if you open a store in New Jersey, it’ far from New York; if you open one in New York, it’s far from New Jersey.

All places are close to some things and far from others.

Oh well, who needs reason when you’ve got an outrageous signaling of virtue at hand?

I’m keen on the Swedist store, evil Nazi peas notwithstanding.

The next time you’re there, take my advice: getcha a softserve vanilla cone. Those things are delicious.

-ALEX

 

Relevant RedState links in this article:

See 3 more pieces from me:

Find all my RedState work here.

And please follow Alex Parker on Twitter and Facebook.

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The post Think You’ve Heard the Stupidest Thing Ever? I Disagree. Witness the Woke’s New Condemnation of Ikea appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group ikea-4048229_1280-300x200 Think You’ve Heard the Stupidest Thing Ever? I Disagree. Witness the Woke’s New Condemnation of Ikea woke virtual signaling Uncategorized Sweden Social Justice outrage Ikea Front Page Stories Food Featured Story environment Culture cultural appropriation Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Winery Day Trip: Find wine country’s iconic bottles in Fauquier

Here’s how to spend a day in Virginia wine country, including where to eat, where to play and what favorite bottles to take home.

1st stop: Breakfast (and to-go lunch) at The Apple House

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The Apple House. (Photo courtesy of The Apple House)

Start the trip at The Apple House in Linden for warm apple butter cinnamon doughnuts. The restaurant has been making them for more than 50 years, and they’ve sold nearly 5,000 in a day. Linden is sublimely underdeveloped, so also order a to-go sandwich to eat later in the day, because you won’t find many options along the way.
Next stop: 7 minutes; 3.6 miles

Westlake Legal Group reeg Winery Day Trip: Find wine country’s iconic bottles in Fauquier wine cover Wine Virginia wine Things to Do Features Things to Do sips October cover local wine Food Drinks day trips Beverage
Jim Law at Linden Vineyards. (Photo by Robert Merhaut)

2nd stop: Linden Vineyards

Head to Linden Vineyards when it opens at 11 a.m. to get a spot in owner Jim Law’s cozy tasting room—no groups larger than four people, no limos and no parties. Law first planted the estate in 1985, and he is recognized as one of the earliest and most talented winegrowers and winemakers in Virginia.

On Fridays, the lovely terrace and grounds are available to all guests, but they are reserved for wine club members on weekends. If you go on a weekend, try to arrive in time for the free, in-depth vineyard and cellar tour at 11:15 a.m. Or, in December, ask about the winery’s free-form tastings for wine geeks, featuring older vintages and yet-to-be released wines. Also this fall, Linden will feature side-by-side comparisons of its Petit Verdot bottles from two vintages (2014 and 2016) made in different styles. The 2014 underwent a long fermentation and was aged in oak and the 2016 was made with a quicker fermentation and no oak.

Bring home the bottle
Linden Vineyards Village Chardonnay 2017 ($32)
Notes: The beauty of this wine is in its harmony, complexity and balance.”
Grape: 100% chardonnay
Next stop: 10 minutes; 4.2 miles

3rd stop: Lunch and fresh air at Marriott Ranch

After the tasting, head to the 4,200-acre Marriott Ranch in Hume for a picnic lunch (must order three days in advance, or bring your own food) on the grounds among the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and then work it off on a 90-minute trail ride to enjoy the fall leaves in the woods.
Next stop: 28 minutes; 18.2 miles

Westlake Legal Group uu Winery Day Trip: Find wine country’s iconic bottles in Fauquier wine cover Wine Virginia wine Things to Do Features Things to Do sips October cover local wine Food Drinks day trips Beverage
RdV Vineyards. (Photo courtesy of RdV Vineyards)

4th stop: RdV Vineyards

Make the 30-minute drive to Delaplane for a late afternoon tasting at RdV Vineyards. The winery, owned and operated by former Jim Law-apprentice Rutger de Vink, provides a reservations-required hospitality experience without parallel in the state, complete with welcome Champagne (sometimes it’s RdV’s limited-edition rosé), a small-group tour and capped with a tasting of several vintages—including bottles unavailable outside of its pricey membership program—alongside a locally sourced cheese and meats board.

Kids, picnics and pets are not allowed on the grounds, so expect a quiet, unrushed experience with spectacular views and engaged hosts. If you’re lucky, your guide will be estate director Jarad Slipp, who is a member of the Court of Master Sommeliers and a graduate of both the Culinary Institute of America and the International School of Italian Cuisine. Slipp worked in several powerhouse restaurants in DC and New York City before coming to Northern Virginia, and manages to wield his encyclopedic knowledge of wine and winemaking in a way that empowers both vino newbies and experts alike. You’ll hang on his every word.

Westlake Legal Group hyh Winery Day Trip: Find wine country’s iconic bottles in Fauquier wine cover Wine Virginia wine Things to Do Features Things to Do sips October cover local wine Food Drinks day trips Beverage
RdV Vineyards. (Photo courtesy of RdV Vineyards)

Bring home the bottle
RdV Vineyards Rendezvous 2016 ($75)
Notes: “This blend … displays a rich, round, fruit-driven style with a generosity and accessibility that make it perfect to enjoy right away.”
Grape: cabernet sauvignon, merlot, cabernet franc, petit verdot

5th stop: Dinner at Field & Main

Sup at Field & Main in Marshall, a quick drive from the winery and a great place to continue exploring some of the state’s top bottles in a casually upscale, neighborly setting. Owners Neal and Star Wavra are passionate about supporting local farmers, distillers, brewers and cider-makers across the Piedmont, and often host special dinners featuring area winemakers. Consider ordering the family style progressive tasting menu to share, highlighting chef Anthony Nelson’s intricate plate work and signature dishes like Buffalo-style fried pigs ear with Crystal Hot Sauce and large-format meat and fish dishes, cooked in the hearth. Ask for a spot near the open kitchen to watch the action, and be sure to check out the Coravin menu for small samples of prized, pricey wines.

Westlake Legal Group fdffd Winery Day Trip: Find wine country’s iconic bottles in Fauquier wine cover Wine Virginia wine Things to Do Features Things to Do sips October cover local wine Food Drinks day trips Beverage
RdV Vineyards. (Photo courtesy of RdV Vineyards)

More …

If you come to Marshall early, grab breakfast for the next day at Red Truck Rural Bakery … If you’d rather take your upscale picnic lunch to-go, there are plenty of spots to eat along the Appalachian Trail section that winds through Linden … Check out the herbal products at the Paris Apothecary on the grounds of The Ashby Inn & Restaurant, where you can also end the day with dinner on the patio.


Details

The Apple House: 4675 John Marshall Highway, Linden
Linden Vineyards: 3708 Harrels Corner Road, Linden
Marriott Ranch Trail Rides: 4437 Fiery Run Road, Hume
RdV Vineyards: 2550 Delaplane Grade Road, Delaplane
Field & Main: 8369 W. Main St., Marshall

This post originally appeared in our October 2019 cover story. To get more food & drink news straight to your inbox, subscribe to our weekly e-newsletter. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

4 collaborations between NoVA’s beer, spirits and wine industries to know about

Westlake Legal Group Drinks-Feature 4 collaborations between NoVA’s beer, spirits and wine industries to know about Wine spirits Port City Brewing News & Updates local drinks local Liquor KO Distilling Food News Food Drinks drinking Catocin breweries beer alexandria
Photo by Rey Lopez

Mt. Defiance Cidery & Distillery + Evolution Food Group
For: Virginia-made ‘tequila’
Tequila can only be made in the Mexican state of Jalisco, so anytime blue agave is used elsewhere, it’s given a different name. Mt. Defiance teamed up with Evolution Food Group for the release of Dos Gringos Agave Spirit, available in drinks at EFG’s Mexican-inspired Cocina on Market and ABC stores. The distillery also uses vidal blanc from Middleburg’s 50 West Vineyards for its sweet vermouth. // Cocina on Market: 7 W. Market St., Leesburg

Catoctin Creek Distilling Company + Port City Brewing Company
For: Delicious waiting game 
A pioneer in the recent craft spirits boom, Catoctin regularly works with local breweries and restaurants on collaborations and private-label spirits. (And, for about $8,000, you can have 30 gallons of personalized whiskey.)

Booze-making is long-term planning: Port City Brewing Company is sending a pilot batch of Colossal 10, a barley wine, for Catoctin to turn into a single-malt whiskey, which will age and release in time for the brewery’s 10-year anniversary in 2021. Until then, find Catoctin spirits with partners Ford’s Fish Shack, Coton & Rye (inside Lansdowne Resort and Spa) and Jackson 20 and The Study (inside The Alexandrian). // Multiple locations

MurLarkey Distilled Spirits + Sinistral Brewing Company
For: Chocolatey brews
With an infused-whiskey program, MurLarkey sends out flavored barrels, and local breweries are taking advantage. Sinistral Brewing Company is letting Camryn’s Poker-Faced Porter age for six months in MurLarkey’s Cocoa Whiskey (winter release). // Sinistral: 9419 Main St., Manassas

KO Distilling + A. Smith Bowman Distillery + BadWolf Brewing Company
For: Sour pursuits
Though BadWolf Brewing Company founder, Jeremy Meyers, sold his company, he continues as lead brewer, playing with souring beers in used barrels. The goal of Meyers’ sours, called the Solara Project, is not to pick up the boozy notes of KO’s gin or Bowman’s bourbons, but letting live wild yeasts and bacteria in the barrels sour the beer for a controlled, funky flavor. // BadWolf: 9776 Center St., Manassas

This post originally appeared in our September 2019 issue. To get more food news straight to your inbox, subscribe to our weekly e-newsletter. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Here’s your chance to meet Bobby Flay at the Mosaic District

Pumpkin pancakes with apple cider syrup and Spanish-style shrimp and grits are just two of the dishes that you can find in Bobby Flay’s newest cookbook, Bobby at Home: Fearless Flavors from My Kitchen, set to release on Tuesday, Sept. 24.

But what’s even better than making the 165 recipes from the book is getting to meet Flay in Northern Virginia on the day of the book’s release. The celebrity chef, who has published 13 cookbooks in total, is hosting a meet and greet and book signing at Williams Sonoma, at the Mosaic District location, to celebrate on Sept. 24, from 6 to 8 p.m.

The chef will mingle with guests while discussing new recipes and the bold flavors that readers can find throughout his newest cookbook. Other recipes include Brussel Sprout Nachos with Pickled Chiles, Quick Bolognese Sauce and No-Bake Chocolate Hazelnut Crema Catalana.

Flay has hosted 14 Food Network programs and was the first chef to be awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

More details have yet to be released about the event, but interested attendees can purchase tickets on Eventbrite. // Williams Sonoma Mosaic: 2920 District Ave., Suite 115, Fairfax; $34.20 per person

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Last Course: The latest from the food scene in NoVA

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-181 Last Course: The latest from the food scene in NoVA restaurants openings new in NoVA food updates food scene Food News food holidays Food beer
Photo courtesy of Chop Shop Taco

Alexandria Update

Old Town Alexandria was once dominated by chef Cathal Armstrong. While he has sold restaurants during his reign, the demise officially started last summer with the closure of the nationally recognized modern American, fine-dining Restaurant Eve. This summer, Society Fair (which was sold to an employee) closed, as well as Eammon’s A Dublin Chipper and the groundbreaking speakeasy PX (with collaborator Todd Thrasher). Only Hummingbird inside Hotel Indigo maintains the Irishman’s footprint. Armstrong and team decamped to the city, opening pan-Asian Kaliwa and Potomac Distilling Company at The Wharf.

This post was originally published in our September 2019 issue. For more food content, subscribe to our monthly print magazine and weekly e-newsletters.

New players have moved into his turf. Armstrong’s The Majestic Cafe and Virtue Feed & Grain are owned by Alexandria Restaurant Partners, which also runs a handful of spots spanning from the waterfront to Braddock Road Metro. Developer Teddy Kim transformed neighborhood Parker Grey with cool-casual spots like Chop Shop Taco and Pendleton Carryout Co. And, Common Plate Hospitality serves everything from mussels (Augie’s) and Mexican (Urbano 116) on King Street to seafood (Catch on the Ave) in Del Ray.

Beer

Old Ox Brewery opens a second location in Middleburg; Crooked Run Brewing opens a second location in Sterling, flush with a biscuit shop, cocktail bar and pop-up farm stand; and pioneer Mad Fox Brewing Company blames a saturated marketplace for shuttering a week after its ninth anniversary.

Mediterranean

A decade after it opened in DC, Agora opens a second location in Tysons Corner, this time with 12 seats overlooking the kitchen. // 7911 Westpark Drive, McLean

(Fake) Food Holidays

Sept. 7: Beer Lover’s Day
Sept. 10: Hot Dog Day
Sept. 29: Coffee Day

Barbecue

Longtime roadside stand The Pit Stop is on an expansion plan: It opened its first brick-and-mortar shop in Sterling earlier this year and now serves pulled pork and brisket for lunch and reopens at 11 p.m. for the late-night crowds inside of One Loudoun. // 44717 Thorndike St., Ashburn

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Maintain nutritional balance this fall with tips from a NoVA nutritionist

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-55 Maintain nutritional balance this fall with tips from a NoVA nutritionist pumpkin spice latte pumpkin nutritional Nutrition Features nutrition healthy eating health and wellness Health Food fall foods expert advice eating diet cooking
© nblxer / adobe.stock.com

The official start of fall is just under two weeks away, bringing with it evening breezes, colorful leaves and, of course, seasonal food staples we all look forward to. 

From the Starbucks pumpkin spice latte to homemade apple pie, every flavor adds a little bit of comfort to the colder and darker days of the fall and winter seasons. And while the delicious treats of autumn bring joy, they also change up our typical eating patterns and affect our nutritional balance. 

According to Allison Tepper, a registered dietitian and owner of Allison Tepper Nutrition Consulting based in Leesburg, people tend to overindulge in the fall and winter, but it is possible to manage those habitual patterns.

For more nutrition tips this season, sign up for our weekly Health newsletter.

Whether you can’t stay away from those sugar-filled, seasonal drinks or tend to stick by the appetizer bar at the holiday party, here’s everything you need to be aware of this fall and winter, according to Tepper. 

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-61 Maintain nutritional balance this fall with tips from a NoVA nutritionist pumpkin spice latte pumpkin nutritional Nutrition Features nutrition healthy eating health and wellness Health Food fall foods expert advice eating diet cooking
Photo courtesy of Allison Tepper

Let’s start with the pumpkin spice latte. What makes that drink so “unhealthy?”
With any of those drinks, there are several pumps of sugar, which eventually adds up. And the coffee and baseline is good, but the amount of sugar, whole milk and saturated fat is really the biggest thing. With anything, if you have something once in a while, it won’t make or break anything. Yet, if it’s consumed over and over again every day in the fall when it’s offered, that’s where there might be an issue. It’s not inherently bad, each individual just needs to take it with moderation.

Are there any alternatives for common treats that are heavy on pumpkin spice, cinnamon or other sweet ingredients?
I definitely recommend asking for less pumps of sugar with the pumpkin spice latte and also switching to 1% or 2% milk instead of whole. A lot of my clients make coffee and add their own cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice on top. You can also add that to healthier bases like oatmeal in the morning or peanut butter toast. But sometimes you need the real thing, so it’s all about being mindful of it. I also think utilizing the nutritious foods that are in season is a great option, like baked apple dishes or pumpkin-based cookies. 

With your clients, what do you recommend for overall nutrition during the fall and winter seasons, when food is typically heavier and more sugar-based?
It’s definitely about finding what feels good. I think a lot of times when we overindulge, we don’t feel good, in that we bloat, feel tired, are groggy throughout the day. I recommend to clients to have the food they enjoy, but also listen to your body when it is too much. I focus on the 80-20 rule: 80% of the time you enjoy the nutrient-dense foods like fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains and so on, and 20% of time you can have the fun foods that we crave. Having those things once in a while isn’t bad for us, but we tend to over-consume. 

Holiday season is around the corner, which means indulging is bound to happen. What are some tips and tricks people should consider?
Thanksgiving and Christmas are one-day events that turn into month-long things with leftovers and holiday parties, so you have to be mindful. This is definitely a time for comfort foods, so I recommend staying active as much as possible, whether that be walking or getting some form of cardio on a regular basis. Another pro tip I give is to plate your food and sit down with it. With parties and holiday events where we graze and pick at food, we don’t realize how much we are really taking in. If you organize it on a plate and sit down to enjoy it, that helps you realize when you are actually full.

It’s also important to pay attention to emotional eating. Especially during the holidays, there is a lot of stress with the weather getting colder, and even seasonal depression. I try to encourage clients to pay attention to reasons outside of hunger why they are eating and be honest with themselves about why they are eating. If you are eating for other reasons than hunger, it’s important to find the other activities you can do to take care of yourself.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The menu at Spike Mendelsohn’s Vim & Victor keeps wellness in mind

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-24 The menu at Spike Mendelsohn’s Vim & Victor keeps wellness in mind Vim & Victor upscale food Reviews restaurant Health Foods Food News Food eats dining casual dining
Vim & Victor is inside of high-end gym, The St. James. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

The Max from Saved by the Bell. Central Perk from Friends. Pop’s Diner from Riverdale. The famous “third” place: not home, not work or school, but somewhere else. Somewhere to tuck into for a quick bite, a coffee, a milkshake, a drink. Somewhere to sit, watch TV, clang mugs after a rec soccer game. These spots are cafes or diners, maybe for some, a hotel lobby.

But what if you could get cozy inside of a gym, already that spot away from home, away from the rush of the day? What if there were avocado toasts and “wellness” lattes with turmeric, maple syrup, black pepper and, for three more dollars, a shot of espresso? It’s lovely and silky, a little earthy, a reminder this is supposed to be good for you, but also it’s just good.

This post was originally published in our September 2019 issue. For more Food content, subscribe to our monthly print magazine and weekly e-newsletters.

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-110 The menu at Spike Mendelsohn’s Vim & Victor keeps wellness in mind Vim & Victor upscale food Reviews restaurant Health Foods Food News Food eats dining casual dining
Celebrity chef Spike Mendelsohn (Photo by Rey Lopez)

Captive dining situations—food inside of a mall, food inside of a grocery store—have been one of the biggest beneficiaries of the good-food-everywhere boom. It only makes sense for a full-scale restaurant to exist inside of the gargantuan, showy gym that is The St. James in Springfield.

On a Monday night, Spike Mendelsohn, holding a green smoothie in a plastic to-go cup, walks through Vim & Victor. He’s wearing a T-shirt. He fits into the scene here, teammates unchanged from a game, munching on sweet potato fries, sipping on golden beers. Mendelsohn found fame on an early season of Top Chef, he capitalized on his persona and boyish grin and opened a pizza joint (We the Pizza) and a burger place (Good Stuff Eatery), among other concepts.

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-31 The menu at Spike Mendelsohn’s Vim & Victor keeps wellness in mind Vim & Victor upscale food Reviews restaurant Health Foods Food News Food eats dining casual dining
From fame on Top Chef to building a brand with burgers, pizza, CBD drinks and turmeric lattes, Spike Mendelsohn has his footprint everywhere. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

Mendelsohn isn’t all about the grease. His out-of-the-kitchen projects focus on food advocacy (DC Central Kitchen, World Wildlife Fund). His entrepreneurial streak includes PLNT, described as a “wellness drink made to inspire moments of clarity and curiosity” that’s “CBD-infused plant water intended to nourish a balanced mood and a healthy stress response … crafted to synergistically work with CBD to activate wellness in your gut, mind and body.”

In other words, wellness lattes match Mendelsohn and the clientele at this high-end sports complex.

Vim & Victor’s menu diverges into two camps: “I worked out, I deserve a treat,” or “I worked out, I want a pitaya smoothie bowl.”

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-41 The menu at Spike Mendelsohn’s Vim & Victor keeps wellness in mind Vim & Victor upscale food Reviews restaurant Health Foods Food News Food eats dining casual dining
Made for the ‘Gram: Thank pitaya (aka dragon fruit) for the bright pink hue of this smoothie bowl. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

The latter of which is hot pink dragon fruit, icy and smooth, decorated with cut fruit, cacao nib granola and coconut shavings. It’s not as rich as an acai bowl, which feels like ice cream for lunch, this is more like a sorbet for a meal.

For the former, there are fried chicken wings slathered in liquefied blue cheese with roasted slices of celery and red onion. It’s a bold move, considering blue cheese’s divisiveness. Plus, after the kitchen works so hard to make a perfectly good fried chicken, why does it then cover it in sauce, thereby losing the aforementioned crisp? Still, it works.

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-54 The menu at Spike Mendelsohn’s Vim & Victor keeps wellness in mind Vim & Victor upscale food Reviews restaurant Health Foods Food News Food eats dining casual dining
Whole branzino served at Vim & Victor. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

Some items split the middle: potato skins using sweet potato over russets, Greek yogurt instead of sour cream, plus shaved Brussels sprouts and—Mendelsohn isn’t a monster—bacon. Some spuds were cooked through, others not, with some toppings omitted, and the overall impression of an afterthought.

More thoughtful was the whole branzino, an elegant dish signaling to forget the guest at the next table wears mesh shorts and sneakers and down the hall are at least a hundred treadmills and an ice hockey game that won’t finish until 10 p.m. The fish is supple in parts, crisp skin in others, covered by a thicket of fresh herbs and greens. A dunk in nuoc cham, a Vietnamese dipping sauce, adds a peppy zing.

Dessert plays into the I-earned-it camp with a fudgy brownie topped with ice cream, whipped cream and sprinkles. There are no tricks here, just a straightforward classic. It’s nothing to travel for, but on the way out from working up a sweat, do calories even count?


SCENE
This full-service restaurant lives inside of a gym, expect casual dress, casual service and upscale-casual food.

DON’T MISS
Golden latte, smoothie bowls, whole branzino

The St. James: 6805 Industrial Road, Springfield; Open daily for lunch and dinner; Small plates $12-$16; Entrees $17-$29

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

After a decade in business, fine-dining Trummer’s on Main closes, reopens as an American bistro

Westlake Legal Group trummers-renovated After a decade in business, fine-dining Trummer’s on Main closes, reopens as an American bistro Trummer's on Main Trummer's restaurant openings restaurant closings News & Updates Food News Food dining clifton restaurants clifton
Trummer’s on Main is currently revamping its interior, and is dropping the “on Main.” (Photo courtesy of Trummer’s)

A Trummer’s on Main employee was out to dinner at another Clifton restaurant and overheard another table talking about Trummer’s. There were locals and out-of-towners, and the locals described Trummer’s with such regard, with such reverence, that they described it as Virginia’s version of the French Laundry. The French Laundry features a $325-per-person, multicourse tasting menu at Thomas Keller’s three-star Michelin restaurant in Northern California.

Stefan Trummer originally told this as an off-the-record story. But he relented to letting it be shared because this story is the perfect allegory to understand why Trummer’s on Main is closing. For the record, Trummer’s realize the differences between the French Laundry and itself, but it proves the point that the restaurant was looked at as a special occasion place. And that’s exactly what Stefan and Victoria Trummer, his wife and business partner, wanted to change.

After about a month of renovations—a total overhaul of the kitchen, three-floors of dining spaces, a patio and, of course, the menu—Trummer’s drops “on Main” and rebrands as an American bistro. The restaurant will reopen Sept. 19.

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“How do we take it down a notch?” is the question Victoria thinks about when they’re making paint, wallpaper and light fixture decisions. They’re keeping the famed paddle fans in the main dining room, but everything else will look different, feel different and taste different. 

John Cropf remains as head chef, as does Meagan Tigh in pastry and Nicole Bernard in wine. The biggest shift in the menu, besides prices dropping as much as $10 an entree (or about 20% to 35%), is the addition of a Rotisol Rotisserie, a French-made machine that’s about 5 feet wide and 6 feet tall. Rotisserie-cooked foods will represent about half of the menu with items like spit-roasted prime rib, half or whole chicken, duck, baby goat, fish (technically spun in a metal basket) and beets au poivre. Most entrees (starting at about $19) from the rotisserie will come with potatoes cooked under the meats to capture the drippings, with an extra side of drippings. 

Stefan, originally from Austria, will continue the presence of dishes inspired from his homeland, and initial ideas include wiener schnitzel, spatzle (including a spin on chicken noodle soup), pretzels and goulash. Off-rotisserie items could include some longtime favorites like shrimp and grits and fried Brussels sprouts with kimchi mayo and benne seeds. The cornbread will stay, but instead of served gratis, there will be a new bread basket section of the menu with options like squash bread with a quenelle of freshly shaved truffles mixed into butter and rosemary focaccia with blistered tomatoes. 

New items proposed, as the menu is still being finalized, are cast-iron hanger steak and ricotta gnocchi. 

Sides include coffee-glazed carrots, blistered shishitos with lemon aioli, pomme puree with goat’s milk butter and whatever vegetables are in season, cooked from the live fire in the rotisserie. 

Westlake Legal Group trummers2 After a decade in business, fine-dining Trummer’s on Main closes, reopens as an American bistro Trummer's on Main Trummer's restaurant openings restaurant closings News & Updates Food News Food dining clifton restaurants clifton
Textures of Orange at Trummer’s (Photo by Jonathan Timmes)

As one of the few restaurants with a full-time pastry chef, desserts will still be a focus. Tighe’s signature Textures of Orange will remain, and other sweets she’s playing with are the Viennese sacher torte (chocolate cake, apricot jam, chocolate ganache) and elevated sundaes (with spit-fired peaches, if the fruit lasts until mid-September). The wine will still lean Austrian, but the prices will come down. Cocktails favorites (Pleasure & Pain) will remain, but watch for zero-proof and lower-alcohol versions, too. 

The rebrand has been a two-year conversation, says Victoria. The Trummers thought about how they like to eat, what restaurants they want to go to on their days off. “It’s been 10 years of this,” says Victoria. “What should the next 10 years look like?” // Trummer’s: 7134 Main St., Clifton

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Joe Theismann’s Restaurant debuts a modern look inspired by its roots

Westlake Legal Group Image-16 Joe Theismann’s Restaurant debuts a modern look inspired by its roots Sports restaurant renovations News & Updates Joe Theismann historic restaurant Food News Food Culture
Photo courtesy of Alexandria Restaurant Partners

Throughout the summer, Alexandria Restaurant Partners (ARP) has been remodeling the interior of Joe Theismann’s Restaurant, officially unveiling the entirety of the changes Monday, Sept. 9, to coincide with the end of Metro’s Summer Shutdown. 

From the floor to the ceiling of the 7,800-square-foot space, every surface diners see and touch is completely new, showcasing a sleek, modern look ARP has envisioned since the company purchased the site in March 2018. Renovations are now complete, right in time to celebrate the NFL’s 100th anniversary and founder Joe Theismann’s 70th birthday this fall.

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“Theismann’s continued success has evidenced its strength here,” says one of ARP owners, Scott Shaw, referencing a consistent increase in revenue over the years. “We knew if we bought it, Joe Theismann had to stay involved or we weren’t interested. And the third thing was, we knew the restaurant needed a makeover.”

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-12 Joe Theismann’s Restaurant debuts a modern look inspired by its roots Sports restaurant renovations News & Updates Joe Theismann historic restaurant Food News Food Culture
Photo courtesy of Alexandria Restaurant Partners

While the original restaurant opened in Falls Church in 1975 by former Redskins Super Bowl-winning quarterback Joe Theismann, the Old Town location has thrived for nearly 33 years.  

Before the renovations began, the ARP team and Joe Theismann agreed on three key goals: strip the entire interior to create a new feel within the restaurant, expand the bar significantly and reincorporate Theismann himself into the site. 

“Over the years, they turned it into an all-purpose sports bar with oversized pictures of all kinds of athletes, but we thought let’s get back to the roots, which is Joe Theismann and what he stands for. “Out with the polo players on the wall and in with Joe.”

Westlake Legal Group Untitled-13 Joe Theismann’s Restaurant debuts a modern look inspired by its roots Sports restaurant renovations News & Updates Joe Theismann historic restaurant Food News Food Culture
Photo courtesy of Alexandria Restaurant Partners

While the front of the restaurant is memorabilia-free, the back now pays homage to Theismann, with mementos from his life in football, including original jerseys from high school, college and NFL teams framed on the walls, as well as trophies and photos from his days on the field.

As for the food, ARP saved Theismann’s classics, such as the French onion soup, Joe’s spiral chicken, lollipop lamb chops and Joe’s all-American burger and added Cuban sliders topped with Dijonnaise, blackened fish tacos, tuna poke salad, 26-ounce rib-eye for two and an Impossible Burger. For the new brunch service, find apple-cinnamon doughnuts, a bacon-sausage-homefries scramble and avocado toast.

“One of the goals of doing all this work is to recognize Theismann’s next 30 years,” says Shaw. “While we are looking to keep our regulars, we also hope to bring in our next generation of regulars.” // Joe Theismann’s Restaurant: 1800-A Diagonal Road, Alexandria

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Leesburg is becoming a restaurant town. The Wine Kitchen sets the scene.

Westlake Legal Group TWK-Feature Leesburg is becoming a restaurant town. The Wine Kitchen sets the scene. The Wine Kitchen Reviews restaurants restaurant reviews Leesburg restaurants leesburg Food Features Food dining
Starters include a goat cheese fritter, beer cheese made with neighbor Black Hoof’s suds and pickled produce. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

★ ★ ☆ ☆

SCENE

Charming and lively, this wine bar takes its food just as seriously. It’s also a fun time.

DON’T MISS

Tomato salad, pea ravioli, Arctic char, Walsh Family Wines


There wasn’t much in downtown Leesburg,” says Tim Rowley, the chef and co-owner of The Wine Kitchen. Of course, he lists old-time favorites like Tuscarora Mill and Lightfoot. But now, there’s a scene.

“Downtown Leesburg has a restaurant at every other door,” Rowley says. There’s Bites, a wine and grilled cheese bar; Señor Ramon, a taco shop; Trungo’s, a gastropub; and SideBar, an all-day concept with an attached coffee bar and a DJ on Friday nights.

The Wine Kitchen has always been buzzy—a small, lively spot with a bar, and cozy (re: you’ll get to know your neighbors) seating. The draw was, and still is, an eclectic and varied wine list from around the world, shown off in flights, where three wines display a certain grape or mood or region. (There’s only one dedicated to Virginia wines, and it’s worth it alone to try an experimental red from one of Loudoun’s newest, promising wineries, Walsh Family Wine.)

While there have been chef changes through the years, it’s been helmed for the last four under Rowley, who continues to push the farm-to-table aesthetic.

“We just want to make good food, and use the best product possible,” Rowley says, almost laughing, acknowledging this sentiment, however true, has become cliche. In Loudoun County, where highways and dirt roads divide farmland and the rapid sprawl of retail and residential development, it’s easy to receive a box of tomatoes in the morning and slice them into a showpiece salad: thick slices of red tomato stacked underneath softened strips of sweet peppers topped with generous dollops of burrata.

Sure, it’s a tomato salad. But just like a crisply made bed, or that perfect half-tuck of a shirt, it’s the details that matter.

It’s a perfect tomato. It’s the surprise of peppers, an often uncelebrated ingredient, and here, the way in which the strips are marinated feel reminiscent of a New Jersey-style hoagie. It’s the hefty tufts of burrata, ready to creep into the crevices of the sliced tomato.

Westlake Legal Group TWK-2 Leesburg is becoming a restaurant town. The Wine Kitchen sets the scene. The Wine Kitchen Reviews restaurants restaurant reviews Leesburg restaurants leesburg Food Features Food dining
Tomato is King Summer’s star plays well with burrata, peppers and a glass of wine. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

Tomatoes weren’t as successful in a chilled soup with curry and a crowd of lentils. The texture was grainy, like chewing on a melting Slurpee. Later, a $37 steak arrived more or less rare, when ordered medium-rare. There was no sear, none of that only-in-restaurants-is-there-this-much-butter floating atop the cut. It was seasoned well, but the execution wasn’t there.

But, the misses were few.

Pasta is a dream. A mash of peas wrapped inside a sheet of dough, folded into half-moons, overlapping on the plate with a scattering of peas, wilted greens, various mushrooms in shapes more resembling aliens and deep red drops of beet puree. It’s art really, and also delicate, dramatic, delicious, too. Gnocchi is a heartier, more rustic affair, like a patch of autumn in a bowl with thick carrots, unpeeled, just scrubbed, so the sauce settles into its textured exterior. There’s shaggy, braised lamb and the whole combination resonates with a dash of harissa heat, but mostly a stunning smokiness.

Fish is served with a deftness, tuna paired with its pink partner, watermelon, plated in alternating swaths filled in with pickled jalapeno, Taggiasca olives and scattered microgreens, a wild combination that works better in the mouth than it might read on the menu.

Westlake Legal Group TWK-3 Leesburg is becoming a restaurant town. The Wine Kitchen sets the scene. The Wine Kitchen Reviews restaurants restaurant reviews Leesburg restaurants leesburg Food Features Food dining
A miso-mustard sauce stands up to the rich Arctic char. (Photo by Rey Lopez)

Tilefish arrives almost creamy, especially underneath a crisped film of skin. It’s next to a summery succotash-like combination of tomatoes, corn and pea shoots. Porcini-crusted Arctic char is a showpiece when it lands on the table. The squared-off filet balances on roasted mushrooms and green beans, heavily sauced in a miso-mustard dressing flooded with sesame seeds. The sauce is rich and savory in a way only fermented soy can bring.

A chocolate torte is best for its neighbor, a scoop of lush passionfruit sorbet made in-house. Better yet, look to the night-ending drink list, especially now that The Wine Kitchen has a spirits program. Start the night there, too, if just to admire the illustrated booklet of seasonal cocktails, whimsically named and described (Beachcomber with aged white rum and allspice dram is “a gentle breeze” and “good for a cool time”).

The Wine Kitchen didn’t start Leesburg’s food scene, and it’s not new and shiny. But that’s exactly why it’s time to go there now, a restaurant comfortable in what it does, and how it does it. It has nothing to prove, and so it proves it’s exactly where to find that next meal. // 7 S. King St., Leesburg; Open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Sunday; brunch on Sunday; Starters: $2-$17; Entrees: $15-$37

This post was originally published in our September 2019 issue. Interested in more food content? Subscribe to our monthly print magazine and weekly e-newsletter.

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