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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks

Legionnaires’ outbreak in North Carolina kills 1, sickens nearly 100 others: officials

Westlake Legal Group legionella-bacteria Legionnaires' outbreak in North Carolina kills 1, sickens nearly 100 others: officials Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc f178edc6-3bba-5f96-adab-bd7250622ef8 article

An outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in North Carolina has killed at least one person and sickened dozens of others, state health officials said.

As of Sept. 30, at least 97 people were sickened with the disease, while 63 were hospitalized, according to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. 

LEGIONNAIRES’ DISEASE OUTBREAK AT ATLANTA HOTEL LEAVES 1 DEAD, STATE HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY

Though officials are still investigating the source of the outbreak, many of those sickened reported attending the North Carolina Mountain State Fair in September. Officials are urging anyone who attended the fair and is experiencing symptoms of Legionnaires’ to see a doctor.

“Legionnaires’ disease is a severe form of pneumonia,” according to the Mayo Clinic, which explains pneumonia as an inflammation of the lung that is typically caused by an infection.

“You can’t catch Legionnaires’ disease from person-to-person contact. Instead, most people get Legionnaires’ disease from inhaling the bacteria,” the Mayo Clinic adds, noting that older adults, those who smoke, or those with a compromised immune system are the most susceptible.

Legionella pneumophila, a bacterium, is usually the cause of the illness. It can be found in soil and water, but more commonly causes infection when it multiplies in water systems (e.g., hot tubs and air conditioners).

LEGIONNAIRES’ DISEASE OUTBREAK AT ATLANTA HOTEL IS NOW LARGEST EVER RECORDED IN GEORGIA, HEALTH OFFICIAL SAYS

The disease is treatable with antibiotics, and those who are sickened typically recover in full. Symptoms often include fever, chills, cough, and shortness of breath.

The news comes after health officials in Georgia this past August responded to a massive Legionnaires’ outbreak linked to a hotel in Atlanta. At the time, a state health official told Fox News that the Legionella outbreak was the largest ever recorded in Georgia.

Westlake Legal Group legionella-bacteria Legionnaires' outbreak in North Carolina kills 1, sickens nearly 100 others: officials Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc f178edc6-3bba-5f96-adab-bd7250622ef8 article   Westlake Legal Group legionella-bacteria Legionnaires' outbreak in North Carolina kills 1, sickens nearly 100 others: officials Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/north-carolina fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc f178edc6-3bba-5f96-adab-bd7250622ef8 article

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Salmonella outbreak connected to backyard poultry sickens more than 1,000 across 49 states: CDC

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6014009438001_6014008273001-vs Salmonella outbreak connected to backyard poultry sickens more than 1,000 across 49 states: CDC Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc e554d6c5-1d00-520e-88f8-085363f6e85f article

More than 1,000 people have been sickened by a salmonella outbreak linked to backyard poultry, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in an update late last week.

The CDC on Friday announced a total of 1,003 people have been sickened by the outbreak across 49 states — an increase of 235 people since the federal health agency last issued an update in July. At least two people have died and 175 have been hospitalized due to the illness.

As of Friday, 73 people in Ohio were sickened — the most of any state where cases have been reported. Tennessee followed closely behind with 67 cases.

DRUG-RESISTANT SALMONELLA LINKED TO SOFT CHEESE, BEEF SICKENS HUNDREDS: CDC

“Of 850 ill people with age information available, 192 are children younger than 5 years,” the CDC said, adding “epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicate that contact with backyard poultry, such as chicks and ducklings, from multiple hatcheries, are the likely source of these outbreaks.”

Many people reported buying chicks and ducklings from agricultural stores, websites, and hatcheries prior to becoming ill.

“Six of the outbreak strains making people sick have been identified in samples collected from backyard poultry environments at people’s homes in California, Minnesota, and Ohio and from poultry environments at retail stores in Michigan and Oregon,” said the agency.

Symptoms of salmonella usually develop 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria, with most people developing diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. The illness usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment.

“In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized,” according to the CDC. “Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.”

Federal health officials say that children younger than 5 years of age, pregnant women, adults 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

The CDC estimates salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses, 23,000 hospitalizations, and 450 deaths in the U.S. every year.

Food is the source for about 1 million of those illnesses.

AMID SALMONELLA OUTBREAK, CDC WARNS: DON’T ‘KISS OR SNUGGLE’ CHICKENS

In May, when 52 people were affected by the outbreak, the CDC warned to not “kiss or snuggle” chickens. It also issued a list of precautions the public should take when handling the animals to avoid contracting the illness, such as always washing your hands after handling a backyard flock and not letting the birds inside the home — especially in areas where food is prepared.

The CDC also said at the time that children younger than 5 or adults over 65 should avoid handling “chicks, ducklings, or other poultry” altogether.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6014009438001_6014008273001-vs Salmonella outbreak connected to backyard poultry sickens more than 1,000 across 49 states: CDC Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc e554d6c5-1d00-520e-88f8-085363f6e85f article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6014009438001_6014008273001-vs Salmonella outbreak connected to backyard poultry sickens more than 1,000 across 49 states: CDC Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc e554d6c5-1d00-520e-88f8-085363f6e85f article

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Hepatitis A outbreak at New Jersey golf club leaves 1 dead, 27 others sickened

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs Hepatitis A outbreak at New Jersey golf club leaves 1 dead, 27 others sickened Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc article 0a94f36c-ccca-5536-aca9-33ea906e4a39

At least one person who contracted hepatitis A linked to an outbreak at a golf and tennis club in New Jersey has died, local officials said.

At least 27 others have been sickened due to the outbreak connected to the Mendham Golf & Tennis Club, officials with the Morris County Office of Health Management said, according to NJ.com. That’s an increase from the 23 who were sickened earlier this month when news of the outbreak first broke.

The person who died was not identified.

HEPATITIS A OUTBREAK AT NEW JERSEY GOLF CLUB AFFECTS NEARLY TWO DOZEN PEOPLE, ONE INDIVIDUAL ‘SERIOUSLY ILL’

An infected food handler was likely behind the outbreak, the New Jersey Department of Health previously said. Those sickened were exposed between June 9 and June 30 but were not notified of a possible exposure until July 5.

The outbreak was contained to the members-only club.

When members were first notified, they were asked to inform any guests who may have dined at the club with them.

“This notification also advised that those who dined at the club when the food-handler was potentially infectious should receive post-exposure prophylaxis,” health officials said at the time.

The “highly contagious” liver infection is caused by the hepatitis A virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The virus typically spreads when a person eats or drinks something “contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person,” the health agency said.

Those who contract hepatitis A — not to be confused with hepatitis B or C, which are caused by different viruses — may be sick for “several weeks” and usually fully recover, according to the CDC. It is rare to die from the illness, though hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death, typically in those who are 50 years of age or older.

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, dark urine, vomiting, joint pain, and jaundice, among other signs.

‘MULTIPLE’ MINNESOTA COUNTIES AFFECTED BY HEP A OUTBREAK; OFFICIALS SAY DRUG USERS, HOMELESS HIT HARDEST

While hepatitis A infections do happen in the U.S., they’re more common in developing countries where sanitation and hygiene are poor, the CDC says.

The disease is preventable with a vaccine.

A spokesperson for the Morris County Office of Health Management did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs Hepatitis A outbreak at New Jersey golf club leaves 1 dead, 27 others sickened Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc article 0a94f36c-ccca-5536-aca9-33ea906e4a39   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs Hepatitis A outbreak at New Jersey golf club leaves 1 dead, 27 others sickened Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc article 0a94f36c-ccca-5536-aca9-33ea906e4a39

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‘Multiple’ Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs 'Multiple' Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc edaf3beb-8eef-51e7-b6e8-26b3f2276763 article

At least nine counties in Minnesota are experiencing a hepatitis A outbreak, state health officials announced this week.

In a statement Thursday, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) said it has declared an outbreak in “multiple counties among people who use street drugs (injection or non-injection), are experiencing homelessness or unstable housing, or have been recently incarcerated.”

So far, there have been 23 cases of hepatitis A across the nine counties — Pine, Hennepin, Kanabec, Mille Lacs, St. Louis, Washington, Chisago, Dakota and Kandiyohi — involved.

MEASLES EXPOSURE AT UNION STATION IN LOS ANGELES CONFIRMED: HEALTH OFFICIALS

“Thirteen cases have been hospitalized and all have been discharged,” health officials said.

“While initial cases were clustered in east-central Minnesota and had links to each other, more recent cases occurred in counties in other parts of the state. The infection source is not known for some cases, suggesting some community transmission among those in high-risk groups,” they added.

The “highly contagious” liver infection is caused by the hepatitis A virus, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus typically spreads when a person eats or drinks something “contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person,” the health agency said.

Those who contract hepatitis A — not to be confused with hepatitis B or C, which are caused by different viruses — may be sick for “several weeks” and usually fully recover, according to the CDC. It is rare to die from the illness, though hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death, typically in those who are 50 years of age or older.

“Declaring an outbreak is a significant step because it allows us to access additional resources to fight the outbreak.”

— Kris Ehresmann

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, dark urine, vomiting, joint pain, and jaundice, among other signs.

While hepatitis A infections do happen in the U.S., it is more common in developing countries where sanitation and hygiene are poor, the CDC says.

The disease is preventable with a vaccine.

BREAST CANCER RISK REDUCED BY SWAPPING RED MEAT FOR POULTRY, STUDY FINDS

“We have been working with our public health partners to respond to individual cases and prevent future cases,” Kris Ehresmann, infectious disease director for MDH, said in a statement. “Declaring an outbreak is a significant step because it allows us to access additional resources to fight the outbreak.”

The state health department announced the outbreak after it began seeing an increase in hepatitis A cases beginning in May.

“These cases had similar risk factors to national outbreaks of hepatitis A that have been occurring since 2016. Nationally, there have been more than 23,600 cases in 29 states. MDH has been monitoring the national outbreaks and conducting enhanced surveillance of hepatitis A since mid-2018 to help quickly identify cases,” state health officials added.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs 'Multiple' Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc edaf3beb-8eef-51e7-b6e8-26b3f2276763 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs 'Multiple' Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc edaf3beb-8eef-51e7-b6e8-26b3f2276763 article

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Salmonella outbreak linked to fresh papayas sickens at least 62 people in 8 states, CDC says

Dozens of people in eight U.S. states have been infected with a strain of salmonella after eating fresh papayas imported from Mexico, according to federal health officials.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that 62 people have so far been infected with the strain of Salmonella Uganda, of which 23 have been hospitalized.

The illnesses started on dates ranging from Jan. 14 to June 8, with most of the illnesses occurring since April.

CHILD EXPOSED TO E. COLI AT SAN DIEGO COUNTY FAIR DIES, 3 OTHERS SICKENED: OFFICIALS

“Epidemiologic evidence and early product distribution information indicate that whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico and sold in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island are a likely source of this outbreak,” the CDC said.

Westlake Legal Group SalmonellaMap1 Salmonella outbreak linked to fresh papayas sickens at least 62 people in 8 states, CDC says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/rhode-island fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc article 5fcddcc7-59f7-5d83-bb99-9a11067e39d2

At least 62 people in 8 states have been sickened with salmonella after eating fresh papayas imported from Mexico, according to federal health officials. (CDC)

While no deaths attributed to Salmonella have been reported, the agency is advising that consumers in those states not eat any, whole fresh papayas from Mexico. Health officials are also advising people not to eat fruit salads or other mixes that include papayas from Mexico.

“If you aren’t sure the papaya you bought is from Mexico, you can ask the place of purchase,” the agency states. “When in doubt, don’t eat the papaya. Throw it out.”

AMID SALMONELLA OUTBREAK, CDC WARNS: DON’T ‘KISS OR SNUGGLE’ CHICKENS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is also advising importers, suppliers, and distributors, as well as restaurants, retailers and other food service providers across all states to halt sales of whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Papaya Salmonella outbreak linked to fresh papayas sickens at least 62 people in 8 states, CDC says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/rhode-island fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc article 5fcddcc7-59f7-5d83-bb99-9a11067e39d2

Whole, fresh papayas from Mexico and sold in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island are the likely source of the outbreak. (iStock)

Of those sickened so far, 24 were in New York, 14 were in Connecticut and 12 were in New Jersey.

Symptoms of salmonella usually develop 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria, with most people developing diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. The illness usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized,” according to the CDC. “Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.”

Federal health officials say that children younger than 5-years-old, pregnant women, adults 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

The CDC estimates that Salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses, 23,000 hospitalizations, and 450 deaths in the U.S. every year. Food is the source for about 1 million of those illnesses, according to the agency.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Papaya Salmonella outbreak linked to fresh papayas sickens at least 62 people in 8 states, CDC says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/rhode-island fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc article 5fcddcc7-59f7-5d83-bb99-9a11067e39d2   Westlake Legal Group iStock-Papaya Salmonella outbreak linked to fresh papayas sickens at least 62 people in 8 states, CDC says Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/rhode-island fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/massachusetts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/foodborne-illness fox news fnc/health fnc article 5fcddcc7-59f7-5d83-bb99-9a11067e39d2

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Boy, 5, dies of Ebola as outbreak crosses Congo border

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032800027001_6032805263001-vs Boy, 5, dies of Ebola as outbreak crosses Congo border fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/ebola fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 8668ed4b-4003-50f1-a30b-b32a10bb0e2e

A 5-year-old boy vomiting blood became the first cross-border victim in the current Ebola outbreak on Wednesday, while his 3-year-old brother and grandmother tested positive for the disease that has killed nearly 1,400 people in Congo.

The outbreak’s spread into Uganda prompted the World Health Organization to revisit whether the second-largest Ebola epidemic in history should be declared a global health emergency. A WHO expert committee meets on Friday. Such declarations almost always boost attention and donor funding.

UGANDA CONFIRMS FIRST EBOLA CASE SINCE VIRUS BROKE OUT IN CONGO

The boy’s mother had taken him and his brother from Uganda into Congo, where her father was ill. WHO said he died of Ebola, and officials believe those who mourned him became infected, too.

The family then crossed back into Uganda via an unguarded foot path, bypassing official border crossings where health workers have been screening millions of travelers since the outbreak was declared in August.

Authorities in both countries now vow to step up border security.

Experts have long feared Ebola could spread to neighboring countries because of rebel attacks and community resistance hampering containment work in eastern Congo, one of the world’s most turbulent regions. The virus can spread quickly via close contact with bodily fluids of those infected and can be fatal in up to 90 percent of cases.

The 5-year-old boy’s mother and grandmother, along with several other children, were stopped at a border post before crossing into Uganda. A dozen of them already showed symptoms of Ebola.

Congo’s health ministry said those 12 were put in an isolation center, but in fact they were told to remain where they were staying until transport was found to an Ebola treatment unit, Dr. Dominique Kabongo, a local coordinator of response teams, told The Associated Press.

Instead, six family members quietly crossed into Uganda.

WHEN DREAM VACATIONS TURN INTO TRAGEDIES: MANY DEATHS AT POPULAR RESORTS REMAIN MYSTERIES

“Many people are evading (border) customs and using small footpaths and it is difficult for us to follow the contacts,” Kabongo said.

On arrival in Uganda, where authorities had been alerted by Congolese colleagues, the boy received treatment while relatives were isolated and tested. The boy’s uncle is among seven suspected cases now identified in Uganda.

On the Congo side, five family members who did not cross into Uganda have tested positive for Ebola, the health ministry said.

Health teams in Uganda “are not panicking,” Henry Mwebesa, the national director of health services, told the AP. He cited the East African nation’s experience battling previous outbreaks of Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers.

This outbreak “is not going to go beyond” the boy’s family in Uganda, he added.

While officials vowed to close unauthorized crossings, an AP reporter in the border area where the family crossed saw surveillance teams patrolling the Ugandan side. Some footpaths, however, remained unguarded. Some people wade across the shallow Lubiriha River.

The “stubbornness of Congolese” is a challenge in screening, a Ugandan Red Cross official, Francis Tumwine, told the AP at one border crossing last week. “They have failed to understand that Ebola is there, they think that it is witchcraft which is killing them.”

A Congolese trader, Muhindo Kaongezekela, added: “We are not sure if there’s Ebola in Congo. In Congo, if they find you with a headache, they take you to the hospital and later say they died of Ebola.”

This is the first time this restive part of vast Congo, veteran of several Ebola outbreaks, has experienced the virus.

Resistance by residents wary of authorities has hurt containment efforts in an outbreak where an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine is being widely used for the first time. More than 130,000 people have received the vaccine.

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Uganda is more stable than eastern Congo, and it has vaccinated nearly 4,700 health workers. WHO is shipping another 3,500 doses this week for health workers and contacts of those infected.

The WHO expert committee has twice decided that this outbreak, while of “deep concern,” is not yet a global health emergency. But international spread is one of the major criteria the United Nations agency considers before making a declaration. WHO has advised against travel restrictions.

The first cross-border case is “tragic but unfortunately not surprising,” said Dr. Jeremy Farrar with the Wellcome Trust, which funds Ebola vaccine research.

While Uganda is well-prepared, he added, “we can expect and should plan for more cases in (Congo) and neighboring countries. This epidemic is in a truly frightening phase and shows no sign of stopping anytime soon.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032800027001_6032805263001-vs Boy, 5, dies of Ebola as outbreak crosses Congo border fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/ebola fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 8668ed4b-4003-50f1-a30b-b32a10bb0e2e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032800027001_6032805263001-vs Boy, 5, dies of Ebola as outbreak crosses Congo border fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/ebola fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 8668ed4b-4003-50f1-a30b-b32a10bb0e2e

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Drs. Thomas Frieden, Margaret Hamburg: There’s a limited window to make America safer from epidemics

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032800027001_6032805263001-vs Drs. Thomas Frieden, Margaret Hamburg: There’s a limited window to make America safer from epidemics Tom Frieden, M.D. Margaret Hamburg fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/ebola fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/opinion fnc b4c65d0b-f110-537e-8c75-de88605aff5c article

Every day brings stark reminders that we live in a dangerous world. The latest Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is out of control and threatens to spread throughout the region. Measles, imported to the U.S. from countries around the world, has reached levels not seen in decades. And the threat of a new global pandemic – either naturally occurring or man-made – looms on the horizon, ready to strike anywhere at any time.

In one week, the World Bank will decide how to allocate more than $50 billion in development funding to lower income countries. The World Bank should dedicate some of its International Development Association (IDA) funds – say, 5 percent, or about $1 billion per year over three years – to help countries become better prepared for infectious disease outbreaks.

The United States delegation should champion this initiative and insist on both fundings for preparedness and accountability for progress.

EBOLA OUTBREAK IN CONGO REACHES OVER 2,000 CONFIRMED CASES

Working in public health at local, national, and global levels, we’ve seen first hand the tragedy of preventable epidemics – and we’ve seen that better protection can save lives and money. Right now, the world has a narrow window of opportunity to substantially improve our protection against diseases such as measles, Ebola, and drug-resistant bacteria.

IDA financing offers exceptional value, with every $1 in partner contributions generating approximately $3 in new spending. For those who believe that the U.S. funds more than its fair share for global health, the U.S. isn’t the leading donor to IDA (the U.K. is).

After the SARS epidemic in 2003, all countries of the world agreed to improve their preparedness against disease outbreaks. But the Ebola epidemic of 2014 showed that many countries were not able to stop infectious diseases, and recent independent and objective evaluations show that most countries are still woefully underprepared.

Lack of funds for epidemic preparedness means lack of safety in the U.S. Unless lower-income countries receive substantially more resources than they have so far, the world, and therefore the U.S., will remain vulnerable, and unnecessarily so.

It is not a matter of if, but when the next disease outbreak will strike. Outbreaks are becoming more frequent and can now spread more rapidly. All of us are at greater risk than ever. Early action to contain an outbreak of Ebola, cholera or plague – or the next unknown pathogen – is the best way to protect everyone across the globe.

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Disease outbreaks can wipe out years of investments and severely damage development. Economic losses can dwarf the cost of response – the World Bank estimates that SARS cost the global economy $54 billion in little over half a year and that a severe flu pandemic could cost more than $3 trillion, nearly five percent of global GDP.

Because of its global reach, the World Bank is in the best position to take the lead on this critical effort, but the United States delegation has one week to make sure it does so at its annual meeting on June 17. The total needed to close preparedness gaps is estimated at about $4.5 billion annually, less than $1 per person per year. An additional $1 billion infusion each year for the next three years will provide a tremendous jump start – and is a bargain the United States cannot afford to miss.

Drs. Frieden and Hamburg are former health commissioners of New York City and, respectively, former Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, and are members of the Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032800027001_6032805263001-vs Drs. Thomas Frieden, Margaret Hamburg: There’s a limited window to make America safer from epidemics Tom Frieden, M.D. Margaret Hamburg fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/ebola fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/opinion fnc b4c65d0b-f110-537e-8c75-de88605aff5c article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6032800027001_6032805263001-vs Drs. Thomas Frieden, Margaret Hamburg: There’s a limited window to make America safer from epidemics Tom Frieden, M.D. Margaret Hamburg fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease/ebola fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/opinion fnc b4c65d0b-f110-537e-8c75-de88605aff5c article

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Millions of pigs in Asia culled as African swine fever spreads

Millions of pigs have reportedly been culled throughout Asia as a swine fever outbreak — described as the “biggest animal disease outbreak we’ve ever had on the planet” — spreads throughout the continent.

African swine fever (ASF) is a “highly contagious and deadly viral disease affecting both domestic and wild pigs of all ages,” according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The disease “cannot be transmitted from pigs to humans,” and isn’t a food safety problem, per officials.

SOUTH KOREA SCRAMBLES TO CURB AFRICAN SWINE FEVER AFTER NORTH KOREA REPORTS OUTBREAK IN PIG FARMS

There is no known cure or vaccines for the disease, which is found throughout the world — particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. But in recent months, Asian countries like China, Mongolia and Vietnam, and areas in the European Union have been affected.

Westlake Legal Group pigs-asia-1-AP Millions of pigs in Asia culled as African swine fever spreads Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 2e4af490-5ad5-545c-b2df-3d24481c132b

In this April 29, 2009, file photo, a South Korean farmer sprays disinfectant against a possible swine flu outbreak at a port farm in Paju, South Korea. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Lee Jung-hoon)

1 MILLION POUNDS OF PORK SEIZED AS US BORDER AMID DEADLY CHINESE OUTBREAK

In China and other Asian countries, swine fever has decimated pig herds. An expert on the disease recently told The Guardian it will continue to spread.

“This is the biggest animal disease outbreak we’ve ever had on the planet,” Dirk Pfeiffer, a veterinary epidemiologist at City University of Hong Kong and swine fever expert, said. “It makes the foot and mouth disease and [mad cow disease] outbreaks pale in comparison to the damage that is being done. And we have no way to stop it from spreading.”

Westlake Legal Group pigs-asia-2-AP Millions of pigs in Asia culled as African swine fever spreads Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 2e4af490-5ad5-545c-b2df-3d24481c132b

In this June 3, 2019, photo, health officials spray disinfectant solution as a precaution against African swine fever near a pig farm in Incheon, South Korea.  (Yun Tae-hyun/Yonhap via AP)

On Wednesday, South Korea said North Korea has so far ignored its calls to jointly stem the spread of swine fever following an outbreak near the North’s border with China.

A lack of bilateral cooperation between the two nations renders South Korea helpless in preventing the disease from reaching the North-South border. There is concern that an outbreak in South Korea would deal a significant blow to a massive industry that involves 6,300 farms raising more than 11 million pigs.

North Korean state media has published several articles in recent weeks detailing the spread of African swine fever across Asia, but none of them so far has specifically mentioned that the disease has reached the North, which the South believes raises about 2.6 million pigs in 14 government-run or cooperative farms.

Agriculture officials said swine fever has never been found in the U.S. If it were to spread, it “would have a “significant impact on U.S. livestock producers, their communities and the economy.”

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“There is no treatment or vaccine available for this disease,” the department states online. “The only way to stop this disease is to depopulate all affected or exposed swine herds.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group pigs-asia-2-AP Millions of pigs in Asia culled as African swine fever spreads Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 2e4af490-5ad5-545c-b2df-3d24481c132b   Westlake Legal Group pigs-asia-2-AP Millions of pigs in Asia culled as African swine fever spreads Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 2e4af490-5ad5-545c-b2df-3d24481c132b

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Kentucky teen at center of vaccination lawsuit comes down with chickenpox, report says

Westlake Legal Group kentucky-teen-at-center-of-vaccination-lawsuit-comes-down-with-chickenpox-report-says Kentucky teen at center of vaccination lawsuit comes down with chickenpox, report says fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 23dd1ecb-b9da-5d11-90d1-5cfadabb6ddf
Westlake Legal Group jerome_kunkel Kentucky teen at center of vaccination lawsuit comes down with chickenpox, report says fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 23dd1ecb-b9da-5d11-90d1-5cfadabb6ddf

The Kentucky high school senior at the center of a vaccination lawsuit has allegedly come down with the chicken pox. The teen’s lawyer reportedly told the Cincinnati Enquirer that his client was diagnosed with the virus last week and that “he’s a little itchy.”

The diagnosis comes weeks after 18-year-old Jerome Kunkel first landed in the headlines for the lawsuit he filed against his state’s health department, which had barred him from participating in his school’s basketball season over his refusal to get the chickenpox vaccine.

PARENTS’ PLEA TO HELP INFANT BORN WITH BRAIN STICKING OUT OF NOSE

The rule was instated after a chickenpox outbreak took place at the Assumption Academy, where Kunkel is enrolled, which is associated with Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Church in Union. After 32 students came down with the illness, the health department said that unvaccinated students were not allowed to attend school until 21 days after the onset of a rash on the last student or staff member.

Kunkel claimed the vaccine was “derived from aborted fetal cells,” which he considers “immoral illegal and sinful.” While some Catholics take issue with the fact that some vaccines were derived from cells taken from two fetuses who were aborted in the 1960s, the National Catholic Bioethics Center notes that a tiny sample of those cells were multiplied to create viruses that were, in turn, used to develop vaccines, and that today’s vaccines are far removed from those cells because the cell lines have grown independently.

MOM SUING ETSY, TEETHING NECKLACE MAKER OVER SON’S 2016 DAYCARE STRANGULATION DEATH

Two dozen other students joined Kunkel’s lawsuit. His lawyer, Christopher Wiest, told the news outlet that about half of his clients had come down with the contagious virus since the filing.

The virus is a high contagious illness that can cause itchy, blister-like rash on patients that first appears on the chest, back and face. It can be serious in babies, adolescents, people with weakened immune system, adults and pregnant women.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the best way to prevent the virus is to receive the vaccine.

Fox News’ Anna Hopkins contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group jerome_kunkel Kentucky teen at center of vaccination lawsuit comes down with chickenpox, report says fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 23dd1ecb-b9da-5d11-90d1-5cfadabb6ddf   Westlake Legal Group jerome_kunkel Kentucky teen at center of vaccination lawsuit comes down with chickenpox, report says fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 23dd1ecb-b9da-5d11-90d1-5cfadabb6ddf

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Canadian man hit Seattle’s tourist hot spots while infected with measles, health officials say

Westlake Legal Group canadian-man-hit-seattles-tourist-hot-spots-while-infected-with-measles-health-officials-say Canadian man hit Seattle's tourist hot spots while infected with measles, health officials say fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 65777dcb-4598-5b1b-9b94-84204a25f8f3
Westlake Legal Group 85a15187-Canada-Wildfires-Haze-2 Canadian man hit Seattle's tourist hot spots while infected with measles, health officials say fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 65777dcb-4598-5b1b-9b94-84204a25f8f3

Health officials in Seattle are warning about a Canadian traveler who passed through popular tourist spots in late April while infected with measles. The patient, described to be a male in his 40s, had visited New York and Japan before arriving in the King County area.

According to a news release, the man was infectious when he visited the Sea-Tac Airport, Marriot Courtyard Hotel Pioneer Square, the Seattle Space Needle and several other popular locations including the monorail and coffee shops during his weeklong stay.

US MEASLES COUNT RISES TO 764, DRIVEN BY NEW YORK OUTBREAKS

“This case is another reminder that measles is resurgent in many areas of the United States and the world, and that because we all travel, no community is safe from measles introductions,” Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County, said in the news release. “Measles vaccine is safe and effective — all adults and children should be sure they are up to date with the recommended doses of the vaccine to protect themselves and their community.”

Residents or other visitors who frequented potential locations of exposure during the allotted time period are encouraged to find out if they have been vaccinated for the measles virus, or call a health care provider immediately if they begin showing symptoms of fever, or rash between April 27 and May 19.

CDC: RECORD MEASLES OUTBREAK FUELED BY ANTI-VACCINATION PROPAGANDA 

On Monday, health officials said 60 more measles cases had been reported, bringing 2019’s total to 764. It’s the most the U.S. has seen since 1994, when 963 cases were reported. Most cases involve unvaccinated patients, with New York reporting the most. In total, 23 states have reported confirmed cases of the virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has railed against anti-vaccination propaganda that they say is fueling the outbreak in communities around the nation.

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“The biggest challenge we face right now is misinformation and myths about the vaccine. It’s important that parents realize that the vaccine is safe and effective,” Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, previously told Fox News.

Westlake Legal Group 85a15187-Canada-Wildfires-Haze-2 Canadian man hit Seattle's tourist hot spots while infected with measles, health officials say fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 65777dcb-4598-5b1b-9b94-84204a25f8f3   Westlake Legal Group 85a15187-Canada-Wildfires-Haze-2 Canadian man hit Seattle's tourist hot spots while infected with measles, health officials say fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/seattle fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 65777dcb-4598-5b1b-9b94-84204a25f8f3

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