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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/health/infectious-disease

Philadelphia airport visitors may have been exposed to measles, officials warn

Travelers who passed through Philadelphia International Airport earlier this month may have been exposed to measles, health officials announced on Friday.

People who traveled through the air hub on Oct. 2 and 3 may have been exposed to the infectious disease, Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine and Philadelphia Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley said.

“An individual with a suspected case of measles was present in the Philadelphia International Airport on two days and may have exposed many individuals,” Levine explained in a news release. “The Department of Health is working with the county and municipal health departments to notify Pennsylvanians who were on flights with the suspected case, but other individuals may have been exposed at the airport during the identified times.”

BOSTON SEES FIRST MEASLES CASE SINCE 2013, CITY HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY

“However, if you have been properly immunized against measles, your risk of getting the disease is minimal,” Levine continued. “If you believe you might have been exposed and experience symptoms, please contact your health-care provider or call our toll-free hotline at 1-877-PA-HEALTH.”

The Department of Health also shared news of the public health alert to Twitter.

Westlake Legal Group istock-536681219 Philadelphia airport visitors may have been exposed to measles, officials warn Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc e8cef03d-e021-5cde-99a1-3f3af3635e59 article

An image of Philadelphia International Airport in PA. To date this year, 15 cases of measles have been confirmed in the Keystone State. Over 1,200 cases have been reported in the U.S. in 2019 – the greatest number of measles cases reported in America since 1992. (iStock)

To date this year, 15 cases of measles have been confirmed in the Keystone State. Over 1,200 cases have been reported in the U.S. in 2019 – the greatest number of measles cases reported in America since 1992.

MEASLES CASES IN US HIGHEST SINCE 1992, CDC SAYS

Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that is spread in the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. However, people can also contract measles if they come in contact with saliva or mucus from an infected person.

Though symptoms sometimes do not appear for weeks, typical signs of measles include a high fever, rash, cough, and red, watery eyes.

Common complications include ear infections and diarrhea, but more severe complications — such as pneumonia, encephalitis (swelling of the brain) — can also occur, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The highly contagious disease is preventable with a vaccine.

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Fox News’ Madeline Farber contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group istock-536681219 Philadelphia airport visitors may have been exposed to measles, officials warn Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc e8cef03d-e021-5cde-99a1-3f3af3635e59 article   Westlake Legal Group istock-536681219 Philadelphia airport visitors may have been exposed to measles, officials warn Janine Puhak fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/health fnc e8cef03d-e021-5cde-99a1-3f3af3635e59 article

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Connecticut resident is state’s fourth to contract rare tick-borne illness linked to brain infections, death

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5460529352001_5460511749001-vs Connecticut resident is state's fourth to contract rare tick-borne illness linked to brain infections, death Madeline Farber fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc c6012ecf-50f9-5b15-8909-41184c2fac5f article

A fourth Connecticut resident has contracted the rare tick-borne Powassan encephalitis disease, more commonly referred to as Powassan virus.

The patient, who was not identified, is from Ridgefield, according to various local media outlets. Their condition is currently unclear. The Connecticut Department of Health on its website recently updated the number of reported cases to four.

MASSACHUSETTS GIRL, 5, INFECTED WITH EEE DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL AS DONATIONS REACH $190G

Other cases have been reported in New Canaan, New Preston and Newton, reports NBC Connecticut.

Powassan virus — which “belongs to a group of viruses that can cause infection of the brain (encephalitis) or the membranes around the brain and spinal cord (meningitis), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) —  is typically spread to humans after they’re bitten by an infected woodchuck or deer tick. The federal agency says those who live or work near brushy or woody areas are more likely to be exposed to potentially infected ticks.

Those infected with the virus typically experience fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, seizures and memory loss.

TODDLER’S E. COLI DEATH AFTER VACATION SPARKS INVESTIGATION AMID FAMILY HEARTBREAK

Patients often need support breathing and treatment for swelling around the brain, but there is no medicine to treat the virus, nor is there a vaccine to prevent it. About 10 percent of cases result in death, the CDC says.

Powassan virus is rare, with an average of seven reported cases each year in the U.S. Most cases of the virus — which was first discovered in Powassan, Ontario, in 1958 — have occurred in the northeast and Great Lakes areas of the U.S.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5460529352001_5460511749001-vs Connecticut resident is state's fourth to contract rare tick-borne illness linked to brain infections, death Madeline Farber fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc c6012ecf-50f9-5b15-8909-41184c2fac5f article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5460529352001_5460511749001-vs Connecticut resident is state's fourth to contract rare tick-borne illness linked to brain infections, death Madeline Farber fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc c6012ecf-50f9-5b15-8909-41184c2fac5f article

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Connecticut woman’s EEE-linked death marks state’s first since 2013

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088042827001_6088042224001-vs Connecticut woman's EEE-linked death marks state's first since 2013 fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 701833fa-5116-5514-8eeb-4c12b71d8de7

A 77-year-old Connecticut resident died last week, marking the first fatality linked to Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) in the state since 2013. The woman, who was identified by the Rev. Brian Maxwell as Patricia Shaw, had been hospitalized since late August due to the virus.

“I was with her family yesterday and they were telling me that she was so kind towards animals and if she was walking down the road and saw something that was wounded, she’d pick it up,” Maxwell, of Saint Matthias in East Lyme, told WFSB.com. “They rescued a bird, she wouldn’t kill a bug. And so it’s almost ironic that she received this bite from a mosquito and had this very rare disease occur.”

EEE KILLS MASSACHUSETTS MAN; 2ND DEATH IN STATE THIS YEAR

On Friday, Connecticut’s Department of Health confirmed the death of an East Lyme resident and announced a second EEE case in an adult resident of Old Lyme who remains hospitalized. Officials did not give an update on the condition of the patient but said the individual became ill during the second week of September.

“The identification of two Connecticut residents with EEE, one of whom had passed away, emphasizes the seriousness of this infection,” DPH Commissioner Renee Coleman Mitchell, said in the news release. “Using insect repellent, covering bare skin and avoiding being outdoors from dusk to dawn are effective ways to help keep you from being bitten by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes continue to be active until the first heavy frost.”

MICHIGAN MAN WENT FROM ‘PERFECTLY HEALTHY’ TO BRAIN DEAD IN 9 DAYS AFTER CONTRACTING MOSQUITO-BORNE ILLNESS

In the neighboring state of Massachusetts, officials have tallied 10 human cases of EEE and two fatalities, while Rhode Island has reported three cases, and one death.

Symptoms of the virus typically appear about four to 10 days after a bite, with severe cases progressing to encephalitis. Patients may experience high fever, stiff neck, severe headache and lack of energy. Approximately one-third of patients who contract EEE will die, and there is no specific treatment for the virus. Health officials said the only way to protect against the virus to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

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“Although EEE-infected mosquitoes continue to be detected in the southeastern corner of Connecticut, the numbers are declining and we are not experiencing the excessively high levels of activity seen in Massachusetts,” Connecticut health officials said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088042827001_6088042224001-vs Connecticut woman's EEE-linked death marks state's first since 2013 fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 701833fa-5116-5514-8eeb-4c12b71d8de7   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088042827001_6088042224001-vs Connecticut woman's EEE-linked death marks state's first since 2013 fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/connecticut fox-news/health/medical-research/rare-diseases fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 701833fa-5116-5514-8eeb-4c12b71d8de7

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Tennessee woman blames nail salon after almost losing arm from flesh-eating bacteria infection: report

Westlake Legal Group 49e156a0-Flesh-Eating-Bacteria-latino Tennessee woman blames nail salon after almost losing arm from flesh-eating bacteria infection: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/health/infectious-disease/flesh-eating-bacteria fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 7768f4f6-98e0-5993-9293-12a806dd3889

A Tennessee woman claims she almost lost one of her arms after contracting a flesh-eating bacteria at her local nail salon, according to a report.  

Jayne Sharp told Knoxville’s WBIR-TV she’s undergone several surgeries to remove large chunks of tissue in one of her hands that was destroyed due to the infection. She claims she first began seeing symptoms months ago after she was cut on her right thumb while getting a manicure at Jazzy Nail Bar in Knoxville.

ORLANDO MAN WHO LOST 25 PERCENT OF SKIN TO FLESH-EATING BACTERIA HAS DIED

“While I was there I got stuck on my thumb and I went ‘ouch’ but I went back to looking at my telephone,” she told the station. Her thumb began to throb and she fell so ill that she had trouble sleeping that night, she said.

Sharp went to Summit Medical Group the next day to be checked for the flu. When the flu test came back negative, nurse practitioner Nikki Brown drew a line around a spot on Sharp’s thumb that showed an unusual amount of swelling. Brown told her to monitor the spot in case the swelling got worse. Brown ordered Sharp to go to the emergency room the next day after being told over the phone that the swelling had spread up her right arm. Sharp also developed a red rash.

“She could have lost her finger or her arm if she hadn’t been diagnosed properly,” Dr. Udit Chaudhuri, an internal medicine specialist with Summit Medical Group who also treated Sharp, told WBIR.

He explained that flesh-eating disease, known medically as necrotizing fasciitis, can be contracted through an open cut or wound and “this bacteria gets introduced under the skin into the soft tissue and then into the blood stream.” He added that individuals with compromised immune systems are more likely to contract the disease. Sharp “is a diabetic so that made her more susceptible,” Chaudhuri said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

A manager at Jazzy Nail Bar told WBIR-TV that the business passed a state inspection conducted several days after Sharp reported she had been infected by flesh eating bacteria. He said the nail salon cleans its tools in compliance with state-mandated regulations. The Tennessee Board of Cosmetology and Barber Examiners establishes sanitary rules for licensed salons across the state.

Sharp told the station she is beginning to regain feeling in her right hand after the surgeries but still has trouble flossing her teeth. “My life took a total turn when this happened to me,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group 49e156a0-Flesh-Eating-Bacteria-latino Tennessee woman blames nail salon after almost losing arm from flesh-eating bacteria infection: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/health/infectious-disease/flesh-eating-bacteria fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 7768f4f6-98e0-5993-9293-12a806dd3889   Westlake Legal Group 49e156a0-Flesh-Eating-Bacteria-latino Tennessee woman blames nail salon after almost losing arm from flesh-eating bacteria infection: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/health/infectious-disease/flesh-eating-bacteria fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 7768f4f6-98e0-5993-9293-12a806dd3889

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Explosion at Russian research lab that stores smallpox virus: officials

A virus research center in Russia — one of two places in the world that houses the smallpox virus — exploded on Monday, officials said.

The blast at the State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology, or “Vector,” left one employee injured and the building, located in Koltsovo, near the Siberian city of Novosibirsk, survived without structural damage, according to a statement from the facility.

ANTI-VAXXER WHOSE SON CONTRACTED MEASLES SAYS SHE PLAYED ‘RUSSIAN ROULETTE’ WITH BOY’S HEALTH

The suspected gas explosion happened on the fifth floor of the 6-floor concrete building during scheduled repairs, Russian-owned news agency TASS reported.

Nikolai Krasnikov, the head of Koltsovo — which is known as a science city — said no biohazardous material was being stored where the blast occurred, and that there’s no threat to the population. He added the worker who was injured suffered burns and is in intensive care.

Westlake Legal Group Smallpox-Vaccine_Reuters Explosion at Russian research lab that stores smallpox virus: officials Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 94b7f01e-fd4d-53f8-8088-ffaa4c74bc2c

A virus research lab in Russia, one of two places in the world that stores the smallpox virus, was rocked by an explosion on Monday, officials said. (REUTERS)

The facility in Russia, created in 1974, is one of two places that stores the variola virus, otherwise known as the deadly infectious smallpox disease. The other location is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Ga.

Described as “one of the world’s most devastating diseases known to humanity,” smallpox was declared eradicated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1980 following a worldwide immunization campaign.

But following its eradication, scientists and public health officials felt research was still necessary and agreed to hold the smallpox virus in four locations across the world — the U.S., Russia, England and South Africa.

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Within years, England and South Africa destroyed their stocks of the virus or transferred them to other labs — leaving the U.S. and Russia to be the only locations left to store the deadly disease, according to the CDC.

In 2016, WHO determined the Vector facility “was found to meet international levels of biosafety and biosecurity for variola virus research and storage.”

Westlake Legal Group Smallpox-Vaccine_Reuters Explosion at Russian research lab that stores smallpox virus: officials Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 94b7f01e-fd4d-53f8-8088-ffaa4c74bc2c   Westlake Legal Group Smallpox-Vaccine_Reuters Explosion at Russian research lab that stores smallpox virus: officials Nicole Darrah fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health fox news fnc/world fnc article 94b7f01e-fd4d-53f8-8088-ffaa4c74bc2c

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Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river

Westlake Legal Group brain-eating-amoeba-infection Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river New York Post fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 31d34d1a-1191-5a0a-abd5-25603ca2dd2a

A young Texas girl is fighting for her life after she was infected with a deadly brain-eating amoeba following a day spent swimming in a river, according to reports.

Lily Mae Avant, 10, went swimming over Labor Day weekend in the Brazos River near Waco — where doctors believe she contracted the often-fatal Naegleria fowleri amoeba, news station KWTX-TV reported.

Days after her swim, the Valley Mills Elementary School student started experiencing a fever and a headache, according to the station.

GIRL INFECTED WITH RARE MOSQUITO-BORNE EEE VIRUS GETS MASSIVE SUPPORT ONLINE

Though she appeared to be suffering from symptoms of a common virus, her family said they still believed that “something was not quite right,” according to a Facebook page launched to support Lily.

Then one night, Lily’s mother heard concerning noises coming from her daughter’s room.

“She was incoherent, unresponsive and was quickly swept up and taken to the ER,” the page said.

Lily was then flown to Cook Children’s Heath Care System in Forth Worth, where a spinal tap revealed she had contracted Naegleriasis, a rare infection caused by the amoeba.

Read more from the New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group brain-eating-amoeba-infection Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river New York Post fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 31d34d1a-1191-5a0a-abd5-25603ca2dd2a   Westlake Legal Group brain-eating-amoeba-infection Texas girl contracts brain-eating amoeba during swim in river New York Post fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fnc/health fnc article 31d34d1a-1191-5a0a-abd5-25603ca2dd2a

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Anti-vaxxer whose son contracted measles says she played ‘Russian roulette’ with boy’s health

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs Anti-vaxxer whose son contracted measles says she played 'Russian roulette' with boy's health Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/new-zealand fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 0144981d-121b-5bd3-a8a1-a82198487d45

A New Zealand woman who chose not to vaccinate one of her children was candid when describing how her decision ultimately put her son’s life in jeopardy.

Ally Edward-Lasenby told the radio station “The Hits” she chose to vaccinate one of her children but not her son Cameron, who later contracted the measles and became very ill.

When probed by the radio hosts as to why she made the choice not to vaccinate Cameron, Edward-Lasenby said a “research” paper that claimed there was a link between vaccinations and autism influenced her decision.

MEASLES CASES IN US HIGHEST SINCE 1992, CDC SAYS

The paper Edward-Lasenby was seemingly referring to was published in the medical journal The Lancet in 1997, but was retracted in 2010 due to its incorrect elements and ethical violations, among other reasons. Separate studies conducted following the report’s initial release did not find a link between any vaccine and autism, ultimately debunking its claims.

“I made what I thought was an informed decision at the time,” she said.

Edward-Lasenby’s son Cameron later contracted the measles, an experience she said she “wouldn’t wish on anybody” and which she noted could have been prevented if her son had been vaccinated against measles with the MMR vaccine.

After initially being diagnosed with the flu, Cameron’s condition quickly worsened, Edward-Lasenby said. He suffered from a rash and conjunctivitis — common signs of measles.

“[The doctors] took one look at him and said, ‘You can get him to the hospital first or we can get an ambulance here,'” she said.

Once they arrived, Cameron was confirmed to have measles.

“I believe that it’s important to immunize. We wouldn’t be in that position [if we had]. I played Russian roulette with my son’s health, which I’m not proud of.”

— Ally Edward-Lasenby

“Initially, he had white spots on his mouth,” she said. “He had conjunctivitis. He was really unwell. He continued to deteriorate, and a rash came all over his body. Then they were talking about brain damage — potential brain damage — and the potential loss of life too because it was quite serious.”

The measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes. Others can contract measles when they breathe the contaminated air or touch a contaminated surface, and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth.

“Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before through four days after the rash appears,” says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.

The MMR vaccine can protect both individuals and other people from contracting the virus.

Young children are typically most at risk of contracting measles. The CDC recommends children get two doses of the MMR vaccination, but the first dose is typically given to children when they are between 12 and 15 months old, with the second occurring between ages 4 and 6.

APPARENT ANTI-VAXXER WEARING ‘JESUS WASN’T VACCINATED’ SHIRT SLAMMED ON TWITTER

After he was treated for measles, Cameron developed pneumonia, his mother said. As a result, he suffered from a compromised immune system for months.

“He was in and out of school on a regular basis,” she said.

“I believe that it’s important to immunize. We wouldn’t be in that position [if we had]. I played Russian roulette with my son’s health, which I’m not proud of,” she added.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs Anti-vaxxer whose son contracted measles says she played 'Russian roulette' with boy's health Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/new-zealand fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 0144981d-121b-5bd3-a8a1-a82198487d45   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs Anti-vaxxer whose son contracted measles says she played 'Russian roulette' with boy's health Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/new-zealand fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 0144981d-121b-5bd3-a8a1-a82198487d45

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Measles case confirmed in Hawaii resident after traveling to another state: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs Measles case confirmed in Hawaii resident after traveling to another state: report Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 4d12cc23-51db-5a58-aceb-d695fb4d0ec4

At least one Hawaii resident has been infected with measles, according to a report.

Officials with the state’s Department of Health confirmed the case on Tuesday, according to Hawaii News Now, which added the resident contracted the virus while traveling to another state.

“Because CDC reports cases based on their area of residence, the individual is counted as a Hawaii case even though they contracted the disease in another state,” health officials told the news outlet in a statement. “If DOH had any reported measles case that was locally transmitted, we would announce the information immediately.”

MEASLES CASES IN US HIGHEST SINCE 1992, CDC SAYS

No other details were provided.

The case comes after New York City officials this week declared an end the largest measles outbreak the city has seen in nearly 30 years.

Officials said New York City spent more than $6 million to combat the outbreak, which primarily affected Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn. More than 500 staff were involved in response efforts, which included disseminating pro-vaccination booklets, distributing educational materials in multiple languages, and attending community events, among other efforts.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes. Others can contract measles when they breathe the contaminated air or touch a contaminated surface, and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth.

NEW YORK CITY’S LARGEST MEASLES OUTBREAK IN NEARLY 30 YEARS HAS ENDED, OFFICIALS SAY 

Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before through four days after the rash appears,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says.

The MMR vaccine can protect both individuals and other people from contracting the virus.

Separately, last week federal health officials announced the U.S. is experiencing the highest number of measles cases since the early 1990s. The CDC in its weekly measles cases and outbreaks report said there are 1,215 confirmed measles cases in the U.S., representing an increase of 12 cases from the week before.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs Measles case confirmed in Hawaii resident after traveling to another state: report Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 4d12cc23-51db-5a58-aceb-d695fb4d0ec4   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs Measles case confirmed in Hawaii resident after traveling to another state: report Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 4d12cc23-51db-5a58-aceb-d695fb4d0ec4

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New York City’s largest measles outbreak in nearly 30 years has ended, officials say

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs New York City's largest measles outbreak in nearly 30 years has ended, officials say Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 27f93a15-a9bf-599a-82d2-0d536a26cf2a

New York City officials on Tuesday declared an end to the largest measles outbreak the city has seen in nearly 30 years.

Officials said New York City spent more than $6 million to combat the outbreak, which primarily affected Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn. More than 500 staff were involved in response efforts, which included disseminating pro-vaccination booklets, distributing educational materials in multiple languages, and attending community events, among other efforts.

MEASLES CASES IN US HIGHEST SINCE 1992, CDC SAYS

In certain parts of Brooklyn, namely Williamsburg and Borough Park, officials administered more than 15,000 doses of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine since declaring an emergency order that required people living or working in affected areas to be vaccinated against the illness.

The end of the outbreak, which was declared a public health emergency in April, is announced when two incubation periods of measles — about 42 days — have passed since the last day a person with measles is considered infectious in an affected area, officials explained.

No new cases have been reported since mid-July, though the New York City Health Department  “will continue monitoring and may add cases retrospectively as they are identified.”

“Ending the measles outbreak required extensive collaboration with community organizations and Jewish leaders. They helped encourage vaccinations and achieve record immunization levels in parts of Brooklyn,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement. “As we head back to school this week, we just remain vigilant. To keep our children and communities safe, I urge all New Yorkers to get vaccinated. It’s the best defense we have.”

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes. Others can contract measles when they breathe the contaminated air or touch a contaminated surface, and then touch their eyes, nose or mouth.

“Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before through four days after the rash appears,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says.

The MMR vaccine can protect both individuals and other people from contracting the virus.

Young children are typically most at risk of contracting measles. The CDC recommends children get two doses of the MMR vaccination, but the first dose is typically given to children when they are between 12 and 15 months old, with the second occurring between ages 4 and 6.

In New York City, most measles cases — 80 percent — were diagnosed in people under the age of 18, officials said. Overall, 654 people were diagnosed with the virus since the outbreak began in October of last year.

The news comes after federal health officials last week announced the U.S. is experiencing the highest number of measles cases since the early 1990s. The CDC in its weekly measles cases and outbreaks report said there are 1,215 confirmed measles cases in the U.S., representing an increase of 12 cases from the week before.

MEASLES EXPOSURE AT UNION STATION IN LOS ANGELES CONFIRMED: HEALTH OFFICIALS 

Separately, a recent study by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health determined measles outbreaks in Texas, specifically, could be more commonplace as an increasing number of children in the state show up to school unvaccinated.

Texas, according to researchers, is the “largest state by population” that allows parents to not vaccinate their children for personal or religious reasons. And the number of exemptions has increased in recent years, growing from 2,300 in 2013 to 64,000 in 2016. The researchers found just a 5 percent decrease in the vaccination rate could increase the size of a potential measles outbreak by 4,000 percent in some communities in Texas.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs New York City's largest measles outbreak in nearly 30 years has ended, officials say Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 27f93a15-a9bf-599a-82d2-0d536a26cf2a   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5998287293001_5998284797001-vs New York City's largest measles outbreak in nearly 30 years has ended, officials say Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article 27f93a15-a9bf-599a-82d2-0d536a26cf2a

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Mumps outbreaks affected migrants at detention centers in 19 states: CDC

Westlake Legal Group MUMP-VACCINE-MIGRANTS Mumps outbreaks affected migrants at detention centers in 19 states: CDC fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc f4d76602-99b2-54c1-9429-de496c4d01c2 Danielle Wallace article

About 900 migrants held in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody have been exposed to mumps since last September, according to the first U.S. government report on outbreaks in the nation’s overloaded immigration system.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported Thursday a total of 898 confirmed and probable mumps cases in adult migrants in 57 facilities housing ICE detainees across 19 states since September 2018. The virus also sickened 38 staffers in that time span.

LACK OF FLU SHOTS FOR MIGRANTS AT CBP DETENTION CENTERS A CONCERN, CRITICS SAY

More than 80 percent of the patients who fell ill with the mumps at the detention centers were first exposed to the virus while in the custody of ICE or another U.S. agency, according to the CDC report.

ICE spokesman Bryan Cox told The Associated Press medical professionals at detention facilities screen all new detainees within 24 hours of their arrival to ensure that highly contagious diseases are not spread. Cox said some detainees come from countries where communicable diseases are less controlled than in the U.S. and carry with them the risk of spreading infection.

Mumps is a contagious virus that causes swollen glands, puffy cheeks, fever, headaches and, in severe cases, hearing loss and meningitis. Critics claim U.S. immigrations officials are not doing enough to quarantine migrants and prevent the spread of infectious disease in overcrowded detention centers.

“This has all the makings of a public health crisis,” Nashville immigration attorney R. Andrew Free, who has been tracking facilities with mumps outbreaks from reports of advocates and lawyers representing detainees, told The Associated Press. “ICE has demonstrated itself incapable of ensuring the health and safety of people inside these facilities.”

A large portion of the cases recorded by the CDC were reported at detention facilities in Texas. The Texas Department of State Health Services raised the alarm in December, followed by six other state health departments in early January, prompting what the CDC report calls “a coordinated national outbreak response.” ICE has given more than 25,000 doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in the affected facilities, according to The Associated Press.

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In the U.S., vaccines have drastically reduced the number of mumps cases. Only a few hundred cases are reported most years, with periodic outbreaks involving colleges or other places where people are in close contact.

The CDC report dealt only with mumps, not other health problems in detention facilities. At least two migrant children have died of complications of the flu after being detained by U.S. Border Patrol. The agency recommended detention facilities follow guidance from state and local health departments when responding to mumps.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group MUMP-VACCINE-MIGRANTS Mumps outbreaks affected migrants at detention centers in 19 states: CDC fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc f4d76602-99b2-54c1-9429-de496c4d01c2 Danielle Wallace article   Westlake Legal Group MUMP-VACCINE-MIGRANTS Mumps outbreaks affected migrants at detention centers in 19 states: CDC fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc f4d76602-99b2-54c1-9429-de496c4d01c2 Danielle Wallace article

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