web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse

Miley Cyrus, Liam Hemsworth split gets ugly with drug, partying and cheating allegations: report

Westlake Legal Group liam-hemsworth-miley-cyrus-sad-2 Miley Cyrus, Liam Hemsworth split gets ugly with drug, partying and cheating allegations: report The Sun fox-news/topic/celebrity-breakups fox-news/person/miley-cyrus fox-news/person/liam-hemsworth fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/feud fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article ae223916-3fb0-5c0d-b935-46a509440a60

Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth’s “amicable” split has turned nasty, with drug use and infidelity accusations flying.

Sources on both sides have made shock claims just days after their separation was confirmed.

TMZ reported that 26-year-old Cyrus battled “valiantly” to save her and Hemsworth’s seven-month marriage, but struggled to accept his heavy drinking and “use of certain drugs.”

LIAM HEMSWORTH SPEAKS OUT ON MILEY CYRUS SPLIT

The website claims that her own past substance abuse battle made drug use a “deal-breaker.”

However, an insider from Hemsworth’s camp told TMZ that the drug allegations are “bulls—t” – and that it was Cyrus’ infidelity that ended their romance.

They also denied claims that 29-year-old Hemsworth split from his wife months earlier, with Cyrus hitting the headlines when she was spotted kissing Brody Jenner’s ex Kaitlynn Carter last week.

MILEY CYRUS GETS REAL ABOUT MARRIAGE TO LIAM HEMSWORTH

IS MILEY CYRUS FAKING HER ROMANCE WITH KAITLYNN CARTER TO SPITE LIAM HEMSWORTH?

The source said of the claims: “This is another attempt by Miley to distract from her infidelity and recent outrageous public behavior.”

Meanwhile, Page Six has reported that while Hemsworth wanted to settle down and live a “normal” life with his famous partner, Cyrus looked as though she was heading back to her wild ways.

They also denied that Cyrus had been unfaithful, adding: “She never hooked up with girls while she was married. It wasn’t a part of the relationship.

MILEY CYRUS DANCES IN THONG BIKINI ON ITALIAN VACATION

“There was no hooking up behind his back or with his knowledge.”

Hemsworth broke his silence on the break up two days after Cyrus was pictured kissing Carter.

Posting a photo of a sunset to his Instagram page, he wrote: “Hi all. Just a quick note to say that Miley and I have recently separated and I wish her nothing but health and happiness going forward… Peace and Love.”

MILEY CYRUS SLAMS LIAM HEMSWORTH BREAKUP RUMORS IN TWEET CELEBRATING DATING ANNIVERSARY

MILEY CYRUS CALLS LIAM HEMSWORTH HER ‘SURVIVAL PARTNER’

A rep for Cyrus previously said: “Liam and Miley have agreed to separate at this time. Ever-evolving, changing as partners and individuals, they have decided this is what’s best while they both focus on themselves and careers.

“They still remain dedicated parents to all of the animals they share while lovingly taking this time apart. Please respect their process and privacy.”

Cyrus and Hemsworth first started dating in 2009, they had an on-off relationship with an engagement being announced in June 2012, they then split in 2014.

But in 2016, the romance was back on — as was the engagement.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

On Dec. 24, 2018, it was revealed that the couple had wed in a secret ceremony at Cyrus’ house in Franklin, Tenn., six years after first getting engaged.

This article originally appeared on The Sun.

Westlake Legal Group liam-hemsworth-miley-cyrus-sad-2 Miley Cyrus, Liam Hemsworth split gets ugly with drug, partying and cheating allegations: report The Sun fox-news/topic/celebrity-breakups fox-news/person/miley-cyrus fox-news/person/liam-hemsworth fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/feud fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article ae223916-3fb0-5c0d-b935-46a509440a60   Westlake Legal Group liam-hemsworth-miley-cyrus-sad-2 Miley Cyrus, Liam Hemsworth split gets ugly with drug, partying and cheating allegations: report The Sun fox-news/topic/celebrity-breakups fox-news/person/miley-cyrus fox-news/person/liam-hemsworth fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/feud fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article ae223916-3fb0-5c0d-b935-46a509440a60

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Multiple’ Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs 'Multiple' Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc edaf3beb-8eef-51e7-b6e8-26b3f2276763 article

At least nine counties in Minnesota are experiencing a hepatitis A outbreak, state health officials announced this week.

In a statement Thursday, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) said it has declared an outbreak in “multiple counties among people who use street drugs (injection or non-injection), are experiencing homelessness or unstable housing, or have been recently incarcerated.”

So far, there have been 23 cases of hepatitis A across the nine counties — Pine, Hennepin, Kanabec, Mille Lacs, St. Louis, Washington, Chisago, Dakota and Kandiyohi — involved.

MEASLES EXPOSURE AT UNION STATION IN LOS ANGELES CONFIRMED: HEALTH OFFICIALS

“Thirteen cases have been hospitalized and all have been discharged,” health officials said.

“While initial cases were clustered in east-central Minnesota and had links to each other, more recent cases occurred in counties in other parts of the state. The infection source is not known for some cases, suggesting some community transmission among those in high-risk groups,” they added.

The “highly contagious” liver infection is caused by the hepatitis A virus, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus typically spreads when a person eats or drinks something “contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person,” the health agency said.

Those who contract hepatitis A — not to be confused with hepatitis B or C, which are caused by different viruses — may be sick for “several weeks” and usually fully recover, according to the CDC. It is rare to die from the illness, though hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death, typically in those who are 50 years of age or older.

“Declaring an outbreak is a significant step because it allows us to access additional resources to fight the outbreak.”

— Kris Ehresmann

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, dark urine, vomiting, joint pain, and jaundice, among other signs.

While hepatitis A infections do happen in the U.S., it is more common in developing countries where sanitation and hygiene are poor, the CDC says.

The disease is preventable with a vaccine.

BREAST CANCER RISK REDUCED BY SWAPPING RED MEAT FOR POULTRY, STUDY FINDS

“We have been working with our public health partners to respond to individual cases and prevent future cases,” Kris Ehresmann, infectious disease director for MDH, said in a statement. “Declaring an outbreak is a significant step because it allows us to access additional resources to fight the outbreak.”

The state health department announced the outbreak after it began seeing an increase in hepatitis A cases beginning in May.

“These cases had similar risk factors to national outbreaks of hepatitis A that have been occurring since 2016. Nationally, there have been more than 23,600 cases in 29 states. MDH has been monitoring the national outbreaks and conducting enhanced surveillance of hepatitis A since mid-2018 to help quickly identify cases,” state health officials added.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs 'Multiple' Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc edaf3beb-8eef-51e7-b6e8-26b3f2276763 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5581165512001_5581154881001-vs 'Multiple' Minnesota counties affected by hep A outbreak; officials say drug users, homeless hit hardest Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/infectious-disease/outbreaks fox news fnc/health fnc edaf3beb-8eef-51e7-b6e8-26b3f2276763 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Photos of drug user’s home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: ‘It felt normal’

One photo shows needles and syringes resting on a windowsill mere inches away from an unsuspecting infant. Another shows dirty laundry and trash littering the floor as a toddler peers over an unmade bed. This was home life for Davidlee Richardson, Jaralee Metcalf, Danika Richardson and Brynlee Richardson — four siblings who were living with a mother in the depths of addiction.

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_1 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

This is the original photo that Brynlee posted to a Reddit forum, which she said was taken by an older half-sibling who showed it to his teacher. (Courtesy of Richardson family)

Some of their earliest memories revolve around their mother, who was always sleeping, and a much older father who died in a car accident early in their childhood, and was already a dad to nine kids by the time they were born. Their maternal grandmother made sure the kids had enough food to survive.

A PEEK INTO OPIOID USERS’ BRAINS AS THEY TRY TO QUIT

“We grew up on Fruity Pebbles and SpaghettiOs,” Jaralee, now 23 and living in Idaho Falls, told Fox News. “When we moved to Tennessee, I just remember knowing that I had watched my dad do it a billion times — just boil pasta, throw sauce over it and throw it together.”

“I knew she loved us, I just knew she made a lot of mistakes.”

— Davidlee Richardson, speaking about his mother

Danika, now 20 and living in Utah, remembers her dad always making Saturday breakfasts for them — but she also remembers that her mother was addicted to heroin, meth, alcohol, cigarettes and cannabis, and was trigged by caffeine. David, now 24 and living in Idaho, remembers one instance after his father died when he made his drunken mother angry, but he can’t remember why, and he was running down a hill away from her. His mother stumbled, fell and ended up bloodied and cut, so he turned around and went to help her back up.

The siblings don’t speak of their mother with disdain or hatred, but have learned to separate her from her addiction. Danika said she’s never held a grudge against her mom, while Brynlee, now 17 and living in Utah with Danika, said that her mother’s addiction started at 13, so it wouldn’t be fair to blame an adult for something that a teen did.

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_2 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

Jaralee said that when she was old enough, she asked a neighbor to homeschool her, so she would be more readily available to help her younger siblings.  (Courtesy of Richardson family)

“My mom was very loving, she loved us a lot,” Jaralee told Fox News. “She also had schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and she self-medicated with drugs and alcohol.”

Jaralee, who took on the maternal role for her siblings to make sure they ate, had clean clothes and attended school, said she and David would break into their mother’s room in the night to make sure she was still breathing. She also asked a neighbor to homeschool her, so she would be more readily available for her younger siblings.

ONE NURSE’S STORY OF ADDICTION AND RECOVERY

And when a half-sibling took the photos of their living situation and showed it to a teacher — which, in turn, sparked an investigation and eventual foster care — the siblings repeatedly told a judge they wanted to live with their mother because they “didn’t know any different,” Jaralee said.

“Of course we wanted to live with our mom,” Danika told Fox News. “It felt normal.”

Jaralee said her mother would also pressure them to repeat to the judge that they wanted to go home with her, and that it took her many years to realize that the living situation was unhealthy for them.

“She said a lot of times — and this really frustrated me — when we were in foster care that ‘If you loved me, you would tell the judge you want to live with me,’ and we told them all the time,” she said. “It took a long time for me to tell the judge, ‘No, we don’t want to live with her.’ Early in childhood it was just the normal, but finally I realized no, this is not normal.”

Jaralee said she remembers sometimes showing up to foster families’ homes with just the clothes on their backs at 2 a.m.

After more than 10 years of being placed in and out of foster care, the four were adopted by older half-siblings, with Danika and Brynlee being kept together while Jaralee went with another sibling and David with another. All of them have stayed away from alcohol and illicit substances for religious reasons, but they said their upbringing gave them the tools they needed to thrive today.

“Once we realized that this wasn’t something that happened to every kid, then I was able to stand up to my mom, get us away from that situation and get us adopted,” Jaralee said. “What I want people to know who are going through this situation is that it isn’t what life is like – it does get better.”

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_3 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

The siblings said they survived mostly on cereal and boiled pasta, and that their maternal grandmother played a large role in helping them make sure they had enough food to survive. (Courtesy of Richardson family.)

David said their upbringing “forced us to speak our minds” and “stand up for ourselves.” All of them have been through therapy, or are still seeing therapists. They also keep in touch with their foster families, and most plan to foster children in the future, especially older ones.  All four have either completed or are working toward college degrees, thanks in part to the college fund their maternal grandmother — who still plays a large role in their lives today — set up for them.

MILLIONS SHOULD STOP TAKING ASPIRIN FOR HEART HEALTH, STUDY SAYS

It was the youngest, Brynlee, who shared the photos on Reddit, because she said she likes hearing other people’s stories, and thought her own might be able to help someone else. She said she didn’t expect the overwhelming response she received, and while some of it has been negative and critical of their mother, many have thanked her for sharing.

They know their upbringing isn’t unheard of either. In 2016, 48.6 million Americans used illicit drugs or misused prescription drugs, and more than 63,000 drug overdose deaths in the same year involved a prescription or illicit opioid. The next year, over 15,000 Americans died from drug overdoses involving heroin, with the use of the drug skyrocketing among both men and women in recent years.

Brynlee said she spoke to her mother a few months before she died two years ago, and that her mother told her that she is “beautiful and not to let anyone tell me otherwise.”

“I knew she loved us,” David said. “I just knew she made a lot of mistakes.”

At the time of her death, the siblings were told she died of a heart attack. It was only after her funeral when they received her death certificate that they learned she had heroin in her system, and that she had died of asphyxiation after choking on a small bag.

Her children then found a Facebook tribute she had written to them in her biography. She wrote that they were “her greatest blessings,” and that they were “her most important contribution to this world and make me proud always.”

Danika said her mother wrote that they made her “life worthwhile,” and “her world go round.”

“I’m sorry you missed out on both of your parents,” her mother wrote, according to Danika. “But always know how much you are and were loved,” Danika said her mother wrote.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group Richardson_1 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad   Westlake Legal Group Richardson_1 Photos of drug user's home shed light on childhood marred by opioid addiction: 'It felt normal' fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 4b62b882-0910-5552-885e-2097fc6b3cad

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen’s ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says

Westlake Legal Group brooke-mueller-getty Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen's ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says Sasha Savitsky Jessica Sager fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/person/charlie-sheen fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6d617bbd-2794-5b3b-9c8e-e9c8e4af8f16

Charlie Sheen’s ex-wife, Brooke Mueller, is still struggling with sobriety, a source told Fox News Monday.

A report early Monday claimed that Mueller, 41, may have relapsed during a weekend trip to the Hamptons.

A rep for Mueller declined to comment on the report, but an insider close to the actress and real estate investor told Fox News, “Like so many people, sobriety is a daily challenge for Brooke. She genuinely wants to be well and tries every day to live a healthy life. Unfortunately, the demons of addiction are strong and overpower her efforts to stay sober.”

DID BROOKE MUELLER ENTER REHAB TO KEEP HER KIDS?

A spy told Page Six that Mueller appeared distraught at a Southampton Rite Aid early Sunday and that she begged a stranger to help her get home.

“We took her home because we thought she needed help. But once we were in the house, she opened her bags and she had so many drugs it was like ‘Scarface,’” a witness said.

BROOKE MUELLER HOSPITALIZED FOLLOWING ‘BIZARRE’ BEHAVIOR

Once at Mueller’s property, the witness alleges, “The guys in the house were just waking up from a long night, and nobody was in the mood to party. But Brooke had other ideas, and kept saying, ‘Why are you all so boring? Let’s party.’ She had so many bags of drugs, it wasn’t clear what they were, but she had white powder around her nose, so I assume it was cocaine.”

CHARLIE SHEEN RECALLS 2011 SPIRAL, REHAB JOURNEY AND DIVORCES

“She disappeared in the bathroom for a while with one young man, then came out and went back in the bathroom with another guy,” the witness added.

Mueller shares 10-year-old twin sons with Sheen, 53, to whom she was married from 2008 to 2011.

In 2009, Mueller accused Sheen of threatening her life during an argument. He later pleaded not guilty to domestic violence in relation to the incident.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

She’s struggled with drug abuse for years and has been in rehab several times.

Westlake Legal Group brooke-mueller-getty Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen's ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says Sasha Savitsky Jessica Sager fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/person/charlie-sheen fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6d617bbd-2794-5b3b-9c8e-e9c8e4af8f16   Westlake Legal Group brooke-mueller-getty Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen's ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says Sasha Savitsky Jessica Sager fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/person/charlie-sheen fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6d617bbd-2794-5b3b-9c8e-e9c8e4af8f16

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen’s ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says

Westlake Legal Group brooke-mueller-getty Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen's ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says Sasha Savitsky Jessica Sager fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/person/charlie-sheen fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6d617bbd-2794-5b3b-9c8e-e9c8e4af8f16

Charlie Sheen’s ex-wife, Brooke Mueller, is still struggling with sobriety, a source told Fox News Monday.

A report early Monday claimed that Mueller, 41, may have relapsed during a weekend trip to the Hamptons.

A rep for Mueller declined to comment on the report, but an insider close to the actress and real estate investor told Fox News, “Like so many people, sobriety is a daily challenge for Brooke. She genuinely wants to be well and tries every day to live a healthy life. Unfortunately, the demons of addiction are strong and overpower her efforts to stay sober.”

DID BROOKE MUELLER ENTER REHAB TO KEEP HER KIDS?

A spy told Page Six that Mueller appeared distraught at a Southampton Rite Aid early Sunday and that she begged a stranger to help her get home.

“We took her home because we thought she needed help. But once we were in the house, she opened her bags and she had so many drugs it was like ‘Scarface,’” a witness said.

BROOKE MUELLER HOSPITALIZED FOLLOWING ‘BIZARRE’ BEHAVIOR

Once at Mueller’s property, the witness alleges, “The guys in the house were just waking up from a long night, and nobody was in the mood to party. But Brooke had other ideas, and kept saying, ‘Why are you all so boring? Let’s party.’ She had so many bags of drugs, it wasn’t clear what they were, but she had white powder around her nose, so I assume it was cocaine.”

CHARLIE SHEEN RECALLS 2011 SPIRAL, REHAB JOURNEY AND DIVORCES

“She disappeared in the bathroom for a while with one young man, then came out and went back in the bathroom with another guy,” the witness added.

Mueller shares 10-year-old twin sons with Sheen, 53, to whom she was married from 2008 to 2011.

In 2009, Mueller accused Sheen of threatening her life during an argument. He later pleaded not guilty to domestic violence in relation to the incident.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

She’s struggled with drug abuse for years and has been in rehab several times.

Westlake Legal Group brooke-mueller-getty Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen's ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says Sasha Savitsky Jessica Sager fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/person/charlie-sheen fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6d617bbd-2794-5b3b-9c8e-e9c8e4af8f16   Westlake Legal Group brooke-mueller-getty Brooke Mueller, Charlie Sheen's ex wife, still struggling with drug use, source says Sasha Savitsky Jessica Sager fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/person/charlie-sheen fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6d617bbd-2794-5b3b-9c8e-e9c8e4af8f16

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Drug cop loses daughter to overdose, builds sober living house in her honor

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5719669053001_5719667494001-vs Drug cop loses daughter to overdose, builds sober living house in her honor Jezzamine Wolk fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc article 1727fd31-25fd-522b-b9d7-0e5cffa41ac6

Kevin Simmers locked up drug abusers in western Maryland for years as a narcotics officer for the Hagerstown Police Department. Then, one day, the crisis found a way into his own home.

“I felt like handcuffs and incarceration were the answer to this epidemic,” Simmers said.

Now, he runs a drug treatment program to help addicts. He’s hoping that although he wasn’t able to save his daughter, he could save the lives of others.

“Brooke’s House,” which opens its doors soon Hagerstown, Md., is named after his late daughter, who after a years-long battle with drug addiction, ended up dying from a drug overdose. The program he opened with his wife offers counseling, medically assisted treatment and career training.

POLICE DEPARTMENTS RETHINK APPROACH TO BATTLING ADDICTION CRISIS

“I’m hoping they leave here with a purpose, live a sober life, and are ready to conquer the world,” Simmers said.

He said his views on drugs and addiction changed in 2013, when his then-18-year-old daughter, Brooke, admitted she was hooked on Percocet, an opioid pain medication.

Simmers, now a retired officer, said he watched his own daughter battle addiction for years. Although he tried to help her, he could not.

Simmers reached out to treatment facilities to try to get her off the street, but was frustrated he couldn’t choose the type of treatment. The insurance companies only authorized outpatient treatment.

TIMOTHY MCMAHAN KING: I’VE STRUGGLES WITH AN OPIOID ADDICTION – TO FIND A SOLUTION, WE MUST BREAK THE SILENCE

This ultimately failed, as she quit after a few weeks. Brooke told her father she was now shooting heroin, and funding her habit through shoplifting, embezzlement, and selling her body.

The family then tried an inpatient facility option, but bed space wasn’t available for over a week. In that time, Brooke ended up relapsing. She was in and out of treatment facilities, seeking help but then relapsing again. She ended up in the hospital, she ended up in jail. Nothing helped.

She ended up dying from a heroin overdose.

Nationwide, more than 70,200 Americans died from an overdose in 2017, according to the latest data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

FATHER OF OKLAHOMA FOOTBALL STAR WHO OVERDOSEd TESTIFIES AT LANDMARK OPIOID TRIAL

A month after Brooke’s funeral, Simmers and his wife realized they needed to fulfill their promise to Brooke and build the sober living home in her honor.

Anytime Simmers and his wife went on vacation, they would visit drug treatment facilities to collect research. They wanted to avoid copying other facility’s bad attributes, such as overcrowding. He didn’t want a place that was co-ed.

After four years, they built Brooke’s House. The women enrolled have three career path options to be trained in — cosmetology, pet grooming and chocolate making. The goal is to give these girls applicable job skills they can utilize after graduating from the program, an opportunity Brooke did not get.

Everyone in “Brooke’s House,” from management to enrollees, are required to participate in the chocolate-making process. Proceeds from chocolate sales will support the program.

When asked the difference between this house and other facilities Brooke was enrolled in, Simmers said: “This house has been built with love.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Everything from the driveway, to furniture and plumbing has been donated from the community.

Simmers says he doesn’t believe in the saying, “You won’t be able to reach everybody.” He feels “Brooke’s House” will be able to help every girl that enters.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5719669053001_5719667494001-vs Drug cop loses daughter to overdose, builds sober living house in her honor Jezzamine Wolk fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc article 1727fd31-25fd-522b-b9d7-0e5cffa41ac6   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5719669053001_5719667494001-vs Drug cop loses daughter to overdose, builds sober living house in her honor Jezzamine Wolk fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc article 1727fd31-25fd-522b-b9d7-0e5cffa41ac6

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Timothy McMahan King: I’ve struggled with an opioid addiction – To find a solution, we must break the silence

Westlake Legal Group Addiction-Nation Timothy McMahan King: I've struggled with an opioid addiction – To find a solution, we must break the silence Timothy McMahan King fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox news fnc/opinion fnc c6ddc7b3-4ea0-5031-acc5-594e8c4803eb article

For years, I thought my story was just my own. I didn’t think anyone else needed to know, or would even care, that I struggled with an opioid addiction.

But since the year 2000, over 400,000 have lost their lives to this crisis, more than all the Americans who died during World War II combined.

As I saw the death toll on the rise, I knew I needed to tell my story publicly. But honestly, I wasn’t sure what difference it would make in the face of such an epidemic.

NEWT GINGRICH: ‘THE WAR AT HOME’ FOCUSES ON OPIOID ADDICTION

Then I read a study that completely changed my mind. It demonstrates just how important it is that share our stories of both hardship and recovery. When we put a face to this crisis and remove the stigma and shame that too often comes with addiction, we can help change the trajectory of this epidemic.

Two researchers, Leake and King, went to three different alcohol recovery centers and started analyzing the files and data on the patients there.

No, we aren’t going to just talk ourselves into a solution for this crisis. But it is clear that how we talk about it and what we believe about what can happen actually changes what is possible.

At the end of their time, they told the staff at these centers which clients they believed were most likely to recover.

The researchers then tracked the progress of everyone leaving the center.

A year later, the individuals they identified were still more likely than the rest to be employed and sober and to have had fewer and shorter relapses.

What had the researchers observed that allowed them to so accurately predict success?

Nothing.

Leake and King randomly assigned people to be on the list of those with a high chance of recovery.

They didn’t tell the patients, only the staff.

What changed is that the staff were more likely to believe that someone could recover. When the beliefs of the staff changed, so did the outcomes.

It doesn’t end there.

Another study showed that just the tone of voice a doctor uses, judgmental versus empathetic, can change the likelihood of someone recovering.

Small changes can have an outsized impact.

This epidemic spread under across the country under a cloak of silence, stigma and shame. Individuals, families and communities were afraid to speak out out of fear that they would be labeled as immoral, out of control or worthless.

While addictions themselves are harmful, some of the greatest harm can come from how we treat those who struggle with addiction.

We need to share our stories so that there is hope. We need to change how we talk so that those wrestling with an addiction always know that there are those who care for them and understand what they are going through.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

No, we aren’t going to just talk ourselves into a solution for this crisis. But it is clear that how we talk about it and what we believe about what can happen actually changes what is possible.

It’s time to start a better conversation about opioid addiction.

Westlake Legal Group Addiction-Nation Timothy McMahan King: I've struggled with an opioid addiction – To find a solution, we must break the silence Timothy McMahan King fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox news fnc/opinion fnc c6ddc7b3-4ea0-5031-acc5-594e8c4803eb article   Westlake Legal Group Addiction-Nation Timothy McMahan King: I've struggled with an opioid addiction – To find a solution, we must break the silence Timothy McMahan King fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/opinion fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fox news fnc/opinion fnc c6ddc7b3-4ea0-5031-acc5-594e8c4803eb article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pennsylvania mom avoids jail time after son dies from drinking drug-laced breast milk

A Pennsylvania mother whose 10-month-old son was killed by drugs in her breast milk will not serve jail time after agreeing to a plea deal, police said Thursday.

Samantha Jones, 31, of New Britain Township, pleaded guilty Wednesday to involuntary manslaughter, admitting she had taken drugs prior to breastfeeding her baby last spring, the Bucks County District Attorney’s Office said in a press release.

She was originally charged with homicide.

“I never wanted this to happen. I loved my little boy more than anything,” Jones said during her sentencing, according to the press release. “I loved him, and I have to live with this every day.”

PARENTS OF TEEN GIRLS HARASSED BY BRIAN SIMS RAISE OVER $100G FOR PHILLY PRO-LIFE ORG

Police responded to Jones’ home on April 2, 2018 where officers found the 10-month-old in cardiac arrest. Medical examiners concluded her son died after ingesting a mix of amphetamine, methamphetamine and methadone.

Westlake Legal Group samantha_jones Pennsylvania mom avoids jail time after son dies from drinking drug-laced breast milk fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 3373f007-3785-529e-8a1c-6cc88c415f62

Samantha Jones admitted to taking drugs before breastfeeding her 10-month old son who later died from cardiac arrest due to a deadly mix of amphetamine, methamphetamine and methadone. (Bucks County District Attorney’s Office)

Jones was legally prescribed methadone, a drug that alone is not considered unsafe for breastfeeding mothers and their babies, to help combat her narcotic addiction, the press release stated. Prosecutors argued that Jones had relapsed on drugs and failed to ask for help in caring for her newborn son.

“Samantha was in control of this situation,” Deputy District Attorney Kristin M. McElroy said. “She was in charge of a defenseless baby. He relied on her for everything, and it’s because of her actions that he’s not here today.”

Defense asked for leniency, arguing that people battling addiction are not in their normal states of mind. Jones told responding officers that she had switched to bottle formula but decided to breastfeed her son when he woke up crying at 3 a.m., People reported.

“She just said she was so tired that she didn’t have the energy to go downstairs and make a bottle,” New Britain Township Detective Cpl. Jeffrey A. Cummins testified during a preliminary hearing last year.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

She said her husband prepared a bottle for her son three hours later and then left for work. At that time, Jones fed the baby the bottle formula and fell back asleep. When she woke up again, Jones noticed her son was “distressed” and called for help. Officials said the formula bottles tested negative for drugs.

A judge sentenced Jones to three years of probation and 100 hours of community service working with parents or expectant mothers struggling with addition.

Westlake Legal Group samantha_jones Pennsylvania mom avoids jail time after son dies from drinking drug-laced breast milk fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 3373f007-3785-529e-8a1c-6cc88c415f62   Westlake Legal Group samantha_jones Pennsylvania mom avoids jail time after son dies from drinking drug-laced breast milk fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/us/crime fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 3373f007-3785-529e-8a1c-6cc88c415f62

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Philadelphia’s move toward decriminalizing drug possession: smart or dangerous?

Westlake Legal Group philadelphias-move-toward-decriminalizing-drug-possession-smart-or-dangerous Philadelphia's move toward decriminalizing drug possession: smart or dangerous? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente article 27a480a9-7d77-53c9-a5d0-e3aa2969282f
Westlake Legal Group smoking_pot_istock Philadelphia's move toward decriminalizing drug possession: smart or dangerous? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente article 27a480a9-7d77-53c9-a5d0-e3aa2969282f

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner says that the city is moving toward the decriminalization of possession of small amounts of drugs,  on the grounds that often medical treatment – and not criminal charges – is the right solution.

On “Fox & Friends” Thursday, host Brian Kilmeade asked if Philadelphia puts the plan in place, becoming the first city in the nation with such a policy, would it be the right approach, or would it amount to “a free pass on possession, too easy on crime?”

Luke Niforators, chief of staff at the non-profit Smart Approaches to Marijana, or SMART, told Kilmeade he saw more harm than good in the Philadelphia plan.

“Obviously we don’t want to give people records,” Niforators said. “But by the same token, having these policies make drug use seem like it’s no big deal and is sending the wrong message to our country and [younger] generation.”

DENVER NARROWLY VOTES TO DECRIMINALIZE ‘MAGIC MUSHROOMS’  

“These policies say…this is more of a medical, not really a criminal, problem. They are missing the point. It’s not either/or, we can do both,” Niforators said. “There are the drug courts. We have ways to address treatment and drug issues medically while also discouraging use and having our criminal laws.”

In a recent interview with “Axios on HBO,” Krasner said that diverting people found with small amounts of drugs to treatment or community service rather than jail ultimately would be the most fair and beneficial approach for both the user and the rest of society. In 2014, Philadelphia became the first major city in the nation to pass an ordinance allowing people with less than 30 grams, which is less an ounce, of marijuana to get just a $25 ticket.

“We are talking about people who are using drugs,” Krasner said. “The vast majority of them suffering from addiction. I do not see value in convicting people like that.”

Michael C. Barnes, chairman of the not-for-profit Center for U.S. Policy, and former counsel in the White House drug policy office under President George W. Bush, agrees with Krasner.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“This is not just decriminalization, this program would be pre-arrest diversion for people who are nonviolent or who have mental health or substance abuse disorders,” Barnes said on “Fox & Friends.” “What this means is cops on the street who actually know mental illness and substance abuse better than anybody else…have the discretion, based on their experience, to divert somebody to treatment. The crime remains the same….if it were somebody who has also committed some violent crime or is not in need of treatment.”

“We still reserve the right to file charges and sent the person to the criminal justice system,” Barnes said.

Niforators, however, remained unconvinced.

“Obviously we should have [treatment] programs,” Niforators said. “The concern on the other side…is that if we don’t have some sort of stick in place, people are going to think that drug use is no big deal…Sending a message that this is just a medical problem is not the right way to go. We have to let the public know that [drug use] should be discouraged.”

Westlake Legal Group smoking_pot_istock Philadelphia's move toward decriminalizing drug possession: smart or dangerous? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente article 27a480a9-7d77-53c9-a5d0-e3aa2969282f   Westlake Legal Group smoking_pot_istock Philadelphia's move toward decriminalizing drug possession: smart or dangerous? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox news fnc/us fnc Elizabeth Llorente article 27a480a9-7d77-53c9-a5d0-e3aa2969282f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Doctors eye deep brain stimulation to treat opioid addiction

Westlake Legal Group doctors-eye-deep-brain-stimulation-to-treat-opioid-addiction Doctors eye deep brain stimulation to treat opioid addiction fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fnc/health fnc b1016aaa-e304-5a3c-ab80-f36e0e6a1b0b Associated Press article
Westlake Legal Group opioid_treatment_AP Doctors eye deep brain stimulation to treat opioid addiction fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fnc/health fnc b1016aaa-e304-5a3c-ab80-f36e0e6a1b0b Associated Press article

Patient Number One is a thin man, with a scabby face and bouncy knees. His head, shaved in preparation for surgery, is wrapped in a clean, white cloth.

Years of drug use cost him his wife, his money and his self-respect, before landing him in this drab yellow room at a Shanghai hospital, facing the surgeon who in 72 hours will drill two small holes in his skull and feed electrodes deep into his brain.

The hope is that technology will extinguish his addiction, quite literally, with the flip of a switch.

The treatment — deep brain stimulation — has long been used for movement disorders like Parkinson’s. Now, the first clinical trial of DBS for methamphetamine addiction is being conducted at Shanghai’s Ruijin Hospital, along with parallel trials for opioid addiction. And this troubled man is the very first patient.

FORMER US DRUG CZAR SAYS NATIONAL FOCUS ON OPIOID EPIDEMIC IS OVERLOOKING REAL CULPRIT

The surgery involves implanting a device that acts as a kind of pacemaker for the brain, electrically stimulating targeted areas. While Western attempts to push forward with human trials of DBS for addiction have foundered, China is emerging as a hub for this research.

Scientists in Europe have struggled to recruit patients for their DBS addiction studies, and complex ethical, social and scientific questions have made it hard to push forward with this kind of work in the United States, where the devices can cost $100,000 to implant.

China has a long, if troubled, history of brain surgery for drug addiction. Even today, China’s punitive anti-drug laws can force people into years of compulsory treatment, including “rehabilitation” through labor. It has a large patient population, government funding and ambitious medical device companies ready to pay for DBS research.

There are eight registered DBS clinical trials for drug addiction being conducted in the world, according to a U.S. National Institutes of Health database. Six are in China.

But the suffering wrought by the opioid epidemic may be changing the risk-reward calculus for doctors and regulators in the United States. Now, the experimental surgery Patient Number One is about to undergo is coming to America. In February, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration greenlighted a clinical trial in West Virginia of DBS for opioid addiction.

___

HUMAN EXPERIMENTS

Patient Number One insisted that only his surname, Yan, be published; he fears losing his job if he is identified.

He said doctors told him the surgery wasn’t risky. “But I still get nervous,” he said. “It’s my first time to go on the operating table.”

Three of Yan’s friends introduced him to meth in a hotel room shortly after the birth of his son in 2011. They told him: Just do it once, you’ve had your kid, you won’t have problems.

Smoking made Yan feel faint and slightly unhinged. Later, he found meth brought crystalline focus to his mind, which he directed at one thing: Cards. Every time Yan smoked, he gambled. And every time he gambled, he lost — all told, around $150,000 since he started using drugs, he estimated.

His wife divorced him. He rarely saw his son.

WARREN UNVEILS $100 BILLION PLAN TO TACKLE OPIOID CRISIS

Yan checked into a hospital for detox, moved to another town to get away from bad influences, took Chinese traditional medicine. But he relapsed every time. “My willpower is weak,” he said.

Last year his father, who had a friend who had undergone DBS surgery at Ruijin, gave him an ultimatum: Back to rehab or brain surgery. “Of course, I chose surgery,” Yan said. “With surgery, I definitely have the chance to get my life back.”

Before there were brain implants in China there was brain lesioning. Desperate families of heroin users paid thousands of dollars for unproven and risky surgeries in which doctors destroyed small clumps of brain tissue. Brain lesioning quickly became a profit center at some hospitals, but it also left a trail of patients with mood disorders, lost memories and altered sex drives.

In 2004, China’s Ministry of Health ordered a halt to brain lesioning for addiction at most hospitals. Nine years later, doctors at a military hospital in Xi’an reported that roughly half of the 1,167 patients who had their brains lesioned stayed off drugs for at least five years.

DBS builds on that history. But unlike lesioning, which irreversibly kills brain cells, the devices allow brain interventions that are — in theory — reversible. The technology has opened a fresh field of human experimentation globally.

“As doctors we always need to think about the patients,” said Dr. Sun Bomin, director of Ruijin Hospital’s functional neurosurgery department. “They are human beings. You cannot say, ‘Oh, we do not have any help, any treatment for you guys.'”

Sun said he has served as a consultant for two Chinese companies that make deep brain stimulators — SceneRay Corp. and Beijing PINS Medical Co. He has tried to turn Ruijin into a center of DBS research, not just for addiction, but also Tourette syndrome, depression and anorexia.

In China, DBS devices can cost less than $25,000. Many patients pay cash.

“You can rest assured for the safety of this operation,” Yan’s surgeon, Dr. Li Dianyou, told him. “It is no problem. When it comes to effectiveness, you are not the first one, nor the last one. You can take it easy because we have done this a lot.”

In fact, there are risks. There is a small chance Yan could die of a brain hemorrhage. He could emerge with changes to his personality, seizures, or an infection. And in the end, he may go right back on drugs.

____

A BUZZING DRILL

Some critics believe this surgery should not be allowed.

They argue that such human experiments are premature, and will not address the complex biological, social and psychological factors that drive addiction. Scientists don’t fully understand how DBS works and there is still debate about where electrodes should be placed to treat addiction. There is also skepticism in the global scientific community about the general quality and ethical rigor — particularly around issues like informed consent — of clinical trials done in China.

“It would be fantastic if there were something where we could flip a switch, but it’s probably fanciful at this stage,” said Adrian Carter, who heads the neuroscience and society group at Monash University in Melbourne. “There’s a lot of risks that go with promoting that idea.”

The failure of two large-scale, U.S. clinical trials on DBS for depression around five years ago prompted soul-searching about what threshold of scientific understanding must be met in order to design effective, ethical experiments.

“We’ve had a reset in the field,” said Dr. Nader Pouratian, a neurosurgeon at UCLA who is investigating the use of DBS for chronic pain. He said it’s “a perfectly appropriate time” to research DBS for drug addiction, but only “if we can move forward in ethical, well-informed, well-designed studies.”

In China, meanwhile, scientists are charging ahead.

At 9 a.m. on a grey October Friday in Shanghai, Dr. Li drilled through Yan’s skull and threaded two electrodes down to his nucleus accumbens, a small structure near the base of the forebrain that has been implicated in addiction.

Yan was awake during the surgery. The buzzing of the drill made him tremble.

At 4 p.m. the same day, Yan went under general anesthesia for a second surgery to implant a battery pack in his chest to power the electrodes in his skull.

Three hours later, Yan still hadn’t woken from the anesthesia. His father began weeping. His doctors wondered if drug abuse had somehow altered his sensitivity to anesthesia.

Finally, after 10 hours, Yan opened his eyes.

___

BODY COUNT

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 500,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in the decade ending in 2017 — increasingly, from synthetic opioids that come mainly from China, U.S. officials say. That’s more than the number of U.S. soldiers who died in World War II and Vietnam combined.

The body count has added urgency to efforts to find new, more effective treatments for addiction. While doctors in the U.S. are interested in using DBS for addiction, work funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health is still focused on experiments in animals, not people.

At least two U.S. laboratories dropped clinical trials of DBS for treating alcoholism over concerns about study design and preliminary results that didn’t seem to justify the risks, investigators who led the studies told The Associated Press.

“The lack of scientific clarity, the important but strict regulatory regime, along with the high cost and risk of surgery make clinical trials of DBS for addiction in the U.S. difficult at the present time,” said Dr. Emad Eskandar, the chairman of neurological surgery at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

China’s studies have offered mixed results. Sun and his colleagues have published one case study, describing a patient who used heroin and fatally overdosed three months after getting DBS. But a separate pilot study published in January by doctors at a military hospital in Xi’an showed that five of eight heroin users stayed off drugs for two years after DBS surgery.

Based on those results, SceneRay is seeking Chinese regulatory approval of its DBS device for opioid addiction, and funding a multi-site clinical trial targeting 60 participants. SceneRay chairman Ning Yihua said his application for a clinical trial in the U.S. was blocked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

But in February, the FDA greenlighted a small, separate trial of DBS for opioid use disorder, said Dr. Ali Rezai, who is leading the study at the West Virginia University Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute. They hope to launch the trial in June, with funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The FDA declined comment.

“People are dying,” Rezai said. “Their lives are devastated. It’s a brain issue. We need to explore all options.”

___

‘YOU CAME TOO LATE’

Two unsteady days after Yan’s surgery, doctors switched on his DBS device. As the electrodes activated, he felt a surge of excitement. The current running through his body kept him awake; he said he spent the whole night thinking about drugs.

The next day, he sat across from Dr. Li, who used a tablet computer to remotely adjust the machine thrumming inside Yan’s head.

“Cheerful?” Li asked as the touched the controls on the tablet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Yes,” Yan answered.

Li changed the settings. “Now?”

“Agitated,” Yan said. He felt heat in his chest, then a beating sensation, numbness and fatigue. Yan began to sweat.

Li made a few more modifications. “Any feelings now?”

“Pretty happy now,” Yan said.

He was in high spirits. “This machine is pretty magical. He adjusts it to make you happy and you’re happy, to make you nervous and you’re nervous,” Yan said. “It controls your happiness, anger, grief and joy.”

Yan left the hospital the next morning.

More than six months later, he said he’s still off drugs. With sobriety, his skin cleared and he put on 20 pounds. When his friends got back in touch, he refused their drugs. He tried to rekindle his relationship with his ex-wife, but she was pregnant with her new husband’s child.

“The only shame is that you came too late,” she told him.

Sometimes, in his new life, he touches the hard cable in his neck that leads from the battery pack to the electrodes in his brain. And he wonders: What is the machine doing inside his head?

Westlake Legal Group opioid_treatment_AP Doctors eye deep brain stimulation to treat opioid addiction fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fnc/health fnc b1016aaa-e304-5a3c-ab80-f36e0e6a1b0b Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group opioid_treatment_AP Doctors eye deep brain stimulation to treat opioid addiction fox-news/topic/opioid-crisis fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fox-news/health/mental-health/addiction fnc/health fnc b1016aaa-e304-5a3c-ab80-f36e0e6a1b0b Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com