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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/politics/finance/taxes

Maria Bartiromo: Trump pitching ‘significant’ middle-class tax cut for second term

Westlake Legal Group trump-maria-AP-FOX Maria Bartiromo: Trump pitching 'significant' middle-class tax cut for second term Julia Musto fox-news/us/economy/taxes fox-news/us/economy fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article a1244ca6-bae7-5b5b-878d-13fb6de4675d

President Trump is trying to “put forth” all of his economic successes at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland as the impeachment trial continues in the Senate, Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo said.

Appearing on “America’s Newsroom” with host Sandra Smith, Bartiromo said that while he is undoubtedly unhappy with the trial, she agrees with his aides that his “best defense” is to “continue to talk about what he is getting done.”

In a sitdown interview with the president earlier Wednesday morning, Bartiromo and the president broke news on a planned middle-class tax cut the president said will be announced over the next 90 days.

“It’s got a long way to go, in fairness,” said the president. “But, we will make a cut.”

National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow told Fox Business Network’s Stuart Varney last weekend that they want to aim their focus on “even faster economic growth’ in a potential second term.

“Re-elect President Trump and you’ll get lower tax rates and lower tax burdens,” Kudlow promised.

TRUMP SAYS TAX CUTS, HEALTH CARE AND TRADE DEALS ARE AHEAD

The U.S. economy grew at a 2.1 percent pace in the third quarter of 2019, the most recent period for which data was available. Its growth reached a Trump-era peak of 4.2 percent in the second quarter of 2018, following the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which lowered the top corporate rate from 35 percent to 21 percent and reduced personal income taxes.

The White House budget is scheduled to be submitted in February.

Bartiromo told Smith that while the president didn’t provide specific numbers during the interview, she got a sense of the range of the tax cut.

“At this point,” said Bartiromo. “if you are making between $30,000 and $100,000 you are in the tax range of about 24 percent to 28 percent. He’s talking about cutting that to 15 percent, Sandra.”

“He didn’t go into specific numbers. I don’t know if it’s going to be 15 percent. But, he definitely has been talking about that range,” she explained.

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“So, that would be a pretty significant cut for the middle class and he needs the House to do that,” she continued. “He needs the Republicans to reclaim the House in order to get something like that through. So, he said it’s only going to be done if we have the House and we have the Senate. Because, they are not going to allow him to do much if, in fact, he is in a second term.”

“You see the way they are fighting him at every turn now,” Bartiromo remarked.

Fox Business’ Jonathan Garber and Ken Martin contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group trump-maria-AP-FOX Maria Bartiromo: Trump pitching 'significant' middle-class tax cut for second term Julia Musto fox-news/us/economy/taxes fox-news/us/economy fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article a1244ca6-bae7-5b5b-878d-13fb6de4675d   Westlake Legal Group trump-maria-AP-FOX Maria Bartiromo: Trump pitching 'significant' middle-class tax cut for second term Julia Musto fox-news/us/economy/taxes fox-news/us/economy fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article a1244ca6-bae7-5b5b-878d-13fb6de4675d

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Warren’s ‘fantasy’ wealth tax: Here’s all the programs 2020 Dem claims to cover with funding trick

As the progressive wing of the Democratic Party pushes an agenda that asks millionaires and billionaires to pay higher taxes to fund ambitious social programs, 2020 hopeful Elizabeth Warren has made an unprecedented tax proposal on accumulated wealth a centerpiece of her campaign.

And nearly a year into her presidential bid, that wealth tax has become a central funding mechanism for a host of major policy proposals — despite lingering doubts about its constitutionality and whether it can generate the cash flow she promises. Warren has connected the wealth tax to no fewer than eight separate initiatives:

  • Student debt cancellation
  • Universal childcare
  • Universal pre-k
  • $800 billion in new federal funding for public schools
  • Tuition-free college
  • $50 billion for Historically Black Colleges and Universities
  • $1 trillion for “Medicare-for-all”
  • Tackling the opioid crisis

WARREN TOLD PRO-SCHOOL-CHOICE ACTIVIST SHE SENT HER KIDS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL, CAMPAIGN SAYS OTHERWISE

“We can raise the wages of every childcare worker and preschool teacher in America. We can put $800 billion new federal dollars into all of our public schools. We can make college tuition-free for every kid, we can put $50 billion into historically black colleges and universities,” Warren said of what she would do with the revenue from a wealth tax during the Democratic primary debate in November. “We can invest in an entire generation.”

Warren’s current iteration of a wealth tax, which she terms an “Ultra-Millionaire Tax,” would require families to pay a 2 percent levy for every dollar of their net worth over $50 million and force billionaires to cough up 6 percent of their net worth over $1 billion. Her original plan would’ve taxed 3 percent of families’ wealth over $1 billion, but after being pressed on how she would fund “Medicare-for-all,” Warren announced that billionaires would be required to pay a 6 percent wealth tax to help fund the program.

Warren’s policy is slightly less ambitious than a similar plan introduced by Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., her main adversary, as she courts the progressive wing of the party. Both argue a wealth tax would make the U.S. tax system more fair than the current one, which taxes income but does not go after money people already have.

“Our tax code focuses on taxing income, but a family’s wealth is also an important measure of how much it has benefitted from the economy and its ability to pay taxes,” Warren’s campaign website reads. “And judged against wealth, our tax system asks the rich to pay a lot less than everyone else…. [T]he families in the top 0.1% are projected to owe 3.2% of their wealth in federal, state, and local taxes this year, while the bottom 99% are projected to owe 7.2%.”

BUREAUCRACY BONANZA? WARREN’S PLANS WOULD CREATE PLETHORA OF NEW FEDERAL OFFICES

Warren sees this untaxed accumulated wealth as a source of funding for a wide variety of programs, but those on the right, and even some on the left, are skeptical about how effective a wealth tax would be, or even if it’s legal.

Writing for Fox News earlier this year, Heritage Foundation research associate Joel Griffith argued that while the Constitution permits direct taxes on individuals “if they are equally apportioned along with excise taxes and duties,” it is doubtful that a wealth tax would survive constitutional scrutiny.

“The Constitution does not specifically empower Congress to adopt a wealth or asset tax (as with the Sixteenth Amendment), an asset tax cannot be ‘equally apportioned’ (by definition, it takes only from the better off), and possessing wealth or assets is not, by definition, a ‘transaction’ (any more than owning a home is),” Griffith wrote. “In fact, seizing this private property without just compensation would clearly violate the Fifth Amendment Takings Clause.”

KEY DEM INDICATES WARREN’S WEALTH TAX HAS LITTLE CHANCE OF PASSING HOUSE

Warren’s campaign website touts the endorsement of multiple constitutional scholars, saying the tax would pass constitutional muster.

Griffith also argued a wealth tax would create “economically destructive distortions by artificially diverting capital from investment to consumption.” The result, Griffith says, would cause wealthy people, “to consume their wealth rather than invest and grow it.”

Griffith says that those investments by entrepreneurs are what truly fuels the American economy, not just consumption. He also wrote that 10 of the 14 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries to try wealth taxes in the past 23 years subsequently got rid of them.

Fellow 2020 hopeful Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., echoed that point during the Democratic presidential debate in November.

Westlake Legal Group Booker-Warren-AP Warren’s ‘fantasy’ wealth tax: Here’s all the programs 2020 Dem claims to cover with funding trick Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8386da67-7ca2-5e89-933f-d439c8785211

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Sen. Elizabeth Warren. D-Mass., during the November Democratic presidential primary debate. The two senators had a heated exchange over the merits of Warren’s proposed wealth tax. (Associated Press)

DEVAL PATRICK, IN 2020 STOP, WARNS FELLOW DEMS: HATING REPUBLICANS IS NOT GOOD POLITICS

“The tax the way we’re putting it forward right now, the wealth tax, I’m sorry it’s cumbersome, its been tried by other nations, it’s hard to evaluate. We can get the same amount of revenue through just taxation,” Booker said in a heated exchange with Warren. “But again, we as Democrats, have got to start talking not just about how you tax from a stage, but how we grow wealth in this country amongst those disadvantaged communities that are not seeing it.”

According to Warren’s own analysis, a wealth tax would generate $3.75 trillion in 10 years for the U.S. government. Those numbers, however, have been disputed.

Marc Goldwein, the senior vice president and senior policy director for the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, said there are several factors that could result in the wealth tax bringing in significantly less than Warren’s projected $3.75 trillion.

‘If we think we’re going to get 100 percent of our expected tax base, that’s a little bit of a fantasy because people will take measures to avoid the tax including some that aren’t even what you’d think of as tax avoidance.’

— Marc Goldwein, Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget

“If we think we’re going to get 100 percent of our expected tax base, that’s a little bit of a fantasy because people will take measures to avoid the tax including some that aren’t even what you’d think of as tax avoidance, just like spending the money or giving it to charity,” he told Fox News.

This could frustrate Warren’s “anti-evasion measures” she says would keep money in the U.S. and prevent those subject to the wealth tax from dodging it. Goldwein said the 15 percent avoidance rate baked into Warren’s numbers is likely low.

He also mentioned that Warren’s wealth taxes could see diminishing returns over time.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“When you have a very high tax, you’re actually eating at your own base,” he said, specifically regarding the 6 percent levy on billionaires. “And so it’s shrinking in real dollars … The bigger your rate is the more likely you’re actually eating into your own base and so you have less money in year two and year three and year four.”

Goldwein also noted that Warren seems to view a wealth tax as something to add to other ways of taxing capital income, like her proposed mark-to-market tax (a tax on investments that increase in value), rather than a replacement to such levies as other countries have done. This, he said, could cause interactions between the policies that reduce the returns for both.

A recent analysis, from the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Wharton Budget Model also found the Warren wealth tax would bring in at least $1 trillion less than projected over 10 years — or somewhere between $2.3 trillion and $2.7 trillion.

Meanwhile, the study said the tax would cause the economy to shrink over the next 30 years.

But whether a wealth tax will be an effective source of funding or a drag on the economy, the concept fits neatly into the current narrative of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party and follows with the voting public’s general desire to soak the rich.

“I’m tired of free-loading billionaires,” Warren tweeted last month. “My #WealthTax asks them to pitch in a little more, so that every family can have a shot at the American dream.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118273901001_6118271846001-vs Warren’s ‘fantasy’ wealth tax: Here’s all the programs 2020 Dem claims to cover with funding trick Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8386da67-7ca2-5e89-933f-d439c8785211   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118273901001_6118271846001-vs Warren’s ‘fantasy’ wealth tax: Here’s all the programs 2020 Dem claims to cover with funding trick Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8386da67-7ca2-5e89-933f-d439c8785211

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Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax plan torched by GOP financier

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-12-26-at-8.37.06-PM Elizabeth Warren's wealth tax plan torched by GOP financier Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc da78f275-c5a1-5d21-b13c-2b36ebd88100 article

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax plan would be devastating to the people forced to pay it, Republican financier Dan Palmer said Thursday on “America’s Newsroom.”

“It’s gotten to be confiscatory,” Palmer went on to say. “There’s really been an attitude against wealth creators. I don’t know anyone who has the talent or the good fortune to have, say, achieved $100 million dollars of wealth who thinks that the United States government is going to be a better allocator of that wealth than they are.”

A CNBC poll indicated that a majority of millionaires supported a wealth tax on those worth $50 million or more. However, their support dropped if the tax were to apply to those worth $10 million.

ELIZABETH WARREN’S WEALTH TAX MATH DOESN’T ADD UP, NONPARTISAN ANALYSIS SAYS

While the senator’s plan would apply a 2-percent tax on wealth over $50 million and 6 percent over $1 billion, 59 percent percent of millionaires supported a new federal tax on wealth over $50 million, according to the Q4 CNBC Millionaire Survey.

Furthermore, 49 percent did not support a wealth tax on those worth over $10 million.

Warren, D-Mass., has defended her tax, arguing that the wealthiest haven’t paid their fair share.

KEY DEMOCRAT INDICATES WARREN’S WEALTH TAX WOULD FACE HIGH HURDLES IN CONGRESS

“I understand there are people who want to throw up a lot of dust around this because they don’t really have any comeback to that central question, and that is, why aren’t we asking folks at the very top to pitch in a couple of cents so that we can actually invest in opportunity in everyone else,” Warren told Fox News.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Most of these people are enormously charitable anyway. I mean, over half of the people with billion-dollar-plus fortunes are already committed to the giving pledge where they are going to give it to private foundations and so forth,” Palmer said.

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser and Leland Vittert contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-12-26-at-8.37.06-PM Elizabeth Warren's wealth tax plan torched by GOP financier Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc da78f275-c5a1-5d21-b13c-2b36ebd88100 article   Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-12-26-at-8.37.06-PM Elizabeth Warren's wealth tax plan torched by GOP financier Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc da78f275-c5a1-5d21-b13c-2b36ebd88100 article

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Protesters crash Andrew Cuomo’s NYC birthday fundraiser, call for wealth tax, Green New Deal

Westlake Legal Group AP19268178165473 Protesters crash Andrew Cuomo's NYC birthday fundraiser, call for wealth tax, Green New Deal fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/topic/green-new-deal fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/person/andrew-cuomo fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 778e3404-15ef-57bf-8a81-d3bfa5670f58

Demonstrators gathered outside Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s fundraiser and birthday bash in New York City on Wednesday night, demanding he increase taxes on billionaires to fund the Green New Deal and other progressive programs.

Cuomo, who turns 62 on Thursday, hosted the celebrity-studded event, reportedly charging guests $50,000 per plate to raise money for his re-election campaign. Video on social media showed a small group of protesters attempting to storm the reception room inside the Essex House hotel near Central Park to deliver a birthday cake for Cuomo with #MakeBillionairesPay written in frosting.

CLIMATE ACTIVISTS TURN UP THE HEAT ON ELECTED DEMS, CRITICIZE INACTION

It was unclear if Cuomo or other attendees were present when the activists were ushered out by security. A larger crowd gathered outside on the street, demanding the Democratic governor tax the mega-rich, create a “Green New Deal” for New York, bring energy into public ownership, eliminate fossil fuels, ensure 100 percent renewable energy, guarantee homes for New York residents, fully fund public school and make college free.

“There has been an explosion in wealth and income at the very top,” Michael Kink, executive director of the Strong Economy For All Coalition, told the New York Daily News.

The Green New Deal, co-sponsored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., failed to advance in Congress but has become a rallying cry for more progressive elements of the party. The more progressive presidential candidates — Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders – have proposed taxing the mega-rich to fund Medicare-For-All federal health care plans.

“New York has more billionaires than anywhere else in the country. It’s time for them to pay, to contribute to the things that all New Yorkers need,” he continued. “We can address all of those needs and cover the budget gap by targeting billionaires and ultra-millionaires.”

A report released by the Public Accountability Initiative and Hedge Clippers on Wednesday — to coincide with the organized protest — slammed Cuomo for accepting more than $4 million in donations from 49 billionaires, worth a combined $280 billion, since 2002.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Cuomo senior adviser Rich Azzopardi responded to the report, brushing off the subsequent protest as “performance art.”

“Mike Kink’s ineffective and uninteresting special interest-funded performance art is not worth commenting on,” Azzopardi told the Daily News. “Budget decisions are made on the merits, not on what some cog in the advocacy industrial complex rants about.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19268178165473 Protesters crash Andrew Cuomo's NYC birthday fundraiser, call for wealth tax, Green New Deal fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/topic/green-new-deal fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/person/andrew-cuomo fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 778e3404-15ef-57bf-8a81-d3bfa5670f58   Westlake Legal Group AP19268178165473 Protesters crash Andrew Cuomo's NYC birthday fundraiser, call for wealth tax, Green New Deal fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/topic/green-new-deal fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/person/andrew-cuomo fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 778e3404-15ef-57bf-8a81-d3bfa5670f58

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Key Dem indicates Warren’s wealth tax has little chance of passing House

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Pascrell-AP-Reuters Key Dem indicates Warren's wealth tax has little chance of passing House Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/executive/health-care fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc b1060364-4d39-516f-8aba-4f24c1bab725 article

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax wouldn’t have support among the House committee responsible for drafting the policy, a key Democrat on the committee suggested.

Democrats have reportedly been weighing alternatives to the wealth tax proposed by Warren as part of her attempt to convince the public she could fund her massive “Medicare-for-all” proposal. And according to Bloomberg on Thursday, Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., a senior Democrat on the House Ways and Means Committee, indicated that if Warren, D-Mass., tried pushing the tax as president, it wouldn’t gain enough traction among House Democrats.

“If you’re asking about the wealth tax, no,” Pascrell said. His statement was the latest indication that progressive candidates like Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., would face pushback from Democrats if they take the White House.

Even Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., — a progressive icon who often demands purity over political practicality — indicated Warren’s tax would face an uphill battle. “It’s not something that’s discussed a lot,” she told Bloomberg. She added that she thought the electorate favored a wealth tax but “it’s a matter of, will the more corporate-friendly wing of the party be down for it?”

FORMER CLINTON TREASURY SECRETARY LARRY SUMMERS WARNS ABOUT WARREN TAX PLAN: ‘NOT REMOTELY FEASIBLE’

Warren’s plan would require substantial tax increases on the wealthy as she aimed to implement a $52 trillion health plan without charging the middle class.

Warren previously proposed a 2 percent tax on wealth above $50 million as well as a 3 percent tax on wealth that surpassed $1 billion. That later changed to 6 percent after Warren faced questions over how she would pay for her “Medicare-for-all” plan — a massive proposal that conservatives have warned would cost too much and burden the economy.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the rates could vary and make 100 percent tax rates “typical” for investment income.

Warren has defended her tax, arguing that the wealthy don’t pay their fair share. The tax, she said, would fund universal childcare and pre-k and her plan to cancel student loan debt, among other things.

BILLIONAIRE KEN LANGONE CALLS ELIZABETH WARREN A ‘PHONY AND A LIAR,’ WANTS TO SEE HER DONATIONS TO CHARITY

When former Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., suggested Warren was unrealistic in her push for “Medicare-for-all,” she balked at him, saying she didn’t understand why someone would run for president to “talk about what we really can’t do and shouldn’t fight for.”

It’s unclear how much support the ambitious health plan itself will gain in Congress. While the plan has support from progressives like Ocasio-Cortez, it could face pushback from Democratic leadership.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has already said she hopes the 2020 field moves away from “Medicare-for-all” and toward a health proposal that didn’t eliminate private insurance.

“I would think that hopefully, as we emerge into the election year, the mantra will be more ‘health care for all Americans’ because there is a comfort level that some people have with their current private insurance,” she said at the beginning of November.

Westlake Legal Group Warren-Pascrell-AP-Reuters Key Dem indicates Warren's wealth tax has little chance of passing House Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/executive/health-care fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc b1060364-4d39-516f-8aba-4f24c1bab725 article   Westlake Legal Group Warren-Pascrell-AP-Reuters Key Dem indicates Warren's wealth tax has little chance of passing House Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/executive/health-care fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc b1060364-4d39-516f-8aba-4f24c1bab725 article

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Michigan county seized retiree’s home over $8 debt – now he’s fighting back in state’s top court

In August 2011, Uri Rafaeli bought a three-bedroom, 1,500-square-foot home in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, Mich., for $60,000. He converted the fixer-upper into a rental property.

Two-and-a-half years later – and at the time unbeknownst to the retired engineer – Oakland County seized his property, put it up for auction and sold the house for $24,500. All this, after a mistake in calculating his property taxes left Rafaeli’s account delinquent by just $8.41. Oakland County ended up keeping all of the $24,500 from the sale, while Rafaeli, now 83, was left without the home and the income he made from renting it.

Rafaeli’s stunning case, which is at the heart of a legal battle currently being considered before Michigan’s Supreme Court, is an extreme example. Yet it is hardly unique: more than 100,000 homeowners in the state have fallen victim to an aggressive property tax law that legislators in Lansing passed two decades ago. Similar statutes have been passed in more than a dozen other states.

‘You have a situation where a person owed $8 and lost their house. I mean, how is that equitable?’

— Michigan Supreme Court Justice Richard Bernstein

Act 123 of 1999 was meant to speed up the redevelopment of blighted properties amid Michigan’s economic woes, but critics of the statute say it has allowed county officials to act as debt collectors and line their coffers by retaining the excess revenue made by selling houses with unpaid property taxes — no matter how paltry the debt.

HOMEOWNER CENSORS HALLOWEEN DECORATION AFTER HOA DISAPPROVES OF DISPLAY

“When the government takes property to settle a debt, they have to give the extra money they make back to you,” Christina Martin, a lawyer with the Pacific Legal Foundation who is representing Rafaeli in his case against Oakland County, told Fox News. “It doesn’t matter what law Michigan passes, they have the constitutional obligation to pay back any more than they are owed.”

In a recent op-ed for The Detroit News, Rafaeli said he was “shocked and angry” over the county’s actions.

“Soon I would learn that while I had signed up for a piece of the American Dream with my investment, I was entering a bureaucratic nightmare — all thanks to Michigan’s Draconian tax forfeiture laws, which I’m now challenging in court,” he wrote.

At the core of Martin’s argument is a clause in the Fifth Amendment, which states that the government cannot take a citizen’s private property for public use, “without just compensation.” In the case before the Michigan Supreme Court, Martin argued that Oakland County has violated both the state and U.S. constitutions under the Takings Clause by seizing and selling Rafaeli’s property and then failing to recoup him any of the money made from the sale.

Westlake Legal Group 20159-Mada-Avenue-Southfield-MI Michigan county seized retiree’s home over $8 debt – now he’s fighting back in state’s top court fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/judiciary/state-and-local fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 1d2bb5e9-3c78-5c36-a347-9cccae17dba8

The property that was seized from Uri Rafaeli by Oakland County. (Google Maps)

Martin added that even if the county had paid Rafaeli the extra $24, 491.59 that it made from the sale of his property, that money still pales in comparison to what the retired engineer really lost given that he paid $60,000 for the house, pumped thousands more into fixing it up and has lost years of rent he could have collected were the property still in his possession.

Property values in Southfield have also skyrocketed since Rafaeli bought the home in 2011 for $60,000, with estimates currently valuing the house at more than double what he paid.

“The money the county made falls far short for Mr. Rafaeli,” Martin said. “In Mr. Rafaeli’s case, he should get much more than that.”

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Rafaeli’s tax woes started about a year after he purchased the house in Southfield when he was notified that he had underpaid his 2011 property taxes by $496. In the meantime, he had continued making the following property tax payment on time, and in January 2013 he attempted to settle the outstanding debt he had with Oakland County.

But due to a mistake he made in calculating his interest, he was short of paying off his balance by $8.41. The bill eventually grew to $285 with penalties and interest.

The Oakland County Treasurer’s Office attempted to collect the debt a number of times – sending mailed notifications to both the property in Southfield and to an address it had for Rafaeli in Michigan. But Rafaeli had by that time moved out of state, and his tenants in Southfield did not forward the notices.

In February 2014, the property was eventually seized by the county and was one of 11,000 homes put up for auction.

Rafaeli, however, was unaware that his property was no longer his property and continued to pay property taxes even after it was seized, his lawyers said. He only became aware that something was amiss when he stopped receiving rent payments from his tenants – who no longer resided at the seized home.

“You shouldn’t have to rely on the mercy of a tax collector to have your constitutional rights protected,” Martin said. “No amount of mail should allow the government to steal your property.”

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After discovering that his property had been seized and sold, Rafaeli and his family hired local lawyers to help him regain either his house or his money.

These efforts, however, proved fruitless as his case – in which his lawyers argued that his due process rights had been violated – was first dismissed by the Oakland County Court and later the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled against him, citing the state’s civil forfeiture laws.

It was here that Martin and the Pacific Legal Foundation stepped in to help – petitioning the Michigan Supreme Court. The state’s high court granted Rafaeli’s case a review after Martin argued that his constitutional rights were violated under the Takings Clause.

The Oakland County Treasurer’s Office declined Fox News’ request for comment, but in a written brief to the court, the county’s lawyers argue that “by failing to pay back taxes and failing to redeem the property before auction, the taxpayer no longer possesses an interest for the government to ‘take.’” The brief also noted that Rafaeli was given “numerous notice provisions and opportunities” to pay his balance.

William Horton and John Bursch, the county’s attorneys, contested Martin’s assertion that the county’s actions violated the Takings Clause – saying in the brief that “tax collections are not the taking of private property for public use in the constitutional sense” and that Martin’s argument is similar to ones previously shot down by courts across the country.

“This is hardly the first time that a delinquent taxpayer has brought a claim to recover the ‘surplus’ proceeds in a tax sale,” the lawyers said.

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In court last week, Bursch argued that a ruling in favor of Rafaeli would set a precedent that could ultimately bankrupt Michigan counties by forcing local governments to compensate all homeowners in similar situations. He estimated it would cost around $2 billion.

Michigan Supreme Court Justice Richard Bernstein did not appear to agree with the county lawyer’s assessment of the situation.

“The interpretation you gave was very dramatic: that this is going to end schools, and the counties are going to crumble, and society is just going to implode,” Bernstein said. “You have a situation where a person owed $8 and lost their house. I mean, how is that equitable?”

Rafaeli’s case will be decided sometime before the end of July 2020.

Martin hopes that a ruling in favor of Rafaeli will not just be a victory for the 83-year-old retiree, but will set a precedent in Michigan and across the nation — possibly leading to a ruling by the U.S.  Supreme Court on a similar case in the future.

There are 14 other states in the U.S. that have statutes on the books similar to Michigan, and five of those states – Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts and Nebraska – allow private investors to make money off the sale of foreclosed homes.

“The government should not be making a windfall … when collecting unpaid taxes,” she said. “This is a practice that needs to come to an end.”

Westlake Legal Group uri-1939-780x500 Michigan county seized retiree’s home over $8 debt – now he’s fighting back in state’s top court fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/judiciary/state-and-local fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 1d2bb5e9-3c78-5c36-a347-9cccae17dba8   Westlake Legal Group uri-1939-780x500 Michigan county seized retiree’s home over $8 debt – now he’s fighting back in state’s top court fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/judiciary/state-and-local fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 1d2bb5e9-3c78-5c36-a347-9cccae17dba8

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Al Sharpton gets $1M in pay from his own charity, tax filings show

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6067645775001_6067637213001-vs Al Sharpton gets $1M in pay from his own charity, tax filings show New York Post Melissa Klein Georgett Roberts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/entertainment/events/charity fnc/us fnc article 5f28c46d-3151-54c0-af5d-baf9e64be1ba

He’s the million-dollar minister.

The Rev. Al Sharpton raked in $1,046,948 from his own charity last year, according to National Action Network’s latest tax filings obtained by The Post.

Sharpton got a $324,000 salary — 32% higher than his 2017 pay — in addition to a $159,596 bonus and $563,352 in “other compensation.”

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The Harlem-based nonprofit — which Sharpton controls as president and CEO — said the extra cash was to make up for the years from 2004 to 2017 when he didn’t get his full pay.

NAN said it hired an executive compensation firm that determined the good reverend was owed $1.252 million — but he was generously willing to take $500,000 less.

Sharpton and the nonprofit’s board also agreed “he has now been fully compensated for all the years he was underpaid and received no bonus,” the NAN statement said.

The sharp-dressing, silver-tongued preacher defended the windfall before taking the stage for his weekly rally at NAN’s House of Justice in Harlem, an event where attendees throw cash in the collection bucket at the reverend’s behest.

“Fifteen years, you are talking about since 2004 when I came back after running for president,” he said. “For anybody else it would be laughable.”

He said he also deserved the 2018 raise.

“It’s a six-day-a-week job and several hours a day and when [the compensation firm] compared it to other companies, other nonprofits, that’s the salary that they would get,” he said.

The firebrand activist and MSNBC host was not exactly earning minimum wage in recent years. The last year he went without a salary was 2008, and he has made well into the six figures every year since, tax documents show.

He certainly wasn’t coveting his neighbor’s paycheck in 2017, when his NAN salary came to $244,661, or the year before, when he was paid $250,000 plus a $437,555 bonus. NAN justified the bonus at the time saying it was designed to make up for a lack of full compensation, including no retirement or benefits packages over the years.

The nonprofit also noted in 2016 that Sharpton’s average yearly pay of $283,543 from 2007 through 2016 fell within the competitive range of those who held similar positions.

in 2014, Sharpton got much more than the average pay — $348,244 plus a $64,400 bonus, tax filings show.

The holy man’s mammon really raised eyebrows last year when NAN’s filing revealed he had sold the rights to his life story to his own charity for $531,000. The organization contended the purchase would provide a revenue stream because it could turn around and sell the rights.

NAN at the time said an unnamed “executive committee independently approved” the deal, leading one expert to question how the independence was achieved.

“In this case, it’s really difficult because of his role in the organization and just because of his overall influence,” Linda Sugin, a Fordham University Law School professor and associate dean said at the time.

Sharpton said Saturday that NAN did sell the rights for a documentary that filmed the night of his 65th birthday gala at the New York Public Library, an event hosted by Samuel L. Jackson and Spike Lee. But he said he hadn’t received any cash yet.

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“They have already made a profit on that off the birthday,” he said.

NAN took in $7.3 million in donations last year, up $1 million from the previous year. NAN paid off years of accumulated tax debt in 2014.

Sharpton has been paying down millions in his own personal federal and state tax liens. In June, he finally paid off his personal tax debt to the state, which last year stood at $95,031.21. He still owes $698,470.99 in back taxes for three of his companies, according to the state Tax Department.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6067645775001_6067637213001-vs Al Sharpton gets $1M in pay from his own charity, tax filings show New York Post Melissa Klein Georgett Roberts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/entertainment/events/charity fnc/us fnc article 5f28c46d-3151-54c0-af5d-baf9e64be1ba   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6067645775001_6067637213001-vs Al Sharpton gets $1M in pay from his own charity, tax filings show New York Post Melissa Klein Georgett Roberts fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/entertainment/events/charity fnc/us fnc article 5f28c46d-3151-54c0-af5d-baf9e64be1ba

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Funding ‘Medicare-for-all’ with taxes on the rich ‘impossible,’ study says

Westlake Legal Group AP19294670506241 Funding 'Medicare-for-all' with taxes on the rich 'impossible,' study says Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/senate/health-care fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/deficit fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 475dbfac-ebc5-5c01-a1c1-dbc69d0d8eff

A bipartisan budget watchdog released a report Monday detailing options for how the federal government could pay for “Medicare-for-All,” the health care plan popular with 2020 Democratic presidential contenders — and its findings show there would be no way to fund the expanded health program by simply raising taxes on the rich.

The report, published by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, examines a variety of potential ways to raise the estimated $30 trillion over 10 years necessary to fund “Medicare-for-All,” including a 32 percent payroll tax, a 25 percent income surtax and a 42 percent value-added tax. These methods could all raise $30 trillion, the report says, but there is no way for the federal government to bring in that much money simply by taxing rich people.

“There is not enough annual income available among higher earners to finance the full cost of ‘Medicare-for-All,'” it says. “On a static basis, even increasing the top two income tax rates (applying to individuals making over $204,000 per year and couples making over $408,000 per year) to 100 percent would not raise $30 trillion over a decade.”

An accompanying chart lists the tax-the-rich funding option as “IMPOSSIBLE.”

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The role of middle-class taxes in funding “Medicare-for-All” has become a point of contention in the Democratic primary, especially at the most recent debate in Ohio. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren tiptoed around questions from the moderators about whether or not middle-class taxes would increase under her “Medicare-for-All” health care plan. Warren chose to focus on net costs instead.

“I will not sign a bill into law that does not cut costs for middle-class families,” she said.

South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who endorses a public option plan rather than Warren’s single-payer “Medicare-for-All,” accused her of being evasive.

“Your signature, senator, is to have a plan for everything— except for this,” he said. “No plan has been laid out to explain how a multitrillion-dollar hole in this Medicare-for-All plan that Senator Warren is putting forward is supposed to get filled in.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who is fond of reminding Democratic contenders endorsing “Medicare-for-All” that he “wrote the damn bill,” was more open than Warren about his plans to finance the $30 trillion health care plan.

ELIZABETH WARREN’S CAMPAIGN IS AT A  ‘MAKE-OR-BREAK’ MOMENT, SAYS CHARLES PAYNE

“It is appropriate to acknowledge that taxes will go up,” he said, “for virtually everybody, the tax increase they pay will be substantially less than what they were paying for premiums and out-of-pocket expenses.”

A 32 percent payroll tax increase would bring the rate to 47 percent on most wage income, according to the CRFB report. A 25 percent income surtax would force the lowest federal income tax rates to 35 percent and compel the top earners to pay 62 percent of their income.

The options for financing “Medicare-for-All” without increasing taxes are similarly immoderate. The CRFB says the federal government would need to cut “non-health federal spending by 80 percent” in order to pay for “Medicare-for-All” without increasing taxes. This would require cutting Social Security benefits from approximately $18,000 to about $3,600 each year and cutting troop numbers from 1.3 million to 270,000.

If a Warren or a Sanders administration decided to finance “Medicare-for-All” simply on debt, consequences could be dire, according to the report.

BUTTIGIEG, KLOBUCHAR SLAM WARREN FOR NOT SAYING HOW SHE’LL FINANCE ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’

“Deficit-financing ‘Medicare-for-All’ would be far more damaging to the economy,” the report says. “Assuming that such a massive increase in the debt would not roil financial markets or lead to high inflation, we estimate that a 108 percent of GDP increase in the federal debt would shrink the size of the economy by roughly 5 percent in 2030 – the equivalent of a $4,500 reduction in per-person income – and far more in the following years.”

The CFRB report also points out lawmakers could combine several of the above-listed options to reduce the impact any one option might have. As an example for one way a bill could get to $30 trillion in revenue over 10 years, the report suggests, “a 16 percent employer-side payroll tax with a public premium averaging $8,000 per household ($3,000 per person), $5 trillion of taxes on high earners and corporations, and $1 trillion of spending cuts.”

The report also acknowledges the best way to finance “Medicare-for-All” might be to make the plan less ambitious than progressive leaders like Sanders and Warren have proposed.

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“While the financing options above are quite large in magnitude, they could be reduced significantly by reducing the cost of ‘Medicare-for-All’ itself,” the report says. “These cost reductions could be achieved in part by reforming or reducing provider payments, improving care coordination, and identifying policies to reduce excessive utilization of care.”

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095384784001_6095382083001-vs Funding 'Medicare-for-all' with taxes on the rich 'impossible,' study says Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/senate/health-care fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/deficit fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 475dbfac-ebc5-5c01-a1c1-dbc69d0d8eff   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095384784001_6095382083001-vs Funding 'Medicare-for-all' with taxes on the rich 'impossible,' study says Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/senate/health-care fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/deficit fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc article 475dbfac-ebc5-5c01-a1c1-dbc69d0d8eff

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Richard Fowler: Churches should be more focused on God than the IRS

Westlake Legal Group FOWLER Richard Fowler: Churches should be more focused on God than the IRS Julia Musto fox-news/us/religion fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox news fnc/media fnc article 1aef743b-0e2f-5a83-a8fd-7b15a3cc7e2c

Churches and other religious institutions should be more focused on God than the IRS, Fox News contributor and Democratic strategist Richard Fowler said Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend,” Fowler told host Jedediah Bila that he doesn’t agree with 2020 Texas Democrat Beto O’Rourke, who took aim at churches and other religious institutions that oppose same-sex marriage.

“There can be no reward, no benefit, no tax break for anyone or any institution, any organization in America that denies the full human rights and the full civil rights of every single one of us,” O’Rourke said at a CNN town hall Thursday.

HOMELESS MAN BAPTIZED IN CHURCH HE VANDALIZED SIX MONTHS EARLIER

“So as president, we’re going to make that a priority, and we are going to stop those who are infringing upon the human rights of our fellow Americans,” he told CNN’s Don Lemon.

In O’Rourke’s “Plan to Pursue Equality for LGBTQ+ People and Ensure They Can Live Openly Without Fear of Discrimination or Violence,” he lists reversing the Trump administration’s “attempt to expand religious exemptions in order to enable discrimination or harm others.”

President Trump has championed religious liberty, largely winning the evangelical vote in 2016, and earlier this year, his administration launched a global effort to decriminalize homosexuality.

“I really don’t think it’s a question for these churches or these institutions about…should they be worried about the IRS?” Fowler said. “I think they should be having a bigger conversation with their maker.”

“I grew up in church my entire life and one thing that God taught — what I was taught from day one — is that Jesus is love and his love is limitless,” he told Bila. “And so, if you are going to limit Jesus, I think you’re doing more harm to your faith than good by excluding a certain group of people.”

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Fowler said he doesn’t agree with O’Rourke’s methodology.

“I don’t think a lot of voters do and the polls reflect that,” he said. Adding: “I think this issue around whether or not churches should have tax-exempt status — everybody could take a different position on it.”

“My position as a Democrat is sure you could keep your tax-exempt status because I think the problem’s with your maker,” Fowler concluded.

Fox News’ Caleb Parke contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group FOWLER Richard Fowler: Churches should be more focused on God than the IRS Julia Musto fox-news/us/religion fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox news fnc/media fnc article 1aef743b-0e2f-5a83-a8fd-7b15a3cc7e2c   Westlake Legal Group FOWLER Richard Fowler: Churches should be more focused on God than the IRS Julia Musto fox-news/us/religion fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox news fnc/media fnc article 1aef743b-0e2f-5a83-a8fd-7b15a3cc7e2c

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Trump tax return ruling ‘obliterated’ president’s argument, Judge Napolitano says

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Napolitano_AP-FOX Trump tax return ruling 'obliterated' president's argument, Judge Napolitano says fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/your-world-cavuto fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 37971cf9-ed68-52bd-ac4e-91693cea5756

New York federal judge’s ruling dismantled President Trump’s argument against being forced to release his tax returns, according to Judge Andrew Napolitano.

Judge Victor Marrero ruled in Trump’s favor against New York County District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr., whose office had sought the release — but didn’t help the president’s own case, Napolitano claimed Monday on “Your World.”

“The federal district judge here in New York who issued a 75-page ruling early this morning pretty much obliterated the president’s arguments,” he said.

“And, the president had argued for a broad, unlimited immunity from all civil and criminal intrusions into his world while he’s still a sitting president.”

TRUMP GRANTED REPRIEVE ON TAX RETURN CASE AFTER FEDERAL JUDGE ISSUES BLISTERING RULING

Napolitano said the precedent for the judge’s remarks was set in another high-profile case involving a president of the United States — Clinton v. Jones in 1997.

That year, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Eighth Circuit appeals court’s ruling then-President Bill Clinton is “subject to the same laws that apply to all citizens.” Former Arkansas state employee Paula Jones had filed a 1994 sexual harassment suit against Clinton, which eventually led to the final ruling.

On “Your World,” Napolitano said that in the Paula Jones case, the Supreme Court, “unanimously said the president does not enjoy that kind of immunity.”

However, he also offered whether or not Trump has a point when he claims to be the subject of a “witch hunt” through multiple means, including litigation.

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“Is this the witch hunt that the president says it is, or is it a legitimate prosecution run by the district attorney here in New York City?” he asked.

“Who knows, it has the earmarks of a legitimate prosecution, it is based upon information that his office received of criminal behavior. This is the type of material that investigators almost always get when they are investigating a white-collar crime.”

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At the same time, Napolitano said, there is no precedent for prosecutors seeking a president’s tax returns for years prior to him taking office.

“The stay issued by the Second Circuit… is what we call an ‘administrative stay’ — it’s not on the merits, it’s just ‘let’s just hold off until we can find a panel of three judges to receive the documents and they’ll decide on this’.”

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He echoed host Neil Cavuto’s remark the tax returns situation is part and parcel to the “understatement of the century” — that state and local governments can be “intrusive” into the private life of a president of the United States.

Napolitano also claimed Trump has a valid concern that sensitive information like his tax returns could be leaked from Vance’s office if the Manhattan prosecutor wins the rights to get them.

In his ruling, Marrero declared the federal court should abstain from the matter, as the investigation is part of an ongoing state prosecution. Recognizing that an appellate court may take issue with this decision, Marrero sought to explain at length why he was rejecting Trump’s immunity claim and denying the request for an injunction against the subpoena.

The Clinton appointee wrote that “the expansive notion of constitutional immunity invoked here to shield the President from judicial process would constitute an overreach of executive power,” and that Trump’s argument essentially claims “that a constitutional domain exists in this country in which not only the President, but, derivatively, relatives and persons and business entities associated with him in potentially unlawful private activities, are in fact above the law.”

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Napolitano_AP-FOX Trump tax return ruling 'obliterated' president's argument, Judge Napolitano says fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/your-world-cavuto fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 37971cf9-ed68-52bd-ac4e-91693cea5756   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Napolitano_AP-FOX Trump tax return ruling 'obliterated' president's argument, Judge Napolitano says fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/your-world-cavuto fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox-news/politics/finance/taxes fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 37971cf9-ed68-52bd-ac4e-91693cea5756

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