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Trump takes aim at Dem senator over Iran meeting, suggests he should be prosecuted

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-540682798 Trump takes aim at Dem senator over Iran meeting, suggests he should be prosecuted Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article a4d5101e-f538-5dd8-a2e8-e5e704f0acf1

President Trump lashed out Wednesday at Sen. Chris Murphy for meeting with Iran’s foreign minister and accused the Democratic senator of “illegally” violating the Logan Act.

The Logan Act, enacted in 1799, bars Americans from conducting rogue negotiations with foreign governments in disputes with the U.S.

SENATE DEMOCRAT MURPHY ACKNOWLEDGES MEETING WITH IRAN’S FOREIGN MINISTER

No one has ever been successfully prosecuted under this obscure federal law, but some critics suggested in 2017 that Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn ran afoul of the law in his dealings with Russia before Trump took office. Murphy himself called for investigations at the time. Trump on Wednesday argued the Connecticut senator is now the one in breach of that law, suggesting he face consequences.

“Kerry & Murphy illegally violated the Logan Act,” Trump tweeted Wednesday, in reference to former Secretary of State John Kerry as well. “This is why Iran is not making a deal. Must be dealt with strongly!”

Murphy met with Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif while at the Munich Security conference declaring, “if Trump isn’t going to talk to Iran, then someone should.”

Once hearing the news of Murphy’s visit, Trump previewed his line of attack to reporters.

“I saw that Senator Murphy met with the Iranians, is that a fact?” Trump said Tuesday before boarding Air Force One.  “I just saw that on the way over. Is there anything I should know? Because that sounds like, to me, a violation of the Logan Act.”

Trump has previously accused Kerry of meeting the Iranians and trying to undermine his foreign policy.

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A spokesperson for Kerry responded Wednesday: “We’ve addressed this many times before. The president is still tweeting, is still wrong, and is still trying to distract from his diplomatic malpractice on Iran.”

Flynn wasn’t prosecuted for Logan Act violations, but in 2017 he pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI in relation to the Russia probe.

Fox News’ Rich Edson contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-540682798 Trump takes aim at Dem senator over Iran meeting, suggests he should be prosecuted Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article a4d5101e-f538-5dd8-a2e8-e5e704f0acf1   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-540682798 Trump takes aim at Dem senator over Iran meeting, suggests he should be prosecuted Marisa Schultz fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article a4d5101e-f538-5dd8-a2e8-e5e704f0acf1

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Manchin defends impeachment trial vote to oust Trump, says he wanted more evidence to acquit

Westlake Legal Group Video-19 Manchin defends impeachment trial vote to oust Trump, says he wanted more evidence to acquit fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/shows/bill-hemmer-reports fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 1647e52e-d48a-5faa-9dd6-8651b2534ff1

Senator Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., reacted Friday to claims from his Senate colleague that his constituents are not happy with his vote to convict and remove President Trump in the Senate impeachment trial this week.

Manchin defended his position on “Bill Hemmer Reports,” saying that the vote was the toughest decision he’s made in public life, and that he hoped to come to the opposite conclusion. However, Manchin also criticized the president’s use of “rogue proxies” to set foreign policy, singling out former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

IMPEACHMENT WITNESS VINDMAN FIRED, ESCORTED OUT OF WHITE HOUSE AFTER TRUMP ACQUITTAL

On Thursday, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., said Manchin’s decision is “not being received well here at home,” and claimed that Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. likely “pulled the noose a little tight [around his caucus] and said ‘Come on, everybody, we are going to jump off this cliff together’.”

Manchin rejected the assertion that he operates in lockstep with or under threat of blowback from Schumer, the Senate Minority Leader, and said that he and Capito are good friends and he simply disagreed with her remarks.

“We see this differently. We talk about it. We see it different and I think Shelly knows … no one can pull my chain or tie a noose around me — I’m the most conservative Democrat in all of Congress,” he said after host Bill Hemmer noted he was back in Charleston when Capito spoke Thursday.

Manchin noted that he has taken many votes that are unpopular with his Democratic caucus but endeared him to the GOP. He said his mantra when considering a resolution is that if “I can explain it, I can vote for it,” adding that his 37-year public service record speaks for itself.

He said the evidence was “overwhelming” in House managers’ favor when it came to impeaching Trump and lamented that the president’s team did not want additional witnesses or documents subpoenaed in the Senate trial. He said witnesses would have ve possibly brought more clarity to the president’s case and convinced him to vote to acquit.

The most damning part of the Senate trial, he said, was an argument by Harvard Law Emeritus Professor Alan Dershowitz — who has claimed his remarks were taken out of context.

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“The most powerful person in the world calls the most inexperienced new leader of a country that’s fighting Russia in their own backyard — that’s just an affront that I couldn’t get over [and] when the only defense that was made was Professor Dershowitz saying if the president does it and if it’s in the best interest of the country and that means him doing whatever, even for his election, then it’s OK. I can’t get there. That’s not what the Constitution says,” Manchin explained.

When Hemmer asked about comments made by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., that indicated House Democrats will pursue other avenues of investigation, Manchin shot down the idea that he would support going back over the Ukraine case and pursuing further allegations against Trump.

“Absolutely not,” he replied. “Unless the president continues using rogue proxies such as Rudy Giuliani running around playing with foreign policy within the election process.

“I’m hoping that the president has learned: Mr. President, we are equal powers,” Manchin added. “We were designed differently than any other, any other government in the [world].”

Westlake Legal Group Video-19 Manchin defends impeachment trial vote to oust Trump, says he wanted more evidence to acquit fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/shows/bill-hemmer-reports fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 1647e52e-d48a-5faa-9dd6-8651b2534ff1   Westlake Legal Group Video-19 Manchin defends impeachment trial vote to oust Trump, says he wanted more evidence to acquit fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/west-virginia fox-news/shows/bill-hemmer-reports fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 1647e52e-d48a-5faa-9dd6-8651b2534ff1

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Judge Andrew Napolitano: Despite his impeachment trial acquittal, Trump clearly guilty of a high crime

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6128244045001_6128244336001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Despite his impeachment trial acquittal, Trump clearly guilty of a high crime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Andrew Napolitano 40137080-19fb-52c2-8b18-dddbc3472892

 “The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command.” – George Orwell, “1984”

The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump ended not with a bang but a whimper. What different outcome could one expect from a trial without so much as a single witness, a single document, any cross-examination or a defendant respectful enough to show up?

Law students are taught early on that a trial is not a grudge match or an ordeal; it is a search for the truth. Trial lawyers know that cross-examination is the most effective truth-testing tool available to them.

But the search for the truth requires witnesses, and when the command from Senate Republican leaders came down that there shall be no witnesses, the truth-telling mission of Trump’s trial was radically transformed into a steamroller of political power.

GREGG JARRETT: TRUMP ACQUITTAL IN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL IS A HUMILIATING DEFEAT FOR PARTISAN DEMOCRATS

And in its wake is a Congress ceding power to the presidency, almost as if the states had ratified a constitutional amendment redefining the impeachment language to permit a president to engage in high crimes and misdemeanors so long as he believes that they are in the national interest and so long as his party has an iron-clad grip on the Senate.

How could presidential crimes be in the national interest? Here is the backstory.

When the House of Representatives voted in favor of two articles of impeachment against Trump, it characterized his lawlessness as contempt of Congress and an abuse of power.

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The contempt of Congress consisted of Trump’s orders to subordinates to disregard congressional subpoenas. Both Republican- and Democratic-controlled Houses of Representatives have deemed such presidential instructions in an impeachment inquiry as impeachable per se.

The abuse allegations address Trump’s solicitation of assistance for his reelection campaign from a foreign government by holding up the release of $391 million in military aid to the same foreign government. These funds were congressionally appropriated and ordered to be paid by legislation that Trump had signed into law.

Federal law prohibits such solicitation as criminal and prohibits government officials from seeking personal favors in return for performing their governmental duties. The latter is bribery.

Because the solicitation that Trump committed was a crime against the government, it is among those referred to when the Constitution was written as a “high” crime. High crimes are a constitutional basis for impeachment, along with bribery and treason.

The evidence that Trump did this is overwhelming and beyond a reasonable doubt, and no one with firsthand knowledge denied it. Numerous government officials recounted that the presidential leverage of $391 million in U.S. assistance for a personal political favor did occur and the government’s own watchdog concluded that it was indisputably unlawful.

The favor Trump sought was an announcement by the Ukrainian government of the commencement of an investigation of Trump’s potential presidential foe, former Vice President Joe Biden.

While the Senate was hearing House prosecution managers argue their case, and Trump’s lawyers challenged those arguments, The New York Times revealed that John Bolton, Trump’s former national security adviser, had authored an as yet unpublished book demonstrating that the House case against Trump was true.

True because, unlike the senators who shut their eyes and ears at Trump’s trial, Bolton saw for himself the presidential tit-for-tat machinations that the House had alleged and, if proven, were criminal and impeachable.

The Times also revealed the existence of 24 emails sent by Trump aides manifesting indisputably his lawless behavior. But the emails are secret.

At the same time, two signal events occurred in the impeachment trial. The first was an argument by Trump’s lawyers that every president seeking reelection believes his victory will be in the national interest and thus all presidential efforts toward that victory are constitutional and lawful.

This morally bankrupt, intellectually dishonest argument – which effectively resuscitates from history’s graveyard President Richard Nixon’s logic that “when the president does it, that means that it is not illegal” because the president is above the law – must have resonated with Senate Republican leaders.

The leaders coerced their Senate Republican colleagues into embracing the view that – since the president did not want Bolton to testify or White House emails to be revealed – they must bar all witnesses and documents.

The second signal event was shameful. It was the 51 to 49 Senate vote to bar witnesses and documents from the trial.

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Isn’t it odd that a president who clamors for exoneration, who claimed loud and long that he committed no crime and did no wrong, who insisted that his request to the Ukrainian president to seek dirt on Biden in return for American financial assistance was “perfect,” would command the members of his own party to block testimony adverse to him – rather than hear it, cross-examine it, challenge it and thereby obtain the exoneration on the merits that he seeks?

Do innocent people behave this way?

If Trump really believes he did not commit any crimes and any impeachable offenses, why would he orchestrate blocking evidence? And who – having taken an oath to do “impartial justice” – would close their eyes to the truth? How could such a marathon of speeches possibly be considered a trial?

Trump will luxuriate in his victory. But the personal victory for him is a legal assault on the Constitution. The president has taken an oath to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution. Instead, he has trashed it.

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How? By manipulating Senate Republicans to bar firsthand evidence and keep it from senatorial and public scrutiny, Trump and his Senate collaborators have insulated him and future presidents from the moral and constitutional truism that no president is above the law.

Somewhere, Richard Nixon is smiling.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLITANO

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6128244045001_6128244336001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Despite his impeachment trial acquittal, Trump clearly guilty of a high crime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Andrew Napolitano 40137080-19fb-52c2-8b18-dddbc3472892   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6128244045001_6128244336001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: Despite his impeachment trial acquittal, Trump clearly guilty of a high crime fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Andrew Napolitano 40137080-19fb-52c2-8b18-dddbc3472892

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Manchin, swing-state senators swarmed with Dem hugs after voting to convict Trump

Westlake Legal Group MANCHIN Manchin, swing-state senators swarmed with Dem hugs after voting to convict Trump Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 52b689a4-0f9f-5ef5-a3ce-f9bd01a2fc10

A trio of swing-state senators got a lot of love from their fellow Democrats after voting “guilty” on two articles of impeachment against President Trump Wednesday, as their colleagues hailed them for political courage.

Immediately after their historic votes, Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va.; Doug Jones, D-Ala., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., were rushed by fellow Democrat lawmakers who gave them hugs, pats on the back and handshakes.

As the three undecided Democrats before Wednesday’s vote, and under tremendous pressure from all sides, their decision to stick with their party led to an outpouring of support.

SENATE ACQUITS TRUMP ON ABUSE OF POWER, OBSTRUCTION OF CONGRESS CHARGES

“We knew that they were really struggling. They are in the toughest states politically and it took real courage,” said Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. “People are very sensitive to the political risks of standing up in doing what you believe is right against a very vindictive president.”

Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va.; Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii; Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., and Kirsten Gillbrand, D-N.Y., were among the Democrats who showed visible affection to the vulnerable senators inside the Senate chamber after their fateful votes.

Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., gave Jones and Manchin tight hugs. Then Jones and Manchin, both representing Trump stronghold states, exchanged an embrace. And Manchin and Sinema also shared a big hug on the Senate floor.

“I didn’t know how he was going to vote,” Gillibrand said afterward of her show of affection for Manchin. “I had spoken to him a few times in the cloakroom. I was very proud of his decision. And he did what he thought was the right thing to do.”

Even Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, came over from the House to watch and headed for Manchin after the vote on the Senate floor to shake his hand.

Jones was the first to announce his guilty vote earlier Wednesday, followed by Sinema and Manchin, who put out a statement just minutes before the impeachment vote began. Democrat Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he didn’t know of Manchin’s decision until “10 minutes before the vote.”

“Joe Manchin does the right thing,” Schumer said.

ROMNEY ANNOUNCES HE WILL VOTE TO CONVICT TRUMP IN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL

Republicans had long-predicted a bipartisan acquittal, but the last-minute decision by the three robbed Trump of that talking point. With Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, defecting from his party and voting for guilt on one article of impeachment, it was Democrats who celebrated bipartisanship.

The vote “created a bipartisan impeachment that can never be erased from history,” Schumer said.

Democrats touted the party unity and praised the House impeachment managers for making a convincing case.

“There was a bipartisan vote — even though it wasn’t two thirds — that found President Trump guilty,” Stabenow said. “Every single Democrat plus one Republican.”

Earlier in the day, Manchin took to the Senate floor to suggest censure for Trump and he was considered by Republicans one of their best bets for a defection. For his part, Manchin said he prayed on the decision.

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“This was the most difficult decision I’ve ever had to make,” Manchin told reporters afterward.

“… This is not a political vote whatsoever. It’s not whether I like the president. I’ve always had a good relationship [with Trump], but I love my country, and I have an obligation, responsibilities and my duties to my country. And if I can’t explain that then shame on me,” he said.

Fox News’ Jason Donner contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group MANCHIN Manchin, swing-state senators swarmed with Dem hugs after voting to convict Trump Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 52b689a4-0f9f-5ef5-a3ce-f9bd01a2fc10   Westlake Legal Group MANCHIN Manchin, swing-state senators swarmed with Dem hugs after voting to convict Trump Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox news fnc/politics fnc article 52b689a4-0f9f-5ef5-a3ce-f9bd01a2fc10

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Juan Williams: Trump impeachment shows Americans ‘we have a corrupt president’ who ‘got away with it’

Westlake Legal Group image-5 Juan Williams: Trump impeachment shows Americans 'we have a corrupt president' who 'got away with it' fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/mitt-romney fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 710d7c4b-20c1-5537-9e92-598625f3b26d

Juan Williams reacted to the acquittal of President Trump by the Senate Wednesday, saying that Trump has been revealed to be a corrupt head of state who “got away with” the act of which he was accused.

Williams said on “The Five” that impeachment did not “backfire” on Democrats as co-host Jesse Watters had posited.

Watters had said that instead of removing Trump from office, all Democrats succeeded with was damaging former Vice President Joe Biden, likely keeping the Senate out of their reach in 2020, and spiking the president’s approval rating.

ROMNEY THE ONLY SENATOR TO DEFECT FROM PARTY IN IMPEACHMENT VOTE

Williams disagreed.

“Impeachment led most of the American people now to understand that this is a corrupt president,” he said. “But they said, in essence, and this was the Republican line, ‘Even if he did it, we don’t think it is quite impeachable.’ Wait until the election — as if the Forefathers [Founding Fathers] didn’t think about elections.”

“[T]he man basically got away with it,” Williams added. “This is the man [who said he could be] on Fifth Avenue shooting someone, as he’s bragged, and his followers say nothing.” In 2016, then-candidate Trump claimed during a rally that he could “stand in the middle” of the famous thoroughfare and “shoot someone and not lose any voters.”

Williams said that several Republican senators had criticized the impeachment process, noting claims that the White House was potentially holding back documents and witnesses.

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Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Mitt Romney of Utah — the last of whom voted to convict Trump on one of the two articles — had been vocal in their assertion that the president did something “wrong, embarrassing [or] inappropriate,” Williams said.

Of Romney, Williams said the 2012 Republican presidential nominee is a “man of principle” because he acted in a way that he knew will bring political blowback and harsh messaging from the president’s Twitter feed.

“To me, what you get here is this is what Republicans in the Senate say, they just say, ‘You know what, boy, we don’t want Donald Trump saying nasty things about us.'”

Westlake Legal Group image-5 Juan Williams: Trump impeachment shows Americans 'we have a corrupt president' who 'got away with it' fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/mitt-romney fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 710d7c4b-20c1-5537-9e92-598625f3b26d   Westlake Legal Group image-5 Juan Williams: Trump impeachment shows Americans 'we have a corrupt president' who 'got away with it' fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/person/mitt-romney fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 710d7c4b-20c1-5537-9e92-598625f3b26d

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Donna Brazile: Trump acquittal in impeachment trial will go down in history as a sad day for democracy

Westlake Legal Group image Donna Brazile: Trump acquittal in impeachment trial will go down in history as a sad day for democracy fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Donna Brazile article 9271a95a-556a-5368-ae12-7f6104f7dff6

The impeachment trial of President Trump will soon be history, and the outcome will go down as a sad day for our democracy.

Although the evidence of President Trump’s unlawful and impeachable acts is overwhelming and growing, the Republican-controlled Senate is certain to fall short Wednesday of the two-thirds vote needed to convict him on two articles of impeachment adopted by the House.

Saying that something will “soon be history” can have a dismissive ring to it. To some people, it just means that it’s done, over, finished, forgotten. But history is never done, nor over, nor finished. And what has taken place over these past few weeks will never be forgotten.

HOYER ON IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: ‘I DON’T UNDERSTAND HOW ANY AMERICAN BELIEVES THE SENATE IS DOING THE RIGHT THING’

Leaders need to be aware of history when they’re making really big decisions. Those really big decisions aren’t made just for themselves, for their careers, their party, or even their constituents. Those decisions are made for all Americans, including the dead and those yet to be born – for everyone in the history of this nation. Even the history that hasn’t been written yet.

The decision by Senate Republicans to shut down the impeachment trial of President Trump took place despite his obvious guilt on both articles of impeachment.

Just a few hours after the trial record was effectively sealed by the Senate, the Justice Department made a midnight court filing that revealed the existence of dozens of emails that the White House is hiding from congressional oversight.

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The emails reportedly reveal President Trump’s thinking during the time he was illegally withholding nearly $400 million in aid desperately needed by Ukraine to defend itself against invading Russian military forces.

But in voting to bar new witnesses and evidence from being introduced at the Trump impeachment trial, Senate Republicans closed their eyes – they said they would prefer not to see any of it. And they don’t want us seeing it either. Why? It’s going to come out one day.

The Senate didn’t hold a valid trial because – for the first time in our history – it did not call witnesses in a presidential impeachment trial. That’s why so many Americans believe that the Senate oversaw a cover-up.

The proceedings – you can’t really call this a real trial – were halted without speaking to a single witness, despite the fact that there are vital witnesses willing to testify. No new evidence was allowed in, despite new revelations being made on an almost daily basis.

And worse, the decision to stop the impeachment trial took place not just despite the witnesses and the evidence – it took place specifically in order to quash those witnesses and evidence. A trial is supposed to seek the truth, but the GOP Senate used this trial to bury the truth.

The vote to exclude witnesses was a vote to stop the facts from becoming known – even to those Senate jurors who were supposed to be examining the facts. The vote was the very definition of willful ignorance.

Worst of all, it was a vote to impose that ignorance of the facts onto the American people.

House Democrats did the right thing in impeaching Trump. Impeachment was necessary, even if removal was always unlikely. As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said: “We have pulled back a veil of behavior totally unacceptable to our founders, and that the public will see this with a clearer eye.”

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And in forcing Senate Republicans to show their hand, a veil has also been pulled back to reveal the behavior of President Trump’s congressional enablers – behavior that would be equally as unacceptable to our founders and to the public.

The politically driven acquittal sets a horrible precedent and it weakens the rule of law.

The action of Senate Republicans in shutting down the impeachment trial is a slap in the face to all Americans, even those who support President Trump. If Republican senators truly believe in his innocence, why not find out what happened by looking at evidence and witness testimony?                                          

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But given the historic nature of these events, this politically driven rush to acquittal is also an affront to every generation of Americans, from the nation’s founders through those future generations who will learn about these actions in their history lessons.

The impeachment trial of President Trump is headed for the history books. And history will remember the evidence that continues to drip out and the witnesses who were not called to tell us what they know.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DONNA BRAZILE

Westlake Legal Group image Donna Brazile: Trump acquittal in impeachment trial will go down in history as a sad day for democracy fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Donna Brazile article 9271a95a-556a-5368-ae12-7f6104f7dff6   Westlake Legal Group image Donna Brazile: Trump acquittal in impeachment trial will go down in history as a sad day for democracy fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Donna Brazile article 9271a95a-556a-5368-ae12-7f6104f7dff6

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Claire McCaskill faces racism accusations after singling out Ben Carson in photo of Trump surrogates

Westlake Legal Group McCaskill-Ben-Carson Claire McCaskill faces racism accusations after singling out Ben Carson in photo of Trump surrogates Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/cabinet fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f250fcb0-61e4-5006-b392-6806127b0e3d article

Former Sen. Claire McCaskill received a wave of backlash on Tuesday after she appeared to single Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson out for his race.

“One of these things is not like the others. Hint: they made him squat in the aisle so he was visible,” McCaskill, now a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC, tweeted alongside a photo of Carson on an airplane with other Trump supporters.

Prominent Trump supporters, including one of his top African American advisers, fired back.

Katrina Pierson, a black woman who serves as a senior adviser for Trump’s campaign, tweeted: “Only a closet racist would make such an incredibly stupid and non factual [sic] observation. There were several ‘things’ on that plane. TWO OTHERS IN THAT ROW! You’re trying too hard, but don’t worry… You’ll see us soon in a town near you.”

BEN CARSON DEFENDS TRUMP AMID FEUD WITH HOUSE DEMS: ‘HE’S NOT A RACIST’

The president’s oldest son also blasted McCaskill, clarifying that Carson didn’t have a seat in the photo because he was in first class.

“Dr. Carson is not a ‘thing,’ he is a world renowned, [sic] life-saving neurosurgeon,” Donald Trump Jr. tweeted. “Anyway, how’s unemployment?”

McCaskill lost her bid for reelection to Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., in 2018. She was unrepentant amid the backlash, tweeting: “Ummm. Pretty sure pointing out a lack of diversity is not racist. Sorry Trump world.”

FORMER SEN. MCCASKILL SAYS RAND PAUL IS ‘KIND OF AN IDIOT’ AFTER WHISTLEBLOWER COMMENTS

But many disagreed, tweeting that the former senator’s comments were racist.

This wasn’t the first time Carson was targeted for his race. For example, the short-lived NBC comedy “Marlon” suggested Carson was a “sell-out” for supporting Trump.

“I mean, do you wanna be Dr. Martin Luther King or Dr. Ben Carson? Do you wanna be Rosa Parks or Omarosa? Do you wanna be Mrs. Dash or Stacey Dash?” asked a character in the show. “The View” co-host Sunny Hostin also seemed to single Carson out last year when Trump feuded with late Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md.

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“When you are silent in the face of racism, you are complicit in that racism and I strongly believe that,” Hostin said on “The View.” “I’m calling out Ben Carson, who spent the majority of his career in West Baltimore.”

In the new documentary “Created Equal,” Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas remarked on the treatment he and Carson received as African-American conservatives.

“There’s different sets of rules for different people,” he says in a preview clip released in October. “If you criticize a black person who’s more liberal, you’re a racist whereas if you can do whatever to me — or now, Ben Carson — and that’s fine because you’re not really black because you’re not doing what we expect black people to do.”

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Carson has repeatedly defended President Trump from accusations of racism and bigotry, saying last summer: “I have an advantage of knowing the president very well, and he’s not a racist and his comments are not racist.”

Carson had not responded via Twitter before publishing time. MSNBC did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Fox News’ Victor Garcia and Nick Givas contributed to this report.

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Brit Hume on Democratic candidates making final Iowa push: ‘The race could change overnight’

Westlake Legal Group Brit-Hume Brit Hume on Democratic candidates making final Iowa push: 'The race could change overnight' Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc b66b3f79-8ae8-579f-8ed2-9c9b60b4ce4d article

Speaking on Fox News on Sunday ahead of Monday night’s Iowa caucuses, Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume said after the results are in, “the race could change overnight.”

“What this race has needed, at least from my perspective as an observer, is some shape,” Hume said.

He then noted that “polls have been up and down” and “all over the place.”

“[Former Vice President Joe] Biden has managed to hang on to something of a national lead. Now in the early states, it appears that Bernie Sanders is ahead,” Hume said. “We’ll know an awful lot more about this race on Tuesday morning and I’m sort of looking forward to having a race that you could kind of get your arms around to understand it.”

Looking out at more than 3,000 supporters at a campaign rally and concert in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on Saturday night, Sanders, I-Vt., boldly predicted victory ahead of Monday night’s Iowa caucuses — which will mark the first test of whether the fiery populist can achieve in 2020 what eluded him four years ago.

COLIN REED: GOP, TAKE BERNIE SERIOUSLY – DON’T FORGET THESE LESSONS FROM TRUMP IN 2016

His campaign quickly touted that it was the largest rally of any Democratic presidential contender this cycle in the Hawkeye State.

The gathering – coming just 48 hours before the first contest in the long road to the White House – was another sign of the Sanders surge in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Crowd sizes are one way to gauge the momentum – two others are polls and fundraising figures.

The independent Vermont senator who’s making his second straight bid for the Democratic nod has soared in polls in Iowa the past couple of months. In October and the first half of November, Sanders was in the mid-teens in the Real Clear Politics average of the latest Iowa Democratic caucus surveys, trailing two key rivals – former Vice President Joe Biden and fellow progressive rock star Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

But Sanders’ numbers edged up to the upper teens by December and skyrocketed in January. He now stands at 24 percent support among likely Democratic caucus-goers in the latest RCP average, ahead of Biden at 20 percent, former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg at 16 percent and Warren at 15 percent.

INSIDE THE SANDERS SURGE: IOWA LEADER DEPLOYS ARMY OF SUPPORTERS, SURROGATES IN FIGHT TO LOCK DOWN THE LEFT

When anchor Martha MacCallum asked if he’s surprised that Sanders “is still such a big element in this four years later” Hume answered, “I don’t think so because if you look at the direction the Democratic Party has taken, the center left party of Bill Clinton is basically gone.”

“Bernie Sanders had strong staying power four years ago, he’s still got it today,” he continued. “He’s going to be in this, I think, until the end because he’s not going to run out of money and his supporters are ardent and energetic and so he’s going to be with us.”

He went on to say that “the only real question is whether he can mount an early lead and then kind of run the tables in this and win the whole thing which, I think, will result in delirium tremens among establishment Democrats. I’m sure they’re worried as hell that that could happen.”

Hume noted that after Iowa’s results are in, “Some candidates may fall by the wayside.”

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He added, “If Elizabeth Warren doesn’t do anything here, I think she’s in some trouble already, she may fall by the wayside and of course who does that strengthen? Guess who? Bernie Sanders in my view.”

Fox News’ Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

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Amy Klobuchar helped jail teen for life, but case was flawed

This story was produced in collaboration with American Public Media.

MINNEAPOLIS — It was a prime-time moment for Amy Klobuchar.

Standing in the glare of television lights at a Democratic presidential debate last fall, she was asked about her years as a top Minnesota prosecutor and allegations she was not committed to racial justice.

“That’s not my record,” she said, staring into the camera.

Yes, she was tough on crime, Klobuchar said, but the African-American community was angry about losing kids to gun violence. And she responded.

She told a story that she has cited throughout her political career, including during her 2006 campaign for the U.S. Senate: An 11-year-old girl was killed by a stray bullet while doing homework at her dining room table in 2002. And Klobuchar’s office put Tyesha Edwards’ killer — a black teen — behind bars for life.

But what if Myon Burrell is innocent?

WHY THE NY TIMES, HEDGING ITS BETS, ACTUALLY FAVORS KLOBUCHAR OVER WARREN

An Associated Press investigation into the 17-year-old case uncovered new evidence and myriad inconsistencies, raising questions about whether he was railroaded by police.

Conflicting accounts

The AP reviewed more than a thousand pages of police records, court transcripts and interrogation tapes, and interviewed dozens of inmates, witnesses, family members, former gang leaders, lawyers and criminal justice experts.

Westlake Legal Group AP20027679721202 Amy Klobuchar helped jail teen for life, but case was flawed Robin McDowell fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fnc/politics fnc b81240d5-7dee-5671-a19f-3b8f34c6f925 Associated Press article

The case of Myon Burrell, convicted in the murder of Tyesha Edwards, an 11-year-old girl pierced in the heart by a stray bullet in 2002 while doing homework at her family’s dining room table, has drawn a growing number of legal experts, community leaders and civil rights activists who are worried that he may have been wrongly convicted. He is seen Oct. 23, 2019, in Stillwater, Minn. (Associated Press)

The case relied heavily on a teen rival of Burrell’s who gave conflicting accounts when identifying the shooter, who was largely obscured behind a wall 120 feet away.

With no other eyewitnesses, police turned to multiple jailhouse snitches. Some have since recanted, saying they were coached or coerced. Others were given reduced time, raising questions about their credibility. And the lead homicide detective offered “major dollars” for names, even if it was hearsay.

There was no gun, fingerprints, or DNA. Alibis were never seriously pursued. Key evidence has gone missing or was never obtained, including a convenience store surveillance tape that Burrell and others say would have cleared him.

Burrell, now 33, has maintained his innocence, rejecting all plea deals.

AMY KLOBUCHAR ALLEGEDLY MISTREATED STAFFERS

His co-defendants, meanwhile, have admitted their part in Tyesha’s death. Burrell, they say, was not even there.

For years, one of them — Ike Tyson — has insisted he was actually the triggerman. Police and prosecutors refused to believe him, pointing to the contradictory accounts in the early days of the investigation. Now, he swears he was just trying to get the police off his back.

“I already shot an innocent girl,” said Tyson, who is serving a 45-year sentence. “Now an innocent guy — at the time he was a kid — is locked up for something he didn’t do. So, it’s like I’m carrying two burdens.”

“I already shot an innocent girl. Now an innocent guy — at the time he was a kid — is locked up for something he didn’t do. So, it’s like I’m carrying two burdens.”

— Ike Tyson

Difficult timing

Asked for comment on the case, a Klobuchar campaign spokesperson said Burrell was tried and convicted of Tyesha’s murder twice, and the second trial occurred when Klobuchar was no longer the Hennepin County Attorney. If there was new evidence, she said, it should be immediately reviewed by the court.

Questions about the case come at a difficult time, as Klobuchar and other presidential hopefuls, including Joe Biden and Michael Bloomberg, face scrutiny for their records on racial justice in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Black and brown communities were being decimated by the war on drugs, and the since-discredited “super-predator” theory prevailed, predicting that droves of poor, fatherless young men devoid of moral conscience would wreak havoc in their neighborhoods.

Democrats joined Republicans in supporting harsher policing and tougher sentencing, leading to the highest incarceration rates in the nation’s history.

Some politicians have tried to distance themselves from the period’s perceived excesses. In January, for instance, Klobuchar returned a $1,000 campaign donation from Linda Fairstein, who prosecuted New York’s infamous Central Park Five, four black teens and one Hispanic who were later exonerated in the rape of a white jogger in 1989.

While campaigning to be the top prosecutor in Minnesota’s most populous county in 1998, Klobuchar advocated for harsher penalties for juvenile offenders.

Westlake Legal Group AP-Amy-Klobuchar Amy Klobuchar helped jail teen for life, but case was flawed Robin McDowell fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fnc/politics fnc b81240d5-7dee-5671-a19f-3b8f34c6f925 Associated Press article

While campaigning to be the top prosecutor in Minnesota’s most populous county in 1998, Amy Klobuchar advocated for harsher penalties for juvenile offenders. The Democratic presidential candidate is seen Jan. 25, 2020, in Bettendorf, Iowa. (Associated Press)

In Minnesota, allegations of gang affiliation or motive played on the fears of mostly white jurors and led to harsher sentences.

“If you were young and black, and your case was tied to gangs or drugs, it was an especially scary time,” said Mary Moriarty, a public defender in Minnesota’s Hennepin County for nearly three decades. “I do firmly believe that there were people convicted of crimes that they did not do.’

She said that the murder Burrell went down for was problematic from the start.

“In the case of Myon Burrell — where you had a really high-profile shooting of an innocent girl and you put a lot of pressure on the system to get someone to be responsible for that — I think a lot of corners were probably cut.”

“In the case of Myon Burrell …  I think a lot of corners were probably cut.”

— Mary Moriarty, Hennepin County public defender

In Minneapolis, soaring homicides had briefly earned the city the grim nickname “Murderapolis.” By the time Klobuchar took office in 1999, crime rates had started to drop. But tensions remained high. Tyesha’s death set off an uproar.

Police pulled out all stops, deploying more than 40 officers and gang task force members.

Despite the lack of physical evidence, they all but wrapped up their case against Burrell in four days.

Ike Tyson, 21, and Hans Williams, 23, were easy. Several people saw them roll by in their car minutes before the attack, and a 911 tip from one of their girlfriends helped seal the deal.

Burrell, then 16, was arrested only after a tip from an often-used jailhouse informant. During his lengthy legal process, Burrell hired and fired six attorneys as they failed to cross-examine witnesses, pursue alibis or challenge glaring irregularities in the investigation.

KLOBUCHAR COMPARES TRUMP TO JOSEPH MCCARTHY

In the end, his sentence stuck: Natural life in prison.

The Minneapolis police declined to comment for this story. Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman’s office said it’s confident the correct person was convicted but it’s always open to reviewing new evidence.

Assistant County Attorney Jean Burdorf, the only prosecutor left who was directly involved in the case, insists that Burrell received justice. “I’ll tell you what I’ve told a lot of people over the years. I have a lot of confidence in Minnesota’s justice system,” she said.

“Certainly, he’s been through the court process, and his conviction has remained intact.”

Changing stories

For years, many caught up in Burrell’s case have insisted police got the wrong person. Some say they initially lied to protect themselves or their friends. Others say they told police what they wanted to hear to get deals on their own sentences or to punish a rival.

Even though some have changed their stories more than once, they insist they are now telling the truth because they have nothing to gain.

Burrell’s co-defendants were members of the Tyson Mob and the Vice Lords. They say drugs and guns were a way of life in their rough neighborhood. But the shooting wasn’t gang warfare as police claimed, they insisted — it was personal.

Tyson said he and Williams were driving in south Minneapolis when they spotted a group of guys hanging out. Among them was 17-year-old Timmy Oliver, a member of the rival Gangster Disciples, who had menacingly waved a gun at them weeks earlier.

The pair slowed down, scowled at Oliver, then continued on. They picked up an unidentified acquaintance, got a gun and headed back. Tyson said it was his idea, and the intention was to scare Oliver, not to kill him.

The three parked a block away, with Williams waiting in the driver’s seat for a quick getaway. Tyson and the third man jumped out, cutting through an alley and ducking between houses. Shielded by a wall, Tyson said he could clearly see Oliver standing in the yard across the street with his back turned.

He said he fired off eight rounds, the last few as he was running backward toward the car. It wasn’t until later that evening that he learned one of his bullets killed Tyesha in the house next door.

“There was only one weapon, one set of shells,” said Tyson. “I’m the one that did this. I did this.”

Soon after the shooting, he was telling friends, his attorney, fellow inmates and even a prison guard that Burrell was not at the scene, court records show. But he said his lawyer told him he’d never see the outside of a prison unless he implicated the youth. Eventually he buckled, but only after being promised his plea would not be used against Burrell.

Tyson doesn’t want to name the other man who was with him, saying he doesn’t want to pull in a person who was only peripherally involved.

The getaway driver, Hans Williams, did identify a third man — by his full name and in a photo lineup. Police initially said they didn’t want to “muddy up the case” with an unverified name, later that they didn’t believe him. They made no real effort to follow up. After getting a denial from the suspect in 2005, the chief homicide detective “permanently checked” out their recorded conversation and gave it to the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office. It has since gone missing.

The gun was never recovered and officers said prints on the magazine and the car were not sufficient for identification. Ballistic tests on Tyson’s jacket were not carried out to verify claims that he was the triggerman.

The killing of Tyesha Edwards topped television news that night.

That’s how a prison inmate first heard about it. Desperate to get money or time cut off his own sentence, he quickly reached out to Oliver, a friend and fellow gang member. Minutes later, the often-used informant gave the cops Burrell’s name, helping steer their investigation, the AP found.

WARREN, BIDEN AND KLOBUCHAR PICK UP ENDORSEMENTS IN EARLY VOTING STATES

Oliver, who had his own troubles with the law, didn’t go to police that day, as he promised. He said one of the bullets had pierced his pants, so he threw them away and went to buy a new pair.

But three days later, he was picked up by officers following another, unrelated shooting. Police now had their sole eyewitness in custody, interviewing him for more than eight hours. Though mandated by law, the interrogation was never recorded. Police later said they “made a mistake.”

Well after midnight, Oliver signed a statement saying he saw Burrell standing across the street in an open lot between two houses, shooting until he emptied his weapon. Later, Oliver’s story would change. He said his diminutive, 5-foot-3 rival was firing from behind a 5-foot wall, 120 feet away, but that his hooded face was still clearly recognizable.

Oliver’s best friend, Antoine Williams, said when the gunfire stopped, he ran to his side.

“I asked Timmy at the time, ‘Who, who did the shooting?’” Antoine Williams recalled in a recorded interview with a private investigator hired by one of Burrell’s attorneys. “He said, ‘I couldn’t see where it was coming from.’”

He later asked Oliver — who died in a shooting in 2003 — why he lied to police.

Oliver told him, “They threatened him, kinda put it like, ‘It was your fault because you were there. You were the intended target,’” Antoine Williams said.

With a new trial date approaching and their key witness, Oliver, gone to the grave, the police turned to informants in the jails and prisons. Some were offered generous sentence reductions, cash and other deals for those willing to come forward with a story about what happened in the shooting, even if it wasn’t true, inmates said.

There were at least seven jailhouse informants, two of whom had coughed up information in more than a dozen other cases. Another went by 29 different aliases.

Terry Arrington, a member of a rival gang, was among those who talked.

He said he was approached by four officers and the prosecutor at a federal correctional facility where he faced 19 years in prison and was told he could knock that down to three if he was willing to cooperate.

He said he knew nothing about the case: “They basically brought me through what to say. Before I went before the grand jury, they brought me in a room and said … ‘When you get in, hit on this, hit on this.’ I was still young and I had fresh kids that I was trying to get home to, so I did what they asked.”

He got his deal, but now lives with that burden.

“Like, I don’t wish jail on nobody,” he said, now back in prison at Rush City correctional facility on other charges. “Even though we was enemies … that’s still a man … So it really bothers me right now.”

He says at least three other men who were locked up with him in the same unit also cut deals with police. One other has recanted.

As far as Arrington knows, “everybody told a lie to get time cut.”

Distrust of police

Like many young black men in his neighborhood, Burrell’s distrust of police came early. He was 12 when a drug addict drew a switchblade, slashing his sister in the hand and drawing blood. His mom called the police, but they assumed the boy was the assailant, threw him up against a sharp fence before hauling him to the station in cuffs. Only then did they realize they had the wrong person.

Soon after, he was caught selling drugs and hanging out with the wrong crowd. Worried he might end up in jail, like his dad and oldest brother, his mother packed up the family and moved to Bemidji, a small city 3 1/2 hours away. But the 13-year-old struggled to fit in and found himself coming back to the Twin Cities often.

In 2002, the family traveled to Minneapolis to spend Thanksgiving with his grandmother.

Less than 24 hours later, Tyesha was dead and police were desperate to find her killer.

They decided early on it was Burrell, though he had not had any serious brushes with the law.

In a video taken by police hours before his arrest, chief homicide detective Richard Zimmerman is seen talking to a man brought to the station following another shooting. The officer says he is ready to pay “major dollars” for information about Tyesha’s murder — even if it’s just street chatter.

“Hearsay is still worth something to me,” Zimmerman tells the man, offering $500 a name. “Sometimes … you get hearsay here, hearsay there. Sometimes it’s like a jigsaw puzzle, things come together, you know what I mean?”

The man gave up three names, but Zimmerman paid for just one: Burrell’s.

The afternoon of the shooting, Burrell said, he was playing video games with a group at his friend’s house. Hungry, they decided to walk to Portland Market on 38th Street. When they didn’t see anything they liked, they continued on to Cup Foods, just a few hundred yards from Tyesha’s house.

During his nearly three-hour interrogation, Burrell identified two people he saw at Cup Foods — Latosha Evans and his friend, Donnell Jones.

Police never followed up. But Evans and Jones told the AP they were with Burrell at Cup Foods, either as shots were fired or immediately after, when sirens were blaring.

Though the store itself was under police surveillance because of allegations of drug dealing and weapons sales, it appears officers never recovered video surveillance tapes.

Evans remembers worrying that Burrell would get caught up in a police sweep and told him he better leave.

“I’d hate to you get blamed for this,’” she remembers telling him. “I hugged him and he went his way.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20027679596732 Amy Klobuchar helped jail teen for life, but case was flawed Robin McDowell fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fnc/politics fnc b81240d5-7dee-5671-a19f-3b8f34c6f925 Associated Press article

Latosha Evans, a friend of Myon Burrell who says she was with the Burrell the evening Tyesha Edwards was shot and killed at home in 2002, stands in her doorway, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, in Minneapolis. (Associated Press)

Burrell was picked up four days later. He was not in a gang database, and had never been tied to a serious crime.

During the interrogation, he never asked for an attorney, but he did ask for his mother 13 times. Each time he was told, “no, not now,” though she was in a room next door.

A police officer told him that he was a huge disappointment to his mother, and that she had told officers she thought he was capable of the shooting.

“Are you kidding?” Burrell responded. “That’s a lie. … That’s not truthful. … I don’t believe that.”

Meanwhile, officers told his mother, falsely, that they had several eyewitnesses saying Burrell was the one and only shooter. Sinking into tears, she asked again and again to see him. “Not yet,” they said.

One month later, the day before Burrell’s indictment, his mother was driving back to Bemidji after a prison visit. She swerved off the road, crashing into a tree. The car burst into flames, killing her.

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Klobuchar denied Burrell’s request to go to his mother’s funeral. He was, she said, a threat to society.

Burrell has spent most of his life in prison. He says he believes authorities knew that he was innocent all along: “They just didn’t feel like my life was worth living.”

If he had told police he was there, but had been an unwilling participant, as officers seemed to want, his nightmare might have been over by now. But he says he wants justice not just for himself, but for Tyesha. He could never admit to a crime he didn’t commit, he says.

“That’s something I struggle with to this day, you know. I coulda been home,” said Burrell. “At least I can look in the mirror and I can still be proud of who I see looking back.”

Associated Press writer Margie Mason contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085839018001_6085840261001-vs Amy Klobuchar helped jail teen for life, but case was flawed Robin McDowell fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fnc/politics fnc b81240d5-7dee-5671-a19f-3b8f34c6f925 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6085839018001_6085840261001-vs Amy Klobuchar helped jail teen for life, but case was flawed Robin McDowell fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fnc/politics fnc b81240d5-7dee-5671-a19f-3b8f34c6f925 Associated Press article

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Jenna Ellis: Trump impeachment trial was fair – Democratic complaints based on Big Lies

Westlake Legal Group image Jenna Ellis: Trump impeachment trial was fair – Democratic complaints based on Big Lies Jenna Ellis fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3fa938d5-d121-5ccd-89ac-4db6567c7010

After 10 days of President Trump’s impeachment trial, the Senate finally voted Friday night not to introduce more witness testimony. This effectively closed the trial and set a timeline to cancel the made-for-TV miniseries “Schumer Schiff Sham Show” on Wednesday.

Predictably, the Democrats are now pivoting their narrative and trying to sell America two Big Lies.

Big Lie 1: “No witnesses, no documents.”

This is a ridiculous spin driven by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

ANDREW MCCARTHY: IN TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, SENATE RIGHT TO BLOCK NEW WITNESS TESTIMONY

The House heard from 18 witnesses (17 of them public). On its own decision, the Democratic majority in the House decided not to allow GOP witnesses or subpoena witnesses like former National Security Adviser John Bolton and Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, who they now claim they “must” hear from.

The Democrats didn’t want to be tied up in the judicial system to allow a court to determine if their subpoenas were valid and could override executive privilege.

It’s theoretically possible Democrats could have prevailed in requiring testimony if they had gone through the proper judicial process, but they were too busy pretending it was a matter of national security to push their impeachment through quickly. That was their choice not to litigate those issues.

It was absolutely not the responsibility of the White House to agree to the House’s witness list just because House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., demanded it and threw a temper tantrum.

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Then, once the two articles of impeachment adopted by the House were finally delivered to the Senate after an inexplicable four-week delay, the Senate heard 192 portions of testimony from 13 of the House witnesses over nine days of arguments from counsel for both sides. The Senate also received 28,578 documents from the House.

This is not a complex case and the facts are very simple and uncontested. Many criminal trials far more complex than this case have fewer witnesses and definitely far fewer documents. It’s a lie to claim the Senate has nothing but statements from counsel or “no witnesses and no documents” to consider when rendering its judgment.

Big Lie 2: “An acquittal isn’t exoneration.”

Of course, it is. In every instance, a verdict of acquittal by the authorized arbiter (whether a judge or jury or – in this case – the Senate) means the person charged is not guilty and fully exonerated. The point of process is to render a final judgment on the merits, unless a case is dismissed earlier for a procedural or process issue.

Here, the Senate would have been well within its constitutional authority to simply dismiss the articles of impeachment outright without considering the merit of the charges, because the articles are defective on their face and fail to allege a valid, impeachable offense. The Senate also could have dismissed the articles outright for the myriad problems with the House inquiry.

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However, the Senate, as the constitutionally appointed arbiter, chose to receive the record from the House (notably absent testimony the 18th witness – Intelligence Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson), hear arguments from both sets of counsel, and next week render a verdict on each of the two articles.

For the Democrats to claim that the Senate’s final judgment on the merits of this case is anything less than full exoneration of President Trump undermines the legitimacy of the Senate, and in turn the Constitution. It’s also just patently false.

Article 1, Section 3.6 of the Constitution gives sole power to try all impeachments to the Senate. Like any regular trial where questions of law (including what evidence is admitted) are determined according to the governing process, one side may be frustrated by an adverse ruling. But nevertheless, the trial proceeds to final verdict.

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In a regular judicial context, there is an appellate process, which the Constitution does not provide for in cases of impeachment. The Senate’s rulings on questions of law are just as final as its verdict. The Democrats obviously won’t like the outcome of a vote for acquittal of President Trump, but an acquittal is indeed a full exoneration. That’s basic law and is also just.

The Democrats will continue to sell their two Big Lies, but at the end of the trial – when the president will be exonerated – all they will be left with is a failed sham based on lies and debunked presumptions.

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Westlake Legal Group image Jenna Ellis: Trump impeachment trial was fair – Democratic complaints based on Big Lies Jenna Ellis fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3fa938d5-d121-5ccd-89ac-4db6567c7010   Westlake Legal Group image Jenna Ellis: Trump impeachment trial was fair – Democratic complaints based on Big Lies Jenna Ellis fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3fa938d5-d121-5ccd-89ac-4db6567c7010

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