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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/tech/companies/apple

What does Apple have up its sleeve in 2020?

Apple is expected to have at least two big product launches in 2020 with the first round coming possibly as early as March. The focus of the second, in the fall, will likely be a 5G iPhone.

Apple typically rolls out new products in the early spring but the launch this year is a bit different than usual because of guidance from the company on Feb. 17 that the “worldwide iPhone supply will be temporarily constrained” due to the public health response in China to coronavirus, or COVID-19.

COULD CORONAVIRUS PRODUCE IPHONE SHORTAGES IN THE US?

Westlake Legal Group AppleiPhone11ProGetty2019 What does Apple have up its sleeve in 2020? fox-news/tech/technologies/mac fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/technologies/ipad fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Brooke Crothers article 5cc8ab43-6cd5-5904-b16c-fbf0a0a27af1

Phil Schiller, senior vice president of worldwide marketing at Apple Inc., speaks about iPhone Pro during an event at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. (Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Here’s what to expect based on reports.

–iPhone SE 2 or iPhone 9: While final product names are never a sure thing until Apple actually announces, the “iPhone SE 2,” aka “iPhone 9,” is expected to be Apple’s second stab at a low-cost iPhone following the original iPhone SE that was released in March 2016. The new phone could be priced around $400 – cheap for an iPhone – and be based on the iPhone 8 but with upgraded internal components. Bloomberg recently reported that the low-cost iPhone is still on track for March though plans are “fluid” because of the slowdown in China.

–Updated iPad Pro: iPads often get some kind of update in the early spring. This year Apple is expected to focus on a new camera system with a triple-lens rear camera and 3D sensing that supports immersive augmented reality, according to various reports, including Apple rumor site MacRumors.

6 SECURITY SETTINGS IPHONE AND IPAD USERS NEED TO CHANGE RIGHT NOW

–MacBook Pro, MacBook Air: Following the October launch of the 16-inch MacBook Pro, which features a design overhaul of the previous 15.4-inch MacBook Pro, Apple is expected to update its more popular, and cheaper, 13-inch MacBook Pro. The updated 13-inch laptop is rumored to include upgraded Intel processors and a so-called “scissor-switch” keyboard that is expected to be an improvement over the much-maligned “Butterfly” keyboard on the current MacBook Pro and MacBook Air, according to MacRumors. The MacBook Air could also see an upgrade to internal components. The launch date could be March or this summer.

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iPhone 12 with 5G: A bevy of rumors are suggesting that there will be four iPhones coming out in the fall with screen sizes of 5.4, 6.1, 6.7 inches. All will come with organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays, according to reports. The 5.4-inch model would be a new size and the 6.7-inch model would be Apple’s largest iPhone to date. At least one of the models is expected to get a design makeover. Rumors also suggest a chassis like the iPhone 4. The current physical iPhone design, with a notch at the top of the display that houses the selfie camera, has changed little since 2017 when the iPhone X was launched. Other expected features include a new processor, called the A14, and an upgraded camera. But the marquee feature will be 5G. Samsung, Apple’s chief rival, has already announced 5G Galaxy phones but 5G coverage in the U.S. is still spotty. Apple appears to be timing its 5G rollout to wider availability of 5G.

Westlake Legal Group AppleiPhone11ProGetty2019 What does Apple have up its sleeve in 2020? fox-news/tech/technologies/mac fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/technologies/ipad fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Brooke Crothers article 5cc8ab43-6cd5-5904-b16c-fbf0a0a27af1   Westlake Legal Group AppleiPhone11ProGetty2019 What does Apple have up its sleeve in 2020? fox-news/tech/technologies/mac fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/technologies/ipad fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Brooke Crothers article 5cc8ab43-6cd5-5904-b16c-fbf0a0a27af1

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

To get past Apple encryption, NYPD uses $10 million lab with supercomputer generating millions of passwords

Inside a fortified $10 million lab that looks like something NASA might have cooked up, the New York Police Department is trying to crack the encryption of iPhones confiscated during alleged crimes.

The cybercrime unit’s radiofrequency isolation room, which is protected by two airtight, metallic doors designed to block any electromagnetic waves, is where the NYPD uses algorithms to try to extract data from locked phones before their owners can wipe them clean.

Apple and Google both encrypt the devices that consumers shell out hundreds of dollars for, so the conflict between law enforcement and Big Tech is likely to continue.

The phones get hooked up to two computers that generate random numbers in an attempt to figure out the passcode that locked each device, but there are a very large number of potential sequences; 10,000 random sequences had been tried on just one phone examined by Fast Company.

CYBER ATTACK ON MAJOR BANK COULD SPREAD FAST, NEW RESEARCH SHOWS

“You entrust us with this responsibility to protect the public,” Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance told Fast Company. “At the same time, they”—Apple and Google— “have taken away one of our best sources of information. Just because they say so. It’s not that some third party has decided, this is the right thing for Apple and Google to do. They just have done it.”

Apple has not yet responded to a request for comment from Fox News.

The lab also reportedly contains a supercomputer that can generate 26 million random passcodes per second, a robot that can extract a memory chip from a phone without using heat, and tools that can repair severely damaged devices.

Apple, which has made privacy a major focus of its marketing in recent years as other tech companies have been scrutinized, is unlikely to bend to the wishes of law enforcement anytime soon.

The company led by CEO Tim Cook came under fire recently from President Trump for not helping the FBI unlock the phones owned by the alleged shooter in the attack at Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida.

However, Apple maintained that it has already provided significant assistance in the investigation.

AMAZON PATENT SHOWS ROVING ROBOTS THAT COULD DROP OFF PACKAGES ON SIDEWALKS

Westlake Legal Group iphone-11-pro-getty-images To get past Apple encryption, NYPD uses $10 million lab with supercomputer generating millions of passwords fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article adb8aede-4395-5558-bae5-a846736c7ddf

Apple’s new iPhone 11 Pro Max is seen above. The company has come under from law enforcement over the issue of encryption. (Getty Images)

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“We have always maintained there is no such thing as a backdoor just for the good guys,” Apple said, in its statement. “Backdoors can also be exploited by those who threaten our national security and the data security of our customers. Today, law enforcement has access to more data than ever before in history, so Americans do not have to choose between weakening encryption and solving investigations. We feel strongly encryption is vital to protecting our country and our users’ data.”

For his part, Vance remains skeptical that Apple does not have the ability to access iPhones through a secret back door.

“They get into my phone all the time because they upgrade my operating systems and they send me messages,” he said.

Fox News’ James Rogers contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 570103-iphone-security To get past Apple encryption, NYPD uses $10 million lab with supercomputer generating millions of passwords fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article adb8aede-4395-5558-bae5-a846736c7ddf   Westlake Legal Group 570103-iphone-security To get past Apple encryption, NYPD uses $10 million lab with supercomputer generating millions of passwords fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article adb8aede-4395-5558-bae5-a846736c7ddf

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

6 security settings iPhone and iPad users need to change right now

Our devices are packed with account credentials, contacts, emails, photos, videos and more that we definitely don’t want in the wrong hands. The problem is we get our devices and just start using them, giving little thought to the risks.

Your iPhone or iPad might have a virus and malware right now, sending your confidential data to who knows who. Tap or click here to check your phone or tablet for a virus or malware and clean it up if you do.

Far too many people think that if they have an Apple product they are immune to viruses and malware. What phones do you think are most vulnerable to getting hacked? What about apps? Tap or click for the answers that will definitely surprise you.

Here are security settings you need to activate, whether you’ve got a brand new iPhone or an iPad you’ve had for years. Not only will your device be safer to use, your social media accounts and privacy will benefit too.

  1. Create a secure passcode and turn on biometrics

iOS devices are acclaimed for their security. In fact, competitors actively try to copy some of Apple’s most secure systems like Apple Pay, Touch ID and Face ID.

When you first set up your device, you’ll be prompted to create a passcode. Many people try to skim through this section any create something “easy,” but your passcode shouldn’t be taken lightly. It’s the main way you lock your phone from the outside world, and leaving it unsecured leaves it open to bad actors.

UPGRADE YOUR APPS: Apps are a great way to get even more out of your phone. Tap or click here for 10 apps I have on my phone that you’ll want too.

Upon booting up your device, follow the passcode prompts and select a combination of digits that is easy enough to remember, yet tough enough to be secure. You may want to write it down, just in case you forget it.

By default, the system will have you set up a 6-digit code, which is quite secure. Don’t reduce the digits, even if it may seem easier. Your security is worth it in the long run.

If you missed or glossed over this part of the setup, open the Settings app and visit the Touch ID/Face ID & Passcode setting.

If it isn’t already enabled, tap Turn Passcode on and enter your 6-digit code. Once you’ve set this code, you can set up any biometric settings like Touch ID or Face ID. Which one you use will depend on whether your phone has a home button. Tap Add a Fingerprint or Set up Face ID and follow the on-screen prompts.

  1. Lock out accessory hackers and hijackers

As secure as iPhones and iPads are, a dangerous new way hackers are cracking these devices is via compromised USB connections. A modified device plugged into an iOS system can easily access personal data if it isn’t properly secured.

Thankfully, Apple thought ahead and included an option to restrict USB access in iOS. To find it, visit the Touch ID/Face ID & Passcode menu in the Settings app and scroll down. You’ll see an option labeled “USB Accessories.” Make sure it’s toggled off, as in the image above.

By doing this, your phone will restrict data access to your device if it’s left locked and dormant for an hour or more. This means any USB accessories will only be good for charging and will not be able to access any data.

TECH ACCESSORIES: Need a new case, a keyboard or an easier way to charge on the go? Tap or click for some of the best Apple accessories to outfit your tech.

  1. Prevent others from using your home screen to bypass your lock

Apple tends to walk a fine line between security and convenience, and the home screen on iOS is a perfect example. As secure as your lock and biometrics may be, an iPhone or iPad will allow certain features like replying to texts and returning calls right from alerts that appear when your device is locked.

Though this can be useful when you’re on the go and unable to fully log into your phone, it can have dangerous side effects for your security. A nosy friend could easily pick up your phone and start replying for you if they see an alert.

To limit lock screen access on iOS, we’re going to revisit the Touch ID/Face ID & Passcode menu. Scroll down until you find a section labeled Allow Access When Locked. Here, you can toggle specific settings like Siri and message replies, and restrict access without a passcode.

DIGITAL TIPS STRAIGHT TO YOUR INBOX: Get breaking tech news as it happens with free email alerts from Kim’s desk to your inbox. Tap or click here to sign up.

  1. Automate updates to stay ahead of the curve

Hackers and cybercriminals are constantly refining their tactics, which means the security on your device can become obsolete in a matter of weeks. Exploits and security flaws pop up all the time, which is why companies like Apple release patches and updates to refine their products and security.

If you’d rather not be pressured to constantly download new updates, you can instruct your phone to download and install them automatically. This will keep your device on the cutting edge of Apple’s security releases.

UPDATE WINDOWS: Microsoft is warning users to update now, following a stark warning from the NSA. Tap or click here to find out what’s putting millions of systems at risk.

To activate auto updates, open Settings, followed by General. Then, select Software Update. In this menu, you may see an update available to download. Do so when you have the chance, but for now, tap Automatic Updates and toggle the setting on.

This will download and install updates overnight when your phone is connected to power and Wi-Fi. Don’t forget that if you aren’t charging your phone overnight (which you should do anyway) the updates won’t install.

Keep in mind not every Apple update is perfect. Some have had significant issues that broke major features on devices. Tap or click here to see what a recent update from Apple broke. But Apple is pretty good about releasing new updates to fix previous ones, if need be, and updates are still worth it for the security patches.

  1. Adjust location tracking

Apple is a bit better than other companies about privacy, but it will still track your location if you visit the same places frequently.

Thankfully, you can disable this as well. To turn off Apple’s frequently visited location tracking, visit Settings, followed by Privacy. Then, select Location followed by System Services and choose Significant Locations. Turn this feature off to stop your device from keeping track of locations it thinks are important.

  1. Stop Apple from recording your Siri requests

Companies like Amazon have come under fire for recording and transcribing interactions with users. Apple did the same exact thing. Tap or click here to see how Apple transcribes Siri voice data.

The company has since claimed to have stopped the practice unconditionally, but it still records if given permission. This helps Apple improve its voice recognition software, but if you aren’t comfortable playing guinea pig, you can turn this option off.

To access audio review settings, open the Settings app and select Privacy. Then, scroll down and open Analytics & Improvements. Here, look for the section labeled Improve Siri & Dictation and toggle it off. This will stop Apple from storing and transcribing your Siri and Dictation interactions to improve its systems.

With these settings adjustments, you should have a much more private and secure experience on your device. Beyond this, be cautious with what you share on social media and beyond to keep your device as personal as possible. Otherwise, these settings won’t go far enough to protect you.

BONUS TIP FOR EXTRA KNOW-HOW: 3 settings you must change on your video doorbell

Unlike traditional doorbells that require you to squint through a dime-sized peephole, glance out a window or open the door without knowing who is on the other side, Ring provides you a clear view of who’s visiting.

In addition to being a convenient method of answering your door, the Ring video doorbell provides a layer of security for you and your home with its live view and recordings. Setup is simple and straightforward, too. But don’t miss these essential steps.

Tap or click for 3 settings you should adjust right away.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max 6 security settings iPhone and iPad users need to change right now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 608e9833-d1cc-5f8a-95f6-4d8a674f7885   Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max 6 security settings iPhone and iPad users need to change right now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 608e9833-d1cc-5f8a-95f6-4d8a674f7885

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Some Saudi service members in US facing expulsion after NAS Pensacola shooting probe: reports

More than a dozen Saudi service members undergoing training at U.S. military facilities are expected to be expelled from the U.S. following an investigation into last month’s deadly shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida, according to reports.

None of the Saudis targeted for expulsion is accused of aiding the Saudi second lieutenant whom authorities say killed three U.S. sailors and injured eight other people in the Dec. 6 rampage, CNN reported. But some of them were found to have ties to extremist groups and others are accused of possessing child pornography, the report said.

NAVY PILOTS DEMAND MORE BE ARMED ON BASES IN LETTER TO LAWMAKERS AND MILITARY BRASS

The Justice Department is also expected to conclude that the Pensacola attack was an act of terrorism, CNN reported. The FBI has been investigating the case as possible terrorism since discovering writings by the gunman, who was killed by reponding sheriff’s deputies, The Washington Post reported.

Following the attack, about a dozen Saudi trainees were confined to their quarters in Pensacola as the FBI investigated the shooting as a possible terror attack and the Pentagon launched a review of some 850 Saudis undergoing training throughout the U.S., the report said.

“In the wake of the Pensacola tragedy, the Department of Defense restricted to classroom training programs foreign military students from Saudi Arabia while we conducted a review and enhancement of our foreign student vetting procedures. That training pause is still in place while we implement new screening and security measures,” Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Robert Carver told the Washington Post.

CNN said its report was based on conversations with “multiple sources.” Officials from the FBI and Justice Department would not comment. CNN said U.S. Navy officials referred questions to the Defense Department, which had not responded to the network.

The gunman, identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was believed to have acted alone. He is said to have become angered when an instructor at Pensacola referred to him as “Porn Stash,” comparing his mustache to that of a stereotype of an actor in pornography films, The New York Times reported.

Westlake Legal Group Mohammed-Saeed-Alshamrani-REUTERS Some Saudi service members in US facing expulsion after NAS Pensacola shooting probe: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 691d7390-9340-5b7e-9c9e-fd66dd4fcd83

Royal Saudi Air Force 2nd Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, airman accused of killing three people at a U.S. Navy base in Pensacola, Fla., is seen in an undated military identification card photo released by the FBI, Dec. 7, 2019. (FBI via Reuters)

Meanwhile, the FBI has asked Apple for help in accessing data from a pair of iPhones owned by the gunman.

Investigators are hoping that data stored on the phone may help them learn more about a possible motive behind the killings.

Apple has previously resisted efforts by government authorities to access phone customers’ data, citing a company commitment to its customers’ privacy. But Apple told Fox News it is cooperating in the Pensacola investigation.

Westlake Legal Group NAS-Pensacola-2-US-Navy Some Saudi service members in US facing expulsion after NAS Pensacola shooting probe: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 691d7390-9340-5b7e-9c9e-fd66dd4fcd83

​​​​​​​The main gate at Naval Air Station Pensacola is seen March 16, 2016, in Pensacola, Fla. (U.S. Navy/Patrick Nichols)

“We have the greatest respect for law enforcement and have always worked cooperatively to help in their investigations,” the Apple statement said. “When the FBI requested information from us relating to this case a month ago we gave them all of the data in our possession and we will continue to support them with the data we have available.”

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Following an unrelated attack in San Bernardino, Calif., in 2015 that left 14 people dead, Apple denied an FBI request to access data on the shooter’s phone but was later ordered to comply through a judge’s order. But by that time the FBI had already hired a different company for the job, USA Today reported.

Westlake Legal Group NAS-Pensacola-2-US-Navy Some Saudi service members in US facing expulsion after NAS Pensacola shooting probe: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 691d7390-9340-5b7e-9c9e-fd66dd4fcd83   Westlake Legal Group NAS-Pensacola-2-US-Navy Some Saudi service members in US facing expulsion after NAS Pensacola shooting probe: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 691d7390-9340-5b7e-9c9e-fd66dd4fcd83

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A

Each week, I receive tons of questions from my listeners about tech concerns, new products, and all things digital.

Sometimes, choosing the most interesting questions to highlight is the best part of my job.

This week, I received questions about smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids, PC bloatware, and more.

Do you have a question you’d like to ask me?

Tap or click here to email me directly.

Smart TV hacker threat

Q: I bought a smart TV at Costco. It was a great price, but I heard you say something about the FBI, hackers and TVs. Should I have not bought it?

A: If you follow us at komando.com, you already know some of the dangers of having Internet of Things (IoT) appliances in your home. These are products that connect to the internet, like smart light bulbs, smart refrigerators, and smart doorbells.

The FBI recently stated your smart TV could be a gateway for hackers to come into your home. They may not be able to access your locked-down computer directly, but it’s possible an unsecured smart TV could give them a simple backdoor through your router, allowing them to take control of your set.

Low-risk threats include changing channels, adjusting the TV volume and showing kids inappropriate videos. Worst-case scenarios involve turning your bedroom TV’s camera and mic into a stalking and spying device. Yikes!

Tap or click here for steps you need to take to protect your network and family.

Video doorbell security settings

Q: My wife got me a video doorbell for Christmas. I am really worried about who has access to these videos. It’s my house and my privacy. Are there security settings on these things?

A: While traditional doorbells are sufficient at letting you know when someone is at your door, newer video doorbells, such as the Google Nest Hello, provide a real-time view of who is outside your home. The initial setup is straightforward, but there are a few settings you will want to adjust to improve your experience.

Tap or click here for the steps to lock down your video doorbell.

Be tech-savvy in 2020

Q: I want to learn more about tech in 2020. You are my trusted source because you never know what you’ll find with a Google search! But the local radio station pre-empts you for sports. How can I listen to your show?

A: I hate when that happens! To listen to my show on your schedule, get the podcast. It’s super easy to subscribe, and when you do, my show is automatically delivered to you — even while you’re sleeping! Each radio show is three hours, so you have 12 hours of quality tech programming and entertainment each month.

You can fast-forward or listen to parts again — and there are no commercial breaks.

Tap or click here to subscribe to my national radio show podcasts.

Be gone, new PC bloatware

Q: I finally got rid of my 8-year-old Windows computer. This new one is fast, but dang, there’re a lot of junk programs on it. What’s the fastest and safest way to clean it up?

A: It can be fun setting up a new PC. Customizing your desktop, so it looks just right, downloading new apps, and sitting down to use it for the first time feels fantastic. Unfortunately, it isn’t always as simple as going through a quick setup process, selecting a few colors for fonts and windows, and going from there.

Tap or click here to learn how to customize your computer.

Many pre-built computers come with at least a modicum of extraneous, unwanted apps and software on them: bloatware. Bloatware can include trials of games you don’t want; apps you’ll never use or proprietary software that can slow down your computer.

Tap or click here for steps to get rid of bloatware.

Use AirPods as hearing aids

Q: I love my Apple AirPods. I thought I heard that you could use them as hearing aids. What’s the insider pro trick to doing that?

A: If you have ever had difficulty hearing someone during a conversation, AirPods can be your on-demand hearing aid. Apple introduced a feature, starting with iOS 12, called Live Listen.

Once set up, you can place your iPhone closer to the person you want to hear and the AirPods will produce clearer audio for you. There are other AirPod tricks you might like, like finding them when you lose them (it will happen!), having Siri announce calls and making your AirPods play nice with all your other devices.

Tap or click here for 10 AirPods secret tricks any owner should know.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group SmartTVGetty2012 Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/tvs fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 94188476-f604-5e4b-a971-baac29035eb6   Westlake Legal Group SmartTVGetty2012 Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/tvs fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 94188476-f604-5e4b-a971-baac29035eb6

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

9 Apple AirPods tricks you’ll wish you knew before now

AirPods were a holiday season top seller, and if you haven’t already cut the cord on your earbuds, you can expect to do so soon. Small, sleek, and Bluetooth-enabled, AirPods have turned regular old earphones into dynamic devices in their own right, and they have only improved with each generation.

Yet, many people are concerned that AirPods may cause cancer since they are embedded within one’s ear canal, directly exposing the inner ear to EMF radiation. The proximity to the brain is also alarming to many scientists. Tap or click here to read the research 250 scientists presented to the United Nations and World Health Organization.

The earbuds are pricey, retailing from $159 to $259 on Apple’s site. But one clever Redditor built his own Airpods using parts purchased on eBay. Tap or click here to learn how he made AirPods for $4.

If you’re new to AirPods, here are 9 helpful tips that will enhance your auditory experience. I bet you’ll find more than one on this list you’ll use time and time again.

1. Use only one pod when in a pinch

Although you can expect your AirPods to last several hours on a single charge, here’s a clever, quick fix for when you’re in a battery pinch. Leave one AirPod in the charging case while you use the other. Swap them when necessary.

2. Put Siri to work for you

If you installed the latest operating system, Siri can read your incoming messages via your AirPods, using nothing but your voice. After listening to your messages, you also have the option to reply to texts with a voice command.

The latest models of AirPods let you summon Siri with the simple “Hey Siri” command. You can request Siri to help with any number of additional tasks, such as change songs, turn up the volume or get the weather forecast.

Do proceed with caution, though. Apple gives you the option to disable Siri’s audio collection. Tap or click here to learn which privacy setting you must change to keep Siri from spying on you.

3. Easily connect your AirPods to your various devices

Users routinely connect their AirPods to their iPhone, Macbook, iPad, and Apple Watch simultaneously. AirPods automatically switch audio between the two devices. But there may be occasions you want to put down your iPhone and use your AirPods to listen to the audio from your Mac or iPad.

The transition requires little effort if you pair your AirPods with your iPhone first. That’s the trick. This process connects the headset to your Apple account, which will allow the buds to work across all of your Apple devices.

To switch up devices open Control Center (swipe down the home screen on iPhone X or newer and swipe up on an iPhone 8 or older). Press down on the audio card in the upper right corner of Music and tap on the device you want to use.

Get tech know-how and breaking news on the go. Click here to download the free Komando.com App.

4. Share the AirPod love

Because AirPods are wireless, you can opt to share the earbuds with someone else when listening to music or watching a movie. Even if you receive a phone call while sharing your earbuds, you both can hear the phone conversation. Do keep in mind because only one mic is active at a time; only one person can speak to the caller.

5. Find your lost AirPod

AirPods are super easy to lose. If you need to replace one AirPod, a 2nd gen is $69 each, and an individual AirPod Pro is $89. Make it routine that when you are done using your AirPods, you drop them directly back into its charging case. Knowing that might not always happen, it’s essential to take precautionary steps now.

If you have the “Find my iPhone” feature activated on your portable device and have paired it with your AirPods, you can also use this feature to locate your lost earbuds. When you need to find missing AirPods, go into your iPhone Settings, and tap your name. Click Find My and enable Find My iPhone and Send Last Location.

6. Know who’s calling without looking

Thanks to your AirPods and Siri, you can hear who is calling without needing to check your iPhone. To enable this feature, go into your iPhone Settings and tap on Phone, then tap Announce Calls and select Always. Nice.

7. Use your AirPods with non-Apple products

Despite what you may think, AirPods are not exclusive to Apple products. You can use your earbuds with other iOS gear not logged into an iCloud account or with Android devices.

With your AirPods in the closed case, open the lid, press and hold down the pairing button on the back of the case. Launch the Bluetooth settings on your device, the select AirPods to confirm pairing. To re-pair with your iPhone when done, reselect AirPods within your iPhone’s Bluetooth settings.

If you’re wondering how AirPods compare to Bose, Beats, Echo and Sony’s similar products, tap or click here for my complete buying guide.

8. Turn your AirPods into a makeshift hearing aid

If you have ever had difficulty hearing someone during a conversation, AirPods can be your on-demand hearing aid. Apple introduced a feature, starting with iOS 12, called Live Listen. Once set up, you can place your iPhone closer to the person you want to hear, and the AirPods will produce clearer audio for you.

To set up this feature, go into your iPhone Settings and click Control Center. Select Customize Controls and tap the plus sign next to Hearing. When ready, place the AirPods in your ears, and either swipe down your iPhone X (or newer) home screen or up on an iPhone 8 or older and click the ear icon. Tap Live Listen.

9. Customize how you use your AirPods

Although the default double-tap settings on your AirPods are functional as is, you may wish to change them. It’s easy to customize both the double-tap or press-and-hold settings for either earbud.

With your AirPods connected to your iPhone or iPad, go into Settings and select Bluetooth. Click on the “i” icon next to your AirPods and choose the left or right to make changes. Options include play, pause, play genre and skip to next track.

You can get information like this delivered right to your email. Sign up for my free email newsletters now while you’re thinking of it at Komando.com/Subscribe.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group apple-airpod 9 Apple AirPods tricks you’ll wish you knew before now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/wearable-tech fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 9e5dc2eb-0282-5552-8e56-efdd76c0301a   Westlake Legal Group apple-airpod 9 Apple AirPods tricks you’ll wish you knew before now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/wearable-tech fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 9e5dc2eb-0282-5552-8e56-efdd76c0301a

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Big holiday iPhone heists strike Best Buy, Apple Store shopper

In year-end holiday heists, over $200,000 in iPhones were stolen from a Best Buy and a large haul of phones was taken from a car after an Apple Store shopping spree.

New iPhones are always a hot commodity but they become red hot during the holiday season when shoppers and stores stock up on America’s No.1 smartphone, according to a report at AppleInsider.

The biggest heist took place in Ardmore, Okla. where police say a Best Buy employee stole $200,000 worth of iPhones from a distribution center, according to a local News12 report.

In another Best Buy theft, police say three men broke into a store in Summerville, SC and lifted about 100 iPhones worth about $100,000, according to a local report, citing a store manager.

Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max Big holiday iPhone heists strike Best Buy, Apple Store shopper fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox news fnc/tech fnc Brooke Crothers article 3416853e-9147-5350-8c57-4d9a8c7e8b40

New iPhones are popular targets for thieves. (Apple)

Another large iPhone haul, worth $115,000, was taken from the car of a shopper who had just made an unusually large purchase at an Apple Bridgeport Village store in Oregon, a report said, citing police sources.

Police were looking for a man and a woman who allegedly stole the phones, adding that one of the suspects had stolen items from the same Apple Store the week before.

One of the thieves acted as a lookout while the other broke into the car, the report said.

iPhones aren’t the only Apple product targeted by bad guys

In a pre-holiday heist at the Stanford Shopping Center Apple Store in Palo Alto, Calif. thieves stole 22 iPads, 10 MacBooks, 71 iPhones and 23 Apple Pencils, according to report in a local Palo Alto newspaper. The total haul tallied $105,000.

This was a “grab-and-run heist,” the report said, citing police.

“The suspects, who were all described as being in their early 20s, ran into the store at 8:12 p.m. on Wednesday, picked up all the items they could carry and ran outside,” according to the report.

Two getaway cars were waiting for the men, the report said.

Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max Big holiday iPhone heists strike Best Buy, Apple Store shopper fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox news fnc/tech fnc Brooke Crothers article 3416853e-9147-5350-8c57-4d9a8c7e8b40   Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max Big holiday iPhone heists strike Best Buy, Apple Store shopper fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox news fnc/tech fnc Brooke Crothers article 3416853e-9147-5350-8c57-4d9a8c7e8b40

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You’re not paranoid. Your phone really is listening in.

The scene plays out like a thriller: you pull out your phone, and you see an ad for AirPods.

Wait a minute, you think. Didn’t I just have a conversation about AirPods with my friend? Like, a real conversation, spoken aloud? Is my phone… listening to me?

Why, yes, it probably is. When you use your default settings, everything you say may be recorded through your device’s onboard microphone. Our phones routinely collect our voice data, store it in a distant server, and use it for marketing purposes. This fact was kept quiet for some time, but this kind of targeted ad is gradually becoming common knowledge.

As a “prime” example, tap or click here to see what Amazon does with the voice data it harvests and how you can stop Alexa from listening.

Your phone isn’t the only device that’s watching and listening to you. The FBI warns hackers can take over your smart TV if you don’t secure it. Tap or click to learn how to take control of your privacy on your TV before it’s too late.

Before you ask, yes, it’s perfectly legal, and developers claim not to abuse this practice. But that doesn’t mean you have to like it; many people are startled to see ads for things they have only spoken about, not search for on their browsers. Luckily, there are ways to stop your devices from eavesdropping on you.

Whispering (marketing) campaigns

When you think about it, smartphones are equipped with an arsenal of monitoring equipment: multiple microphones and cameras are designed to absorb audio and video. While these tools may be useful for creating media, they are also a goldmine for advertisers.

In mid-2018, a reporter for Vice experimented to see just how closely smartphones listen to our conversations. To test his phone, the journalist spoke pre-selected phrases twice a day for five days in a row. Meanwhile, he monitored his Facebook feed to see if any changes occurred.

Sure enough, the changes seemed to arrive overnight. One of his test phrases involved going “back to university,” and by the next morning, the reporter saw ads for summer courses. He then changed up his test phrase to “cheap shirts,” and quickly saw advertisements for low-cost apparel on his Facebook feed.

This report triggered a wave of studies on the surveillance effects of social media platforms.

While not every study provided clear answers, a general sense of agreement on the matter was reached due to hints in the User Agreements of several apps and social media platforms. Tap or click for an easy way to spot what’s hiding in the User Agreement of your favorite platforms.

These user agreements explicitly state recorded audio may be used for targeted advertising purposes. Interestingly, such practices aren’t against the law. This action allows tech companies to push the privacy boundaries even further to encourage us to buy things we don’t need.

What can I do about being spied on?

If you’re not comfortable with targeted ads, there are ways to mitigate your smartphone’s spy power. That said, you may lose access to some handy features like wake words and voice assistants, so you’ll have to decide whether these features are worth sacrificing your privacy.

The biggest vulnerability comes from the “always-on” feature of most voice assistants. To pick up wake words like “Hey Siri,” the mic needs to remain on at all times – which means your phone is always listening.

The best place to start taking your privacy back is by turning off the “always-on” microphone features on your handset. Here’s how to do it.

Deactivate “Hey Siri”

Apple has come under fire for transcribing audio recordings of Siri users. The data is locally stored on your device and is uploaded once Siri is activated, so disabling this feature will at least make your Siri inputs shorter and more specific to your requests.

To turn off “Hey Siri,” navigate to your iOS device’s Settings, followed by Siri & Search. Then, toggle Listen for ‘Hey Siri to Off.

Disable “OK Google”

Every time you use “OK Google,” or use another voice-controlled function, your query is recorded, and the transcripts are saved to your Google account. Tap or click here to learn how to remove these recordings and other info you don’t want Google to store.

If you use Google Assistant on Android, open the Google Assistant Settings. Say, “OK Google” or hold down the phone’s home button, then tap the file drawer icon found on the upper right-hand corner, and tap the three-dot menu. Select More and choose Settings.

From this point, you’ll want to scroll down to the devices category and select your phone, then in the Google Assistant section near the top, tap the blue slider button to change it gray, which turns off Google Assistant.

Disable mic access for apps

Disabling the always-on microphone features from your phone isn’t enough for some apps like Facebook. The social site makes exceptions to the rule and will keep on listening unless you make the change.

This is just one of the many privacy settings you really should be using if you have a Facebook account. Tap or click for more ways to lock down your profile.

Here’s how you can turn audio recording off for Facebook, but the same steps apply for any app that uses the microphone:

iPhone

Go to Settings >> Facebook >> Settings in the sub-menu. Slide the Microphone switch to the left, so it turns from green to white. That turns it off. Alternatively, you can go to Settings >> Privacy >> Microphone then look for Facebook to do the same. Note that you can toggle the mic on and off for other apps, too.

Android

Open Settings, then choose Applications and Application Manager. Look for Facebook, and tap App Permissions, then toggle the microphone off.

Keep in mind, turning off Facebook’s microphone access will affect and disable certain features like Live Video. If you’re going to use these features, you will have to toggle the mic back on. Follow the same steps above, but make sure the toggle is set to On, and you’ll be good to go.

Bonus Tip for More Know-How:

Amazon has previously come under fire for violating the privacy of its users with Alexa. The famous voice assistant was revealed to be recording users’ inquiries and storing the recordings for human reviewers to analyze. The exposure caused Amazon to make several drastic changes to its products and privacy policy.

Tap or click here for 3 new Alexa privacy settings you need to know about.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-538683033 You’re not paranoid. Your phone really is listening in. The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/technologies/smartphones fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fnc/tech fnc article 3cb70cb1-8e09-5245-bd46-2010398029e5   Westlake Legal Group iStock-538683033 You’re not paranoid. Your phone really is listening in. The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/technologies/smartphones fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fnc/tech fnc article 3cb70cb1-8e09-5245-bd46-2010398029e5

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Trump fires back at ‘corrupt’ Schiff, ‘phony’ mainstream media during fiery remarks on impeachment

Westlake Legal Group ENC2_132187607670650000-1 Trump fires back at 'corrupt' Schiff, 'phony' mainstream media during fiery remarks on impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 569e66d8-5590-5187-9e0a-6685bedcc426

President Trump slammed Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., as “shifty” and a “corrupt politician” Thursday in response to the latest developments in the impeachment inquiry hearings on Capitol Hill.

The president was touring an Apple plant in Austin, Texas with company CEO Tim Cook and others when he was asked about the hearings back in Washington. He responded by attacking the media and House Democratic leadership, reminding reporters of a parody account of the president’s call with Ukraine’s leader that Schiff shared before Congress in September.

“Nancy Pelosi has done a terrible job as Speaker [of the House]. There’s never been a speaker that’s done so little, and she’s totally incompetent,” Trump said. “And shifty Schiff, he stands up and he tells lies all day long … We have no due process.”

TRUMP IMPEACHMENT HEARINGS: LIVE UPDATES FROM DAY FOUR

Trump also called out what he said were incorrect and conflicting reports of his discussion with Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland — Schiff’s first witness of the day Wednesday — about the Ukraine matter.

“He [Sondland] asked me what should he do — I said ‘I want nothing’ — and then I repeated — ‘I want nothing. I want no quid-pro-quo. Tell the president [of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky] to do the right thing,’ and then he finished off, he said, ‘this is the final word from the president of the United States’,” Trump told the assembled media before taking aim at their coverage.

More from Media

The president claimed there has been some “fair” coverage of the inquiry before going on to claim, “Not only did we win today, it’s over.”

“Some of the fair press, of which there isn’t too much, said ‘this thing is over,” Trump continued.

“We have a phony press — they’re dishonest. Most of them — we have some fine people, fine journalists and reporters,” he later said, calling several outlets, including ABC News, CNN and the Washington Post “fake papers [and] fake press” that “hurt our country.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When asked about the anonymous intelligence community whistleblower, Trump claimed the individual is a “political operative” and that their account of the July 25 call with Zelensky largely became moot after he released the transcript of the conversation.

“The whistleblower’s not a whistleblower, he’s a fake.”

Questioned about any potential Biden family connection to the situation, the president responded by slamming Hunter Biden, the son of the former vice president, criticizing his 2013 discharge from the U.S. Navy.

“When you talk about corruption … All of a sudden he’s getting millions and millions of dollars from Ukraine, from China … This guy made nothing. He got thrown out of the Navy, he couldn’t get a job, and then his father becomes vice president and the press doesn’t want to report it because the press is dishonest,” Trump said.

Westlake Legal Group ENC2_132187607670650000-1 Trump fires back at 'corrupt' Schiff, 'phony' mainstream media during fiery remarks on impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 569e66d8-5590-5187-9e0a-6685bedcc426   Westlake Legal Group ENC2_132187607670650000-1 Trump fires back at 'corrupt' Schiff, 'phony' mainstream media during fiery remarks on impeachment fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/regulation/business fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 569e66d8-5590-5187-9e0a-6685bedcc426

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Smartphone security: What’s better to use a PIN, facial recognition, or your fingerprint?

Locking your phone keeps out snoops, but it’s also your first line of defense against hackers and cybercriminals out for your data and anything else they can steal.

One of their biggest targets? Your money and your credit cards. Tap or click for 3 safer ways to pay for things online other than credit cards.

So, what’s the best way to secure your phone? Is it biometrics like your fingerprint or a scan of your face? Or a traditional PIN or password?

Most people aren’t very good at creating hard-to-crack passwords, so yours might not even be effective at keeping your devices or your accounts safe. Tap or click for 5 new rules you need to use next time you’re creating a new password.

No matter which method you choose, I’ll show you the best way to make sure your phone, and everything in it, is secure. Let’s start with facial recognition.

Look at that face

Facial recognition made its way to smartphones in 2016 with the Galaxy Note 7. Apple introduced Face ID with the iPhone X, which came out the next year.

This feature is all about convenience. Software scans your features to identify and verify your identity. One glance and your device is unlocked — no need to fuss with PINs or passwords.

Apple’s Face ID can do more than just unlock your phone. Tap or click here for 5 tips and tricks to make using your phone safer and easier to use.

Now, odds are slim someone else can use Face ID to unlock your iPhone, at least according to Apple.

The company says there’s a 1-in-1-million chance a random person could unlock your phone or iPad using the facial recognition system. The odds get a lot better if you’ve got an identical twin or a sibling or other relative who looks like you.

RELATED: Your emails are being tracked. But you can stop it. Tap or click here to take back your privacy and shut out data-hungry senders.

Things haven’t been so smooth for Google and its Pixel 4. Last month, early adopters discovered a flaw that makes it easy for anyone with physical access to your phone to unlock it.

Here are a few other situations where using facial recognition to secure your phone gets tricky:

Someone forces you to log into your device by making you look at your phone.

Law enforcement legally compels you to unlock your mobile device. Can police make you unlock your phone? It depends. Tap or click here to find out.

A photo, mask and even a baseball cap are purportedly able to fool facial recognition software.

A lasting impression

Like Face ID, fingerprint authentication is a quick and convenient way to unlock your phone. Just pick it up and place your finger over the sensor. Here are a few reasons you may want to use your fingerprint to lock your device:

No two fingers have identical characteristics, so there’s little chance of false positives. It’s quick. Scanners take just a moment to identify or reject a fingerprint. Unlike a password, you can’t lose or share your fingerprint. Fingerprints are stored as encrypted mathematical representations, not as images. This step makes them difficult to hack.

RELATED: Have a sneaking suspicion someone is stealing your Wi-Fi? Tap or click for a simple way to see every device connected to your network.

Finger authentication has many advantages, but it’s not foolproof — especially for someone who has physical access to you and your phone. There are stories of kids using a sleeping parent’s fingerprint to unlock a device, like a 6-year-old who went on an expensive shopping spree in 2016. And depending on your fingerprint scanner, they can be finicky to use.

Some reports suggest a fingerprint left on an item such as a cup can be used to deceive fingerprint scanners. Mobile security experts even warn replicating a fingerprint may only require a camera and printer.

Name games

Despite advances in technology, tried-and-true methods like PINs, passcodes and passwords are still some of the most common for securing smartphones.

Many users find these forms of security handy as they can use a similar PIN or password across many sites, accounts and devices. Smartphone users also tend to create PINs or passwords that are easy to remember, such as a birthday, address, username or other special date.

What makes this type of authentication convenient is also what makes it most susceptible to hackers. Cybercriminals know people create passwords from basic words or phrases and that they use identical passwords across the internet. Plus, PINs and passwords can be forgotten or stolen or even decoded with devices like GrayKey.

Make it a combo

While each method of securing your phone has its own set of weaknesses, stats show about a quarter of mobile device users don’t use any security technique at all. So, if you utilize any of the above procedures, you’re already a step ahead of those who take no precaution.

For the best protection, though, don’t rely on just one method. Use a combination of biometrics and PINs, passcodes or passwords to provide an extra layer of security in case one fails or is compromised.

Setting up two-factor authentication for your accounts also goes a long way in protecting you. Tap or click to learn more about how 2FA works.

When creating a password or PIN for two-factor authentication or just to lock your phone, it’s crucial you follow a few guidelines:

Do not create a password or PIN with all the same letters or digits.

Use letters, numbers and special characters whenever you can.

Make your passcode longer than four digits if possible. The longer, the better.

Do not use easy-to-guess information like your birthday, name or address.

If you’re concerned about remembering longer and more complex passcodes and PINs, it may help to store them in a password manager.

Although using multiple forms of security requires a bit more effort than relying just a single technique, it does safeguard against their individual weaknesses. This ensures your device — and your data — are protected.

BONUS TIP FOR EVEN MORE KNOW-HOW: Secret way to dig up dirt on anyone online

We’ve probably all done this at some point. You meet someone in person or online, like on a dating site or at work, and you’re compelled to do a little “research” to dig up potential dirt on them.

You can find out a lot about someone online. But there’s only so much info you can glean if the person you’re looking for has locked down his or her social media profiles or erased all the info collected on shady online directories.

That’s why you need to stick with sites you can trust. Don’t get sucked in by those creepy people search sites that charge you for often outdated or incorrect information. Here are three methods to find reliable info on just about anyone.

Tap or click here for my insider trick to learn more about anyone.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group text-message-cell-phone-getty-images Smartphone security: What’s better to use a PIN, facial recognition, or your fingerprint? The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/technologies/smartphones fox-news/tech/companies/samsung fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 60ce94ed-f5fd-5d6d-bb49-31b5cb779de3   Westlake Legal Group text-message-cell-phone-getty-images Smartphone security: What’s better to use a PIN, facial recognition, or your fingerprint? The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/technologies/smartphones fox-news/tech/companies/samsung fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 60ce94ed-f5fd-5d6d-bb49-31b5cb779de3

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