web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon

How US sub-hunting planes track Chinese submarines

The increasingly global reach of Chinese nuclear-armed ballistic missile submarines, armed with JL-2 weapons reportedly able to hit parts of the U.S., continues to inspire an ongoing Navy effort to accelerate production of attack submarines, prepare long-dwell drones for deployment to the Pacific and continue acquisition of torpedo-armed sub-hunting planes such as the P-8/A Poseidon.

Seeking to overcome the Pacific’s “tyranny of distance” dispersed geography, and track China’s expanding fleet of submarines, the Navy is working with Congress to produce as many as three Virginia-class submarines per year, moving beyond the current plan to build two. In the air, the Navy has been moving to place its new Triton sea drones in Guam and, earlier this year, awarded Boeing a $2.4 billion deal to produce 19 more P-8A Poseidon surveillance and attack planes.

Given the Poseidon’s role as a high-tech surveillance aircraft, known for capturing video of Chinese phony island-building in the South China Sea (land reclamation) several years ago, it takes little imagination to envision ways its advanced sensors, sonobuoys and weapons could function as part of a containment strategy against Chinese expansion – – and even operate as a deterrent against China’s growing fleet of nuclear-armed ballistic missile submarines (SSBN).

The PLA Navy has, in recent years, been expanding its reach beyond the Pacific as part of a visible effort to become a major-power international force. Chinese SSBNs have been sighted at great distances from Western Pacific shores, according to numerous news reports – – and the existence of both JL-2s and emerging JL-3s have increased pressure on the US. According to the National Air and Space Intelligence Center, the Chinese had deployed up to 48 JL-2 launchers on submarines as of 2017. With ranges greater than 4,500 miles, JL-2s traveling well beyond China’s immediate vicinity can hold US areas at risk.

SOLDIERS USE AI TO FIRE PRECISION GRENADES, GUIDE DRONE ATTACKS

Just last year, Captain James Fanell, a former director of intelligence and information operations for the U.S. Pacific Fleet, warned Congress about the need to track and deter Chinese nuclear-armed submarines.

“Every time a [PLA Navy] SSBN departs on a strategic nuclear patrol, the [U.S. Navy] must follow closely enough to be ready to sink them if they ever attempt to launch a nuclear-tipped ICBM towards our shores,” he told Congress, according to an essay called “China’s new undersea nuclear deterrent strategy doctrine and capabilities” from the National Defense University. (Dr. Toshi Yoshirara & Dr. James Holmes)

The essay goes on to make the case that, given the difficulties associated with intercepting possible Chinese SLBMs (submarine-launched ballistic missiles), an intelligent way to address the threat might be to “hold Chinese SSBNs at risk so they can be destroyed preemptively before their SLBMs can be launched.”

The Poseidon, alongside ISR-enabled SSN attack submarines, seems well-positioned to help perform this SSBN sub-hunting mission for a number of reasons. Not only is the P-8’s 564 mph speed considerably faster than the P-3 Orion it is replacing, but its six additional fuel tanks enable it to search wider swaths of ocean and spend more dwell-time patrolling high-threat areas. Navy developers explain the Poseidon can operate on 10-hour missions at ranges out to 1,200 nautical miles. More dwell time capacity, fortified by high-speeds, seems to position the Poseidon well for covering wide areas in search of “hidden” Chinese SSBNs.

HOW AI CHANGES ATTACK MISSIONS FOR US FIGHTER JETS AND BOMBERS

​The P-8A, a militarized variant of Boeing’s 737-800, includes torpedo and Harpoon weapons stations, 129 sonobuoys and an in-flight refueling station, providing longer ranges, sub-hunting depth penetration and various attack options. Given that a P-8 can conduct sonobuoy sub-hunting missions from higher altitudes than surface ships, helicopters or other lower-flying aircraft, it can operate with decreased risk from enemy surface fire and swarming small boat attacks. Unlike many drones and other ISR assets, a Poseidon can not only find and track enemy submarines but attack and destroy them as well.

Alongside its AN/APY-10 surveillance radar and MX-series electro-optical/infrared cameras optimized to scan the ocean surface, the Poseidon’s air-parachuted sonobuoys can find submarines at various depths beneath the surface. The surveillance aircraft can operate as a “node” within a broader sub-hunting network consisting of surface ships, unmanned surface vessels, aerial drone-mounted maritime sensors and submarines. As part of its contribution to interconnected sub-hunting missions, the Poseidon can draw upon an Active Electronically Scanned Array, Synthetic Aperture Radar and Ground Moving Target Indicator.

By lowering hydrophones and a magnetic compass to a pre-determined depth, connected by cable to a floating surface radio transmitter, Poseidon sonobuoys can convert acoustic energy from the water into a radio signal sent to aircraft computer processors, according to a June 2018 issue of “Physics World.”

Also, Poseidon-dispatched sonobuoys can contribute to the often discussed “US Navy Fish Hook Undersea Defense Line,” a seamless network of hydrophones, sensors and strategically positioned assets stretching from coastal areas off of Northern China down near the Philippines all the way to Indonesia, according to an essay from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, called “China’s Nuclear Ballistic Missile Submarines and Strategic Stability.”

‘FIRST-CUT-OF-STEEL’ BEGINS NEW ERA IN NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SUBMARINE WARFARE

An improved aerial sub-hunting presence offered by the Poseidon, it seems, could help reinforce this “Undersea Defense Line” effort to prevent Chinese SSBNs from leaving the region undetected.

Interestingly, Poseidons might offer a significant nuance to the Pentagon’s well-cultivated nuclear deterrence posture, by introducing a technically advanced method of finding and destroying enemy SSBNs from the air. It aligns with the current “offensive power can be the best defense” approach central to the Pentagon’s nuclear-triad strategic deterrence strategy. Holding Chinese SSBNs at risk, could at very least help further deter China from contemplating some kind of sub-launched nuclear strike. The Poseidon could almost function as a kind of connective tissue between the undersea and air portions of the nuclear triad. The current air leg of the triad, consisting of platforms such as the B-2 and B-52 bombers, is not able to track or destroy submarines. A Poseidon could further fortify the air leg of the triad while also providing crucial intelligence to surface ships and U.S. undersea assets seeking to track Chinese SSBNs.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Currently in service with U.K., Norwegian, Indian and Australian militaries, among others, the Poseidon is increasingly in demand in the international market.

–This Story First Appeared Earlier this Year –

Westlake Legal Group NavyPoseidon How US sub-hunting planes track Chinese submarines Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article a5d8c439-8d69-5c9b-8e6f-6d7dc3f99997   Westlake Legal Group NavyPoseidon How US sub-hunting planes track Chinese submarines Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article a5d8c439-8d69-5c9b-8e6f-6d7dc3f99997

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Fred Fleitz: Iran’s seizure of two oil tankers was a stupid move – It could boost European support for Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061785538001_6061789128001-vs Fred Fleitz: Iran’s seizure of two oil tankers was a stupid move – It could boost European support for Trump Fred Fleitz fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4b025d3d-7d0a-52da-943e-3ec5a1627627

It has been clear over the past few weeks that Europe’s long-running patience with Iran’s bad behavior is running out. The Islamic Republic’s seizure of two British-operated oil tankers Friday in the Strait of Hormuz was a stupid move that could end that European patience once and for all.

That’s bad news for Iran, but good news for President Trump and his tough Iran policy, and for the U.S.

European leaders have strongly opposed Trump’s Iran policy and his decision to withdraw the United States from the Iran nuclear deal negotiated by the Obama administration.

IRAN’S REVOLUTIONARY GUARD SEIZES TWO UK-OPERATED TANKERS IN STRAIT OF HORMUZ

The deal, which was supposed to keep Iran from developing nuclear weapons, was fatally flawed and would have only delayed Iran’s entry into the nuclear club for a few years. And it did nothing to stop Iran’s support for terrorism and other hostile activity in the Middle East.

Recent Iranian provocations – including mine attacks on ships in the Persian Gulf, shooting down a U.S drone, and an earlier attempt to seize a British ship this month – have been making it harder and harder for Europe to continue to stand with Iran.

European leaders have also been scrambling over the last two weeks to save the Iran nuclear deal, following Tehran’s recent announcements that it has begun violating the deal’s limits on uranium enrichment.

Iran has said the violations are designed to force European states to stop complying with crippling U.S economic sanctions on the Islamic Republic or get them to compensate Iran for the sanctions.

So with tensions between Iran and Europe at such a high level that European officials were already preparing to throw in the towel, Iran drove tensions up even further by seizing the two British-operated oil tankers Friday.

British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said: “These seizures are unacceptable. It is essential that freedom of navigation is maintained and that all ships can move safely and freely in the region.”

Iran’s new provocation also will drive European and other states closer to President Trump’s Iran policy. Hold-outs to U.S. Iran sanctions could soon drop their opposition. There also could be new European sanctions.

President Trump responded calmly, noting the new Iranian provocation confirmed his warnings about Iran. Trump said: “This only goes to show what I’m saying about Iran. Trouble. Nothing but trouble. It goes to show you I was right about Iran.”

Obviously, the seizure of the British-operated tankers raises tensions in the Persian Gulf region. But it also will do enormous damage to Iran’s interests by driving European leaders toward President Trump.

A major reason  Trump hates the 2015 nuclear deal is that despite the huge concessions the Obama administration offered Iran in the agreement – including over $150 billion in sanctions relief – Iran’s behavior significantly worsened after the deal was announced.

Iran’s harmful actions included sending troops to Syria to fight in support of dictator Bashar Assad in a civil war, stepping up support for terrorism, and increasing military spending. Iran also ramped up its ballistic missile program and has been credibly accused of violating the nuclear deal.

Ignoring intense pressure from the U.S. foreign policy establishment and European leaders, President Trump withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal and imposed tough sanctions that are denying Tehran revenue it was spending on its military, missile program, nuclear program and terrorism.

Trump is open to U.S.-Iran talks, but only for a better, comprehensive agreement that deals with the full range of threats posed by Iran. The president also rejected Iran’s demand that he drop U.S. sanctions as a condition of starting talks.

With Iran unlikely to agree to talks with the United States, U.S. officials have been struggling to assemble a “coalition of navies” to protect shipping in the Persian Gulf.

Although European states have been reluctant to contribute to this initiative for fear of being drawn into a military confrontation with Iran, the seizure of the British-operated oil tankers may help U.S. officials win European participation.

Iran’s new provocation also will drive European and other states closer to President Trump’s Iran policy. Hold-outs to U.S. Iran sanctions could soon drop their opposition. There also could be new European sanctions.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Most importantly, President Trump’s restraint in avoiding using military force against Iran – coupled with dangerous Iranian provocations like the seizure of the two oil tankers Friday – may mean that if President Trump decides to attack Iran in the future, he may do so with Europe’s support.

This would be an amazing reversal of fortune for Trump’s Iran policy – a policy that was universally condemned by the foreign policy establishment and Europe just a year ago. Such a reversal is happening because Iran’s responses to President Trump’s policy have been not only stupid, but abysmal failures.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY FRED FLEITZ

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061785538001_6061789128001-vs Fred Fleitz: Iran’s seizure of two oil tankers was a stupid move – It could boost European support for Trump Fred Fleitz fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4b025d3d-7d0a-52da-943e-3ec5a1627627   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6061785538001_6061789128001-vs Fred Fleitz: Iran’s seizure of two oil tankers was a stupid move – It could boost European support for Trump Fred Fleitz fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4b025d3d-7d0a-52da-943e-3ec5a1627627

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Soldiers use AI to fire precision grenades, guide drone attacks

The Pentagon’s research and technology arm is testing a “breakthrough” AI-enabled technology for dismounted mobile combat units that synthesizes drone feeds, robot sensors, small arms fire detection, and ground-based radar — to “out cycle” enemy decision-making and attack with success.

Instead of having to gather, organize and analyze overwhelming amounts of fast-emerging combat variables, soldiers and marines can instantly access a single, integrated or “fused” product enabling them to destroy enemies “first.”

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s SQUAD X program, which is already testing with both CACI and Lockheed Martin, can take information from drone-video feeds, armed ground robots and acoustic sensors detecting the origin of incoming enemy small arms fire – and use automation to present a combined picture to squad leaders in combat.

“A Marine squad does not ever stop moving. They have a ‘bias toward action.’ We want to create a form of autonomy that also has a ‘bias toward action’ to retain the initiative. With human oversight, we employ automated engagement,” Lt. Col. Philip Root, program manager for SQUAD X, told Warrior Maven in an interview earlier this year.

HOW AI CHANGES ATTACK MISSIONS FOR US FIGHTER JETS AND BOMBERS

The system, according to Root, also draws upon ground-based radar, night-vision targeting and infrared-electro-optical sensors to inform ground units in combat. For instance, if ground-based radar were able to identify an enemy object at a certain distance, a nearby drone could be cued to gather video feeds and merge the target information with maps and other sensors, giving soldiers a complete combat picture in seconds. Among other things, this prevents soldiers from losing time analyzing overwhelming amounts of incoming data from disparate sources or nodes.

CACI’s system, according to DARPA developers, relies upon RF frequency innovations; Lockheed system involves a synthesis of sensor and targeting information.

The process can quite accurately be identified as a “ground version” of the F-35s well-known “sensor fusion” phenomenon. Through this technical process, otherwise disconnected sensor input, such as targeting, navigation and threat warning systems, are “fused” and organized into a single screen for the pilot. Referred to often as easing the “cognitive burden,” the concept is to enable informed, accurate and fast human decision making. In effect, SQUAD X does on the ground what sensor fusion does in the air. Root compared it to the historic and famous OODA loop long used to train Air Force fighter pilots. The OODA loop, defined as Observation, Orientation, Decision, Action – is intended to enable fight pilots to complete the attack process or “cycle” faster than an enemy and get inside the loop to attack and kill an enemy “first.”

“We look at how to engage in close combat with the OODA loop. In seconds or fractions of seconds we seek to use AI tools to out-cycle the adversary,” Root said.

‘FIRST-CUT-OF-STEEL’ BEGINS NEW ERA IN NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SUBMARINE WARFARE

AI-empowered computer automation can gather and process information, by itself, to complete otherwise time-consuming analysis. Human cognition, apart from computer high-speed processing, will, of course, be needed to make key, dynamic combat-relevant decisions and solve certain problems. Computer automation, fortified by AI, can use algorithms to find and synthesize key points of relevance. Perhaps information from a soldier-worn acoustic sensor identifies incoming enemy small arms fire and sends information to a drone. A nearby drone or ground robot can then glean additional information about enemy targets and, with a human decision-maker directing lethal force, launch attacks – all while soldiers and marines stay at a safe distance.

Root explained that, at times in the past, ground or air sensors have operated in a more stovepiped fashion, only able to gather information from their own sensors without benefiting from others in real time.

“We have seen ground vehicles that were just sitting in a fight because sensors did not detect that there was gunfire nearby. We want to provide a new form of sensing,” Root says.

SQUAD X testing is already demonstrating this kind of new integration, Root said, adding that simulation has enabled testers to “insert radar tracks into the system” and replicate actual combat scenarios.

NEW AIR FORCE NUCLEAR-ARMED ICBMS TO DEPLOY BY 2029

DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office documents offer additional detail into the aims and technologies central to SQUAD X. One of its key goals is described as spanning from kinetic technologies such as guns and targeting sensors – to electronic warfare and cyber domains.

SQUAD X, according to DARPA, seeks to “enable the rifle squad to precisely engage threats out to 1,000 meters, while maintaining compatibility with infantry weapon systems and human factors limitations….” and also allow non-kinetic technology to “enable the rifle squad to disrupt enemy command and control, communications, and use of unmanned assets to ranges in excess of 300 meters at a squad-relevant operational pace.”

The technology is also engineered to provide location accuracy to rifle squads within six meters in GPS-denied environments through “collaboration with unmanned systems,” DARPA information states.

SQUAD X “Precision Grenade”

While often challenged to operate in urban areas wherein walls and buildings can obstruct sensor signals, the SQUAD X system has already shown an ability to fire a first-of-its-kind “Precision grenade.” The grenade travels to a predetermined spot in the air before using a small camera to identify targets. Then, a soldier or marine can instantly look at the target information, and guide the grenade.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

An exact timeline for when this will be operational has yet to be determined, could likely be a few years. However, DARPA is now working closely with the Marines and Army to bring the system to the requisite level of maturity so that it can transition into a formal program of record.

More Weapons and Technology – WARRIOR MAVEN (CLICK HERE)

Westlake Legal Group DARPADrones Soldiers use AI to fire precision grenades, guide drone attacks Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article 5e16408e-bfbd-5490-bce8-161d45c0182f   Westlake Legal Group DARPADrones Soldiers use AI to fire precision grenades, guide drone attacks Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article 5e16408e-bfbd-5490-bce8-161d45c0182f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper sends first memo to troops as Pentagon boss

On his first day on the job as the new acting secretary of defense, Mark Esper on Monday sent a memorandum to all Pentagon employees, laying out the Defense Department’s “path forward.”

In the memo, titled “Initial Message to the Department,” Esper wrote, “As we continue to advance the Nation’s security, let me reaffirm our path forward. The National Defense Strategy remains our guiding document and everything we do should support its stated objectives.”

Esper was named the new acting secretary of defense by President Trump last Tuesday after Patrick Shanahan withdrew his nomination.

WHO IS MARK ESPER, TRUMP’S NEW ACTING SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PICK?

Esper, 56, has served as the 23rd secretary of the United States Army since Nov. 17, 2017. His duties included the recruitment, organization, training, equipping and care of 1.4 million active duty, National Guard, Reserve Soldiers, Department of the Army Civilians and their families, according to his Pentagon biography.

Esper said Monday the department’s priorities would “remain unchanged” and everything the department did “should support its stated objectives.”

He then went on to explain “three mutually reinforcing lines of effort” used to continue to expand the competitive space. They included building “a more lethal force,” strengthening alliances and attracting new partners, as well as reforming the department “for greater performance and affordability.”

In his memo, Esper explained that building a more lethal force would be the “surest way to deter adversary aggression” and included fully preparing for war. He wrote that it’s important to “continue to build readiness to fight” while “modernizing key capabilities for future conflict.”

Esper explained that U.S. allies and partners “play an essential role in helping us deter conflict and defend freedom around the world.” He added that through continued engagement the country will “grow these relationships and deepen our interoperability.”

TRUMP PUTS ARMY SECRETARY IN CHARGE OF PENTAGON AS SHANAHAN DROPS OUT OF CONTENTION FOR SECDEF

Esper graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1986. He received his commission in the infantry and completed Ranger and Pathfinder training.

He served on active duty for over a decade. In the early ’90s, he served with the 101st Airborne Division in the Gulf War. He later commanded an airborne rifle company in Europe.

Westlake Legal Group Mark-Esper-1 Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper sends first memo to troops as Pentagon boss Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8faaf065-8edf-596b-bb43-76d53956dc00

Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper arriving at the Pentagon on Monday. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Following his service on active duty, he served in both the Virginia and District of Columbia National Guard and Army Reserve. He retired in 2007.

“Having previously served in the Regular Army, National Guard, and Reserve, I understand well the sacrifices our Service Members, Civilians, and their Families make to protect this great country,” Esper wrote in the memo. “This is why I am committed to taking care of Families and ensuring they have the resources they need to thrive.”

He encouraged soldiers, sailors, airmen marines and civilians to stay focused on their mission and “always do the right thing.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Together, we will remain the most ready and capable military force in the world, which is what our nation expects and deserves,” Esper said.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson and Stephen Sorace contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Mark-Esper-1 Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper sends first memo to troops as Pentagon boss Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8faaf065-8edf-596b-bb43-76d53956dc00   Westlake Legal Group Mark-Esper-1 Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper sends first memo to troops as Pentagon boss Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8faaf065-8edf-596b-bb43-76d53956dc00

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US

In the hours after Iran is said to have downed a $125 million U.S. surveillance drone over international waters with a surface-to-air missile, despite Tehran’s vehement denials, President Trump gave the green light to retaliatory military strikes before later ordering a halt amid the alarming spike in tensions.

The inflammatory incident – which comes on the heels of escalating rhetoric between Washington and Tehran and other apparent sabotage vessel attacks – has many U.S. lawmakers and officials still fearing that some form of a military confrontation may be inevitable. But just how capable is Iran when it comes to fighting back and what lurks inside the country’s shadowy arms arsenal and how is the Iranian military structured?

“Iran has two military institutions. First is the Artesh, or the regular armed forces – Army, Navy, Air – and then there’s the Revolutionary Guard or IRGC with its own separate chain of command and force structure. Most of the subterfuge and malicious activities in the Middle East that can be attributed to Iranian actors is the work of the IRGC,” Miguel Miranda, an expert analyst in military technology in Asia, told Fox News. “Now Iran has a colorful arsenal and much of it is obviously dated but still functional. Old CH-47 Chinook helicopters and M60 Patton tanks immediately come to mind – this is what the Artesh are stuck with.”

THE MASTER BEHIND THE MASK: WHO IS IRAN’S MOST FEARED AND POWERFUL MILITARY COMMANDER?

But, he cautioned, since the 1990’s Iran’s state-owned military-industrial sector has made steady progress in four particular areas and is now a “regional leader” alongside Israel and Turkey when it comes to unmanned systems, small arms and light weapons, artillery, and ballistic missiles and other guided munitions.

“Iran has demonstrated it can launch dozens of road-mobile short-range ballistic missiles at targets beyond its borders. Recent innovations include a cruise missile likely patterned on a Soviet design with a range exceeding 1200 miles,” Miranda continued. “Iran’s missile technology and ability to manufacture these is far more advanced than any Arab state. Iran can mass produce short, medium, and long-range anti-aircraft missiles based on-reversed engineered Chinese, Russian and U.S. models.”

Westlake Legal Group 615298bc-AP446885797862 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

A Ghader missile is launched from the area near the Iranian port of Jask port on the shore of the Gulf of Oman during an Iranian navy drill, Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013. Iran says it has tested advanced anti-ship missiles in the final day of a naval drill near the strategic Strait of Hormuz, the passageway for one-fifth of the world’s oil supply. State TV says “Ghader”, or “Capable”, a missile with a range of 200 kilometers (120 miles), was among the weapons used Tuesday. It says the weapon can destroy warships. (AP Photo/Jamejam Online, Azin Haghighi) (AP2013)

While Iran has been a party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) for almost four decades, it is not a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) nor The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation.

Since the 1979 revolution and imposition of hefty western sanctions, coupled with the devastating 1980’s war with bordering Iraq, Iran has been battling a feeble economy and tight restrictions when it comes to easily advancing its weapons cache the way most others in the region have been able to do. Thus, much of the Iranian depository is said to be locally made, with abundant government funding to spend on everything from importing tools and parts to developing factories – with a little help from the outside.

According to John Wood, analyst and author of “Russia, the Asymmetric Threat to the United States,” Iran acquires majority of its equipment and expertise from Russia and China, along with “acquiring technology through the black market, especially from Eastern Europe and North Korea, as well as through clandestine operations in Western Europe.”

While the UN conventional arms embargo has somewhat helped limit what Iran can access abroad through official channels, it expires in October 2020 – rendering an open question as to whether Iran can then purchase more state-of-the-art weaponry from a broader array of players.

Westlake Legal Group 54e1bba7-Mideast-Yemen-3 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

In this image posted on the official Twitter account of the Saudi Press agency, SPA, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2015, confiscated weapons are seen aboard an Iranian fishing boat bound for Yemen. The Saudi-led coalition battling Yemen’s Shiite rebels says it has foiled an attempt by Iran to smuggle missiles and other weapons to the rebels aboard a fishing boat. The coalition says in a statement released Wednesday that the seizure took place on Saturday some 241 kilometers (150 miles) southeast of the Omani port of Salalah. (Saudi Press Agency via AP) (The Associated Press)

Miranda underscored that Iranian drones are “another success story” and they boast having all types from handheld prop-driven spy planes to long-endurance models that carry bombs on their wings to the notorious Saeqeh that comes with a “jet-powered UAV able to launch munitions.”

And then there is a covert action routinely employed to mimic the inventions of its enemies – in particular, Miranda surmised, is that the losses of U.S drones throughout the protracted war in Afghanistan have aided Iran in the way of acquiring the damaged models and enable them to analyze them for reverse engineering.

“Iran will use militias, cells, and spies, in Shia communities throughout the region to conduct sabotage, especially of the energy complex, kidnapping of Westerners and attacks on the US and its allies,” Wood told Fox News, via email. “Over the decades, Iran has developed an extensive and robust military-industrial complex – they also have chemical and biological weapons.”

Yet the breadth and condition of its chemical and biological capabilities – despite having ratified the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) in 1973 – is not completely clear.

NIGERIA’S CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY SLOWLY BEING ERASED AS MILITANTS STEP UP VICIOUS KILLINGS, KIDNAPPINGS

Moreover, Jonathan Rue, associate director of the Jewish Institute for National Security of America’s (JINSA) Gemunder Center for Defense & Strategy, concurred that while Iran lacks the modernity of neighboring countries, it has sought not to match its stockpile with big players like the United States, but has instead become particularly skilled at “using basic capabilities in sophisticated ways to target U.S. and allies’ vulnerabilities, like overwhelming naval and air defenses with lots of attack craft, missiles and drones.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0494ba6cf93a434f892437dccbf2f657 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2019 file photo, an Iranian clergyman looks at domestically built surface to surface missiles displayed by the Revolutionary Guard in a military show marking the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, at Imam Khomeini Grand Mosque in Tehran, Iran. On Monday, April 8, 2019, the Trump administration designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard a “foreign terrorist organization” in an unprecedented move against a national armed force. Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps went from being a domestic security force with origins in the 1979 Islamic Revolution to a transnational fighting force. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)

“Ironically as we’re seeing now, as we saw in the 1980s, Iran’s use of simple naval mines in vital shipping lanes can do a lot in terms of escalating tension with the United States,” he explained. “Decades of sanctions have forced Iran to develop a sizable domestic arms industry. These are not latest-generation capabilities, and they wouldn’t defeat the U.S. in a major head-on conflict. But they are good enough, and Iran has enough of them to make it difficult for the U.S. and allied forces.”

Last year, Trump controversially pulled out of the 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran, re-imposing grueling economic sanctions and applying what experts have coined a “maximum pressure” campaign on Tehran’s regime.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Meanwhile, Iran has for weeks warned it will ignite a treacherous chapter in its dispute with the West next week, threatening to dump aspects of the fragile nuclear deal and resume stockpiling unless European signatories to the deal can get around the crippling U.S. sanctions.

“Iran has significant manpower and a network of proxies and partners around the region that could be activated to deter direct attacks on Iranian soil,” added Ali Vaez, Director of the Iran Project, via email. “It would be a mistake to think that an escalation between Iran and the U.S. will be a quick, cheap or easy military operation. It could well lead to a major confrontation involving major losses in blood and treasure on both sides, and even a wider regional war involving their respective allies.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0494ba6cf93a434f892437dccbf2f657 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0494ba6cf93a434f892437dccbf2f657 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources

President Trump is expected to formally nominate Patrick M. Shanahan to be his permanent defense secretary as soon as next week, two administration officials tell Fox News. This, after an internal Pentagon investigation concluded that the acting defense secretary did not show any bias in favor of his former employer, aerospace giant Boeing.

Shanahan worked at Boeing for over 30 years before coming to the Pentagon as then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’s deputy at the start of the Trump administration.

Shanahan’s nomination had been held up by the White House since the Pentagon inspector general opened an investigation into Shanahan’s conduct following a report in Politico days after taking over for Mattis alleging Shanahan called Boeing-rival Lockheed Martin’s advanced F-35 program “f—ed up” and said the company didn’t know how to run a defense program following years of cost overruns and delays to the fifth-generation fighter jet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Shanahan has been serving as acting defense chief since the president forced Jim Mattis to leave the job early following his resignation in December.

Shanahan faces a potentially contentious confirmation hearing in the Republican-controlled Senate in order to assume the role as defense secretary.

President Trump found an early supporter and point man in Shanahan for the creation of a sixth branch of the military, the Space Force.

In an exclusive interview with Fox News’s Bret Baier, Shanahan spoke about his urgency in developing the new branch.

“We have a $19 trillion economy that runs on space.  Our military runs on space.  It is vitally important,” said Shanahan. “[The] Chinese and Russians are deploying capability to put our economy and our military at risk in the time of crisis.”

Asked for comment a spokesman for the acting defense secretary would not answer the question directly if Shanahan was expecting to be nominated next week.

“Acting Secretary Shanahan remains focused SOLELY on the Department, on our global military options, on our servicemembers, civilians, and their families,” said Army Lt. Col. Joseph Buccino.

A defense official added Shanahan will be “ready for a confirmation hearing, should he be nominated.”

Jennifer Griffin, Kevin Corke and Chad Pergram contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group shanahan Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e504080-1fa5-59a6-9118-c1181cec0beb   Westlake Legal Group shanahan Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e504080-1fa5-59a6-9118-c1181cec0beb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands

Westlake Legal Group missing-japanese-f-35-poses-major-security-headache-for-us-if-it-falls-into-russian-or-chinese-hands Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

The Japanese F-35 fighter jet missing in the Pacific could be a major security headache for the U.S. if Russia or China locate the state-of-the-art fighter jet first, experts warn.

Japanese defense officials say a search is underway for the fighter jet after it disappeared from radar during a flight exercise in northern Japan. The plane’s pilot is also missing.

Bristling with sophisticated technology and weaponry, the F-35 is the result of the most expensive weapons program in America’s military history, valued at $406.1 billion.

AIR FORCE: F-35A FIGHTER JET IS NOW ‘COMBAT READY’

Westlake Legal Group AirForceF35Fuji Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

File photo – A U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II assigned to the 34th Fighter Squadron takes off at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Feb. 9, 2018, after supporting of the vice president’s visit to Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)

“There is no price too high in this world for China and Russia to pay to get Japan’s missing F-35, if they can. Big deal,” tweeted Tom Moore, a former senior professional staff member at the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Both Russia and China maintain a significant naval presence in the region, sparking concerns that they could find the missing F-35, Business Insider reports.

“If one of Japan’s F-35s is sitting at the bottom of the Pacific, we are probably about to see one of the biggest underwater espionage and counter-espionage ops since the Cold War. If it was operating without its radar reflectors pinpointing where it went in may be an issue,” tweeted Tyler Rogoway, editor of The War Zone.

“It could present problems depending on what is recovered, when it is recovered and, above all, in which conditions, after impacting the surface of the water,” Rome-based aviation expert, pilot, and former Italian Air Force officer David Cenciotti told Fox News, via email. “The F-35 is a system of systems and its low observability/stealthiness is a system itself.”

FIGHTER MILESTONE: F-22S AND F-35S TRAIN TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME

Westlake Legal Group AirForceJapanFlag Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

File photo  (U.S. Air Force photo taken by Tech. Sgt. Louis Vega Jr.)

The F-35’s stealth is the result of the aircraft’s shape, its engine, the materials used to construct the plane and the “million lines” of software code used to manage its systems, added Cenciotti, who writes The Aviationist blog.

While the expert thinks that it would be difficult to reverse engineer the aircraft from pieces of wreckage recovered from the seabed, he warns that the debris could still offer vital information. “There are still lots of interesting parts that could be studied to get some interesting details: a particular onboard sensor or something that can’t be seen from the outside but could be gathered by putting your hands on chunks of the aircraft intakes or exhaust section, on the radar reflectors etc,” he said

The stealth fighter, which has been beset by cost overruns and delays, has a price tag of around $100 million each. The U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps all have versions of the F-35.

THE US ARMY WANTS THE F-35 FOR CLOSE AIR SUPPORT

Japan’s Air Self-Defense Force says the F-35A stealth jet went missing Tuesday while flying off the eastern coast of Aomori. It says the plane disappeared from radar about half an hour after taking off from the Misawa air base with three other F-35As for a flight exercise.

Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya told reporters that a search and rescue operation was underway for the missing jet and its pilot. The cause of the mishap was not immediately known.

Iwaya says 12 other F-35s at the Misawa base will be grounded.

SINGLE F-35 ‘KILLS’ DOZENS OF ENEMY FIGHTERS IN AIRWAR LIVE COMBAT ‘SCENARIO’

Japan plans to buy 147 U.S.-made F-35s, most of them F-35As, over the next decade.

The U.S. military temporarily grounded its entire fleet of F-35s last year after one of the jets crashed during a training mission in South Carolina.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson, Travis Fedschun and the Associated Press contributed to this article.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6001714877001_6001714094001-vs Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6001714877001_6001714094001-vs Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands

The Japanese F-35 fighter jet missing in the Pacific could be a major security headache for the U.S. if Russia or China locate the state-of-the-art fighter jet first, experts warn.

Japanese defense officials say a search is underway for the fighter jet after it disappeared from radar during a flight exercise in northern Japan. The plane’s pilot is also missing.

Bristling with sophisticated technology and weaponry, the F-35 is the result of the most expensive weapons program in America’s military history, valued at $406.1 billion.

AIR FORCE: F-35A FIGHTER JET IS NOW ‘COMBAT READY’

Westlake Legal Group AirForceF35Fuji Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

File photo – A U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning II assigned to the 34th Fighter Squadron takes off at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Feb. 9, 2018, after supporting of the vice president’s visit to Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yasuo Osakabe)

“There is no price too high in this world for China and Russia to pay to get Japan’s missing F-35, if they can. Big deal,” tweeted Tom Moore, a former senior professional staff member at the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Both Russia and China maintain a significant naval presence in the region, sparking concerns that they could find the missing F-35, Business Insider reports.

“If one of Japan’s F-35s is sitting at the bottom of the Pacific, we are probably about to see one of the biggest underwater espionage and counter-espionage ops since the Cold War. If it was operating without its radar reflectors pinpointing where it went in may be an issue,” tweeted Tyler Rogoway, editor of The War Zone.

“It could present problems depending on what is recovered, when it is recovered and, above all, in which conditions, after impacting the surface of the water,” Rome-based aviation expert, pilot, and former Italian Air Force officer David Cenciotti told Fox News, via email. “The F-35 is a system of systems and its low observability/stealthiness is a system itself.”

FIGHTER MILESTONE: F-22S AND F-35S TRAIN TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME

Westlake Legal Group AirForceJapanFlag Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

File photo  (U.S. Air Force photo taken by Tech. Sgt. Louis Vega Jr.)

The F-35’s stealth is the result of the aircraft’s shape, its engine, the materials used to construct the plane and the “million lines” of software code used to manage its systems, added Cenciotti, who writes The Aviationist blog.

While the expert thinks that it would be difficult to reverse engineer the aircraft from pieces of wreckage recovered from the seabed, he warns that the debris could still offer vital information. “There are still lots of interesting parts that could be studied to get some interesting details: a particular onboard sensor or something that can’t be seen from the outside but could be gathered by putting your hands on chunks of the aircraft intakes or exhaust section, on the radar reflectors etc,” he said

The stealth fighter, which has been beset by cost overruns and delays, has a price tag of around $100 million each. The U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps all have versions of the F-35.

THE US ARMY WANTS THE F-35 FOR CLOSE AIR SUPPORT

Japan’s Air Self-Defense Force says the F-35A stealth jet went missing Tuesday while flying off the eastern coast of Aomori. It says the plane disappeared from radar about half an hour after taking off from the Misawa air base with three other F-35As for a flight exercise.

Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya told reporters that a search and rescue operation was underway for the missing jet and its pilot. The cause of the mishap was not immediately known.

Iwaya says 12 other F-35s at the Misawa base will be grounded.

SINGLE F-35 ‘KILLS’ DOZENS OF ENEMY FIGHTERS IN AIRWAR LIVE COMBAT ‘SCENARIO’

Japan plans to buy 147 U.S.-made F-35s, most of them F-35As, over the next decade.

The U.S. military temporarily grounded its entire fleet of F-35s last year after one of the jets crashed during a training mission in South Carolina.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson, Travis Fedschun and the Associated Press contributed to this article.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6001714877001_6001714094001-vs Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6001714877001_6001714094001-vs Missing Japanese F-35 poses major security headache for US if it falls into Russian or Chinese hands James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox news fnc/tech fnc article 69429ee1-5837-5072-b9c7-8464fd76fb80

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com