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Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086259618001_6086258090001-vs Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS Jeff Harrigian fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 7444fc94-805a-574f-ac6f-bc290b166d12

I was recently in Kenya working with air force leaders from 35 African nations, and while there I read an African proverb that resonated strongly with me. It stated: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” This could not be truer today in how the U.S. Air Force operates on the European and African continents.

In an area of operations that covers 104 nations, it means having strong, trusted and reliable relationships. This is more important than ever, because trust is something that cannot be surged, it is built over time and based on delivering on your word.

This year, as we celebrate the U.S. Air Force’s 72nd birthday, I am reminded of how strong partnerships and teamwork have contributed to the service’s success and more importantly as a joint force, and a nation. The only way we can successfully tackle the complex challenges of today is if we commit to moving forward together. We have the world’s premier Air Force but we could not successfully “fly, fight and win” without the mindset of unity and teamwork.

AIR FORCE AND DARPA PREPARE TO SHOOT NEW HYPERSONIC WEAPON

This fundamental concept was taught to me early in my Air Force career. It is foundational to what we do. As a cadet at the Air Force Academy I was a member of the Wings of Blue parachute team and quickly learned how teamwork is the foundation of excellence. Our team ate, slept and trained together, forging trust and unbreakable bonds that remain today. These bonds and ability to rely on one another have been part of every successful team I’ve served on.

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During my two years as the commander of U.S. Air Force Central Command (AFCENT), our coalition team delivered results in a complex, pressurized environment with lives on the line. Every nation brought an important capability, all underpinning our success. The key components to our coalition were the people, the relationships and trust that was cultivated on a daily basis on the battlefield.

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I share this because the Air Force of today operates in an environment where a strong architecture of allies and partners is critical to our success — we rely on partnerships that we’ve cultivated over the years to create a strong team of willing partners that can prevail in an era of global power competition. We cannot go at it alone; we must work with allies and partners around the world to degrade and defeat malign influences.

As airmen, we speak a common language that facilitates operating at speed over vast distances. This is critical to competing in today’s security environment. This common language did not occur by happenstance. It grew from the strength of shared experiences in training and in combat. Being a good wingman ensures that bad actors who would seek to disrupt, dismantle and destroy the global world order will never succeed because we are ready, willing and working together to ensure that never happens.

Though we have the ability to surge aircraft and generate combat power at a moment’s notice, what we can’t surge is trust. Strong relationships and partnerships are an investment in security and having a global presence demonstrates that we are committed and have skin in the game. Today’s complex security environment, focused on what is referred to as great power competition, requires us to foster, strengthen and build strategic relationships across the European and African continents. We are doing just that.

In Europe it is imperative that we continue to work with our NATO allies and partners to ensure our forward presence and ability to rapidly deploy capabilities into the theater. Together we are an alliance that has the capability to deter potential adversaries and defend in all domains, ensuring our collective security. Our mission is to provide the credible combat airpower needed to deter war and to protect the security of our nations. Should deterrence fail, however, rest assured we are prepared to fight and win.

While the demand to enhance and strengthen partnerships in Europe continues, U.S. Air Forces Africa is focused on helping partners build capabilities designed to bolster security, stability, and ultimately prosperity. We are actively strengthening key relationships and offering assistance on the continent that support our partners’ defense capabilities, ability to counter transnational threats while offering opportunities for political and economic development.

Our determined African partners fight terrorism while working to build regional self-reliance and security. We are partnering with other countries to reduce the impact of malign influences to position African partners for a better future.

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We are motivated and inspired by the dedication and commitment our partners in Africa are showing to developing their respective air forces capacity. This investment will produce more capable and professional militaries that contribute to greater security and stability in Africa and demonstrates our commitment to pursuing mutual aims.

I am extremely optimistic about what the future holds in both Europe and Africa. The strong military relationships we have developed between our respective air forces bolster our collective readiness, enhances our deterrence capabilities and leverages partnership capacity, security and stability. Today as we stand together, I am confident we will lead the way in answering the challenges in a very complex global security environment.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086259618001_6086258090001-vs Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS Jeff Harrigian fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 7444fc94-805a-574f-ac6f-bc290b166d12   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086259618001_6086258090001-vs Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS Jeff Harrigian fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 7444fc94-805a-574f-ac6f-bc290b166d12

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Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space

Westlake Legal Group AP19241739602547 Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/science fnc f8e20755-9161-5e88-8fc7-303fe0f2a011 article

President Trump formally announced the re-establishment of the U.S. Space Command on Thursday after a 17-year absence as his administration focuses on concerns about the vulnerability of U.S. satellites.

“Just as we have recognized land, air, sea and cyber as vital warfighting domains, we will now treat space an independent region overseen by a new unified geographic combatant command,” Trump said during a ceremony at the White House Rose Garden.

The Senate confirmed Air Force Gen. John Raymond to lead U.S. Space Command this past June. The command is expected to draw on other parts of the armed forces.

Space Command existed from 1985 to 2002 when it was dissolved as part of the government’s post-9/11 reorganization.

The renewed focus on space reflects concerns about the disruption of American satellites from Chinese or Russian weapons.

This is a developing story; check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group AP19241739602547 Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/science fnc f8e20755-9161-5e88-8fc7-303fe0f2a011 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19241739602547 Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/science fnc f8e20755-9161-5e88-8fc7-303fe0f2a011 article

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Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts

The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis Air Force base in California is spearheading an innovative effort to produce 3D-printed aircraft parts.

The squadron is the first field unit in the Air Force to be certified with an industrial-sized 3D printer that is authorized for the production of nonstructural aircraft parts, according to a statement released Monday.

The Stratasys F900 3D printer produces parts up to 36-by-24-36 inches, the Air Force said. It harnesses a material called Ultem 9085 that is described as being stronger, denser and more flexible than traditional plastic.

The printer has been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Air Force Advanced Technology and Training Center.

MARINES 3D-PRINT CONCRETE BARRACKS IN JUST 40 HOURS

It took eight months to make the system fully operational.

Westlake Legal Group AirForce3DPrint3 Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/forefront-of-innovation fox news fnc/tech fnc e4dae693-e36c-5bde-92ea-a87f8924f577 article

Latrine covers, the first aircraft parts authorized for use after being printed on the Stratasys F900 3D printer are on display Aug. 15, 2019, at Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The first approved project was printed on the machine on Aug. 12 — replacement latrine covers for the C-5M Galaxy aircraft.

“The latrine covers we just printed usually take about a year from the time they’ve been ordered to the time they’ve been delivered,” said Master Sgt. John Higgs, 60th MXS aircraft metals technology section chief, in the statement. “We printed two of the covers in 73 hours.”

MARINES 3D-PRINT CONCRETE BRIDGE IN 14 HOURS

The Air Force explained that the parts that don’t keep aircraft from performing their missions don’t have as high a priority for replacement.

Westlake Legal Group AirForce3DPrint2 Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/forefront-of-innovation fox news fnc/tech fnc e4dae693-e36c-5bde-92ea-a87f8924f577 article

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rogelio Lopez, 60th Maintenance Squadron assistant aircraft metals technology section chief, loads Ultem 9085 material into a canister for use in the Stratasys F900 three-dimensional printer Aug. 15, 2019, Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The team can download blueprints that have been approved by the University of Dayton Research Institute from an online database that is part of the Joint Engineering Data Management Information Control System (JEDMICS).

“It brings us a capability that we’ve never had before,” Higgs said. “There’s so many possibilities available to us right now. We’re just scratching the surface.”

AIR FORCE ‘INNOVATION HUB’ LOOKS TO HELP TECH STARTUPS

As the only Air Force field unit that is fully operational, the team at Travis is receiving requests from other parts of the service.

Westlake Legal Group AirForce3DPrint Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/forefront-of-innovation fox news fnc/tech fnc e4dae693-e36c-5bde-92ea-a87f8924f577 article

An aircraft part prints on the Stratasys F900 three-dimensional printer Aug. 15, 2019, at Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

“We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies,” Higgs said, in the statement. “This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Last year Marines used a specialized 3D concrete printer to create a 500-square-foot barracks room in just 40 hours, according to the Marine Corps. Normally, it takes 10 Marines five days to construct a barracks hut out of wood.

ARMY ROBOT CAN GET ITSELF UP AFTER IT FALLS DOWN

The barracks room was built in August 2018 at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in Champaign, Ill.

Army and Navy Seabees were also involved in the construction effort.

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Also last year, Marines at Camp Pendleton, Calif. successfully 3D-printed a reinforced concrete bridge. The feat, which took place in December, is the first time in the U.S. or the Western hemisphere that a bridge has been 3D-printed on site, as opposed to in a factory, according to the Marine Corps.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group AirForce3DPrint2 Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/forefront-of-innovation fox news fnc/tech fnc e4dae693-e36c-5bde-92ea-a87f8924f577 article   Westlake Legal Group AirForce3DPrint2 Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts James Rogers fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/forefront-of-innovation fox news fnc/tech fnc e4dae693-e36c-5bde-92ea-a87f8924f577 article

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Jesse Watters: Here’s why Trump probably hasn’t been told anything about Area 51

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Area51_AP Jesse Watters: Here's why Trump probably hasn't been told anything about Area 51 fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 7840f2ea-cfc1-5a60-a7e4-39340a131b9d

Ahead of a Facebook-advertised “storming” of Area 51, Jesse Watters considered whether President Trump has been told about what goes on at the secretive military installation.

If Trump is privy to top-secret information about the base, which has long been a point of discussion for conspiracy theorists who believe the facility holds government secrets about aliens and UFOs, it is surprising he hasn’t told the public, Watters said on “The Five.”

“I am surprised Trump has not slipped up about Area 51 yet,” he joked.

“The man cannot keep a secret. I don’t even think they told him about Area 51.”

‘STORM AREA 51’ SOCIAL MEDIA MOVEMENT IS ‘GETTING SOMEWHAT OUT OF HAND,’ SAYS UFO EXPERT

The “Watters’ World” host added Trump is often unusually open at campaign events — to a greater extent than past presidents.

“He’ll just let it go at a rally,” he said. “But if he has kept that secret, I am very proud.”

On Facebook, a page advertising the purported event went viral over the past week, as more than 1 million users responded they would go to the top-secret military installation on Sept. 20 at 3 a.m., with the creator writing “they can’t stop all of us.”

While it isn’t exactly known what the base is currently used for, Air Force spokeswoman Laura McAndrews told The Washington Post that Area 51 is where, “we train American armed forces” and “is an open training range for the U.S. Air Force.”

TRUMP’S’ OPINION ON UFOS: NOPE — BUT YOU NEVER KNOW

4 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE TOP-SECRET SITE, AREA 51

“The U.S. Air Force always stands ready to protect America and its assets,” McAndrews added. She discouraged civilians from visiting the area.

Regarding the base’s publicly-known history, Area 51 is a government facility in the Nevada desert near Groom Lake, a salt flat located about 120 miles north of Las Vegas. The site was chosen in the 1950s to secretly test the Air Force’s U-2 aircraft and train pilots, according to the CIA.

The area had earlier been used during World War II as an aerial gunnery range for Army pilots.

Employees take small, unmarked passenger planes from the Las Vegas airport to get to the remote area, according to Business Insider.

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President Dwight Eisenhower approved the facility’s development in the 1950s, according to the CIA. The site was used by the Air Force to test the U-2 spy plane during the Cold War.

In 2013, the CIA acknowledged its existence, releasing its location and how it had been used to test military aircraft, including the F-117A, A-12 and TACIT BLUE, according to Business Insider.

Fox News’ Stephen Sorace contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Area51_AP Jesse Watters: Here's why Trump probably hasn't been told anything about Area 51 fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 7840f2ea-cfc1-5a60-a7e4-39340a131b9d   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Area51_AP Jesse Watters: Here's why Trump probably hasn't been told anything about Area 51 fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/topic/aliens fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 7840f2ea-cfc1-5a60-a7e4-39340a131b9d

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How one woman learned to fly the B-2 stealth bomber

When B-2 stealth bombers attacked Serbia on the opening night of Operation Allied Force in 1999, destroyed Iraqi air defenses during 2003’s “Shock and Awe” and eliminated the Libyan fighter force in 2011 — the attacks were all guided by highly-specialized pilots trained in stealth attack tactics.

Given the dangers of these kinds of missions, such as flying into heavy enemy ground fire from air defenses, confronting the prospect of air attacks and preparing for electronic warfare over hostile territory, B-2 pilots need to be ready.

“We prepare and train every single day in case we get called up tomorrow,” Lt. Col. Nicola Polidor, Commander of Detachment 5 of the 29th Training Systems Squadron, told Warrior in an interview.

While performing missions, B-2 pilots need to maintain the correct flight path, align with specific targeting intelligence and load and prepare weapons, all while manning a digital cockpit to control a wide range of additional variables at one time. Polidor, who trains future B-2 pilots at Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, says Air Force pilot trainees have adjusted well to learning a seemingly overwhelming amount of new information.

B-2 BOMBER 30-YEAR ANNIVERSARY: INSIDE A B-2 STEALTH ATTACK

“The biggest challenge for pilots is being able to manage flying for long periods of time at the same time as managing a communications suite and robust weapons package,” Polidor said.

Polidor is only the 10th female B-2 pilot in history.

Westlake Legal Group nicola-polidor-us-air-force How one woman learned to fly the B-2 stealth bomber Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article 699b950f-115e-57a3-9291-79a8a2e34864

Capt. Nicola Polidor, 393rd Bomb Squadron B-2 Spirit pilot, poses next to a B-2 at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., April 23, 2013. Polidor has been flying for eight years and is the 393rd BS training flight commander ((U.S, Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shelby R. Orozco/Released))

Training is broken down into an academic phase and a flight phase, with classroom training as the first step. Trainees, Polidor explained, typically spend about two months working on a simulator, before taking their first flight.

“The instructor is in one seat, teaching the trainee how to operate in flight in the other seat. You can fly from either seat and control all facets of the aircraft. Both seats have a glass screen cockpit in front of them and both seats have the stick in front of them,” Polidor said.

Control of the aircraft is carefully managed by both crew members. To change pilot operations from one to another, the crew follows specific protocol. The pilot receiving control says “I have the aircraft,” and the pilot passing over control says “roger.you have the aircraft.”

“At anytime it is understood who is at the controls. The instructor pilot will have hands on the controls, without moving anything….in case the trainee has a problem,” Polidor said.

Part of the glass cockpit in front of the pilot is one of eight displays called the Digital Entry Panel which enables pilots to check hydraulics, electronics, flight controls, environmental conditions, weapons suite.

AIR FORCE SET FOR NUCLEAR-ARMED CRUISE MISSILE FOR 2030

“It is like a flying computer. You enter text into the computer. We can input the pressure, airspeed or target for a weapon from that panel and send it,” Polidor said. “We have autopilot just like a commercial airliner. We are able to maintain altitude without our having to input into the computer system.”

Despite flying more than 40-hour missions, pilots have no bed and no refrigerator, just two seats in a small cockpit and a small area behind them about the same width as the seat. Pilot’s food, Polidor said, needs to be non-perishable items.

“Sometimes we can bring a little blow-up mattress, put in on the floor and take a nap,” she said. “It’s about big enough for someone who is 5ft ‘8 but not big enough for taller people.

Most of all, B-2 pilots focus on “being ready,” as they are often the first to strike in high-intensity conflict. An interesting study from the [Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies, called “Building the Future Bomber Force America Needs; The Bomber Re-Vector,”] points to a recent B-2 attack on ISIS terrorists in Libya.

“On January 19, 2017 two B-2s flying from Whiteman AFB, Missouri released dozens of precision munitions on an Islamic State training camp in Libya. This 33-hour mission again showcased the responsiveness, range, and flexibility of the bomber force,” the study, written by Lt. Gen. David Deptula (Ret.) and Douglas Birkey, states.

Deptula, who was involved in planning and preparation for Operation Iraqi Freedom, talked to Warrior about the warzone importance of the B-2.

“The B-2 is one of the most game-changing aircraft ever built…and one of the most cost-effective. One B-2 can deliver the punch of an entire aircraft carrier air wing at several orders of magnitude less in operating cost and personnel,” Deptula said.

Kris Osborn, Managing Editor of WARRIORMAVEN (CLICK HERE) can be reached at krisosborn.ko@gmail.com

Westlake Legal Group nicola-polidor-us-air-force How one woman learned to fly the B-2 stealth bomber Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article 699b950f-115e-57a3-9291-79a8a2e34864   Westlake Legal Group nicola-polidor-us-air-force How one woman learned to fly the B-2 stealth bomber Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article 699b950f-115e-57a3-9291-79a8a2e34864

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B-2 bomber 30-year anniversary: Inside a B-2 stealth attack

Slicing through the sky with bat-like wings, eluding enemy radar with stealth technology, quietly destroying enemy air defenses from 50,000 ft and using computers to merge sensor data with targeting information — the Air Force’s B-2 bomber … has been in the air attacking targets for “30-Years.”

“You pull up the weapons suite screen, align the right weapon with the target and provide input into the DEP – Digital Entry Panel. Then, you enter text into the computer,” Lt. Col. Nicola Polidar, Commander of Detachment 5 of the 29th Training Systems Squadron, told Warrior in an interview.

As this happens….the air attack begins.

***** The B-2 took its first flight July 17, 1989 — so now is the “30-Year Anniversary.” ******

B-2 pilots have operated the sleek, curved air-defense-defying platform for sensitive, highly-dangerous missions many times in recent decades. After blasting onto the scene in the early 90s, the B-2s combat debut came in the late 90s when the aircraft destroyed Serbian targets over Kosovo. Three decades ago, the Air Force and Northrop Grumman thought to massively advance the paradigm for stealth attack, and create a first-of-its kind leap ahead bomber. It was conceived of as a Cold War weapon, engineered to knock out Soviet advanced air defenses. The intent was to build upon and surpass the F-117 Night Hawk’s stealth technology used in the Gulf War.

AIR FORCE SET FOR NEW NUCLEAR-ARMED MISSILE FOR 2030

The B-2s stealth configuration, buried engine, low heat signature and “radar absorbent” coating, is meant to not only avoid being hit by enemy weapons, but complete missions without enemies ever knowing it is there. Its core mission: launch secret, quiet, undetected attacks over heavily defended enemy territory to create a safer “air corridor” for less stealthy planes to operate within extremely lethal,otherwise uninhabitable airspace.

Weapons selection, navigational data and intelligence analysis are all controlled by a human pilot, operating a digital display, computer screen and fire control system in the sky.

“We have eight displays and we are able to pull up different information depending upon which buttons we push. We can see weapons, communications, flight characteristics, current atmospheric conditions, engines, electrical systems and hydraulics,” Polidar said.

Westlake Legal Group B-2_Spirit_cropped B-2 bomber 30-year anniversary: Inside a B-2 stealth attack Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article a713ce97-8366-5e65-b381-bdbaa3a5f760

Courtesy U.S. Air Force (Courtesy U.S. Air Force)

The aircraft, which entered service in the 1980s, has flown missions over Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan. Given its ability to fly as many as 6,000 nautical miles without needing to refuel, the B-2 flew from Missouri all the way to an island off the coast of India called Diego Garcia – before launching bombing missions over Afghanistan.

While the original engineering may have come from the 1980s, many upgrades, adaptations and technological improvements have sought to keep the bomber current, relevant and ahead of evolving threats.

“We’ve been through at least 10-plus major modifications, some hardware and some software. The biggest difference in flying the B-2 today is the amount of information flow coming through the cockpit,” Col Jeffery Schreiner, 509th BW Commander and B-2 Pilot, told Warrior in an interview. Schreiner has been involved with the B-2 bomber for more than 15 years.

Managing this massively increased information flow has inspired new B-2 sensors, targeting displays, communications networks and – perhaps of greatest significance – new computer automation and processor upgrades.

“Pilots manage all the different data sources to make good, tactically relevant decisions and maintain situational awareness. Now you can make specific changes and rework sorties in flight,” Schreiner said.

AIR FORCE BUILDS FIRST B-21 RAIDER ‘TEST’ STEALTH BOMBER

The upgrades involve the re-hosting of the flight management control processors, the brains of the airplane, onto much more capable integrated processing units. This results in the laying-in of some new fiber optic cable as opposed to the mix bus cable previously being used – because original B-2 computers from the 80s could be overloaded with data in a modern war environment, Air Force officials explained.

Schreiner’s strategic view of B-2 modernization plan aligns with what leading service thinkers envision regarding future threats and needed technical adjustments, particularly regarding this need for information and networking. One prominent Air Force strategist, Retired Lt. Gen. David Deptula, Dean of the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies, describes this phenomenon in terms of the need for an emerging “combat cloud.” Improved networking technology, coupled with new processing power, enables new sensors and next-generation targeting to destroy newer threats and also maintain operations in the event that one connection is damaged in war.

“The challenge is this whole notion of sharing, and treating ships, vehicles and aircraft as information nodes. This builds robustness and redundancy of the ability to share information,” Deptula told Warrior.

Extending Deptula’s reasoning, it seems apparent that the Air Force modernization approach with the B-2 has, in some ways, managed to anticipate future warfare environments.

One such example of this is the now-in-development B-2 Defensive Management System, a new sensor enabling B-2 crews to identify some dangerous enemy locations and therefore better avert advanced air defences.

An Air Force 2018 acquisition report examines some of the technical adjustments which enable these advanced sensors, stating that the DMS “upgrades the threat warning systems on board by replacing aging antennas, electronics, display system and an autorouter.”

NAVY ARMS DESTROYERS WITH NEW HIGH-POWERED LASER

The autorouter introduces what could easily be referred to as a transformative technology for several key reasons; the report describes the autoloader as something “which automates the re-planning of aircraft missions in flight.” This brings several key implications; increased automation lessens what’s often referred to as the “cognitive burden” for pilots. This frees up pilots to focus on pressing combat variables because computer automation is performing certain key procedural functions.

Secondly, by allowing for “re-planning of aircraft missions in flight,” the autorouter brings a sizeable intelligence advantage. Instead of relying upon pre-determined target information, on-board intelligence can help pilots adjust attack missions as targets change and/or relocate.. while in flight. Much of these improvements can be attributed to an ongoing effort to implement a new computer processor into the B-2, a system reported by Air Force developers to be 1,000 times faster than the existing system.

Given their 30-year life span, many may wonder how the B-2s have been maintained and remained combat ready through the decades. B-2 maintainer 2nd Lt. Bruce Vaughn from 131st Maintenance describes it as sustaining the welding, fuselage, tubing and sheet metal. Most of all, he said, it has been crucial to maintain the low-observable components and radar absorbent material. “It involves a lot of painting and materials management. You often apply it like spray paint,” Vaughn said.

Westlake Legal Group b-2-image B-2 bomber 30-year anniversary: Inside a B-2 stealth attack Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article a713ce97-8366-5e65-b381-bdbaa3a5f760

Courtesy U.S. Air Force

Vaughn’s description of the challenges and work required to maintain stealth coating, interestingly, is supported by a 2017 essay from the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University, called “Defect-Detection Technologies for Low-Observability Aircraft Skin Coatings.” The paper makes a point to emphasize the importance, and the difficulty, of maintaining stealth materials on an aircraft.

“Due to mechanical trauma, water or other chemical trauma, natural or sunlight- or temperature-accelerated chemical breakdown, etc., an aircraft’s low observability coating peels off the substrate, flakes, blisters, cracks, or otherwise undergoes changes in texture or color or both,” the report states.

The essay also explores ways that both ultraviolet and infrared lights can be used to detect wear and tear or anomalies in the stealth coating. Computer algorithms, the paper explains, can also function as an integral part of the process.

Alongside the coating, there are a handful of additional key variables necessary to preserving stealth. The B-2 not only curved but also entirely horizontal, without vertical structures. This creates a scenario wherein a return electromagnetic ping, or radar signal, cannot obtain an actual rendering of the plane. The exterior is both smooth and curved, without visible seams binding portions of the fuselage. Weapons are carried internally, antennas and sensors are often built into parts of the fuselage itself so as to minimize detectable shapes on the aircraft. By not having protruding objects, shapes or certain vertical configurations such as fins, the bomber succeeds in blinding enemy radar, which is unable to generate enough returning electromagnetic “pings” to determine that an aircraft is there. An indispensable premise of B-2 sustainment is that the aircraft be prepared to succeed in the most “high-threat” or “contested” combat environments likely to exist.

The intent is to not only elude higher-frequency engagement radar, which allows air defenses to actually shoot an airplane, but also elude lower-frequency surveillance radar, which can simply detect an aircraft in the vicinity. Also, stealth aircraft such as the B-2 are built with an internal, or buried, engine to decrease the heat signature emerging from the exhaust. One goal of stealth aircraft thermal management is to try to make the aircraft itself somewhat aligned with the temperature of the surrounding air so as not to create a heat differential for enemy sensors to detect.

The priority, maintainers explain, is to ensure the weapons, electronics, computing and stealth properties are all continuously upgraded. Today’s B-2 could almost be described, in some ways, as an entirely different airplane with the same basic exterior – than it was upon first flight in 1989.

NEW AIR FORCE NUCLEAR-ARMED ICBMS TO DEPLOY BY 2029

The Air Force currently operates 20 B-2 bombers, with the majority of them based at Whiteman AFB in Missouri. The B-2 can reach altitudes of 50,000 feet and carry 40,000 pounds of payload, including both conventional and nuclear weapons.

One emerging nuclear weapon, now being tested and integrated onto the B-2 is the advanced B-61 Mod 12, an upgraded variant of several different nuclear bombs with integrates their functionality into one weapon. This not only decreases payload but of course multiplies attack options for pilots. For instance, a B-2 could quickly adjust from a point detonate variant of the B-61 Mod 12, to one designed with penetration capabilities, Air Force officials said. Alongside its nuclear arsenal, the B-2 will carry a wide range of conventional weapons to include precision-guided 2,000-pound Joint Direct Attack Munitions, or JDAMs, 5,000-pound JDAMs, Joint Standoff Weapons, Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles and GBU 28 5,000-pound bunker buster weapons, among others. The B-2 can also carry a 30,000-pound conventional bomb known as the Massive Ordnance Penetrator, a weapon described as a more explosive version of the Air Force GBU-28 bunker buster.

The platform is also preparing to integrate a long-range conventional air-to-ground standoff weapon called the JASSM-ER, for Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile, Extended Range.

Despite flying more than 40-hour missions, pilots have no bed and no refrigerator, just two seats in a small cockpit and a small area behind them about the same width as the seat. Pilot’s food, Polidar said, needs to be non-perishable items.

“Sometimes we can bring a little blow-up mattress, put in on the floor and take a nap,” she said.

So how much longer will the B-2 fly? It is slated to fly alongside the emerging new B-21 Raider stealth bomber as it starts arriving in the mid 2020s, and ultimately retire. However, given its current trajectory and combat effectiveness, it seems entirely reasonable to speculate 2040? Perhaps 2050? We’ll see, the Air Force does not discuss this much.

Kris Osborn, Managing Editor of WARRIORMAVEN (CLICK HERE) can be reached at krisosborn.ko@gmail.com

Westlake Legal Group B-2_Spirit_cropped B-2 bomber 30-year anniversary: Inside a B-2 stealth attack Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article a713ce97-8366-5e65-b381-bdbaa3a5f760   Westlake Legal Group B-2_Spirit_cropped B-2 bomber 30-year anniversary: Inside a B-2 stealth attack Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article a713ce97-8366-5e65-b381-bdbaa3a5f760

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Acting Air Force Secretary Donovan: America needs a Space Force – Here’s why

Westlake Legal Group 150415-F-AS483-001 Acting Air Force Secretary Donovan: America needs a Space Force – Here’s why Matthew Donovan fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 94fe87e8-d023-57c4-b2b6-5a683008cac6

I have spent over 20 years arguing for an independent U.S. Space Force to unleash the full potential of space. President Trump’s decision to ask Congress to approve the creation of a Space Force is an important step forward and deserves bipartisan support.

From my first flight as an Air Force pilot above the Arctic Circle using a handheld GPS, I knew that space capabilities would forever change our world. These capabilities radically shift how we pilot our combat aircraft and how our country can dominate our adversaries on the battlefield.

We should celebrate a new Space Force as a positive step for America. However, the rhetoric surrounding a Space Force often involves distracting attacks on the Air Force, and accusations that we need a new service principally because the Air Force has fallen short in managing space.

SEN. KEVIN CRAMER: WE NEED A SPACE FORCE TO PROTECT OUR NATIONAL SECURITY – APPROVE TRUMP’S PLAN

This narrative desperately needs a correction and overlooks decades of tireless dedication and commitment by America’s airmen. It overlooks the unparalleled improvements in spacecraft and satellites promoted and sustained by the Air Force. And it overlooks how the Air Force helped craft a space architecture that revolutionized the world economy and our way of war.

Our national leaders understand our dependency on space and routinely cite the threat of Chinese and Russian anti-satellite capabilities. We are right to focus on these threats and search for ways to preserve our unique advantages in this realm.

Armies, navies, and air forces have always sought new weapons and tactics to counter their opponents, and the same is true in space. Many space systems are vulnerable and must adapt, and we are aggressively pursuing new technologies and concepts to maintain our lead.

Today the Department of the Air Force has a historic opportunity to continue our leadership in space and secure the final frontier for our citizens, friends and allies. The best way to do so is through a new military service, the Space Force. We need this change because it’s the best way to protect America and dominate future warfare.

The Air Force was built on innovative ideas and by pushing the boundaries of imagination. It emerged as a global force not through incremental improvement, but by pursuing a bold vision of the future that beckoned from over the horizon.

Today the Department of the Air Force has a historic opportunity to continue our leadership in space and secure the final frontier for our citizens, friends and allies. The best way to do so is through a new military service, the Space Force.

To stay ahead of our adversaries, we will continue to evolve and realize a new future of decisive space power. This future will demand dedicated professionals focused on space – warfighters and advocates who can design the best theories, doctrine, tactics and equipment to protect our American way of life.

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I am immensely proud of the Air Force’s accomplishments in space. However, while the Air Force produces the best space systems and most professional space operators in the world, it’s time to harness our decades of experience and lead the nation into a new future.

We look forward to this historic moment and working with Congress to help expand this vital area. It’s time for the U.S. Space Force.

Westlake Legal Group 150415-F-AS483-001 Acting Air Force Secretary Donovan: America needs a Space Force – Here’s why Matthew Donovan fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 94fe87e8-d023-57c4-b2b6-5a683008cac6   Westlake Legal Group 150415-F-AS483-001 Acting Air Force Secretary Donovan: America needs a Space Force – Here’s why Matthew Donovan fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 94fe87e8-d023-57c4-b2b6-5a683008cac6

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US Special Ops want A-29 Super Tucanos to battle terrorists in Africa

Westlake Legal Group supertucano US Special Ops want A-29 Super Tucanos to battle terrorists in Africa Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article 8daf1fb4-14e6-5adb-8ffe-d8e700a3493b

Members of Congress would like to see a more expansive use of the A-29 Super Tucano aircraft in various global hotspots as a way to support U.S. Special Operations Forces and continue needed counterinsurgency efforts.

The A-29 is turboprop light attack aircraft designed and built by Embraer which has been helping the Afghan Air Force battle insurgents for many years in Afghanistan. It has received rave reviews regarding its performance in theater as a platform which can support ground troops fighting enemies or insurgents.

Given its success, some lawmakers and foreign governments are now hoping the US can increase its Foreign Military Sales of the plane to better help allied forces in vital areas of conflict around the globe.

“There are plenty of countries that have an extremist threat — the Middle East and South and Central Africa. SOCOM (Special Operations Command) is asking for this for Nigeria, Somalia and Libya. It is a perfect platform for where we are fighting,” Rep. Michael Waltz, (R) Fla., told Warrior.

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US-trained pilots with the Afghan Air Force have been attacking the Taliban with A-29 Super Tucano aircraft, a platform which seems well-suited for the Air Force’s intended mission scope. Its integrated weapons and laser-firing technology enable the platform to both lay down suppressive fire in support of advancing infantry and pinpoint targets for precision strikes. This mission envelope seems to enable a wide sphere of operational possibilities, to include counterinsurgency and great power challenges.

“They have long loiter time and can stay close to the fight. They are interoperable in a very close-knit way with operations on the ground,” Waltz said.

Since SOCOM forces often operate in as many as 50-countries or more, there does appear to be a pressing need for light attack air support, Waltz maintains.

A-29s are turboprop planes armed with one 20mm cannon below the fuselage able to shoot 650 rounds per minute, one 12.7mm machine gun (FN Herstal) under each wing and up to four 7.62mm Dillion Aero M134 Miniguns able to shoot up to 3,000 rounds per minute.

Super Tucanos are also equipped with 70mm rockets, air-to-air missiles such as the AIM-9L Sidewinder, air-to-ground weapons such as the AGM-65 Maverick and precision-guided bombs. It can also use a laser rangefinder and laser-guided weapons.

The Super Tucano is a highly maneuverable light attack aircraft able to operate in high temperatures and rugged terrain. It is 11.38 meters long and has a wingspan of 11.14 meters; its maximum takeoff weight is 5,400 kilograms. The aircraft has a combat radius of 300 nautical miles, can reach speeds up to 367 mph and hits ranges up to 720 nautical miles. Its range of 300 nautical miles positions the aircraft for effective attacks within urban environments or other more condensed combat circumstances.

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There are a variety of respects in which A-29s can change the equation when it comes to counterinsurgency. First and foremost, they can save lives. If overhead fire support is able to identify and attack pockets of enemy fighters, fewer ground troops have to enter into enemy fire. Also, an overhead asset of this kind can be an intelligence node able to send targeted information and data regarding troop movements.

When it comes to actual close-in counterinsurgency combat, fighters often obscure themselves in defilade or in buildings, requiring a need for precision strikes. The air-ground Maverick precision weapon can use a laser rangefinder and other kinds of advanced targeting technologies – providing what could be called an indispensable element of attack support. Naturally, advancing ground forces can benefit from air support while advancing on enemies for direct targeting or suppressive fire to enable forces to maneuver.

It is not yet clear exactly which areas might pursue Foreign Military Sales, however, the prospect is increasingly likely in areas where counterterrorism operations continue.

Kris Osborn is a Senior Fellow at The Lexington Institute

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Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports

Westlake Legal Group satellite-images-show-china-is-building-its-third-and-largest-aircraft-carrier-reports Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946
Westlake Legal Group 24a00673-download Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946

Images released by a Washington-based think-tank show construction on China’s third and largest aircraft carrier, activity analysts believe could eventually challenge U.S. strategic superiority in East Asia.

The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington released images from April that reveal construction on China’s third aircraft carrier in the Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai over the past six months, Reuters reported.

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China has not confirmed it is building a third carrier. But the Pentagon said last week that work had begun on a vessel that would “probably be larger than the first two and fitted with a catapult launch system to accelerate aircraft during takeoff.”

The CSIS images support the Pentagon’s claims. The satellite photographs show China’s Type 002 aircraft carrier is slightly smaller than U.S. carriers but larger than France’s Charles de Gaulle, analysts said. It remains unclear whether the vessel would have nuclear capability.

Changing political relationships have motivated the Chinese government to accelerate the modernization of its armed forces over the past few years, the CSIS reports. Both Asian and Western militaries are seeking information regarding the purpose of China’s newest aircraft carrier.

Meanwhile, some analysts view its construction as a way for China to slowly undermine U.S. strategic superiority in the region, according to a series of Reuters Special Reports.

Singapore-based regional security analyst Ian Storey told Reuters that China’s Type 002 might put added stress on the relationship between the U.S. and China as other nations in the region become threatened by China’s growing military presence.

“Once completed, it will outclass any warship from any Asian country, including India and Japan,” said Storey, of the ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute. “It is yet another indication that China has emerged as Asia’s paramount naval power.”

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China’s second, smaller aircraft carrier is not set to go into service until the year 2020. The U.S. operates 11 aircraft carriers in the region. State media has previously reported the Chinese military needs 6 aircraft carriers.

Westlake Legal Group 24a00673-download Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946   Westlake Legal Group 24a00673-download Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946

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A-10 pilot describes how iconic plane survives attacks

Known for an ability to keep flying after taking multiple rounds of enemy machine gun fire, land and operate in rugged terrain, destroy groups of enemy fighters with a 30mm cannon and unleash a wide arsenal of attack weapons, the A-10 is described by pilots as a “flying tank” in the sky — able to hover over ground war and provide life-saving close air support in high-threat combat environments.

“It is built to withstand more damage than any other frame that I know of. It’s known for its ruggedness,” A-10 pilot Lt. Col. Ryan Haden, (former) 23rd Fighter Group Deputy, Moody AFB, told Warrior Maven in a previous interview in 2016.

The pilot of the A-10 is surrounded by multiple plates of titanium armor, designed to enable the aircraft to withstand small-arms fire and keep flying its attack missions.

“The A-10 is not agile, nimble, fast or quick,” Haden said. “It’s deliberate, measured, hefty, impactful calculated and sound. There’s nothing flimsy or fragile about the way it is constructed or about the way that it flies.”

11 AMAZING A-10 WARTHOG IMAGES

A-10 Thunderbolt II, affectionately known as the Warthog, has been in service since the late 1970s and served as a close air support combat aircraft in conflicts such as the Gulf War, Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Allied Force in Kosovo, among others.

Having flown combat missions in the A-10, Haden explained how the aircraft is specially designed to survive enemy ground attacks.

“There are things built in for redundancy. If one hydraulic system fails, another one kicks in,” he said.

If the aircraft loses all of its electronics including its digital displays and targeting systems, the pilot of an A-10 can still fly, drop general purpose bombs and shoot the 30mm cannon, Haden explained.

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“So when I lose all the computers and the calculations, the targeting pod and the heads up display, you can still point the aircraft using a degraded system at the target and shoot. We are actually trained for that,” he said.

Unlike other air platforms built for speed, maneuverability, air-to-air dogfighting and air-to-air weapons, the A-10 is specifically engineered around its gun, a 30mm cannon aligned directly beneath the fuselage. The gun is also called a GAU-8/A Gatling gun.

“The 30mm cannon has 7 barrels. They are centered the way the aircraft fires. The firing barrel goes right down the center line. You can point the aircraft and shoot at the ground. It is designed for air to ground attack,” Haden explained.

Armed with 1,150 rounds, the 30mm cannon is able to fire 70-rounds a second.

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Haden explained the gun alignment as being straight along the fuselage line without an upward “cant” like many other aircraft have. Also, the windows in the A-10 are also wider to allow pilots a larger field of view with which to see and attack targets.

The engines of the A-10 are mounted high so that the aircraft can land in austere environments such as rugged, dirty or sandy terrain, Haden said. The engines on the A-10 are General Electric TF34-GE-100 turbofans.

“I’ve seen this airplane land on a desert strip with the main gear buried in a foot of sand. On most planes, this would have ripped the gear up, but the A-10 turned right around and took off,” he added.

There have been many instances where A-10 engines were shot up and the pilots did not know until they returned from a mission, Haden said.

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These aerodynamic configurations and engine technology allow the A-10 to fly slower and lower, in closer proximity to ground forces and enemy targets.

“The wings are straight and broadened. The engines are turbofan. They were selected and designed for their efficiency, not because of an enormous thrust. We have a very efficient engine that allows me to loiter with a much more efficient gas-burn rate,” Haden said.

Close Air Support

By virtue of being able to fly at slower speeds, the A-10 can fly beneath the weather at altitudes of 100 feet. This gives pilots and ability to see enemy targets with the naked eye, giving them the ability to drop bombs, fire rockets and open fire with the 30mm cannon in close proximity to friendly forces.

“We shoot really close to people. We do it 50-meters away from people. I can sometimes see hands and people waving. If I get close enough and low enough I can see the difference between good guys and bad guys and shoot,” Haden explained.

AIR FORCE TO TEST FIRE FIGHTER JET-CONFIGURED LASER WEAPONS POD FROM THE GROUND

The aircraft’s bombs, rockets and cannon attack enemies up close or from miles away, depending on the target and slant range of the aircraft, Haden added.

“We deliver the munitions by actually going from a base position – then pointing the jet at the ground and then pulling the trigger once we reach the desired range,” he explained.

The A-10 uses both “Lightning” and “Sniper” pods engineered with infrared and electro-optical sensors able to find targets for the pilot.

“The aircraft uses the same targeting pod as F-15E and F-16. However, most of the fighters can’t transition between the two targeting pods and we can, based on our software,” Haden said.

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The A-10 carries a full complement of weapons to include Joint Direct Attack Munitions or JDAM GPS-guided bombs; its arsenal includes GBU 38s, GBU 31s, GBU 54s, Mk 82s, Mk 84s, AGM-65s (Maverick missiles), AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles and rockets along with illumination flares, jammer pods and other protective countermeasures. The aircraft can carry 16,000 pounds of mixed ordnance; eight can fly under the wings and three under-fuselage pylon station, Air Force statements said.

A-10 Avionics Technology

Pilots flying attack missions in the aircraft communicate with other aircraft and ground forces using radios and a data-link known at LINK 16. Pilots can also text message with other aircraft and across platforms, Haden added.

The cockpit is engineered with what is called the CASS cockpit, for Common Avionics Architecture System, which includes moving digital map displays and various screens showing pertinent information such as altitude, elevation, surrounding terrain and target data.

A-10 pilots also wear a high-tech helmet which enables them to look at targeting video on a helmet display.

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“I can project my targeting pod video into my eye so I can see the field of view. If something shoots at me I can target it simply by looking at it,” he explained.

Operation Anaconda

During the early months of combat in Operation Enduring Freedom, in a battle known as “Operation Anaconda,” Haden’s A-10 wound up in a fast-moving, dynamic combat circumstance wherein U.S. military were attacking Taliban fighters in the Afghan mountains.

During the mission in March of 2002, Haden was able to see and destroy Taliban anti-aircraft artillery, guns and troop positions.

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“We could see tracer fire going from one side of the valley to the other side of the valley. We were unable to tell which was from good guys and which was from bad guys. Using close air support procedures in conjunction with our sensors on board, we deconstructed the tactical situation and then shot,” he said.

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