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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force

How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers?

Submarine or ship-launched Tomahawk missiles could hit targets from hundreds of miles away, B-2 stealth bombers could destroy enemy air defenses from high altitudes while undetected and stealthy F-22s and F-35s could attack enemy fighter jets with long-range sensors and air-to-air weapons.

Amphibious assault ships could launch F-35Bs, carriers could catapult F-18s into attack missions and the Pentagon could even launch recently tested medium-range, cruise missiles from fixed ground locations.

Any of these scenarios are within the realm of the possible as the U.S. weighs its response to Iran’s Jan. 7 ballistic missile attacks on U.S. military and coalition forces in Iraq.

“As we evaluate the situation and our response, we will take all necessary measures to protect and defend U.S. personnel, partners and allies in the region,” a Jan. 7 Department of Defense statement said. The attacked bases, Ain al-Asad Air Base and Irbil, have been on high alert in recent days due to “indications that the Iranian regime planned to attack our forces and interests in the region,” the Pentagon statement said.

F-35 SET FOR LASER BOOSTF-35 SET FOR LASER BOOST

A potential war with Iran has become more plausible following the U.S. killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ elite Quds Force. The Iranian-backed group is known to be responsible for many attacks against American forces. While not offering specifics, speaking Tuesday before the Iranian missile attacks in Iraq, Defense Secretary Mark Esper was clear about his stance regarding the possibility of Iranian retaliation.

“We remain prepared for any contingency with regard to Iran,” Esper said, in an impromptu Pentagon news conference.

According to a statement released by the Pentagon, Esper said that the U.S. message is that the ball is in Iran’s court, and the United States encourages Iran to de-escalate the situation. Esper added that the U.S. is open to discussing issues and having a more normal relationship with Iran.

“But if Iran chooses to go the other path, we are prepared to deal with that and will respond forcefully,” he said.

SOLDIERS USE AI TO FIRE PRECISION GRENADES, GUIDE DRONE ATTACKS

While no senior U.S. military official would ever offer specifics or speculate about a possible attack on Iran, or even cite general possibilities, there are a number of interesting hypothetical attack options that might offer themselves as topics for a separate analytical discussion. Of course, entertaining any possibilities for discussion purposes would be something completely separate and apart from any actual DoD comment on the possibility. DoD comments along the lines of attack options would naturally not be expected, for security reasons.

Tomahawk missiles and stealth bombers or fighters, if used as part of a series of opening attacks upon Iran, would likely lead the way in an assault by destroying or “softening” Iranian air defenses and other obstacles intended to thwart any U.S. strike. Using range, precision and air dominance, a massive war campaign against Iran would likely begin by opening up an “air corridor” by destroying air defenses so that non-stealthy attack planes and helicopters can conduct operations at lower risk of attack. Ship-launched Ospreys could drop Marines, weapons and networking gear behind enemy lines to conduct high-risk clandestine missions, destroying Iranian supply lines, laser-painting targets for air attack platforms or scouting terrain for an eventual armored vehicle ground attack. U.S. Navy assets would likely seek to destroy Iranian submarines and fast-attack boats, while coordinating massive carrier-launched air attacks on inland targets.

There is a range of specific air-defense weapons that Iran is known to possess, the most dangerous of which is the Russian-built S-300, the most modern variant being the S-300PMU2. This weapon, while by no means invincible to U.S. B-2s, F-22s or F-35s, is significant in that it can reportedly reach ranges of 200km (124 miles) and travel up to altitudes of 27km (17 miles).

What is not clear, or certainly less obtainable through open-source, public information, is the current state of modernization of these weapons. The most advanced Russian air defenses, while often hyped by Russia itself in its state media, are increasingly able to detect even some stealthy aircraft. They use a wider range of detection frequencies, faster-processing power and increased digital networking able to share target data across multiple nodes. Nonetheless, it is by no means clear, despite Russian claims, that these advanced air defenses can actually threaten the most advanced U.S. stealth attack assets.

Nonetheless, these conditions do further underscore the significance of achieving air superiority at the beginning of any kind of military campaign, because alongside its S-300 series air defenses, the Iranians are also armed with a wide sphere of short-to-medium range ballistic missiles and air defenses. For example, the Iranian Kamin-2, a low-altitude, medium-range air defense system, can reportedly target drones, helicopters or even approaching cruise missiles from distances as far as 60km (37 miles). Iran unveiled its Kamin-2 at a National Day parade in 2018, according to a report in Armyrecognition.com.

HOW AI CHANGES ATTACK MISSIONS FOR US FIGHTER JETS AND BOMBERS

Ultimately, initial strikes could prepare the warzone for a massive ground assault led by tanks, infantry fighting vehicles and even dismounted units prepared to attack urban areas. Such an advance would, of course, not operate without close air support likely to include drones, Apache attack helicopters and low-flying attack planes such as A-10s or even high-speed F-35s capable of ground attack. Air supremacy would also clear the way for helicopters, C-130-transport planes and drones. Iran might also present some air-to-air threats, including some of its own fighter jets. Globalfirepower.com estimates that Iran has 142 fighters out of a total of 509 air assets. One report from The National Interest states that Iran possesses six F-14 Tomcat fighters acquired years ago.

Carrier or other ship-launched air attacks such as amphib-launched Ospreys or F-35Bs would likely operate from the Persian Gulf. The range and reach of sea-fired weapons and carrier-launched fighter attacks, in this scenario, would be of great significance in this kind of particular engagement with Iran. Iran regularly operates both mines and small attack boats in the narrow and highly dangerous Strait of Hormuz waterway, an area bordering Iran’s coastline that functions as a key passageway between the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. Having stand-off weapons attack options such as Tomahawk missiles (which can travel up to 900 miles) and carrier-launched fighters would enable the U.S. to project power while being at lower risk of Iranian counterattack by swarming small boats or coastal region sea mines. As of 2019, Iran is in possession of more than 88 small patrol vessels, according to Globalfirepower.com.

While not likely to overmatch the U.S. by any estimation. the Iranian military is significant in many respects, presenting very serious air, ground and undersea threats. Globalfirepower.com’s 2019 assessment states Iran has more than 1,600 tanks, 837,000 total military personnel, roughly 2,300 armored fighting vehicles, nearly 2,000 rocket projectors and 570 Self-Propelled Howitzer artillery vehicles.

Even operating at safer standoff ranges will not remove the seriousness of Iranian maritime attack possibilities; Iran not only has six frigates but also 34 submarines, including up to three Russian-built Kilo-class submarines, according to information from Globalfirepower.com and the Defense Intelligence Agency. This kind of scenario would likely require the U.S. Navy’s most advanced undersea technologies such as Virginia-class attack submarines, undersea drones, advanced sonar technology and a host of surface anti-submarine systems.

‘FIRST-CUT-OF-STEEL’ BEGINS NEW ERA IN NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SUBMARINE WARFARE

Broadly speaking, there are several key concepts to bear in mind when considering a possible U.S. attack; any campaign would likely be multi-domain, meaning it would incorporate air, sea and possibly land systems operating in tandem. Cyberattacks and even electromagnetic warfare could also quite possibly figure prominently. Given this, one much-discussed phrase to keep in mind is… “no war plan survives first contact with the enemy.”

Tomahawk Attack?

Alongside a theoretical discussion of potential war scenarios, two senior Pentagon officials told Fox News that Tomahawk-armed U.S. assets in the region would be ready to fire if given the order.

The USS Harry Truman aircraft carrier strike group has been in the Gulf of Oman along with guided-missile destroyers, a guided-missile cruiser and at least one submarine,” Fox News reported. “The Navy warships and submarine together had hundreds of Tomahawk cruise missiles with pre-planned targets locked into the missiles.”

Westlake Legal Group F35CombatReady How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers? Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fnc/tech fnc f307cbf5-d866-5db9-85ca-d1df9c6f7a10 article   Westlake Legal Group F35CombatReady How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers? Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fnc/tech fnc f307cbf5-d866-5db9-85ca-d1df9c6f7a10 article

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Elephant Walk at Utah Air Force Base showcases 52 F-35s launching in a row

Westlake Legal Group 200106-F-OD616-0014 Elephant Walk at Utah Air Force Base showcases 52 F-35s launching in a row fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c0861fdb-adf6-53ae-9a7a-535e6477605b article

An Air Force base in Utah staged a massive ‘elephant walk’ that featured 52 of one of the country’s most advanced fighter jets launching in a row.

The F-35A II Lightning fighters were part of the Active Duty 388th and Reserve 419th fighter wings at the Hill Air Force Base in the northern part of the state, according to AirForceMag.com. The base is home to 78 of the  Fifth Generation fighters.

“Today’s exercise marks the accomplishment of over four years of work — a little over four years ago, we received our first F-35,” Col. Michael Ebner, 388th Wing vice commander, told the Deseret News. “We now have our full complement of aircraft and locally, we turn this into a goal of full war-fighting capability.”

US DEPLOYS B-52 BOMBERS TO ISLAND IN INDIAN OCEAN

An “elephant walk” refers to the close formation of military aircraft before takeoff.

The base reportedly said the exercise has been planned for months but comes at a time of extreme tension between Iran and the U.S. President  Trump last week ordered the killing of a top general in Tehran. The 388th Fighter Wing tweeted a photo of the rows of jets on the runway and wrote, “We are now at full warfighting capability.”

The 388th is an operational unit that has already sent one F-35A squadron overseas on a deployment to the Middle East. That unit has since returned and a second F-35A squadron from Hill is now deployed in that region.

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“The message is not just to potential adversaries, but it’s also to our nation’s leadership that they can count on the 388th Fighter Wing to support the combat power that they plan and require us to provide,” Ebner told the paper.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 200106-F-OD616-0014 Elephant Walk at Utah Air Force Base showcases 52 F-35s launching in a row fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c0861fdb-adf6-53ae-9a7a-535e6477605b article   Westlake Legal Group 200106-F-OD616-0014 Elephant Walk at Utah Air Force Base showcases 52 F-35s launching in a row fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c0861fdb-adf6-53ae-9a7a-535e6477605b article

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Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: ‘You only get one shot’

You only get “one shot” while taking down a target like Iranian General Qassem Soleimanidrone expert Brett Velicovich said Saturday.

Appearing on “America’s News HQ: Weekend” with host Ed Henry, Velicovich — who once tracked Soleimani’s movements — said that the drone strike on Soleimani was a ” forceful reminder that the Iranians can no longer attack Americans with impunity, [as well as] that the U.S. government can retaliate with a wide variety of options that are both devastating actions that are short of war.”

“Thanks to  President Trump’s decisive action, we are able to use one of the tools within the government’s arsenal to strike and to strike Soleimani with precision,” he added.

SECURITY UPGRADED AT CAPITOL AFTER SOLEIMANI DRONE STRIKE, SOURCES SAY

The MQ-9 Reaper drone was used to strike Soleimani early Friday at the Baghdad International Airport. With a range of 1,150 miles and the ability to fly at altitudes of 50,000 feet, the Reaper weighs almost 5,000 pounds.

Westlake Legal Group MQ9-2 Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: 'You only get one shot' Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism/al-qaeda fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e7126200-57a4-5d72-ad70-4681d77a422e article

Aircrews perform a preflight check on an MQ-9 Reaper before it takes of for a mission in Afghanistan Sept. 31. The Reaper is larger and more heavily-armed than the MQ-1 Predator and in addition to its traditional ISR capabilities, is designed to attack time-sensitive targets with persistence and precision, and destroy or disable those targets. (Courtesy of the United States Air Force)

SOLEIMANI SLAYING: US SEIZES OPPORTUNE MOMENT, BUT RAMIFICATIONS MAY BE COSTLY

According to the U.S. Air Force, the drone system is an “armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long-endurance” drone that is designed primarily for offensive strikes.

The Reaper, which became operational in 2007, can also conduct surveillance, assist in search and rescue missions, and allow the U.S. to “conduct irregular warfare operations.”

“The MQ9 Reaper is [an] advanced version of what’s known as the Predator drone which a lot of people know as the drone used to strike Al Qaeda,” Velicovich said. “And, basically, it’s used by special operations personnel for surveillance to strike and it’s a very sought-after drone that’s used.”

IRANIAN REVOLUTIONARY GUARD COMMANDER THREATENS ATTACKS ON ‘VITAL’ US DESTROYERS, WARSHIPS

He told Henry that the Reaper has “an incredible payload” with laser-guided and hellfire missiles which are “all designed to give targeters like [himself] the ability to strike with extreme precision.”

Velicovich said that, with a target like Soleimani, “he’s priority number one. It’s all about precision; you only get one shot.”

Velicovich also noted that Baghdad was a “great environment” to be able to fly a drone — comparing commercial air traffic in Baghdad to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).

“No one’s going to know the difference between a drone flying or an airliner,” he stated. “The sound from the drone is muffled so they’re able to fly that drone very, very, low and that opens up their sight picture. It gives the individuals the ability to see — more than likely — exactly where Soleimani was located within that vehicle.”

“It’s all designed to give commanders…[who] are authorizing the strike more confidence that it is the individual they say it is,” he said. “We could have captured Soleimani easily, but this was a deliberate action on the president to say we’re going to throw that option off the table.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20004536567210 Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: 'You only get one shot' Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism/al-qaeda fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e7126200-57a4-5d72-ad70-4681d77a422e article

Protesters hold up posters of Gen. Qassem Soleimani while mourning during a demonstration over the U.S. airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday Jan. 4, 2020. Iran has vowed “harsh retaliation” for the U.S. airstrike near Baghdad’s airport that killed Tehran’s top general and the architect of its interventions across the Middle East, as tensions soared in the wake of the targeted killing. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Soleimani was wiped out in the early hours of Friday morning at Baghdad International Airport. President Trump, who authorized the strike, on Friday accused Soleimani of planning “imminent and sinister attacks”.

“We took action last night to stop a war,” Trump said during brief remarks at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. “We did not take action to start a war.”

Without divulging details about what led to the early morning airstrike that killed Soleimani and nine others, the president said the United States “caught” the general “in the act and terminated him.”

“Soleimani made the death of innocent people his sick passion,” Trump added, saying that “what the U.S. did yesterday should have been done long ago.”

Westlake Legal Group Soleimani-coffin-Getty Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: 'You only get one shot' Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism/al-qaeda fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e7126200-57a4-5d72-ad70-4681d77a422e article

Iraqis surround a coffin, draped in an Iranian national flag, during the funeral procession of Iraqi paramilitary chief Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani, and eight others, in the capital Baghdad’s district of al-Jadriya, near the high-security Green Zone, on January 4, 2020. – Thousands of Iraqis chanting “Death to America” joined the funeral procession for Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani and Muhandis, both killed in a US air strike. The cortege set off around Kadhimiya, a Shiite pilgrimage district of Baghdad, before heading to the Green Zone government and diplomatic district where a state funeral was to be held attended by top dignitaries. In all, 10 people — five Iraqis and five Iranians — were killed in Friday morning’s US strike on their motorcade just outside Baghdad airport. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP) (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP via Getty Images)

The killing of Soleimani, the head of Iran’s elite Quds Force, marks a major escalation in the standoff between Washington and Tehran, which has careened from one crisis to another since Trump withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal and imposed crippling sanctions.

Senior State Department officials described the killing as a defensive strike supported by solid intelligence and claimed Soleimani was planning imminent attacks against United States interests and personnel in the region.

The officials said the attacks were being planned in Iraq, Syria and Lebanon, and targeted U.S. diplomats, military personnel and facilities that house Americans. They claimed hundreds of Americans could have been killed.

Westlake Legal Group AP20004420122248 Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: 'You only get one shot' Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism/al-qaeda fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e7126200-57a4-5d72-ad70-4681d77a422e article

People attend the funeral of Iran’s top general Qassem Soleimani and 9 Iranians and Iraqis, in Baghdad, Iraq, Saturday, Jan. 4, 2020.  (AP)

Iran, in response, has vowed “harsh retaliation” for the strike, with Gen. Gholamali Abuhamzeh, commander of the Revolutionary Guards in the southern province of Kerman, threatening an attack on some 35 “American targets,” including “destroyers and warships” near the Persian Gulf.

“The Strait of Hormuz is a vital point for the West and a large number of American destroyers and warships cross there,” Abuhamzeh said according to a Reuters report, citing Tasnim news agency.

“Vital American targets in the region have been identified by Iran since long time ago … some 35 U.S. targets in the region, as well as Tel Aviv, are within our reach.”

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Fox News’ Alex Pappas and Paulina Dedaj contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119698112001_6119699580001-th Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: 'You only get one shot' Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism/al-qaeda fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e7126200-57a4-5d72-ad70-4681d77a422e article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119698112001_6119699580001-th Brett Velicovich on the drone that took down Soleimani: 'You only get one shot' Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism/al-qaeda fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc e7126200-57a4-5d72-ad70-4681d77a422e article

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Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G

For those in the market for a possible doomsday bunker, a decades-long decommissioned nuclear missile complex in Arizona is being sold for $395,000.

The underground silo that once held the Titan II missile, an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, sits on 12.5 acres just north of Catalina.

PRICE OF GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE’S BOYHOOD HOME SLASHED TO $5.6 MILLION

Photographs posted on Luxe Realty’s website showed the interior of the once top-secret facility. The paint was peeling off the rusted metal walls. Giant vault-like doors opened up into vast, empty corridors, some with dirt floors.

Westlake Legal Group 1e59bc41-Titan-II-Missile-Luxe-Realty-2 Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 6a091211-c791-58c2-a9d7-e4e01889cdcf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

Construction of the Titan II missile launch sites began in December of 1960, according to the Titan Missile Museum. (Casey James / Luxe Realty Photography)

Grant Hampton with Realty Executives, who has the listing for the historic property, described the site to the Arizona Republic as a “time capsule” to another era.

Hampton said he had to descend down a 40-foot ladder to the depths of the underground silo, adding that there was no electricity or cell service so far below the surface.

Westlake Legal Group 6ab39c7e-Titan-II-Missile-Luxe-Realty-1 Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 6a091211-c791-58c2-a9d7-e4e01889cdcf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

The property doesn’t come with any bedrooms or bathrooms, according to the Republic. (Casey James / Luxe Realty Photography)

The 4,000 square foot underground space still had three of its original blast doors, which each weigh 7,000 pounds and can withstand shockwaves, according to Business Insider.

2-BEDROOM GEORGIA HOME FOR SALE FOR $1 BY MOTIVATED OHIO SELLER

The sprawling complex was built around 1963 during the Cold War when the Titan II program went into effect, according to the Titan Missile Museum. The program produced 54 missiles, spread out across three Air Force bases in groups of 18. The Titan II, America’s largest nuclear missile, was ready to be launched at any time from the sites.

Westlake Legal Group 6ee41bb0-Titan-II-Missile-Luxe-Realty-3 Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 6a091211-c791-58c2-a9d7-e4e01889cdcf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

The Titan II missiles were ready to launch at any time from the site. (Casey James / Luxe Realty Photography)

The Titan II program was deactivated in 1982, a year after President Ronald Reagan announced the start of his Strategic Forces Improvement Plan to modernize land-based ICBM programs. The program officially came to an end in 1987 – 24 years after it began – when the last facility was shut down. The sites have been decommissioned ever since

Hampton said the site offers buyers limitless opportunities, suggesting it can become an underground man cave, Air BnB or even a doomsday bunker.

Westlake Legal Group Titan-II-Missile-Luxe-Realty-4-1 Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 6a091211-c791-58c2-a9d7-e4e01889cdcf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

The once top-secret nuclear missile silo is only a 30-minute drive from Tucson, although it may be hard to spot. (Casey James / Luxe Realty Photography)

He told the Republic he’s been getting 30 to 40 calls a day about the site since it went on the market early last week.

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The site has passed through the hands of two owners, the first of whom bought it from the government, the Republic reported, citing public real estate records. Robert Ellis, the current owner, bought it for $200,000 in 2003.

Some of the other Titan II sites in Arizona are privately owned, according to the Arizona Daily Star.

Westlake Legal Group 89ee8718-Titan-II-Missile-Luxe-Realty-5 Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 6a091211-c791-58c2-a9d7-e4e01889cdcf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE   Westlake Legal Group 89ee8718-Titan-II-Missile-Luxe-Realty-5 Decommissioned nuclear missile silo in Arizona being sold for less than $400G Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/real-estate fnc article 6a091211-c791-58c2-a9d7-e4e01889cdcf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

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Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6075367651001_6075370763001-vs Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc d561c926-8045-54a2-a726-5091efc651ca article

The Pentagon is sending more than 50 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters to Europe over the next few years to deter Russia and help NATO prepare for an entirely new kind of warfare.

“By the time our planes get there, there will be 100-plus F-35s there with our European partners,” Air Force Gen. James Holmes told reporters at a recent Air Force Association Conference at Maryland’s National Harbor. “We will be falling in on our European partners who already have their F-35s.”

Although the full number of just over 50 combat aircraft won’t arrive until the early 2020s, preparations are already underway. The Air Force didn’t specify where the F-35s will be sent, citing security reasons. However, there are numerous vital strategic areas in the region, such as the Baltics and places in Eastern Europe, that might be considered.

INSIDE THE F-35 FACTORY, WHERE STEALTH BEGINS

Emphasizing that the arriving fighters will “train and operate” together with European allies, Holmes said the move was “important to our ability to compete and deter in Europe.”

Bringing F-35s to the European continent introduces a range of new attack options for U.S. and NATO forces seeking to prevent potential Russian advances. It brings 5th Generation stealth, which includes targeting sensors with never-before-seen range, new air-to-air weapons and a dronelike ability to surveil and target areas of interest.

U.S. and allied F-35s all have a common data link which enables dispersed, yet networked, attack options. In a tactical sense, it seems that a high-speed F-35, fortified by long-range sensors and targeting technologies, might be well positioned to identify and destroy mobile weapons launchers or other vital, but slightly smaller on-the-move targets.

“Once the F-35 gets there you will see it be moved around and used. It will operate with our allies, reassure them and do some deterrence as well,” Col. William Marshall, 48th Fighter Wing Commander, told reporters at AFA. The arriving F-35s will work through U.S. Air Force Europe.

F-35 SET FOR LASER BOOST

The weapons, the ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) technology and the multirole functions of the F-35 provide a wide range of attack options should that be necessary in the region. The F-35 has completed a series of weapons separation tests and is currently able to be armed with the AIM-9X, AIM-120, AIM-132, GBU-12, JDAM, JSOW, SDB-1 and the Paveway IV, Lockheed Martin data states. The F-35 is configured to carry more than 3.500 pounds of ordnance in stealth mode and over 18,000 pounds uncontested.

As part of this equation, an F-35 might also increasingly be called upon to function as a key element of U.S. nuclear deterrence strategy. In recent years, F-35s were deployed to the Pacific theater to participate in military exercises over the Korean Peninsula.

Utilizing speed, maneuverability and lower-altitude flight – compared to how a bomber such as a B-2 would operate – a nuclear-capable F-35 presents new threats to a potential adversary.

LOCKHEED MARTIN F-35 LIGHTNING II: THE FIGHTER OF THE FUTURE

A nuclear-armed F-35 will be able to respond much more quickly, with low-yield nuclear weapons, in the event that new intelligence information locating a new target emerges. Lower-yield nuclear weapons on the F-35 could enable highly destructive, yet more surgical, nuclear attacks to eliminate targets without necessarily impacting much larger swaths of territory.

Air Force officials say the service is now integrating the B61 mod 12 nuclear bomb into the F-35 as part of an upcoming 4th software drop. The Block 4 F-35, to fully emerge in the next decade, contains more than 50 technical adjustments to the aircraft designed as software and hardware builds — to be added in six-month increments between April 2019 to October 2024.

The latest version of the B61 thermonuclear gravity bomb, which has origins as far back as the 1960s, is engineered as a low-to-medium yield strategic and tactical nuclear weapon, according to nuclearweaponsarchive.org, which also states the weapon has a “two-stage” radiation implosion design. The most current Mod 12 version has demonstrated a bunker-buster earth-penetrating capability, according to the Federation of American Scientists (FAS).

AIR FORCE F-16 GETS F-35 SENSORS, WEAPONS AND RADAR

The B61 Mod 12 is engineered with a special “Tail Subassembly” to give the bomb JDAM-type GPS accuracy, giving a new level of precision targeting, according to data provided by the Federation of American Scientists.

The text of the administration’s Nuclear Posture Review, released last year, specifically cites the importance of dual-capable aircraft (DCA) in Europe and states that a nuclear-armed F-35 is fundamental to deterring Russia.

“We are committed to upgrading DCA with the nuclear-capable F-35 aircraft. We will work with NATO to best ensure – and improve where needed – the readiness, survivability, and operational effectiveness of DCA based in Europe,” the Nuclear Posture Review states.

Strategically speaking, the 31st Fighter Wing Commander at Aviano Air Base in Italy, Brig. Gen. Daniel Lasica, put it this way:

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“We want the F-35s to be both predictable and unpredictable,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6075367651001_6075370763001-vs Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc d561c926-8045-54a2-a726-5091efc651ca article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6075367651001_6075370763001-vs Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc d561c926-8045-54a2-a726-5091efc651ca article

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Air Force’s new B61-12 nuclear bomb hits target in testing

Westlake Legal Group for-carmen-7 Air Force's new B61-12 nuclear bomb hits target in testing Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fnc/tech fnc article 633a02c1-fda3-50a7-adef-98680063f3c5

The Air Force is test-dropping an upgraded, multi-function B61-12 nuclear bomb which improves accuracy, integrates various attack options into a single bomb and changes the strategic landscape with regard to nuclear weapons mission possibilities.

“So far the releases have gone as we have wanted them to. We are very happy with the tail kit which is the DoD portion,” Gen. Timothy Ray, Commander, Air Force Global Strike Command and Commander, Air Forces Strategic – Air Strategic Command, told reporters at the Air Force Association…

The B61-12 adds substantial new levels of precision targeting and consolidates several different kinds of attack options into a single weapon. Instead of needing separate variants of the weapon for different functions, the B61-12 by itself allows for earth-penetrating attacks, low-yield strikes, high-yield attacks, above surface detonation and bunker-buster options.

The latest version of the B61 thermonuclear gravity bomb, which has origins as far back as the 1960s, is engineered as a low-to-medium yield strategic and tactical nuclear weapon, according to nuclearweaponsarchive.org, which also states the weapon has a “two-stage” radiation implosion design.

“The main advantage of the B61-12 is that it packs all the gravity bomb capabilities against all the targeting scenarios into one bomb. That spans from very low-yield tactical “clean” use with low fallout to more dirty attacks against underground targets,” Hans Kristensen, Director of the Nuclear Information Project, Federation of American Scientists, told Warrior Maven in an interview last year.

NEW AIR FORCE RESEARCH LAB STRATEGY FAST-TRACKS WEAPONS

Air Force officials describe this, in part, by referring to the upgraded B61-12 as having an “All Up Round.”

The B61 Mod 12 is engineered with a special “Tail Subassembly” to give the bomb increased accuracy, giving a new level of precision targeting using Inertial Navigation Systems, Kristensen said.

“Right now the B-2 carries only B61-7 (10-360 kt), B61-11(400 kt, earth-penetrator), and B83-1 (high-yield bunker-buster). The B61-12 covers all of those missions, with less radioactive fallout, plus very low-yield attacks,” he added.

The evidence that the B61-12 can penetrate below the surface has significant implications for the types of targets that can be held at risk with the bomb.

By bringing an “earth-penetrating” component, the B61-12 vastly increases the target scope or envelope of attack. It can enable more narrowly targeted or pinpointed strikes at high-value targets underground – without causing anywhere near the same level of devastation above ground or across a wider area.

“A nuclear weapon that detonates after penetrating the earth more efficiently transmits its explosive energy to the ground, thus is more effective at destroying deeply buried targets for a given nuclear yield. A detonation above ground, in contrast, results in a larger fraction of the explosive energy bouncing off the surface,” Kristensen explained.

The testing and integration of the B61-12 is one piece of a massive, fleet-wide B-2 upgrade designed to sustain the bomber into coming years, until large numbers of the emerging B-21 Raider are available. A range of technical modifications are also intended to prepare the 1980s-era bomber for very sophisticated, high-end modern threats.

AIR FORCE PROTOTYPES 6TH-GENERATION FUTURE STEALTH FIGHTERS

The B-2 is getting improved digital weapons integration, new computer processing power reported to be 1,000-times faster than existing systems and next-generation sensors designed to help the aircraft avoid enemy air defenses.

One of the effort’s key modifications is designed to improve what’s called the bomber’s Defensive Management System, a technology designed to help the B-2 recognize and elude enemy air defenses, using various antennas, receivers and display processors.

The Defensive Management System is to detect signals or “signatures” emitting from ground-based anti-aircraft weapons, Air Force officials have said. Current improvements to the technology are described by Air Force developers as “the most extensive modification effort that the B-2 has attempted.”

The modernized system, called a B-2 “DMS-M” unit, consists of a replacement of legacy DMS subsystems so that the aircraft can be effective against the newest and most lethal enemy air defenses.

“The upgraded system integrates a suite of antennas, receivers, and displays that provide real-time intelligence information to aircrew,” a service official told Warrior Maven.

AIR FORCE AND DARPA PREPARE TO SHOOT NEW HYPERSONIC WEAPON

Upgrades consist of improved antennas with advanced digital electronic support measures, or ESMs along with software components designed to integrate new technologies with existing B-2 avionics, according to an Operational Test & Evaluation report from the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

The Air Force currently operates 20 B-2 bombers, with the majority of them based at Whiteman AFB in Missouri. The B-2 can reach altitudes of 50,000 feet and carry 40,000 pounds of payload, including both conventional and nuclear weapons.

Kris Osborn of WARRIOR MAVEN (CLICK HERE) can be reached at krisosborn.ko@gmail.com

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US airman stationed in Germany gets 5 years for recording women undress, shower in his house, report says

A U.S. airman stationed in Germany was sentenced by a court-martial Thursday to five years in jail for using hidden cameras in his off-base house to record women who were his guests bathing or undressing while he was away, according to a report.

Staff Sgt. Andrew P. Rogers told a general court-martial last week that he used cameras hidden in alarm clocks and smoke alarms to record the women in the bathroom or guest bedroom, Stars & Stripes reported.

The devices, which were connected to WiFi, were motion activated, allowing Rogers to watch the footage whether he was on base or on vacation, according to the outlet. Other footage was recorded directly on data cards which Rogers reportedly viewed on his laptop or phone.

Westlake Legal Group Ramstein-Air-Base US airman stationed in Germany gets 5 years for recording women undress, shower in his house, report says fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc cbcbd761-a919-5f66-a590-b348a275ffae Bradford Betz article

A U.S. airman stationed in Germany was sentenced to prison Thursday after he pleaded guilty to indecent recording. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

The illicit recordings took place between November 2015 and April 2018. A woman who’d been house-sitting for Rogers while he was on vacation discovered a hidden camera in the smoke detector while she was taking a shower, Stars & Stripes reported, adding that she later discovered a hidden camera in an alarm clock in the guest bedroom.

Air Force investigators confronted Rogers upon his return from vacation. Defense lawyers said Rogers admitted to secretly recording his guests and provided the names of other victims.

The women, who went unnamed in the report to protect their identities, testified in court that the experience traumatized them. One woman who worked with Rogers said she still checked for cameras, “even in my own house.”

CALIFORNIA MARINE FILMED VIOLENTLY TACKLING TWO BRAWLING STUDENTS TO THE GROUND

“I’ve searched my soul for answers,” Rogers told the court Thursday.

“I became obsessed with something unhealthy, something I knew was destructive, but I continued to do it.”

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Rogers pleaded guilty to six counts of indecent recording, a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

In addition, he received a dishonorable discharge and demotion.

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Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086259618001_6086258090001-vs Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS Jeff Harrigian fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 7444fc94-805a-574f-ac6f-bc290b166d12

I was recently in Kenya working with air force leaders from 35 African nations, and while there I read an African proverb that resonated strongly with me. It stated: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” This could not be truer today in how the U.S. Air Force operates on the European and African continents.

In an area of operations that covers 104 nations, it means having strong, trusted and reliable relationships. This is more important than ever, because trust is something that cannot be surged, it is built over time and based on delivering on your word.

This year, as we celebrate the U.S. Air Force’s 72nd birthday, I am reminded of how strong partnerships and teamwork have contributed to the service’s success and more importantly as a joint force, and a nation. The only way we can successfully tackle the complex challenges of today is if we commit to moving forward together. We have the world’s premier Air Force but we could not successfully “fly, fight and win” without the mindset of unity and teamwork.

AIR FORCE AND DARPA PREPARE TO SHOOT NEW HYPERSONIC WEAPON

This fundamental concept was taught to me early in my Air Force career. It is foundational to what we do. As a cadet at the Air Force Academy I was a member of the Wings of Blue parachute team and quickly learned how teamwork is the foundation of excellence. Our team ate, slept and trained together, forging trust and unbreakable bonds that remain today. These bonds and ability to rely on one another have been part of every successful team I’ve served on.

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During my two years as the commander of U.S. Air Force Central Command (AFCENT), our coalition team delivered results in a complex, pressurized environment with lives on the line. Every nation brought an important capability, all underpinning our success. The key components to our coalition were the people, the relationships and trust that was cultivated on a daily basis on the battlefield.

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I share this because the Air Force of today operates in an environment where a strong architecture of allies and partners is critical to our success — we rely on partnerships that we’ve cultivated over the years to create a strong team of willing partners that can prevail in an era of global power competition. We cannot go at it alone; we must work with allies and partners around the world to degrade and defeat malign influences.

As airmen, we speak a common language that facilitates operating at speed over vast distances. This is critical to competing in today’s security environment. This common language did not occur by happenstance. It grew from the strength of shared experiences in training and in combat. Being a good wingman ensures that bad actors who would seek to disrupt, dismantle and destroy the global world order will never succeed because we are ready, willing and working together to ensure that never happens.

Though we have the ability to surge aircraft and generate combat power at a moment’s notice, what we can’t surge is trust. Strong relationships and partnerships are an investment in security and having a global presence demonstrates that we are committed and have skin in the game. Today’s complex security environment, focused on what is referred to as great power competition, requires us to foster, strengthen and build strategic relationships across the European and African continents. We are doing just that.

In Europe it is imperative that we continue to work with our NATO allies and partners to ensure our forward presence and ability to rapidly deploy capabilities into the theater. Together we are an alliance that has the capability to deter potential adversaries and defend in all domains, ensuring our collective security. Our mission is to provide the credible combat airpower needed to deter war and to protect the security of our nations. Should deterrence fail, however, rest assured we are prepared to fight and win.

While the demand to enhance and strengthen partnerships in Europe continues, U.S. Air Forces Africa is focused on helping partners build capabilities designed to bolster security, stability, and ultimately prosperity. We are actively strengthening key relationships and offering assistance on the continent that support our partners’ defense capabilities, ability to counter transnational threats while offering opportunities for political and economic development.

Our determined African partners fight terrorism while working to build regional self-reliance and security. We are partnering with other countries to reduce the impact of malign influences to position African partners for a better future.

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We are motivated and inspired by the dedication and commitment our partners in Africa are showing to developing their respective air forces capacity. This investment will produce more capable and professional militaries that contribute to greater security and stability in Africa and demonstrates our commitment to pursuing mutual aims.

I am extremely optimistic about what the future holds in both Europe and Africa. The strong military relationships we have developed between our respective air forces bolster our collective readiness, enhances our deterrence capabilities and leverages partnership capacity, security and stability. Today as we stand together, I am confident we will lead the way in answering the challenges in a very complex global security environment.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086259618001_6086258090001-vs Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS Jeff Harrigian fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 7444fc94-805a-574f-ac6f-bc290b166d12   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086259618001_6086258090001-vs Gen. Jeff Harrigan: The US Air Force succeeds by doing THIS Jeff Harrigian fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 7444fc94-805a-574f-ac6f-bc290b166d12

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Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space

Westlake Legal Group AP19241739602547 Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/science fnc f8e20755-9161-5e88-8fc7-303fe0f2a011 article

President Trump formally announced the re-establishment of the U.S. Space Command on Thursday after a 17-year absence as his administration focuses on concerns about the vulnerability of U.S. satellites.

“Just as we have recognized land, air, sea and cyber as vital warfighting domains, we will now treat space an independent region overseen by a new unified geographic combatant command,” Trump said during a ceremony at the White House Rose Garden.

The Senate confirmed Air Force Gen. John Raymond to lead U.S. Space Command this past June. The command is expected to draw on other parts of the armed forces.

Space Command existed from 1985 to 2002 when it was dissolved as part of the government’s post-9/11 reorganization.

The renewed focus on space reflects concerns about the disruption of American satellites from Chinese or Russian weapons.

This is a developing story; check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group AP19241739602547 Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/science fnc f8e20755-9161-5e88-8fc7-303fe0f2a011 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19241739602547 Trump establishes Space Command, defends US interest in space Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/science fnc f8e20755-9161-5e88-8fc7-303fe0f2a011 article

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Air Force base produces first certified 3D-printed aircraft parts

The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis Air Force base in California is spearheading an innovative effort to produce 3D-printed aircraft parts.

The squadron is the first field unit in the Air Force to be certified with an industrial-sized 3D printer that is authorized for the production of nonstructural aircraft parts, according to a statement released Monday.

The Stratasys F900 3D printer produces parts up to 36-by-24-36 inches, the Air Force said. It harnesses a material called Ultem 9085 that is described as being stronger, denser and more flexible than traditional plastic.

The printer has been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Air Force Advanced Technology and Training Center.

MARINES 3D-PRINT CONCRETE BARRACKS IN JUST 40 HOURS

It took eight months to make the system fully operational.

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Latrine covers, the first aircraft parts authorized for use after being printed on the Stratasys F900 3D printer are on display Aug. 15, 2019, at Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The first approved project was printed on the machine on Aug. 12 — replacement latrine covers for the C-5M Galaxy aircraft.

“The latrine covers we just printed usually take about a year from the time they’ve been ordered to the time they’ve been delivered,” said Master Sgt. John Higgs, 60th MXS aircraft metals technology section chief, in the statement. “We printed two of the covers in 73 hours.”

MARINES 3D-PRINT CONCRETE BRIDGE IN 14 HOURS

The Air Force explained that the parts that don’t keep aircraft from performing their missions don’t have as high a priority for replacement.

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U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rogelio Lopez, 60th Maintenance Squadron assistant aircraft metals technology section chief, loads Ultem 9085 material into a canister for use in the Stratasys F900 three-dimensional printer Aug. 15, 2019, Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The team can download blueprints that have been approved by the University of Dayton Research Institute from an online database that is part of the Joint Engineering Data Management Information Control System (JEDMICS).

“It brings us a capability that we’ve never had before,” Higgs said. “There’s so many possibilities available to us right now. We’re just scratching the surface.”

AIR FORCE ‘INNOVATION HUB’ LOOKS TO HELP TECH STARTUPS

As the only Air Force field unit that is fully operational, the team at Travis is receiving requests from other parts of the service.

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An aircraft part prints on the Stratasys F900 three-dimensional printer Aug. 15, 2019, at Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

“We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies,” Higgs said, in the statement. “This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Last year Marines used a specialized 3D concrete printer to create a 500-square-foot barracks room in just 40 hours, according to the Marine Corps. Normally, it takes 10 Marines five days to construct a barracks hut out of wood.

ARMY ROBOT CAN GET ITSELF UP AFTER IT FALLS DOWN

The barracks room was built in August 2018 at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in Champaign, Ill.

Army and Navy Seabees were also involved in the construction effort.

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Also last year, Marines at Camp Pendleton, Calif. successfully 3D-printed a reinforced concrete bridge. The feat, which took place in December, is the first time in the U.S. or the Western hemisphere that a bridge has been 3D-printed on site, as opposed to in a factory, according to the Marine Corps.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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