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‘Almost apocalyptic’: American firefighters battle Aussie wildfires

Westlake Legal Group Anna-Kooiman-AUS-firefighters-FOX-2 'Almost apocalyptic': American firefighters battle Aussie wildfires Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 681c1219-9687-51c3-ba93-170325622579

Firefighters from the U.S. are making a difference combating the massive bush fires ravaging Australia, former “Fox & Friends Weekend” host Anna Kooiman said Thursday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” with hosts Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, and Brian Kilmeade, Kooiman reported that while much-needed rain is pouring down on Australia, firefighters still warn that the dousing is not enough to reverse the damage.

The fires, fueled by drought and the country’s hottest and driest year on record, have been raging since September, months earlier than is typical for Australia’s annual wildfire season. So far, the blazes have killed 28 people and nearly half a billion animals, destroyed 2,000 homes, and scorched an area of more than 25.5 million acres — roughly the size of South Korea.

AUSTRALIA WILDFIRE AREAS MAY SEE THUNDERSTORMS, HEAVY RAIN AS SMOKE IMPACTS AUSTRALIAN OPEN

According to the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, more than 100 U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Department of the Interior wildfire personnel have deployed to assist with ongoing fire suppression efforts, joining 159 who were already in Australia.

The bush fires mark the largest-ever deployment of American firefighters abroad and harken back to 2018 when more than 140 wildfire personnel came from Australia and New Zealand to help douse wildfires in Northern California.

“Balmoral [in New South Wales] was almost apocalyptic. The smoke was really thick. It was like being in a dream,” National Smokejumper Manager for the U.S. National Forest Service Roger Staats told Kooiman. “You never expect a house across from a fire station to burn down because you run out of water. That’s what happened.”

“It’s just a massive wall of fire,” said U.S. Army veteran and freelance firefighting aviator Alain Brackmort, who pilots one of the more than 100 waterbombing aircraft used on a daily basis in the state of New South Wales alone.

“I represent the U.S. and it’s a good feeling to know that we’re here and we can come here and support the Australians,” he said.

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New South Wales Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons told Kooiman that to have the “generosity coming from overseas and bolstering our numbers, bringing in all that extra expertise” is genuinely appreciated.”

“What it really shows is that firefighters across the globe all do the same thing,” Staat remarked. “We’re all in this together.”

Fox News’ Greg Norman, Travis Fedschun, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Anna-Kooiman-AUS-firefighters-FOX-2 'Almost apocalyptic': American firefighters battle Aussie wildfires Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 681c1219-9687-51c3-ba93-170325622579   Westlake Legal Group Anna-Kooiman-AUS-firefighters-FOX-2 'Almost apocalyptic': American firefighters battle Aussie wildfires Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 681c1219-9687-51c3-ba93-170325622579

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Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army

Former Arizona Cardinals defensive back Jimmy Legree said Saturday that his dream was always to serve his country as a soldier.

Legree, appearing on “Fox & Friends,” said he envisioned a career in the military from the time he was a child transfixed by war movies.

“I always wanted to be a part of that military family,” he said.

FORMER ARIZONA CARDINALS’ JIMMY LEGREE ENLISTS IN ARMY, FULFILLING CHILDHOOD GOAL

Legree, 28, started basic training at Fort Sill in Oklahoma in December after enlisting in the Army as a communications specialist. So far, he said, his transition from pro athlete to soldier has been a “good journey.”

“I’m excited to be here,” Legree said. “And excited to see what my future is going to be in the military lifestyle.”

Westlake Legal Group 4279395f-694940094001_6121723028001_6121718641001-vs Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 5af7e6b2-8453-5ade-bf8c-909d8976e231

Jimmy Legree, 28, began basic training at Fort Sill in Oklahoma back in December after enlisting in the Army to pursue a career as a communications specialist – something he says was a childhood goal. (U.S. Army)

Legree, a 2013 graduate of the University of South Carolina, said he hopes to bring dedication, a strong work ethic, resilience and focus to his budding military career.

He told “Fox & Friends” hosts Dean Cain and Pete Hegseth that he joined the Army to fight for his country.

“I always wanted that,” he said.

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Legree was with the Cardinals in 2014 and 2015, when he made preseason appearances. He was previously signed by the Seattle Seahawks for a short time in 2014.

While some of his fellow soldiers rib him about his time in the NFL, jokingly asking for autographs, for the most part he’s just one of them.

“I’m not special or anything like that,” Legree said.

He is currently assigned to D Battery, 1st Battalion, 19th Field Artillery. He graduates from basic training on Feb. 21 and will then head to Fort Gordon in Georgia to learn more adanced skills.

Fox News’ Paulina Dedaj contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121723028001_6121718641001-vs Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 5af7e6b2-8453-5ade-bf8c-909d8976e231   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121723028001_6121718641001-vs Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 5af7e6b2-8453-5ade-bf8c-909d8976e231

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Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down ‘completely’

Westlake Legal Group ap18127637558722 Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down 'completely' Yael Halon fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1f586a20-7f87-573f-b1c4-652fcbd22504

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North responded to President Trump’s national address Wednesday, and shed light on actions taken by the president to aid U.S. troops amid rising tensions in the Middle East.

“I was pleased to see him explain to the world why we did what we did,” North said on “Hannity” of Trump’s decision to order a drone strike that killed Iran Gen. Qassem Soleimani. “I don’t think he [Trump] backed down at all. I think he laid out the parameters that if you kill an American, someone in Iran is going to be paying the price for that.”

TRUMP ADDRESSES NATION AFTER MISSILE STRIKES 

North also praised Trump for his efforts to aid American forces stationed in the Middle East and slammed the mainstream media for their failure to cover the issue.

“Let me give you three things that he will never get credit for because the rest of the so-called mainstream media doesn’t want the American people to know it,” North said.

IRAN’S SUPREME LEADER CALLS MISSILE STRIKE AT BASES A ‘SLAP IN THE FACE,’ WARNS IT’S NOT ENOUGH

“Way back in May, he [Trump] convinced the Russians not to sell one of the finest and most effective aircrafts in the world… to Iran. Now, people didn’t hear boo. They didn’t look at it,” said North.

“Number two, last week he started delivering … missiles and aircraft out there to the [Middle Eastern] region,” he added.

IRANIAN OFFICIAL TWEETS PHOTO OF IRANIAN FLAG AFTER ATTACK ON US TROOPS IN IRAQ

“Then, this week they started sending six B-52s. A B-52 is a standoff weapon. They carry 20 cruise missiles. Twenty times six. That’s a whole bunch of cruise missiles coming down in your oil refinery,” North said. “We can launch an attack that will shut the country down completely.”

“Those are the kinds of things that he started in motion months ago,” North said. “He’s never going to get the credit for it.”

In his address Thursday, Trump touted the strengthening of the military under his administration but added: “The fact that we have this great military and equipment, however, does not mean we need to use it. … We do not want to use it.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

His remarks come after Iran fired 16 ballistic missiles into Iraq. Eleven missiles hit the Ain al-Asad Air Base, which houses U.S. troops, one missile hit a U.S. military base in Erbil, and four missiles failed to hit their targets.

Westlake Legal Group ap18127637558722 Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down 'completely' Yael Halon fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1f586a20-7f87-573f-b1c4-652fcbd22504   Westlake Legal Group ap18127637558722 Oliver North: Trump can launch an attack that would shut Iran down 'completely' Yael Halon fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 1f586a20-7f87-573f-b1c4-652fcbd22504

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How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers?

Submarine or ship-launched Tomahawk missiles could hit targets from hundreds of miles away, B-2 stealth bombers could destroy enemy air defenses from high altitudes while undetected and stealthy F-22s and F-35s could attack enemy fighter jets with long-range sensors and air-to-air weapons.

Amphibious assault ships could launch F-35Bs, carriers could catapult F-18s into attack missions and the Pentagon could even launch recently tested medium-range, cruise missiles from fixed ground locations.

Any of these scenarios are within the realm of the possible as the U.S. weighs its response to Iran’s Jan. 7 ballistic missile attacks on U.S. military and coalition forces in Iraq.

“As we evaluate the situation and our response, we will take all necessary measures to protect and defend U.S. personnel, partners and allies in the region,” a Jan. 7 Department of Defense statement said. The attacked bases, Ain al-Asad Air Base and Irbil, have been on high alert in recent days due to “indications that the Iranian regime planned to attack our forces and interests in the region,” the Pentagon statement said.

F-35 SET FOR LASER BOOSTF-35 SET FOR LASER BOOST

A potential war with Iran has become more plausible following the U.S. killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ elite Quds Force. The Iranian-backed group is known to be responsible for many attacks against American forces. While not offering specifics, speaking Tuesday before the Iranian missile attacks in Iraq, Defense Secretary Mark Esper was clear about his stance regarding the possibility of Iranian retaliation.

“We remain prepared for any contingency with regard to Iran,” Esper said, in an impromptu Pentagon news conference.

According to a statement released by the Pentagon, Esper said that the U.S. message is that the ball is in Iran’s court, and the United States encourages Iran to de-escalate the situation. Esper added that the U.S. is open to discussing issues and having a more normal relationship with Iran.

“But if Iran chooses to go the other path, we are prepared to deal with that and will respond forcefully,” he said.

SOLDIERS USE AI TO FIRE PRECISION GRENADES, GUIDE DRONE ATTACKS

While no senior U.S. military official would ever offer specifics or speculate about a possible attack on Iran, or even cite general possibilities, there are a number of interesting hypothetical attack options that might offer themselves as topics for a separate analytical discussion. Of course, entertaining any possibilities for discussion purposes would be something completely separate and apart from any actual DoD comment on the possibility. DoD comments along the lines of attack options would naturally not be expected, for security reasons.

Tomahawk missiles and stealth bombers or fighters, if used as part of a series of opening attacks upon Iran, would likely lead the way in an assault by destroying or “softening” Iranian air defenses and other obstacles intended to thwart any U.S. strike. Using range, precision and air dominance, a massive war campaign against Iran would likely begin by opening up an “air corridor” by destroying air defenses so that non-stealthy attack planes and helicopters can conduct operations at lower risk of attack. Ship-launched Ospreys could drop Marines, weapons and networking gear behind enemy lines to conduct high-risk clandestine missions, destroying Iranian supply lines, laser-painting targets for air attack platforms or scouting terrain for an eventual armored vehicle ground attack. U.S. Navy assets would likely seek to destroy Iranian submarines and fast-attack boats, while coordinating massive carrier-launched air attacks on inland targets.

There is a range of specific air-defense weapons that Iran is known to possess, the most dangerous of which is the Russian-built S-300, the most modern variant being the S-300PMU2. This weapon, while by no means invincible to U.S. B-2s, F-22s or F-35s, is significant in that it can reportedly reach ranges of 200km (124 miles) and travel up to altitudes of 27km (17 miles).

What is not clear, or certainly less obtainable through open-source, public information, is the current state of modernization of these weapons. The most advanced Russian air defenses, while often hyped by Russia itself in its state media, are increasingly able to detect even some stealthy aircraft. They use a wider range of detection frequencies, faster-processing power and increased digital networking able to share target data across multiple nodes. Nonetheless, it is by no means clear, despite Russian claims, that these advanced air defenses can actually threaten the most advanced U.S. stealth attack assets.

Nonetheless, these conditions do further underscore the significance of achieving air superiority at the beginning of any kind of military campaign, because alongside its S-300 series air defenses, the Iranians are also armed with a wide sphere of short-to-medium range ballistic missiles and air defenses. For example, the Iranian Kamin-2, a low-altitude, medium-range air defense system, can reportedly target drones, helicopters or even approaching cruise missiles from distances as far as 60km (37 miles). Iran unveiled its Kamin-2 at a National Day parade in 2018, according to a report in Armyrecognition.com.

HOW AI CHANGES ATTACK MISSIONS FOR US FIGHTER JETS AND BOMBERS

Ultimately, initial strikes could prepare the warzone for a massive ground assault led by tanks, infantry fighting vehicles and even dismounted units prepared to attack urban areas. Such an advance would, of course, not operate without close air support likely to include drones, Apache attack helicopters and low-flying attack planes such as A-10s or even high-speed F-35s capable of ground attack. Air supremacy would also clear the way for helicopters, C-130-transport planes and drones. Iran might also present some air-to-air threats, including some of its own fighter jets. Globalfirepower.com estimates that Iran has 142 fighters out of a total of 509 air assets. One report from The National Interest states that Iran possesses six F-14 Tomcat fighters acquired years ago.

Carrier or other ship-launched air attacks such as amphib-launched Ospreys or F-35Bs would likely operate from the Persian Gulf. The range and reach of sea-fired weapons and carrier-launched fighter attacks, in this scenario, would be of great significance in this kind of particular engagement with Iran. Iran regularly operates both mines and small attack boats in the narrow and highly dangerous Strait of Hormuz waterway, an area bordering Iran’s coastline that functions as a key passageway between the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. Having stand-off weapons attack options such as Tomahawk missiles (which can travel up to 900 miles) and carrier-launched fighters would enable the U.S. to project power while being at lower risk of Iranian counterattack by swarming small boats or coastal region sea mines. As of 2019, Iran is in possession of more than 88 small patrol vessels, according to Globalfirepower.com.

While not likely to overmatch the U.S. by any estimation. the Iranian military is significant in many respects, presenting very serious air, ground and undersea threats. Globalfirepower.com’s 2019 assessment states Iran has more than 1,600 tanks, 837,000 total military personnel, roughly 2,300 armored fighting vehicles, nearly 2,000 rocket projectors and 570 Self-Propelled Howitzer artillery vehicles.

Even operating at safer standoff ranges will not remove the seriousness of Iranian maritime attack possibilities; Iran not only has six frigates but also 34 submarines, including up to three Russian-built Kilo-class submarines, according to information from Globalfirepower.com and the Defense Intelligence Agency. This kind of scenario would likely require the U.S. Navy’s most advanced undersea technologies such as Virginia-class attack submarines, undersea drones, advanced sonar technology and a host of surface anti-submarine systems.

‘FIRST-CUT-OF-STEEL’ BEGINS NEW ERA IN NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SUBMARINE WARFARE

Broadly speaking, there are several key concepts to bear in mind when considering a possible U.S. attack; any campaign would likely be multi-domain, meaning it would incorporate air, sea and possibly land systems operating in tandem. Cyberattacks and even electromagnetic warfare could also quite possibly figure prominently. Given this, one much-discussed phrase to keep in mind is… “no war plan survives first contact with the enemy.”

Tomahawk Attack?

Alongside a theoretical discussion of potential war scenarios, two senior Pentagon officials told Fox News that Tomahawk-armed U.S. assets in the region would be ready to fire if given the order.

The USS Harry Truman aircraft carrier strike group has been in the Gulf of Oman along with guided-missile destroyers, a guided-missile cruiser and at least one submarine,” Fox News reported. “The Navy warships and submarine together had hundreds of Tomahawk cruise missiles with pre-planned targets locked into the missiles.”

Westlake Legal Group F35CombatReady How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers? Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fnc/tech fnc f307cbf5-d866-5db9-85ca-d1df9c6f7a10 article   Westlake Legal Group F35CombatReady How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers? Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fnc/tech fnc f307cbf5-d866-5db9-85ca-d1df9c6f7a10 article

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Space Force instrumental to future of America’s defense, says former NASA astronaut Tom Jones

Westlake Legal Group Space-Force-Tom-Jones Space Force instrumental to future of America's defense, says former NASA astronaut Tom Jones Julia Musto fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/shows/americas-news-hq-weekend fox-news/science/air-and-space fox-news/politics/executive/budgets fox-news/politics/defense/spending fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0270c132-a7b5-516d-8f0b-2d1b796eac40

Space ForcePresident Trump’s new military branch —  is “very important” for the future of the United States as the world places increasing importance on “the space domain,” former NASA Astronaut Tom Jones said Saturday.

Appearing on “America’s News HQ: Weekend” with host Ed Henry, Jones said the president’s investment in this new branch is a “big shakeup.”

“I think it recognizes the importance of space to our defense,” said Jones. “It recognizes that we have these critical satellites up there that help us do intelligence gathering and reconnaissance and instant communications and getting information about early warnings…You know, launches from enemies towards us.”

TRUMP SIGNS $1.4T SPENDING BILL THAT INCLUDES SPACE FORCE, AVOIDS SHUTDOWN

On Friday, the president signed a  $1.4 trillion spending package that included the launch of Space Force — the first new military service in over 70 years.

“Space is the world’s new war-fighting domain,” Trump said Friday during the signing ceremony at Joint Base Andrews. “Among grave threats to our national security, American superiority in space is absolutely vital. And we’re leading, but we’re not leading by enough, and very shortly we’ll be leading by a lot.”

AIR FORCE SECRETARY BARRETT: SPACE FORCE NOW OPERATING TO PRESERVE AND PROTECT OUR VITAL INTERESTS IN SPACE

Jones said the Space Force is designed to focus U.S. efforts on protecting the satellites and “making sure that other enemies know that they can’t get away with an attack like that without suffering themselves.”

“This recognizes that we’ve got to do more to protect our own satellites with the Space Force. And, it brings the talent together from all the military services to protect those satellites and to build the military capability to threaten an adversary’s,” he told Henry.

The program has a budget of $40 million with 200 new recruits, whereas the U.S. Army has a budget of more than $180 billion with 480,000 active-duty soldiers.

“What’s important is to bring the talent together so they can do their job with less friction and less red tape and acquire the launchers and the satellites that we need rapidly to put our assets back up if they’re ever attacked,” Jones explained.

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“I think it’s very important. I think we’re going to be moving more and more importance into the space domain,” he stated.

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Space Force will start small but let Trump claim a big win

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is celebrating the launch of Space Force, the first new military service in more than 70 years.

In signing the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act that includes Space Force, Trump on Friday can claim a victory for one of his top national security priorities just two days after being impeached by the House.

It is part of a $1.4 trillion government spending package — including the Pentagon’s budget — that provides a steady stream of financing for Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border fence and reverses unpopular and unworkable automatic spending cuts to defense and domestic programs.

Space Force has been a reliable applause line at Trump’s political rallies, but for the military it’s seen more soberly as an affirmation of the need to more effectively organize for the defense of U.S. interests in space — especially satellites used for navigation and communication. Space Force is not designed or intended to put combat troops in space.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper told reporters on Friday: “Our reliance on space-based capabilities has grown dramatically, and today outer space has evolved into a warfighting domain of its own.” Maintaining dominance in space, he said, will now be Space Force’s mission.

Space has become increasingly important to the U.S. economy and to everyday life. The Global Positioning System, for example, provides navigation services to the military as well as civilians. Its constellation of about two dozen orbiting satellites is operated by the 50th Space Wing from an operations center at Schriever Air Force Base in Colorado.

In a report last February, the Pentagon asserted that China and Russia have embarked on major efforts to develop technologies that could allow them to disrupt or destroy American and allied satellites in a crisis or conflict.

“The United States faces serious and growing challenges to its freedom to operate in space,” the report said.

When he publicly directed the Pentagon in June 2018 to begin working toward a Space Force, Trump spoke of the military space mission as part of a broader vision.

“My administration is reclaiming America’s heritage as the world’s greatest space-faring nation,” he said. “When it comes to defending America, it is not enough to merely have an American presence in space. We must have American dominance in space.”

Trump got his Space Force, which many Democrats opposed. But it is not in the “separate but equal” design he wanted.

Instead of being its own military department, like the Navy, Army and Air Force, the Space Force will be administered by the Secretary of the Air Force. The law requires that the four-star general who will lead Space Force, with the title of Chief of Space Operations, will be a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, but not in Space Force’s first year. That leader is likely to be Air Force Gen. John W. Raymond, the commander of U.S. Space Command.

Space Force is the first new military service since the Air Force was spun off from the Army in 1947. Space Force will be the provider of forces to U.S. Space Command, a separate organization established earlier this year as the overseer of the military’s space operations.

The division of responsibilities and assets between Space Force and Space Command has not been fully worked out.

Space Force will be tiny, compared to its sister services. It will initially have about 200 people and a first-year budget of $40 million. The military’s largest service, the Army, has about 480,000 active-duty soldiers and a budget of about $181 billion. The Pentagon spends about $14 billion a year on space operations, most of which is in the Air Force budget.

Kaitlyn Johnson, a space policy expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, sees the creation of Space Force as an important move but doubts it will prove as momentous as Trump administration officials suggest. Vice President Mike Pence has touted Space Force as “the next great chapter in the history of our armed forces.” And Esper earlier this week called this an “epic moment” in recent American military history.

Johnson says Democrats’ opposition to making Space Force a separate branch of the military means it could be curtailed or even dissolved if a Democrat wins the White House next November.

“I think that’s a legitimate concern” for Space Force advocates, she said. “Just because it’s written into law doesn’t mean it can’t be unwritten,” she said, adding, “Because of the politics that have started to surround the Space Force, I worry that that could damage its impact before it even has time to sort itself out” within the wider military bureaucracy.

Some in Congress had been advocating for a Space Force before Trump entered the White House, but his push for legislation gave the proposal greater momentum.

Trump’s first defense secretary, Jim Mattis, was initially cool to the idea, arguing against adding new layers of potentially expensive bureaucracy. Mattis’ successor, Esper, has been supportive of Space Force. In September he said it will “allow us to develop a cadre of warriors who are appropriately organized, trained and equipped to deter aggression and, if necessary, to fight and win in space.” He added, “The next big fight may very well start in space, and the United States military must be ready.”

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The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn’t turn the tide of the war

The last major German offensive campaign on the Western Front has become known as the “Battle of the Bulge” for the thrust into the Allied lines.

For the Americans, this was to be the largest and bloodiest single engagement of the Second World War, and also the third deadliest campaign in American history.

It began 75 years ago on Dec. 16, 1944, and while it caught the Allied forces off guard, in the end, the German Army failed to meet its objectives and the battle essentially exhausted the Germans of their resources.          

Despite its failure, for the Germans, the battle is notable for several reasons. It highlighted that even in the late stages of the war the German military was able to mount such an offensive, but also that the Germans were able to utilize deception in a way the Allies hadn’t expected. Moreover, the German military was also rolling out advanced military hardware – including small arms that would influence weapons development to this day.

GERMAN DECEPTION

In December 1944 the German military was largely seen as a spent force. The Allied success began with the D-Day (June 6) landings in Normandy, and after breaking out of the region, followed by additional landings in the south of France; it seemed that the Germans were on the verge of defeat. However, the Allies had suffered setbacks as well, including the failed paratrooper assault on the Netherlands in September, and the failure to break the German lines in the Battle of Hürtgen Forest, which ended just as the Germans’ Ardennes offensive was to begin.

More importantly, Allied forces were fatigued from the near-continuous fighting, supply lines were overstretched and supplies depleted. The Allies believed the Germans were digging in and planned to use the time to regroup for a renewed offensive.

Due to the wooded terrain of the Ardennes region on the French-Belgian border, the Allies opted to reduce the number of defenders, believing that no German counter-attack would be launched in that sector. However, history had proven otherwise – it was through these woods that Germany had successfully launched its “Blitzkrieg” attack against France in the late spring of 1940.

HOW D-DAY TECHNOLOGY MADE OPERATION OVERLORD A SUCCESS

In December 1944 the Germans tried to do it again, and they used a number of deceptive tactics in advance of the attack.

Westlake Legal Group BattleoftheBulge3 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

In this Jan. 6, 1945 file photo, American tanks wait on the snowy slopes in Bastogne, Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. (AP Photo, File)

“If you look at where the Allies were – after fighting through the hedgerows of Normandy and racing across France, to them the Germans looked bloodied and beaten,” David J. Ulbrich, program director and associate professor in the Master of Arts in History and in Military History at Norwich University in the U.K., told Fox News.

“There was a certain amount of hubris involved,” Ulbrich added. “It was in many ways a colossal failure of intelligence, and the Allies misread the tea leaves. But from the American perspective, the Germans were going to be defeated – it was just that the Allies’ supply lines couldn’t keep up. They (the Americans) were out of food, ammunition and gasoline. It was a good time to take a break, and then you had a huge blizzard.”

By contrast, the Germans were very prepared and had amassed more than 400,000 men, and just over 1,400 armored vehicles including tanks, tank destroyers and assault guns. In the initial attack the Germans had an almost two-to-one advantage in manpower and for the first time on the Western Front outnumbered the Allies in terms of tanks and other armored vehicles.

More importantly, the Germans utilized deception effectively, and that was something that helped catch the Allies off guard.

10 INCREDIBLE TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPED FOR D-DAY

“The Germans historically had not been good at deception,” Robert Citino, senior historian at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, told Fox News.

Westlake Legal Group BattleoftheBulge2 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

FILE – In this Jan. 13, 1945 file photo, and provided by the U.S. Army, American soldiers of the 347th U.S. Infantry wear heavy winter gear as they receive rations in La Roche, Belgium. (U.S. Army, via AP, File)

“The Allies had the gold standard of military intelligence throughout World War II, but in the Ardennes campaign the Germans did a good job with comprehensive subterfuge and deception,” Citino added. “This included false radio traffic from an army that didn’t exist, and the Allies fell for some of it.”

One of the key German tactics leading up to the offensive was in tricking the Allies into thinking they were preparing defensively.

“The German radio traffic talked about the ‘Defensive Battle in the West,’ and that gave the impression that they are standing on defense as effectively as they can,” added Citino.

“This was really a case of good deception by the Germans and bad intelligence by the Americans,” said Ulbrich.

D-DAY’S INGENIOUS TACTICS IN PICTURES: FROM INFLATABLE TANKS TO ‘GHOST’ SOLDIERS

The Germans employed a number of deceptive tactics that included false flag operations, led by Waffen-SS commando Otto Skorzeny. Dubbed Operation Greif, it included German soldiers wearing captured Allied uniforms and using captured vehicles to cause confusion. Around 150 of the best English speakers were organized into a commando unit named Einheit Stielau, but in the end, both the lack of enough equipment and the failure of the Germans to master American idioms reduced the effectiveness of the unit.

Westlake Legal Group BattleoftheBulge The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

In this Dec. 1944 file photo, German infantrymen pass by burning captured American vehicles during the drive into Allied lines on the Western Front during the Battle of the Bulge. (AP Photo, File)

Ulbrich noted that this operation created paranoia and was disruptive but only in small areas and didn’t affect the overall strategy of the battle.

“It is an exciting story, and makes a good narrative in a movie, but it didn’t really change the outcome,” Citino told Fox News. “The battle was also notable in that this was the last German paratrooper drop of the war, and they were supposed to secure a major road. It didn’t work out as the soldiers landed all over the place.”

SMALL ARMS TECHNOLOGY

Unlike the major advances that the Allies undertook for the D-Day landings – which included gliders, landing craft and even an artificial harbor – the German developments were on a far smaller scale, but were still significant. Germany’s war effort was beginning to produce jet aircraft and rockets, but for the soldier on the ground much of this didn’t mean anything.

Instead, those men came to appreciate developments in small arms.

HISTORIC US MILITARY RIFLES IN PICTURES

“Most of the German Army was infantry,” explained Citino. “We focus on the tanks, but we have to remember that Germany entered the war with 100 divisions yet only 10 were armored. Throughout the war, they had millions of horses to move equipment. World War II buffs are guilty of focusing on the King Tiger II tanks, but millions of German soldiers never saw one – what they did see were the automatic weapons.”

Westlake Legal Group SuciuStG441 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

The Sturmgewehr 44 seen at a World War II re-enactment this past summer. This was the world’s first “assault rifle,” and was one of the most advanced small arms to see use during the Second World War. (Photo: Peter Suciu)

These included the StG44 (Sturmgewehr 44), the world’s first “assault rifle,” which would later influence the Soviet-made AK-47; the G-43, a German semi-automatic rifle; and the FG-42, an automatic rifle developed for the paratroopers.

“The FG-42 was influential on post-war small arms development including the American M60 machine gun,” said Citino.

THE LONG GUNS: HISTORY OF US MILITARY RIFLES

Westlake Legal Group SuciuStG442 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

An original but deactivated StG44 in the author’s collection. While this weapon was superior to the Kar98K, the main battle rifle employed by the German Army, its introduction into the war has been described by Prof. Ulbrich of Norwich University as a case of too little, too late. (Collection of Peter Suciu)

“That was an innovative and formidable weapon,” added Ulbrich. “But they didn’t have enough of them to make a difference. That was one of the problems with the Germans by this point in the war. They came up with these innovative weapons system, but they were spread thin trying to come up with solutions so no one weapon system gave advantage at the tip of the spear.”

The final problem for Germany was simply one of numbers. After four-and-a-half years of fighting on multiple fronts, they were, in fact, a spent force.

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Westlake Legal Group SuciuFG42 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

The Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 (“paratrooper rifle 42”) was introduced specially for the German elite paratroopers. While it was an influential automatic rifle, it was only produced in limited numbers and had little impact on the outcome of the war. The examples above are replicas of the two versions produced during the war. (Collection of Peter Suciu)

“The units they could bring up were ‘Volksgrenadier’ – made up of substandard manpower combed out of the rear areas, hospitals and administrative posts,” said Citino. “If you are moving ahead with substandard infantry you can’t get real far. Even with better weapons [it] isn’t going to help enough. It isn’t a winning combination.”

Westlake Legal Group BattleoftheBulge3 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a   Westlake Legal Group BattleoftheBulge3 The Battle of the Bulge: German deception and advanced weapons couldn't turn the tide of the war Peter Suciu fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 82e0795a-00fc-5a50-897b-1cc2180c3f7a

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Army ex-employee charged with bribery in scheme to steer contracts to Kuwait base

A former U.S. Army employee was charged Thursday for his role in a bribery scheme to steer contracts to a U.S. Army base in Kuwait, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced.

Ephraim Garcia, 62, was charged in an indictment with one count of offering a bribe, one count of receiving illegal gratuities and one county of offering kickbacks, according to a DOJ release.

Westlake Legal Group Camp-Arifjan Army ex-employee charged with bribery in scheme to steer contracts to Kuwait base fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/politics/justice-department fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 8d2c2074-42f1-5f74-a900-377f4edfab0f

U.S. soldiers walk near vehicles at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait as they prepare to head to Iraq. (Reuters)

Gandhi Raj, 39, was also charged with paying illegal gratuities to Garcia.

Per the indictment, Garcia was responsible for attracting and managing various government contracts related to projects at Camp Arifjan in Kuwait.

ILLINOIS DEMOCRATIC SENATOR RESIGNS AMID FEDERAL CORRUPTION BRIBERY PROBE

Somewhere around September 2015, Garcia allegedly offered to pay a contractor in exchange for steering contractors to Raj, who owned the subcontractor Gulf Link Venture Company, the DOJ said. Garcia allegedly told the contractor that Gulf Link would artificially inflate the price and that Garcia, Gulf Link and the contractor would split the proceeds.

Garcia and members of his immediate family are also accused of having received more than $170,000 in wire transfers from Raj or Gulf Link-affiliates and another contractor.

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Garcia was arrested Tuesday in the Philippines, where he’d been living since 2016, the DOJ said. Raj, who lived in Kuwait at the time of the alleged offenses, remains at large.

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How new Army-developed AI technology can save infantry in a firefight

Envision a scenario wherein dismounted infantry soldiers are taking heavy enemy fire while clearing buildings amid intense urban combat — when an overhead drone detects small groups of enemy fighters hidden nearby, between walls, preparing to ambush. As the armed soldiers clear rooms and transition from house to house in a firefight, how quickly would they need to know that groups of enemies awaited them around the next corner?

Getting this information to soldiers in seconds can not only decide victory or defeat in a given battle but save lives. What if AI-enabled computer programs were able to instantly discern specifics regarding the threat such as location, weapons and affiliation by performing real-time analytics on drone feeds and other fast-moving sources of information, instantly sending crucial data to soldiers in combat?

While current technology can today perform some of these functions, what if this data was provided to individual dismounted soldiers in a matter of seconds? And instantly networked?  Operating in a matter of milliseconds, AI-empowered computer algorithms could bounce new information off vast databases of previously compiled data to make these distinctions–instantly informing soldiers caught in crossfire.

“The use of autonomy will assist in assimilating data from these various systems and quickly provide useful options to command decision-makers including individual Soldiers. Over time, more and more new intelligent technologies will be introduced,” J. Corde Lane, Ph.D. director of the Human Research and Engineering Directorate, CCDC-Army Research Laboratory, told Warrior in a written statement.

Much of this work centered upon near and far-term applications of AI is being done by the ARL’s Cognition and Neuroergonomics Collaborative Technology Alliance. Army scientists and many of its industry partners rest the entirely of this conceptual approach upon a key premise — that AI and autonomy are intended to massively improve the soldier decision-making process and not displace the crucial and much need faculties unique to human cognition. The idea is to have AI-enabled technical systems perform instant procedural functions able to instantly inform humans operating in a role of command and control.

SOLDIERS USE AI TO FIRE PRECISION GRENADES, GUIDE DRONE ATTACKS

The Army calls this overall process “Soldier as a System” …the concept of using computer networking and the latest algorithms to seamlessly integrate otherwise disconnected nodes operated by soldiers. Specifically, this means a single electronic architecture will connect night vision goggles, individual weapon sites, wearable computers, and handheld devices showing moving digital maps and time-critical intelligence data. Information from all of these otherwise separate soldier technologies, which can also include acoustic and optical sensors or mobile power sources, such as batteries, is naturally interdependent and interwoven in crucial battlefield circumstances. Therefore, an ability to use various applications of autonomy and AI to create instant information-sharing in war changes the tactical and strategic circumstances confronted by individual soldiers, massively improving prospects for survival.

The Army is now discussing various technologies and innovations with a handful of industry partners. One such example is Booz Allen Hamilton, a vendor who has been working on a related program called “Digital Soldier.” The system, as described by Booz Allen Hamilton developers, is similarly based upon the concept of creating an overall system or technical apparatus through which to better connect soldier technologies in war.

“We have created some algorithms that can recognize a human in a video feed and recognize the action they are taking. We can see someone who has raised a weapon and immediately cue a heads-up display or drone flying in the area,” Joel Dillon, vice president of soldier solutions at Booz Allen Hamilton, told Warrior.

BAH, the Army and other industry innovators are working to “co-evolve” autonomy and human decisions, recognizing that there many fast-changing emerging problems in war which contain a mix of interwoven and complex variables less calculable by machines and computer algorithms.; the best AI systems, for instance, cannot replicate a lot of subjective phenomena such as certain kinds of “judgment” decisions, feelings or other nuances associated with human perception.

“The use of autonomy will assist in assimilating data from these various systems and quickly provide useful options to command decision makers including individual soldiers. Over time, more and more new intelligent technologies will be introduced and will continually change the nature of the battlefield and the very nature of the tasks the Soldiers perform,” Lane explained.

HOW AI CHANGES ATTACK MISSIONS FOR US FIGHTER JETS AND BOMBERS

Some future-oriented research and AI-work is now analyzing methods of successfully performing analytics on more subjective nuances associated with human perception and behavior – such as speech patterns or cataloged information regarding previous behaviors, tendencies or decisions. Nonetheless, not only is this work early on, but it does not promise to mitigate some of the known limitations of AI. This question is, interestingly, taken up in “Information,” a Switzerland-based academic journal.

The essay, called “Artificial Intelligence and the Limitations of Information,” entertains some of the challenges associated with AI to include complexities related to “meanings” and “inferences.” The journal article, written by Paul Walton, says certain nuances “we are prone to ignore, is at the heart of many fundamental questions about information. Truth, meaning, and inference are expressed using information, so it is important to understand how the limitations (of AI) apply,” the essay states. (Information is a “scientific journal” published monthly by MDPI.)

Walton also cites a difficulty for AI to fully synthesize or compare some different “ecosystems” of information. For example, certain kinds of information collection systems might be unique to individual data sets; the essay, for instance, says financial data compilation may differ from processes used by mathematicians. Therefore, resolving potential differences between what the essay calls “multiple interactions” might prove difficult.

Future AI will, the article explains, need to “analyze the integration challenges of different AI approaches—the requirements for delivering reliable outcomes from a range of disparate components reflecting the conventions of different information ecosystems.”

All this being said, the current and anticipated impact of fast-progressing AI continues to be revolutionary is many ways; it goes without saying that it is massively changing the combat landscape, bringing unprecedented and previously unknown advantages.

PENTAGON APPROACHES MASSIVE NEW AI, MACHINE LEARNING BREAKTHROUGH

For example, Dillon further elaborated that these kinds of emerging algorithms can quickly distinguish the difference between someone extending a weapon or merely digging a hole — or recognize enemy armored vehicles. The AI-empowered system could also quickly cue a combat analyst so, as he put it … ‘they don’t spend time pouring over massive amounts of data.”

The concept here is not so much the specific systems as it is a need to engineer and adaptable technical infrastructure sufficient to evolve as technology changes. Lane described this as a co-evolution between indispensable human cognition and decision-making and AI-enabled autonomy. The ARL works closely with Army Futures Command’s Soldier Lethality Cross-Functional Team which, among other things, is focused on this concept of extending Soldier as a System architecture across an Army Squad unit.

“In some cases, the better chance of victory will be due to faster adaptability. Creating intelligent systems that are able to self-adapt to Soldiers’ needs and seamlessly adjust as Soldiers adapt to the changing situation promotes rapid co-evolution between Soldiers and autonomy,” Lane added.

“We build out algorithms we could run on some kind of soldier-worn system such as a small form factor computer, thermal imaging, daytime cameras or other data coming in quickly through satellites,” Dillon said. “The more we do this, the smarter the algorithms get.”

The Army and its industry partners are now working on advancing the algorithms, writing the code, upgrading hardware and software and engineering the standards through which to create interfaces between nodes on a soldier or between groups of soldiers. For instance, Dillon explained that some of these nodes could include laser designators, input from radio waves or data coming in from satellite imagery overhead. “Computers are so much faster,” as Dillion put it, explaining that algorithms are now being advanced to “train at scale” to analyze a series of images and pinpoint vital moments of relevance.

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“When you network all of this together and bring in all the sensor data, machine learning can help give soldiers the accurate prompts,” Dillon added.

Westlake Legal Group ArmyJavelin2 How new Army-developed AI technology can save infantry in a firefight Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article 188bf8dc-a424-5fcc-a85c-e93758a1b816   Westlake Legal Group ArmyJavelin2 How new Army-developed AI technology can save infantry in a firefight Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article 188bf8dc-a424-5fcc-a85c-e93758a1b816

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Pardoned Green Beret Matt Golsteyn seeks military awards, decorations

Former Green Beret Maj. Matt Golsteyn intends to fight to get back his military awards and decorations that were stripped from him in 2015, his attorney said, days after he was granted clemency by President Trump along with another Army officer convicted of a war crime and a Navy SEAL who was reduced in rank and docked pay.

Golsteyn’s attorney, Phillip Stackhouse, told the Army Times his client will ask the Army to reinstate his Special Forces tab and Silver Star.

“We are asking for reinstatement of everything that was taken from him because that was the president’s intent: to put him back in the position he was prior to the allegations,” Stackhouse said.

Westlake Legal Group Matthew-Golsteyn-AP Pardoned Green Beret Matt Golsteyn seeks military awards, decorations Louis Casiano fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc c8f7b76a-ee56-53e5-a517-ace0550185cc article

Maj. Mathew Golsteyn, a former Green Beret, was pardoned by President Trump last week for an alleged war crime. Golsteyn is now seeking to have the Army reinstate his Special Forces tab and his Silver Star for valor.  (AP)

Golsteyn was pardoned before he could stand trial next month for the alleged 2010 killing of a suspected Taliban bomb maker in the Helmand province. The pardon does not wipe his military record clean.

DON BROWN: TRUMP’S PARDON OF ARMY LT. CLINT LORANCE ON WRONGFUL WAR CRIME CONVICTION SERVES JUSTICE

The process to revoke Golsteyn’s awards were administrative, a separate proceeding from the judicial process he faced.

“The Army is conducting a review to determine the administrative actions required to fully implement the presidential orders,” said Lt. Col. Emanuel L. Ortiz, an Army spokesman, to the Times.

The Army investigated the alleged killing a second time after the first probe didn’t find sufficient evidence to bring charges against Golsteyn.

In 2015, documents surfaced that show Golsteyn told CIA interviewers during a polygraph test that he killed an Afghan bomb-maker who allegedly constructed a device that killed two Marines.

Charges were brought against him and he was stripped of his Special Forces tab and Silver Star award for valor. Trump took a personal interest in the case, tweeting last month that the White House was reviewing the matter.

GREEN BERET MATT GOLSTEYN WANTS CHARGES IN SUSPECTED TALIBAN BOMB MAKER’S DEATH DROPPED BECAUSE OF INVESTIGATOR’S ‘STOLEN VALOR’

Mike Nelson, an Army Special Forces lieutenant colonel, tweeted that Trump “can make the choice he made, but the SF Regiment decided long ago Golsteyn wasn’t one of us and stripped his tab.”

“A tab or a trident is not a lifetime guarantee of being in good standing if you fail to maintain the expectations of the force,” Nelson told the Times.

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Clay Martin, a retired Army Special Forces sergeant first class, told the paper that the Army should have waited to see if Golsteyn was convicted before taking his awards.

“I honestly think he would have won at court martial as well,” Martin said. “I think it just shows SF command’s willingness to jump up and do anything to avoid a potential political nightmare — just cast a guy out.”

Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance was released from a military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., prison following his pardon. He served six years of a 19-year sentenced for ordering soldiers to open fire on three Afghan men who were killed.

Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher was restored to Special Warfare Operator First Class after he was found guilty of posing for a photo with a dead Islamic State fighter. He was acquitted of the more serious charges of killing an ISIS captive in Iraq in 2017.

Westlake Legal Group Matthew-Golsteyn-AP Pardoned Green Beret Matt Golsteyn seeks military awards, decorations Louis Casiano fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc c8f7b76a-ee56-53e5-a517-ace0550185cc article   Westlake Legal Group Matthew-Golsteyn-AP Pardoned Green Beret Matt Golsteyn seeks military awards, decorations Louis Casiano fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc c8f7b76a-ee56-53e5-a517-ace0550185cc article

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