web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy

Navy fast-tracks autonomous undersea drones able to find and explode enemy mines

They lurk beneath the surface of the ocean with explosive power, often buried in the sea floor, denying enemies entry into combat-critical waterways. They can explode on impact or use sensor technologies for proximity detonation. They are shallow, and deep-water, open ocean weapons that are inexpensive, available and increasingly deployed in critical waters by both rogue nations or great powers.

Sea mines, a persistent and long-standing war threat to U.S. Navy surface ships, submarines and small boats, are becoming much more advanced as newer sensing and explosives become available.

With this in mind, the U.S. Navy continues to fast-track a “take the man out of the minefield strategy,” and develop emerging technologies able to find, track and destroy mines — all without putting sailors in danger. To execute this concept of operation, the Navy is moving quickly on what developers call “single path detection,” according to Capt. Danielle George, Mine Warfare Program Manager.

“It is when you take a single platform and go on a single outing and detect a mine and neutralize a mine all in one shot,” George explained, speaking at the Surface Navy Association Annual Symposium on Jan. 16 in Arlington, Va.

NAVY BUILDS AIRCRAFT CARRIER DRONE HEADQUARTERS

George explained that last summer then-Chief of Naval Operations Amd. John Richardson led a study that assessed various emerging mine-warfare concepts intended to demonstrate single path mine detection and neutralization. 

Typically, a mine detection sonar or maritime sensor is tasked purely with detection, a process intended to clear the path for a separate system or platform to actually “destroy” the mine. Now, emerging algorithms and networking technologies are able to achieve a substantial measure of autonomy, integrating detection and neutralization into a single system.

Westlake Legal Group sea-drone-boeing Navy fast-tracks autonomous undersea drones able to find and explode enemy mines Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 837d0b01-12fc-5c41-83ab-e6c357860b8f

Drone image courtesy of Boeing (Boeing)

For the demonstration, the Navy used an emerging, layered system consisting of a forward-looking AQS 20C sonar system, networking buoy and an undersea sensor-explosive known as Barracuda. The integrated system, as described by Raytheon developers, combines sonar, an RF antenna, an acousting modem, an Electro-Optical/Infrared camera and a highly specialized explosive. The multi-pronged process, according to Andy Wilde, Raytheon Director of Strategy and Business Development for Undersea Capabilities, hinges upon a recently integrated high-tech forward-looking sonar known as AQS 20. Having recently delivered its 10th AQS 20 sonar to the Navy, Raytheon developers are moving quickly to meet a growing Navy demand for its long-range sensing technology.

The detection-neutralization “single-path’ process, Wilde told Warrior, begins with integrating the AQS 20 onto a Navy Common Unmanned Surface Vehicle before it is lowered into the water.

NAVY MAY ARM NEW DESTROYER WITH CONVENTIONAL MISSILE ABLE TO HIT ANYWHERE ON EARTH WITHIN ONE HOUR

“The AQS 20C detects the mine and provides the position to the Barracuda’s acoustic sensor,” Wilde said.

The AQS 20 is networked to the Barracuda through an acoustic modem; the Barracuda then pursues the mine using sonar and its underwater EO/IR sensors. Once it receives its input from the AQS 20, the Barracuda “acoustically acquires the target and gets close enough to provide an EO/IR image back to the boat,” Wilde said. “Once the Barracuda gets to within two-to-three feet of the mine, it stops and hovers.”

“We need to have an operator validate the target. The EO/IR visual sensors senses the mine and captures the image. It sends the video image back to the operator to detonate,” Wilde explained.

Significantly, perhaps of greatest significance, the Barracuda not only uses cameras to “see” and “confirm” the existence of a mine, but also itself functions as its own explosive able to destroy or neutralize the mine. The explosive, Wilde described, is highly specialized for the mission, saying additional detail was not available for security reasons.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group sea-drone-boeing Navy fast-tracks autonomous undersea drones able to find and explode enemy mines Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 837d0b01-12fc-5c41-83ab-e6c357860b8f   Westlake Legal Group sea-drone-boeing Navy fast-tracks autonomous undersea drones able to find and explode enemy mines Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 837d0b01-12fc-5c41-83ab-e6c357860b8f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Navy ramps up radar attack technology across fleet

Descending from high altitudes at lethal speeds and often guided by precision sensors, technically improved enemy ballistic missiles can increasingly close in on surface Navy ships, often holding large platforms and even groups of vessels at tremendous risk of destruction.

Many of these threats, to include long-range anti-ship cruise missiles, can travel hundreds of miles to their targets, moving beyond the horizon toward surface ships challenged to detect the approaching weapon with line-of-sight radar systems.

Recognizing the seriousness of these threats, which are quickly increasing in today’s global environment, the Navy is working with industry partners such as Raytheon to integrate an entire family of new radar systems across a wide swath of its surface fleet. The goal is to not only arm surface ships with a new generation of highly-sensitive, discriminating radar technology but succeed in networking them to one another.

NAVY MAY ARM NEW DESTROYER WITH CONVENTIONAL MISSILE ABLE TO HIT ANYWHERE ON EARTH IN AN HOUR

This way, targets from beyond the horizon can be detected by one ship’s radar system, which can then share the “track” information with vulnerable ships miles away. Target data can be passed along, or networked, enabling ship commanders to have more time to identify the best response to the attack. Is a rapid counterattack the best option? Perhaps an interceptor missile might be the better option with which to defend a ship?

The new radars, reported to bring an exponential increase in sensitivity and mission effectiveness to sea-based air and missile defense, are in the process of being built into large portions of the fleet to include emerging new DDG Flight III destroyers, amphibious assault ships and even aircraft carriers. They are called the SPY-6 family of radars, the most powerful of which, the SPY-6 (V)1, is now being engineered into the Navy’s first-of-its kind Flight III Destroyer, the USS Jack Lucas (DDG 125).

The Navy’s Above Water Sensors Program Manager, Capt. Jason Hall explained that the success of the radar systems is inspiring the service to explore new platforms for the technology and pursue a series of weapons and fire control network upgrades moving forward.

NAVY STRATEGY FAST-TRACKS NEW WEAPONS FOR ‘OFFENSIVE’ ATTACK

“The DDG 125 Jack Lucas sets the technical foundation for the fleet. We plan to leverage this combat system as we look at frigate, amphibs and carriers,” Hall said Jan. 15 at the Surface Naval Association Annual Symposium, Arlington, Va., referring to SPY-6 radar integration.

The SPY-6 family advances the technical curve in a number of tactically significant respects, in part because it can combine ballistic missile defense and air and missile defense into a single integrated system. This synergy gives the system an ability to track and help destroy enemy drones, aircraft, cruise missiles and long-range incoming ballistic missiles.

“A lot of this is in the back end in the digital processing, so it is a huge change. Digital is a big change from the analog of old days, which gives you a lot of the improved discrimination, sensitivity,” Hall said.

NAVY ACCELERATES NEW SHIP RADAR TO SUPPORT EMERGING ‘SEA-ATTACK’ STRATEGY

Hall said this back-end digital processing and a radar suite controller operate in tandem with a next-generation X-band solid-state radar.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“We are building the arrays for this ship. We have run the gamut as to what this radar can do. We have simultaneous weapons support functions. We have electronic protection and environmental protection,” Hall explained.

Westlake Legal Group Arabian-Sea-1 Navy ramps up radar attack technology across fleet Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 6a95e866-a718-5fd3-a05e-b24a4bc76142   Westlake Legal Group Arabian-Sea-1 Navy ramps up radar attack technology across fleet Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 6a95e866-a718-5fd3-a05e-b24a4bc76142

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers?

Submarine or ship-launched Tomahawk missiles could hit targets from hundreds of miles away, B-2 stealth bombers could destroy enemy air defenses from high altitudes while undetected and stealthy F-22s and F-35s could attack enemy fighter jets with long-range sensors and air-to-air weapons.

Amphibious assault ships could launch F-35Bs, carriers could catapult F-18s into attack missions and the Pentagon could even launch recently tested medium-range, cruise missiles from fixed ground locations.

Any of these scenarios are within the realm of the possible as the U.S. weighs its response to Iran’s Jan. 7 ballistic missile attacks on U.S. military and coalition forces in Iraq.

“As we evaluate the situation and our response, we will take all necessary measures to protect and defend U.S. personnel, partners and allies in the region,” a Jan. 7 Department of Defense statement said. The attacked bases, Ain al-Asad Air Base and Irbil, have been on high alert in recent days due to “indications that the Iranian regime planned to attack our forces and interests in the region,” the Pentagon statement said.

F-35 SET FOR LASER BOOSTF-35 SET FOR LASER BOOST

A potential war with Iran has become more plausible following the U.S. killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ elite Quds Force. The Iranian-backed group is known to be responsible for many attacks against American forces. While not offering specifics, speaking Tuesday before the Iranian missile attacks in Iraq, Defense Secretary Mark Esper was clear about his stance regarding the possibility of Iranian retaliation.

“We remain prepared for any contingency with regard to Iran,” Esper said, in an impromptu Pentagon news conference.

According to a statement released by the Pentagon, Esper said that the U.S. message is that the ball is in Iran’s court, and the United States encourages Iran to de-escalate the situation. Esper added that the U.S. is open to discussing issues and having a more normal relationship with Iran.

“But if Iran chooses to go the other path, we are prepared to deal with that and will respond forcefully,” he said.

SOLDIERS USE AI TO FIRE PRECISION GRENADES, GUIDE DRONE ATTACKS

While no senior U.S. military official would ever offer specifics or speculate about a possible attack on Iran, or even cite general possibilities, there are a number of interesting hypothetical attack options that might offer themselves as topics for a separate analytical discussion. Of course, entertaining any possibilities for discussion purposes would be something completely separate and apart from any actual DoD comment on the possibility. DoD comments along the lines of attack options would naturally not be expected, for security reasons.

Tomahawk missiles and stealth bombers or fighters, if used as part of a series of opening attacks upon Iran, would likely lead the way in an assault by destroying or “softening” Iranian air defenses and other obstacles intended to thwart any U.S. strike. Using range, precision and air dominance, a massive war campaign against Iran would likely begin by opening up an “air corridor” by destroying air defenses so that non-stealthy attack planes and helicopters can conduct operations at lower risk of attack. Ship-launched Ospreys could drop Marines, weapons and networking gear behind enemy lines to conduct high-risk clandestine missions, destroying Iranian supply lines, laser-painting targets for air attack platforms or scouting terrain for an eventual armored vehicle ground attack. U.S. Navy assets would likely seek to destroy Iranian submarines and fast-attack boats, while coordinating massive carrier-launched air attacks on inland targets.

There is a range of specific air-defense weapons that Iran is known to possess, the most dangerous of which is the Russian-built S-300, the most modern variant being the S-300PMU2. This weapon, while by no means invincible to U.S. B-2s, F-22s or F-35s, is significant in that it can reportedly reach ranges of 200km (124 miles) and travel up to altitudes of 27km (17 miles).

What is not clear, or certainly less obtainable through open-source, public information, is the current state of modernization of these weapons. The most advanced Russian air defenses, while often hyped by Russia itself in its state media, are increasingly able to detect even some stealthy aircraft. They use a wider range of detection frequencies, faster-processing power and increased digital networking able to share target data across multiple nodes. Nonetheless, it is by no means clear, despite Russian claims, that these advanced air defenses can actually threaten the most advanced U.S. stealth attack assets.

Nonetheless, these conditions do further underscore the significance of achieving air superiority at the beginning of any kind of military campaign, because alongside its S-300 series air defenses, the Iranians are also armed with a wide sphere of short-to-medium range ballistic missiles and air defenses. For example, the Iranian Kamin-2, a low-altitude, medium-range air defense system, can reportedly target drones, helicopters or even approaching cruise missiles from distances as far as 60km (37 miles). Iran unveiled its Kamin-2 at a National Day parade in 2018, according to a report in Armyrecognition.com.

HOW AI CHANGES ATTACK MISSIONS FOR US FIGHTER JETS AND BOMBERS

Ultimately, initial strikes could prepare the warzone for a massive ground assault led by tanks, infantry fighting vehicles and even dismounted units prepared to attack urban areas. Such an advance would, of course, not operate without close air support likely to include drones, Apache attack helicopters and low-flying attack planes such as A-10s or even high-speed F-35s capable of ground attack. Air supremacy would also clear the way for helicopters, C-130-transport planes and drones. Iran might also present some air-to-air threats, including some of its own fighter jets. Globalfirepower.com estimates that Iran has 142 fighters out of a total of 509 air assets. One report from The National Interest states that Iran possesses six F-14 Tomcat fighters acquired years ago.

Carrier or other ship-launched air attacks such as amphib-launched Ospreys or F-35Bs would likely operate from the Persian Gulf. The range and reach of sea-fired weapons and carrier-launched fighter attacks, in this scenario, would be of great significance in this kind of particular engagement with Iran. Iran regularly operates both mines and small attack boats in the narrow and highly dangerous Strait of Hormuz waterway, an area bordering Iran’s coastline that functions as a key passageway between the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. Having stand-off weapons attack options such as Tomahawk missiles (which can travel up to 900 miles) and carrier-launched fighters would enable the U.S. to project power while being at lower risk of Iranian counterattack by swarming small boats or coastal region sea mines. As of 2019, Iran is in possession of more than 88 small patrol vessels, according to Globalfirepower.com.

While not likely to overmatch the U.S. by any estimation. the Iranian military is significant in many respects, presenting very serious air, ground and undersea threats. Globalfirepower.com’s 2019 assessment states Iran has more than 1,600 tanks, 837,000 total military personnel, roughly 2,300 armored fighting vehicles, nearly 2,000 rocket projectors and 570 Self-Propelled Howitzer artillery vehicles.

Even operating at safer standoff ranges will not remove the seriousness of Iranian maritime attack possibilities; Iran not only has six frigates but also 34 submarines, including up to three Russian-built Kilo-class submarines, according to information from Globalfirepower.com and the Defense Intelligence Agency. This kind of scenario would likely require the U.S. Navy’s most advanced undersea technologies such as Virginia-class attack submarines, undersea drones, advanced sonar technology and a host of surface anti-submarine systems.

‘FIRST-CUT-OF-STEEL’ BEGINS NEW ERA IN NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SUBMARINE WARFARE

Broadly speaking, there are several key concepts to bear in mind when considering a possible U.S. attack; any campaign would likely be multi-domain, meaning it would incorporate air, sea and possibly land systems operating in tandem. Cyberattacks and even electromagnetic warfare could also quite possibly figure prominently. Given this, one much-discussed phrase to keep in mind is… “no war plan survives first contact with the enemy.”

Tomahawk Attack?

Alongside a theoretical discussion of potential war scenarios, two senior Pentagon officials told Fox News that Tomahawk-armed U.S. assets in the region would be ready to fire if given the order.

The USS Harry Truman aircraft carrier strike group has been in the Gulf of Oman along with guided-missile destroyers, a guided-missile cruiser and at least one submarine,” Fox News reported. “The Navy warships and submarine together had hundreds of Tomahawk cruise missiles with pre-planned targets locked into the missiles.”

Westlake Legal Group F35CombatReady How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers? Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fnc/tech fnc f307cbf5-d866-5db9-85ca-d1df9c6f7a10 article   Westlake Legal Group F35CombatReady How might the US attack Iran? Tomahawk missiles, B-2 stealth bombers, F-35s, carriers? Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fox-news/tech/technologies/drones fnc/tech fnc f307cbf5-d866-5db9-85ca-d1df9c6f7a10 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Joey Jones: Majority of foreign Naval trainees are ‘amazing,’ Saudi Arabia doesn’t have ‘best reputation’

Westlake Legal Group JOEY Joey Jones: Majority of foreign Naval trainees are 'amazing,' Saudi Arabia doesn't have 'best reputation' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 051fbded-dde2-5e41-8e8f-12c24c7e857a

Retired USMC bomb technician Joey Jones said that the vast majority of foreign nationals trained at U.S. Naval bases are ‘amazing,’ but unfortunately the same can’t be said for everyone.

On Friday, an aviation student from Saudi Arabia, identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, opened fire near a Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla., killing three people and injuring at least seven others.

Six Saudi nationals have since been detained for questioning by the FBI as investigators look into whether or not this was an act of terror. Alshamrani was said to be a student in a U.S. Navy training program for foreign military personnel.

6 SAUDI NATIONALS DETAINED FOR QUESTIONING AFTER NAS PENSACOLA SHOOTING: OFFICIAL

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend” with hosts Pete Hegseth, Ed Henry, and Lisa Boothe, Jones said that the air station in Pensacola is part of a tight-knit community and that he had visited administrative offices there before.

“This is a base that’s old and has a lot of retirees in the community,” he explained. “The merge of the Pensacola community and the naval station there…are kind of one community.”

Jones explained that people come back to the Pensacola base their career to do a “twilight tour” and retire.

Jones said it was below his pay grade to know what went wrong, but added, “What I can tell you is we train a lot of countries in a lot of ways.”

He told the “Friends: Weekend” hosts that “it’s not uncommon at all for foreign nationals to be on our bases training.”

He said that while the “vast majority” of the countries and people that they train are “amazing,” the Saudis “don’t necessarily have the best reputation of being there for the right reasons or putting in the hard work.”

“Sometimes it’s royal family and things like that,” he explained.

Friday’s events caused many officials and lawmakers to call for deeper scrutiny of the security measures and vetting that goes into selecting trainees. Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., wrote on Twitter that he is calling for a “full review” of the Navy training programs and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., also tweeted that Friday’s events “exposed some serious flaw” in the vetting process that trainees undergo before entering the program.

The majority of the hundreds of foreign aviation students who have participated in the program are from Saudi Arabia, the Navy said. The Naval training program has about 1,500 pilots in total.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

President Trump said he spoke to King Salman of Saudi Arabia after the shooting and that the foreign leader “called to express his sincere condolences and give his sympathies to the families and friends of the warriors who were killed and wounded in the attack that took place in Pensacola, Florida.”

“The King said that the Saudi people are greatly angered by the barbaric actions of the shooter and that this person in no way shape or form represents the feelings of the Saudi people who love the American people,” Trump added.

Fox News’ Vandana Rambaran contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group JOEY Joey Jones: Majority of foreign Naval trainees are 'amazing,' Saudi Arabia doesn't have 'best reputation' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 051fbded-dde2-5e41-8e8f-12c24c7e857a   Westlake Legal Group JOEY Joey Jones: Majority of foreign Naval trainees are 'amazing,' Saudi Arabia doesn't have 'best reputation' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 051fbded-dde2-5e41-8e8f-12c24c7e857a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

MSNBC’s ‘AM Joy’ is ‘deeply sorry’ for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary

Westlake Legal Group Richard-Spencer-supremacist-navy MSNBC's 'AM Joy' is 'deeply sorry' for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary Nick Givas fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 130d1af8-437b-5eba-9022-2c9faea8f014

MSNBC’s “AM Joy” mistakenly used a picture of white supremacist Richard Spencer during a Sunday segment, about the former secretary of the Navy who shares the same name.

Spencer was fired from his post last Sunday, after a public disagreement with President Trump over the Eddie Gallagher Navy SEAL Trident case. Spencer supported further disciplinary action against Gallagher after he was cleared of war crimes, and moved to have his Trident pin taken away. Trump stepped in and said he would prevent that from happening, which led to Spencer’s removal.

“CORRECTION: Earlier on #AMJoy as we were talking about former Navy secretary Richard Spencer we mistakenly showed the wrong image of white supremacist Richard Spencer,” host Joy Reid tweeted. “We are very, deeply sorry for that mistake.”

Spencer spoke out about his firing on Wednesday for the first time in an op-ed for the Washington Post and wrote that Trump was out of touch with military standards and practices.

“This was a shocking and unprecedented intervention in a low-level review. It was also a reminder that the president has very little understanding of what it means to be in the military, to fight ethically or to be governed by a uniform set of rules and practices,” he wrote.

EX-MSNBC HOST SAYS NETWORK IS ‘SHAMELESS’ IN COVERAGE OF SANDERS, YANG, GABBARD

Gallagher was found not guilty in July, of murder and premeditated murder but was convicted of a lesser charge of posing for a photo with an Islamic State (ISIS) fighter’s corpse during a deployment to Iraq in 2017.

More from Media

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Spencer ended his article by claiming almost all members of the U.S. armed forces make the right decision, nearly 100 percent of the time, and shouldn’t be judged by the actions of the minority.

“More importantly, Americans need to know that 99.9 percent of our uniformed members always have, always are and always will make the right decision,” he wrote. “Our allies need to know that we remain a force for good, and to please bear with us as we move through this moment in time.”

Fox News’ Melissa Leon contributed to this piece

Westlake Legal Group Richard-Spencer-supremacist-navy MSNBC's 'AM Joy' is 'deeply sorry' for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary Nick Givas fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 130d1af8-437b-5eba-9022-2c9faea8f014   Westlake Legal Group Richard-Spencer-supremacist-navy MSNBC's 'AM Joy' is 'deeply sorry' for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary Nick Givas fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 130d1af8-437b-5eba-9022-2c9faea8f014

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Gen. Anthony Tata: Trump was right, fired Navy secretary was wrong on Eddie Gallagher case

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6110037265001_6110028605001-vs Gen. Anthony Tata: Trump was right, fired Navy secretary was wrong on Eddie Gallagher case fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Anthony Tata a0ba1dfd-d43b-5bda-8a55-cb8876cb5770

Fired Navy Secretary Richard Spencer’s outburst at President Trump in a Washington Post op-ed published Wednesday, calling the president’s handling of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher’s case a “shocking and unprecedented intervention in a low-level review” is in and of itself shocking and unprecedented in several ways.

Spencer wrote: “The president has very little understanding of what it means to be in the military, to fight ethically or to be governed by a uniform set of rules and practices.”

In reality, Spencer is the man who bypassed the chain of command by cutting Secretary of Defense Mark Esper out of his scheming and working a backroom deal. Now, after being exposed, Spencer submissively avails himself to an eager mainstream media ready to consume his invective aimed at the president, creating the very chaos he blames on the president.

FIRED NAVY SECRETARY CRITICIZES TRUMP FOR ‘SHOCKING’ INTERVENTION IN SEAL CASE

Spencer aligned himself with the prosecution, adding more weight to the suffocating pressure of a resource-rich bureaucracy bearing down on the defense attorney and his client, Gallagher. Commanders and secretaries with decision-making and appellate authority are meant to be neutral by design, open to evidence, mitigation, and extenuation from both sides of the case.

More from Opinion

Those, like Spencer, who lack the requisite experience of leading large numbers of servicemen and women often fall prey to their own emotion-driven predilections. Spencer wanted the Navy to be right, so he followed prosecution guidance in a case that was marred by prosecutorial overreach.

For example:

Navy prosecutor Cmdr. Christopher Czaplak secretly embedded a tracking virus in an image of the scales of justice and the American flag on emails he exchanged with Gallagher’s defense attorneys, affording him an illegal window into the defense strategy.

Czaplak’s prosecution team, which included Naval Criminal Investigative Service officials, tampered with witnesses in efforts to prevent testimony, tainted the jury pool by leaking reports to the media favorable to the prosecution, and then conspired to shield those crimes as the defense brought them to light.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

When Gallagher refused to sign a confession, reports indicate the brig commander moved him to solitary confinement, something we in the military recognize as an “enhanced interrogation” technique. Gallagher’s only “misbehavior” was not doing what the prosecution was badgering him to do. Sensory deprivation is solely intended to influence the target. It didn’t work on Gallagher, but they tried.

Spencer argues that the president’s intervention in a “low level” case is counter to the good order and discipline of the military. There is nothing “low level” about a wartime murder trial involving a Navy SEAL where a jury of Gallagher’s combat veteran peers found him not guilty of all crimes with which he was charged save being one of 12 individuals who posed for a picture with a dead combatant. Wrong, yes, but not something that justifies such an aggressive prosecution.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Lastly, Spencer’s quibbling over whether the president’s tweet was a “direct order” or not demonstrates how petty and vengeful he was toward Gallagher. The president was right to intervene to prevent a biased, small-minded person like Spencer from spitefully tilting the weight of the bureaucracy on top of a single sailor. Servicemen and women enjoy the same due process rights as the civilians of the country they serve.

As Spencer and his hashtags fade over the next several days, the president’s support of warfighters over bureaucrats will increase the morale of those in the rank and file. The critics will angrily accuse the president of supporting a war criminal, but the real crimes in this case have been papered over by a secretary of the Navy eager to avoid embarrassment at the expense of a sailor who, on the whole, served honorably.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY GEN. ANTHONY J. TATA

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6110037265001_6110028605001-vs Gen. Anthony Tata: Trump was right, fired Navy secretary was wrong on Eddie Gallagher case fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Anthony Tata a0ba1dfd-d43b-5bda-8a55-cb8876cb5770   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6110037265001_6110028605001-vs Gen. Anthony Tata: Trump was right, fired Navy secretary was wrong on Eddie Gallagher case fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Anthony Tata a0ba1dfd-d43b-5bda-8a55-cb8876cb5770

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Navy SEAL Gallagher to retire from active duty, no review board

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6108687351001_6108691193001-vs Navy SEAL Gallagher to retire from active duty, no review board fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc f71d2217-608d-5e36-915e-0adff6999080 Edmund DeMarche article

Eddie Gallagher, the Navy SEAL at the center of a high-profile standoff between President Trump and some top officials in the Navy, will retire from active duty and will not take part in a review board over his conduct in 2017 while deployed, a Navy spokesman said late Monday.

Gallagher, a highly decorated SEAL who received two Bronze Stars with V for valor, was acquitted of murder in the stabbing death of an Islamic State militant captive but was convicted of posing with the corpse.

Lt. Cmdr. Clay Doss, the Navy spokesman, said there will be no additional information due to privacy concerns.

The announcement was not a surprise. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said earlier that he was given a direct order by Trump to allow Gallagher to retire without losing his status as a Navy SEAL.

Esper on Sunday asked for Richard V. Spencer, the secretary of the Navy, to step down over the handling of the case. Esper claimed that Spencer made overtures to the White House to rig the disciplinary process to ensure that Gallagher would keep his Trident.

“I am deeply troubled by this conduct shown by a senior DOD official,” Esper said on Sunday. “Unfortunately, as a result, I have determined that Secretary Spencer no longer has my confidence to continue in his position. I wish Richard well.”

Spencer’s ousting was not a consequence of standing up for military justice – but rather was for taking the matter into his own hands and not going through the proper military channels, the senior U.S. official told Fox News. He was fired for “lack of candor,” the official added.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Spencer, for his part, issued a statement that appeared to suggest his ouster was a direct result of the Gallagher review. He said, “I no longer share the same understanding with the Commander in Chief who appointed me, in regards to the key principle of good order and discipline.”

Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin, Vandana Rambaran, Alex Pappas and Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6108687351001_6108691193001-vs Navy SEAL Gallagher to retire from active duty, no review board fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc f71d2217-608d-5e36-915e-0adff6999080 Edmund DeMarche article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6108687351001_6108691193001-vs Navy SEAL Gallagher to retire from active duty, no review board fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc f71d2217-608d-5e36-915e-0adff6999080 Edmund DeMarche article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New F-35-armed Navy amphibious assault ship completes trials

Firing deck-mounted guns, intercepting enemy cruise missiles, launching F-35B Joint Strike Fighters and using Osprey tiltrotor aircraft to attack behind enemy lines — are all mission possibilities envisioned for the Navy’s fast-progressing second big-deck America-class amphibious assault ship, the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7).

The new ship just completed its acceptance trials in the Gulf of Mexico, a series of exercises intended to prepare the amphib for deployment by assessing its propulsion, communication, navigation, weapons systems and aviation platforms, a Navy statement said.

“You have a work-up cycle where you do various exercises and training to prepare for deployment,” a Navy official told Warrior.

The first America-class amphib, the USS America, has been operational for a while now. The America-class amphibs are engineered to carry Marine Corps attack units, F-35B Short-Take-Off-and-Landing Joint Strike Fighters, Osprey tiltrotor aircraft, CH-53 Super Stallions and UH-1Y Huey helicopters.

F-35 SET FOR LASER BOOST

The first America-class amphib, the USS America, has been operational for a while now. Designed as aviation-centric amphibs, the first two America class ships do not have well-deck for amphibious vehicles but rather are engineered with a larger hangar for aircraft, increased storage for parts and support equipment and additional aviation fuel capacity to support a higher op tempo. The third America-class ship, the now under construction LHA 8, will bring back the well deck for amphibious operations.

“The ability to embark Joint Strike Fighters and MV-22 Osprey enable this versatile platform to increase the lethality of our expeditionary warfighters,” said Tom Rivers, amphibious warfare program manager for Program Executive Office Ships, in a Navy report.

Progress with the Tripoli aligns with the Navy’s fast-evolving modern amphibious attack warfare strategy which envisions big-deck, F-35 and Osprey-armed amphibs as host-platforms launching air support for amphibious attack — reaching enemy targets with safer stand-off distance, conducting forward reconnaissance and at times operating small fleets of amphibious assets.

Since potential adversaries now have longer-range weapons, better sensors, targeting technologies and computers with faster processing speeds, amphibious forces approaching the shore may need to disperse in order to make it harder for enemy forces to target them. Therefore, the notion of an air-powered, disaggregated, yet interwoven attack force, less vulnerable to enemy fire, could be launched to hit “multiple landing points” to exploit enemy defenses.

‘FIRST-CUT-OF-STEEL’ BEGINS NEW ERA IN NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SUBMARINE WARFARE

Execution of this new strategy is, depending upon the threat, also reliant upon 5th-generation aircraft; the Corp F-35B, now operational as part of Marine Corps Air Ground Task Forces aboard the USS Wasp and USS Essex, is intended to provide close-air support to advancing attacks, use its sensors to perform forward reconnaissance and launch strikes itself. The success of an amphibious attack needs, or even requires, air supremacy. Extending this logic, an F-35 would be positioned to address enemy air-to-air and airborne air-to-surface threats such as drones, fighter jets or even incoming anti-ship missiles and ballistic missiles. The idea would be to use the F-35 in tandem with surveillance drones and other nodes to find and destroy land-based enemy defenses, clearing the way for a land assault.

A deck-launched Osprey impacts assault strategy as well, bringing new dimensions to air-sea-ground attack. Using its ability to transport Marines, cargo, weapons and communications gear, an Osprey could conduct what’s called Mounted Vertical Maneuver wherein small unit transport into and “drop” behind enemy lines. This could include deploying high-risk, clandestine surveillance teams, adding communications nodes in preparation for attack or even staging small, pinpointed ambushes on critical enemy assets, supply lines, ammunition storage or other key targets.

The entire strategic and conceptual shift is also informed by an increased “sea-basing” focus. Aviation-centric amphibs, potentially operating in a command and control capacity with smaller multi-mission vessels, could launch attack operations as sovereign entities at safer distances. Senior Navy officials have explained that larger “host-ships” would operate as “seaports, hospitals, logistics warehouses and sea-bases for maneuver forces.”

Big-deck amphibs like the America class, in particular, are engineered with expansive medical care facilities such as “hospital beds and an operating room,” a Navy official explained to Warrior.

NEW 40MM CANNON ON MARINE CORP AMPHIBIOUS COMBAT VEHICLE DESTROYS DRONES, PICKUP TRUCKS

A 2014 paper from the Marine Corps Association, the professional journal of the US Marine Corps, points to sea-basing as a foundation upon which the Navy will shift away from traditional amphibious warfare.

“Seabased operations enable Marines to conduct highly mobile, specialized, small unit, amphibious landings by stealth from over the horizon at multiple undefended locations of our own choosing,” the paper writes.

In effect, future “ship-to-shore” amphibious attacks will look nothing like the more linear, aggregated Iwo Jima assault. A Naval War College essay on this topic both predicts and reinforces this thinking.

“The basic requirements of amphibious assault, long held to be vital to success, may no longer be attainable. Unlike the Pacific landings of World War II amphibious objective areas could prove impossible to isolate,” the paper, called “Blitzkrieg From the Sea: Maneuver Warfare and Amphibious Operations,” states (Richard Moore, 1983).

MARINE CORPS FIRES WEAPONS AT ITS NEW AMPHIBIOUS COMBAT VEHICLE

The essay, written in the 80s during the height of the Cold War, seems to anticipate future threats from major-power adversaries. Interestingly, drawing from some elements of a Cold War mentality, the essay foreshadows current “great-power” competition strategy for the Navy as it transitions from more than a decade of counterinsurgency to a new threat environment. In fact, when discussing its now-underway “distributed lethality” strategy, Navy leaders often refer to this need to return its focus upon heavily fortified littoral defenses and open, blue-water warfare against a near-peer adversary – as having some roots in the Cold War era.

Dispersed approaches, using air-ground coordination and forward-positioned surveillance nodes, can increasingly use synchronized assault tactics, pinpointing advantageous areas of attack. Not only can this, as the essay indicates, exploit enemy weakness, but it also brings the advantage of avoiding more condensed or closely-configured approaches far more vulnerable to long-range enemy sensors and weapons. Having an advanced airpower such as an F-35B, which can bring a heavier load of attack firepower, helps enable this identified need to bring assault forces across a wide range of attack locations. None of this, while intended to destroy technologically sophisticated enemies, removes major risks; Russian and Chinese weapons, including emerging 5th-generation fighters, DF-26 anti-ship missiles claimed to reach 900-miles and rapidly-emerging weapons such as drones, lasers and railguns are a variety of systems of concern.

The America Class

Technical adjustments were made to the flight deck of the USS America to enable the ship to withstand the heat generated by the take-off and landing of the F-35B; these changes are also built into the future USS Tripoli.

SUBMARINE SURGE: WHY THE NAVY PLANS 32 NEW ATTACK SUBS BY 2034

The flight deck modifications to the USS America and entailed adding intercostal structural members underneath flight deck landing spots numbers 7 and 9, Navy officials explained. These adjusted landing spots better enable closely timed cyclic flight operations without overstressing the flight deck, Navy developers explained.

LHA 7 incorporates gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution, and fuel-efficient electric auxiliary propulsion systems first installed on USS Makin Island (LHD 8).

The USS Tripoli is designed with the high-tech Navy ship-based computing network called Consolidated Afloat Network and Enterprise Services, or CANES. Overall, the USS Tripoli is 844-feet long and 106-feet wide with a weight of more than 44,000 tons. A fuel-efficient gas turbine propulsion system brings the ship’s speed up to more than 20 knots, a previous Huntington Ingalls statement said.

The Tripoli carries 1,204 and 1,871 troops, meaning the ship is engineered to carry a Marine Expeditionary Unit, the statement added.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

America class ships are outfitted with a group of technologies called a Ship Self Defense System. This includes two Rolling Aircraft Missile RIM-116 Mk 49 launchers; two Raytheon 20mm Phalanx CIWS mounts; and seven twin .50 cal. machine guns.

Westlake Legal Group NavyUSSTripoli New F-35-armed Navy amphibious assault ship completes trials Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article 7f8204c7-b06a-5cdc-8127-17300a7ef0ac   Westlake Legal Group NavyUSSTripoli New F-35-armed Navy amphibious assault ship completes trials Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/innovation fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc article 7f8204c7-b06a-5cdc-8127-17300a7ef0ac

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later

Researchers have discovered the wreck of the Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga 77 years after it was sunk by U.S. forces during World War II‘s Battle of Midway.

Experts aboard the research vessel RV Petrel announced the discovery Friday. After surveying more than 500 square nautical miles, crewmembers identified the wreckage Wednesday at a depth of more than 17,000 feet in the Pacific.

RV Petrel is part of Vulcan Inc., a research organization set up by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.

“[The Battle of Midway] was a major carrier-to-carrier battle that left its eerie evidence strewn for thousands of miles across the ocean floor,” Robert Kraft, director of subsea operations for Vulcan, said in a statement. “With each piece of debris and each ship we discover and identify, our intent is to honor history and those who served and paid the ultimate sacrifice for their countries.”

WRECK OF WWII AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS WASP DISCOVERED IN THE CORAL SEA

Eerie images of the Kaga captured by an undersea drone show a starboard side gun, a 20 cm gun, a gun mount and a barbette, or gun emplacement.

Westlake Legal Group KagaStarboardSideGun Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A starboard side gun on the Kaga wreck. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

The Kaga is one of four Japanese aircraft carriers that took part in the Battle of Midway, June 4-7, 1942. All four of the carriers, along with the Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma, were sunk in the battle, marking a pivotal victory for the U.S. Navy.

After the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Japan hoped to deal another major blow to the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Midway. However, U.S. codebreakers were able to get details of the Japanese plan, and the Navy prepared its own ambush.

WWII WRECK USS HELENA DISCOVERED BY MICROSOFT CO-FOUNDER PAUL ALLEN’S CREW

“The Battle of Midway was an American intelligence breakthrough,” Frank Thompson, curator at the Naval History and Heritage Command, said in the statement. “The team that deciphered the Japanese fleet codes enabled Pacific Fleet commander Nimitz to understand Japanese intentions and plan accordingly. This was a true turning point in the war for the U.S. Navy.”

Westlake Legal Group KagaBarbette Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A barbette, or gun emplacement, on the Kaga. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

The Petrel crew hopes to find and survey all the wreckage from the entire battle, an effort that could add new details about Midway to history books.

RV Petrel is no stranger to shipwreck discoveries. Earlier this year, for example, experts from the research vessel discovered the wreck of World War II aircraft carrier USS Wasp in the Coral Sea more than 70 years after the ship was sunk during the Guadalcanal campaign.

Westlake Legal Group KagaGunMount Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A gun mount on the wreck of the Kaga. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc)

Also in 2019, researchers aboard the RV Petrel discovered one of the first Japanese battleships to be sunk by U.S. forces during World War II. Imperial Japanese Navy ship Hiei sank on Nov. 14, 1942, in the Solomon Islands.

ONE OF THE LAST US WARSHIPS SUNK BY A GERMAN SUB DURING WWII REVEALS ITS SECRETS IN EERIE IMAGES FROM SEABED

Paul Allen died in October 2018 from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. His research organization has discovered a host of historic military shipwrecks, such as the wrecks of the USS Helena, USS Lexington and USS Juneau.

Westlake Legal Group bacf9bcd-Kaga20cmGun Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A 20 cm gun on the Kaga, which sank during the Battle of Midway in 1942. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group acffcd28-Kaga20cmGun2 Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

An undersea drone from research vessel RV Petrel captured eerie images of the aircraft carrier on the seabed. (​Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. ​​​​​​​)

The group’s biggest discovery, however, came in 2017, when Allen and his team found the long-lost wreck of the USS Indianapolis in the Philippine Sea.

The Associated Press contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group KagaGunMount Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9   Westlake Legal Group KagaGunMount Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later

Researchers have discovered the wreck of the Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga 77 years after it was sunk by U.S. forces during World War II‘s Battle of Midway.

Experts aboard the research vessel RV Petrel announced the discovery Friday. After surveying more than 500 square nautical miles, crewmembers identified the wreckage Wednesday at a depth of more than 17,000 feet in the Pacific.

RV Petrel is part of Vulcan Inc., a research organization set up by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.

“[The Battle of Midway] was a major carrier-to-carrier battle that left its eerie evidence strewn for thousands of miles across the ocean floor,” Robert Kraft, director of subsea operations for Vulcan, said in a statement. “With each piece of debris and each ship we discover and identify, our intent is to honor history and those who served and paid the ultimate sacrifice for their countries.”

WRECK OF WWII AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS WASP DISCOVERED IN THE CORAL SEA

Eerie images of the Kaga captured by an undersea drone show a starboard side gun, a 20 cm gun, a gun mount and a barbette, or gun emplacement.

Westlake Legal Group KagaStarboardSideGun Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A starboard side gun on the Kaga wreck. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

The Kaga is one of four Japanese aircraft carriers that took part in the Battle of Midway, June 4-7, 1942. All four of the carriers, along with the Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma, were sunk in the battle, marking a pivotal victory for the U.S. Navy.

After the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Japan hoped to deal another major blow to the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Midway. However, U.S. codebreakers were able to get details of the Japanese plan, and the Navy prepared its own ambush.

WWII WRECK USS HELENA DISCOVERED BY MICROSOFT CO-FOUNDER PAUL ALLEN’S CREW

“The Battle of Midway was an American intelligence breakthrough,” Frank Thompson, curator at the Naval History and Heritage Command, said in the statement. “The team that deciphered the Japanese fleet codes enabled Pacific Fleet commander Nimitz to understand Japanese intentions and plan accordingly. This was a true turning point in the war for the U.S. Navy.”

Westlake Legal Group KagaBarbette Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A barbette, or gun emplacement, on the Kaga. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

The Petrel crew hopes to find and survey all the wreckage from the entire battle, an effort that could add new details about Midway to history books.

RV Petrel is no stranger to shipwreck discoveries. Earlier this year, for example, experts from the research vessel discovered the wreck of World War II aircraft carrier USS Wasp in the Coral Sea more than 70 years after the ship was sunk during the Guadalcanal campaign.

Westlake Legal Group KagaGunMount Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A gun mount on the wreck of the Kaga. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc)

Also in 2019, researchers aboard the RV Petrel discovered one of the first Japanese battleships to be sunk by U.S. forces during World War II. Imperial Japanese Navy ship Hiei sank on Nov. 14, 1942, in the Solomon Islands.

ONE OF THE LAST US WARSHIPS SUNK BY A GERMAN SUB DURING WWII REVEALS ITS SECRETS IN EERIE IMAGES FROM SEABED

Paul Allen died in October 2018 from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. His research organization has discovered a host of historic military shipwrecks, such as the wrecks of the USS Helena, USS Lexington and USS Juneau.

Westlake Legal Group bacf9bcd-Kaga20cmGun Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

A 20 cm gun on the Kaga, which sank during the Battle of Midway in 1942. (Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group acffcd28-Kaga20cmGun2 Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

An undersea drone from research vessel RV Petrel captured eerie images of the aircraft carrier on the seabed. (​Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. ​​​​​​​)

The group’s biggest discovery, however, came in 2017, when Allen and his team found the long-lost wreck of the USS Indianapolis in the Philippine Sea.

The Associated Press contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group KagaGunMount Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9   Westlake Legal Group KagaGunMount Wreck of Japanese aircraft carrier sunk in Battle of Midway discovered 77 years later James Rogers fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2ae6add3-fad3-5a10-a665-9a3f4935f5b9

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com