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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/crime (Page 125)

Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls’ death

Westlake Legal Group texas-killer-dies-questions-still-remain-about-girls-death Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls' death NAVASOTA, Texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 96099660-7f4f-5f97-8b78-8fd9a7c91381

A convicted murderer serving 70 years for a 1978 slaying near Houston who was also under investigation in the unsolved killings of 11 missing girls has collapsed and died in a Texas prison.

Jeremy Desel, a spokesman for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, said that inmate Edward Harold Bell, 79, died Saturday at the Wallace Pack Unit in Navasota. The facility located about 60 miles (95 kilometers) northwest of Houston holds several elderly prisoners

“There did not appear to be any signs of foul play,” Desel told The Associated Press on Monday.

Desel declined to discuss Bell’s medical history, citing privacy laws. All in-custody deaths are investigated by the independent Office of Inspector General, according to Desel.

Bell’s death leaves unanswered questions about the unsolved murders of 11 girls he claimed to have killed, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Bell was already serving time for killing Larry Dickens, an ex-Marine from Pasadena, when he admitted in 2011 to kidnapping and killing several girls who had disappeared from Galveston, Dickinson, Houston, Clear Lake and Alvin in the 1970s.

In one of several letters sent, Bell called the girls the “Eleven who went to Heaven.” Bell acknowledged that he had also sent confession letters detailing several identical crimes to prosecutors in Galveston and Harris counties in 1998.

A few years after Bell made claims of being a serial killer, retired Galveston homicide detective Fred Paige and a Chronicle reporter collaborated to find evidence that he murdered the girls. The results of findings in that investigation were highlighted in a 2017 documentary on A&E called “The Eleven.”

Galveston prosecutors then reopened the murder cases of Debbie Ackerman and Maria Johnson, the two island girls whose kidnapping and deaths Bell detailed in letters and interviews.

Bell was never charged with those two homicides, but he remained the key suspect until the time of his death. He also was the suspect in numerous other unresolved murders, but the departments spearheading the 11 cold cases could not find DNA evidence, nor were they able to locate weapons.

Rita Brestrup, who lost her sister Maria Johnson in 1971, said she had no words for Bell but was happy that he “no longer walks this earth and will never be paroled.”

Bell was never prosecuted for any other murders besides Dickens, who was shot and killed after confronting Bell, a serial sex perpetrator who had exposed himself to a group of neighborhood girls.

Pasadena authorities subsequently arrested Bell and found murder weapons and pornography stashed in his pick-up truck. He made bail in Harris County and went on the run for 14 years.

After Bell was the subject of a 1992 Unsolved Mysteries episode, people provided tips which led to his arrest. The episode also featured Matthew McConaughey, who played Dickens in the actor’s first TV role.

___

Information from: Houston Chronicle, http://www.houstonchronicle.com

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42842bc1f03a45ec8fae46864b7d6250 Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls' death NAVASOTA, Texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 96099660-7f4f-5f97-8b78-8fd9a7c91381   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42842bc1f03a45ec8fae46864b7d6250 Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls' death NAVASOTA, Texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 96099660-7f4f-5f97-8b78-8fd9a7c91381

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls’ death

A convicted murderer serving 70 years for a 1978 slaying near Houston who was also under investigation in the unsolved killings of 11 missing girls has collapsed and died in a Texas prison.

Jeremy Desel, a spokesman for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, said that inmate Edward Harold Bell, 79, died Saturday at the Wallace Pack Unit in Navasota. The facility located about 60 miles (95 kilometers) northwest of Houston holds several elderly prisoners

“There did not appear to be any signs of foul play,” Desel told The Associated Press on Monday.

Desel declined to discuss Bell’s medical history, citing privacy laws. All in-custody deaths are investigated by the independent Office of Inspector General, according to Desel.

Bell’s death leaves unanswered questions about the unsolved murders of 11 girls he claimed to have killed, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Bell was already serving time for killing Larry Dickens, an ex-Marine from Pasadena, when he admitted in 2011 to kidnapping and killing several girls who had disappeared from Galveston, Dickinson, Houston, Clear Lake and Alvin in the 1970s.

In one of several letters sent, Bell called the girls the “Eleven who went to Heaven.” Bell acknowledged that he had also sent confession letters detailing several identical crimes to prosecutors in Galveston and Harris counties in 1998.

A few years after Bell made claims of being a serial killer, retired Galveston homicide detective Fred Paige and a Chronicle reporter collaborated to find evidence that he murdered the girls. The results of findings in that investigation were highlighted in a 2017 documentary on A&E called “The Eleven.”

Galveston prosecutors then reopened the murder cases of Debbie Ackerman and Maria Johnson, the two island girls whose kidnapping and deaths Bell detailed in letters and interviews.

Bell was never charged with those two homicides, but he remained the key suspect until the time of his death. He also was the suspect in numerous other unresolved murders, but the departments spearheading the 11 cold cases could not find DNA evidence, nor were they able to locate weapons.

Rita Brestrup, who lost her sister Maria Johnson in 1971, said she had no words for Bell but was happy that he “no longer walks this earth and will never be paroled.”

Bell was never prosecuted for any other murders besides Dickens, who was shot and killed after confronting Bell, a serial sex perpetrator who had exposed himself to a group of neighborhood girls.

Pasadena authorities subsequently arrested Bell and found murder weapons and pornography stashed in his pick-up truck. He made bail in Harris County and went on the run for 14 years.

After Bell was the subject of a 1992 Unsolved Mysteries episode, people provided tips which led to his arrest. The episode also featured Matthew McConaughey, who played Dickens in the actor’s first TV role.

___

Information from: Houston Chronicle, http://www.houstonchronicle.com

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42842bc1f03a45ec8fae46864b7d6250 Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls' death NAVASOTA, Texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 96099660-7f4f-5f97-8b78-8fd9a7c91381   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42842bc1f03a45ec8fae46864b7d6250 Texas killer dies, questions still remain about girls' death NAVASOTA, Texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 96099660-7f4f-5f97-8b78-8fd9a7c91381

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

North Carolina mom charged for having meth near baby bottle

Westlake Legal Group north-carolina-mom-charged-for-having-meth-near-baby-bottle North Carolina mom charged for having meth near baby bottle GRAHAM, N.C. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 9696824a-e2df-58e4-85ff-852c5aadc39b
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news North Carolina mom charged for having meth near baby bottle GRAHAM, N.C. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 9696824a-e2df-58e4-85ff-852c5aadc39b

Sheriff’s deputies in North Carolina have filed multiple charges against the mother of a 21-month-old child after saying they found methamphetamine near a baby bottle.

The Winston-Salem Journal reports the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office says its deputies were trying to serve a warrant at a home on Sunday when 27-year-old Kyle Elizabeth Hollingsworth allowed deputies inside to search for her live-in boyfriend. While searching, deputies found a bottle containing meth less than a foot (0.3 meter) from a half-full baby bottle.

Hollingsworth admitted that her child was drinking from the bottle in the same bed prior to the deputies’ arrival. She was arrested on several charges, including felony possession of methamphetamine and misdemeanor child abuse.

Hollingsworth is jailed on a $25,000 bond and was scheduled to appear in court Monday.

___

Information from: Winston-Salem Journal, http://www.journalnow.com

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Man to plead guilty to threatening Boston Globe journalists

Westlake Legal Group man-to-plead-guilty-to-threatening-boston-globe-journalists Man to plead guilty to threatening Boston Globe journalists fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc b8f12c4a-db08-58d2-b78d-f1a6f1ce410a Associated Press article ALANNA DURKIN RICHER
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Man to plead guilty to threatening Boston Globe journalists fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc b8f12c4a-db08-58d2-b78d-f1a6f1ce410a Associated Press article ALANNA DURKIN RICHER

A Los Angeles man will plead guilty to threatening to kill journalists at The Boston Globe over the newspaper’s criticism of President Donald Trump, his lawyer said on Monday.

Robert Chain was arrested in August after authorities say he made a series of calls threatening the lives of Globe staff in retaliation for its coordinated editorial response to Trump’s frequent attacks on the news media. He had been scheduled to stand trial in June.

Chain’s attorney said the man plans to plead guilty to all counts against him and “take full responsibility for his actions.”

“He is anxious to make a full, public apology, expressing his sincere remorse to those he affected,” attorney William Weinreb said in an email.

A plea hearing has been scheduled for May 15.

Authorities say Chain’s threatening phone calls started after the Globe appealed in August to newspapers across the country to denounce what it called a “dirty war against the free press.”

The day hundreds of editorials were published across the country Chain told a Globe staffer that he was going to shoot employees in the head at 4 o’clock, authorities said. That threat prompted a police response and increased security at the newspaper’s offices.

In some calls, authorities say Chain called Globe employees the “enemy of the people,” a characterization of journalists that Trump has used repeatedly.

Chain, who is retired from the international sales and trade business, said in 2013 he hadn’t worked in more than 20 years and suffered from “continuing health issues,” according to court documents filed in a civil case against him over unpaid student loans.

Chain, of the Encino section of Los Angeles, said at the time that he had a heart attack in 2005 and was receiving Social Security benefits.

He was indicted by a grand jury in September on seven counts of use of interstate and foreign commerce to transmit a threat to injury another person for seven threatening phone calls. The charge carries up to five years in prison.

An email was sent Monday to a spokeswoman for the Globe.

____

Follow Alanna Durkin Richer at http://www.twitter.com/aedurkinricher

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Surveillance clips show Chinese billionaire with accuser

Westlake Legal Group surveillance-clips-show-chinese-billionaire-with-accuser Surveillance clips show Chinese billionaire with accuser fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc b3f145b9-8ea6-5ccb-b3c1-4eefad39cea9 Associated Press article AMY FORLITI

An attorney for JD.com founder Richard Liu said Monday that surveillance video showing the Chinese businessman in an elevator and walking arm-in-arm with a woman who has accused him of rape provides a different account of what happened that night.

Two edited videos of Liu and his accuser were posted Monday to a Chinese social media site. One video shows the pair leaving a group dinner in Minneapolis on Aug. 30, with the woman getting up to leave after Liu gets up, then following him out the door. The other video shows the woman holding onto Liu’s arm as they walk to her apartment, where she says he raped her as she begged him to stop.

Liu, founder of the Beijing-based e-commerce site JD.com, was arrested Aug. 31 in Minneapolis on suspicion of felony rape, but prosecutors announced in December that he would face no criminal charges because the case had “profound evidentiary problems” and it was unlikely they could prove his guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The woman, Jingyao Liu, a Chinese college student at the University of Minnesota, sued the businessman and his company last week. She alleged she was groped in Richard Liu’s limousine and raped in her apartment after a dinner at Origami, a Japanese restaurant in Minneapolis, in which she felt pressured to drink as Liu and other executives toasted her. At one point, Richard Liu said she would dishonor him if she did not join in, the lawsuit says.

Richard Liu and Jingyao Liu are not related.

It’s not clear who posted the videos, which were posted on Weibo under an account for Mingzhou Events. The clips are short and the content is edited, but Richard Liu’s attorneys in China confirmed their authenticity. The videos do not contain audio, and they do not show what happened in his limousine or in the woman’s apartment.

Jill Brisbois, Richard Liu’s attorney in Minnesota, said in a statement to The Associated Press that the clips “further dispel the misinformation and false claims that have been widely circulated and clearly support the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office decision not to file charges against our client.”

Brisbois said the videos speak for themselves and show events as they are happening. While the woman has alleged she was impaired and coerced to drink, she appears to be walking without assistance and linking her arm with the businessman.

The law firm of Florin Roebig, which is representing the woman, said the clips that have been posted online, as well as the full surveillance videos, are consistent with what the woman alleged in her lawsuit and with what she told law enforcement. The lawsuit says the woman went to her apartment building with Liu to be polite and respectful, and believed he was simply walking her to the door.

The clip in Jingyao Liu’s apartment complex shows Richard Liu and the woman walking through multiple lobbies and taking multiple elevators. Initially, Richard Liu’s female assistant is with them and the woman leads the way. At one point, the assistant does not get on an elevator with Richard Liu and the woman, and when they exit the elevator, she has her hand through his arm and he has his hands in his pockets.

She leads him up a short stairway, then through another set of doors and continues to link her hand through his arm. As they get off another elevator, she leads him down a hallway to an apartment. She opens the door and goes in, and Richard Liu follows.

The other clip features surveillance video from the end of the dinner at Origami. It shows Jingyao Liu seated at a table with other men, and Richard Liu is a few seats away, appearing to have an animated conversation with others at the table. One man at the dinner party is slumped over and appears to be passed out. The woman is seen talking to the man next to her, and when Liu gets up to leave, she gets up and appears to follow him. They walk out next to each other. Video from outside the restaurant shows her leaving with Richard Liu and his assistant.

Richard Liu walks ahead and it appears the woman and Liu’s assistant have a brief conversation, then she follows Liu.

Text messages previously reviewed by The Associated Press and portions of the woman’s interviews with police show the woman alleges Liu pulled her into a limousine and made advances and groped her despite her protests. The lawsuit says Liu forcibly raped her at her apartment, again over her protests and resistance. She texted a friend: “I begged him don’t. But he didn’t listen.”

The alleged attack happened while Richard Liu was in Minneapolis for a weeklong residency as part of the University of Minnesota’s doctor of business administration China program. The four-year program in the university’s management school is geared toward high-level executives in China and is a partnership with Tsinghua University School of Economics and Management.

Jingyao Liu is a Chinese citizen studying at the university on a student visa and was a volunteer in the doctorate program while Richard Liu was there. The Associated Press does not generally name alleged victims of sexual assault without their consent, but the Florin Roebig law firm has said she agreed to be named. She was 21 at the time of the alleged attack.

Richard Liu, known in Chinese as Liu Qiangdong, is a prominent member of the Chinese tech elite, with a fortune of $7.5 billion. He is part of a generation of entrepreneurs who have created China’s internet, e-commerce, mobile phone and other technology industries since the late 1990s. The son of peasants, Liu built a Beijing electronics shop into JD.com, China’s biggest online direct retailer, selling everything from clothes to toys to fresh vegetables.

___

Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42dda76c56be4d15a1ebb841600b5a06 Surveillance clips show Chinese billionaire with accuser fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc b3f145b9-8ea6-5ccb-b3c1-4eefad39cea9 Associated Press article AMY FORLITI   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42dda76c56be4d15a1ebb841600b5a06 Surveillance clips show Chinese billionaire with accuser fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc b3f145b9-8ea6-5ccb-b3c1-4eefad39cea9 Associated Press article AMY FORLITI

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What Chinese spies want from Americans

Westlake Legal Group what-chinese-spies-want-from-americans What Chinese spies want from Americans Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 0bc350e3-ff6e-5ec5-b1ca-3f7537f7dacc

It’s the embodiment of a saucy spy thriller.

Questions continue to swirl around Chinese woman Yujing Zhang, who was arrested on March 30 on the grounds of President Trump’s Florida abode, Mar-a-Lago. Her story suspiciously changed between security checkpoints, and she was in possession of two passports, four cellphones, a laptop, an external hard drive and a thumb drive that authorities later claimed contained malware. Moreover, more than $8,000 in U.S. and Chinese currency was discovered in her hotel room nearby.

Denied bail and still behind bars, federal authorities continue to dig deep.

“The Mar-a-Lago incident should be a wakeup call to all businesses and politicians that theft of digital assets does not just happen from nameless, faceless people an ocean away,” Theresa Payton, founder, and CEO of business and government protection agency, Fortalice Solutions told Fox News, via email. “Whether or not this was an independent attempted cybercrime or espionage, it should serve as a stark reminder that strong operational security is absolutely essential.”

Indeed, the strange case of Zhang is hardly the first “possible Chinese spook” story to hit the headlines in recent times, with dozens of individuals over the past two decades being charged in the U.S. with espionage at the behest of the Republic of China. Just last week, New York woman Ying Lin – who worked for Air China – plead guilty to working as an agent for the Chinese government by placing unscreened packages on Beijing-bound flights as mandated by Chinese military personnel stationed at China’s permanent UN mission. Last October, the Justice Department unsealed new charges against ten Chinese hackers and officers, accused of taking part in a years-long and broad scheme aimed at stealing secrets and tradecraft from various fields.

US SPEAKS UP FOR MINORITY MUSLIM UIGHURS IN CHINA – WHILE ISLAMIC COUNTRIES STAY MOSTLY SILENT

But what do Chinese spies ultimately want from ordinary and not-so-ordinary Americans?

“A decade ago, the goal was more narrow. Efforts were focused on government espionage and intellectual property theft. Now, China and other nation-states cast a wide net,” Payton said. “They have learned that all information gathering can be useful, whether the end goal is espionage theft and exploitation of intellectual property or political influence.”

According to Michael Biggs, founder and chairman of Centurions Alliance Group – a global tier-one tactical training and security firm – it’s all about securing cutting edge recipes. He pointed to a recent case of a prominent athletic apparel company in the U.S., which he declined to name, whereby the research and development company had just developed its new clothing line that was slated for later release.

“Then, the (Chief Financial Officer) while on a trip to Asia saw the very same apparel already being sold as cheap knockoffs by street vendors,” Biggs contended. “A hostile group had tapped someone’s phone and pulled the images off, and then reproduced the line in China. Very fast job, no evidence left behind. A huge dollar loss for that company.”

Westlake Legal Group 06_AP19070429963289 What Chinese spies want from Americans Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 0bc350e3-ff6e-5ec5-b1ca-3f7537f7dacc

Bus ushers walk past red flags on Tiananmen Square during a plenary session of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Monday, March 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

While the likes of Larry Johnson, CEO of security firm CyberSponse and a 24-year veteran of the U.S. Secret Service views the Mar-a-Lago incident as being “too unsophisticated and poorly planned” to have been state-sanctioned, he stressed that the official Chinese espionage goals are as pronounced as ever.

“The Chinese rise to global power is dependent largely on espionage and theft of U.S. and western technologies. The United States is the yardstick against which they measure themselves,” he told Fox News. “They want to gather intelligence for any sort of competitive advantage they can obtain be it industrial secrets, trade secrets, political insights, military, you name it. Basically, anything they can get their hands on.”

And that makes all Americans ripe for targeting, experts caution.

“The most vulnerable targets are not computers, but people. Human intelligence gathering is an art,” Biggs said. “It’s about taking advantage of people’s vulnerabilities, no matter what they are, to get the information.”

And the arsenal to do so is said to be wide-ranging, from “IP intercept, ISMI catchers, dumpster diving, listening devices (bugs) and informants, to students at universities, Chinese businesses and their employees,” Johnson asserted.

“Very often, the Chinese use phishing emails to make the initial breach. However, they have highly skilled cyber teams which can also find and exploit network or software vulnerabilities, including the exploitation of zero-day flaws,” he continued, referring to a software security flaw that is known to the vendor but has yet to have been patched or guarded against.

Things to watch for, observed Carlos Perez – research and development practice lead for information technology consultants TrustedSec – are primarily “phishing emails, USB drives left around waiting for a curious person to plug and even phone calls where a person is tricked into downloading and running a piece of software on one’s behalf.”

There is also the issue of boots-on-the-ground recruitment.

“China has trained spies here with the responsibility to spot, assess, develop, recruit and handle individuals with placement and access in key areas of government and industry,” noted Andrew Lewis, President of private intelligence firm The Ulysses Group, emphasizing that “university-based networks are responsible for quite a bit of the information and intellectual property China collects from the U.S.”

INTERNET BOTS ARE GETTING SMARTER AND IMITATING PEOPLE

In December, Bill Priestap Assistant Director, Counterintelligence Division for the FBI, testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, elucidating that “China uses unconventional, economic espionage as a component part of a comprehensive strategy to promote China’s high-tech industries.”

Priestap claimed that “China is by far the most active practitioner of economic espionage today,” and its economic espionage alone costs the U.S as much as $600 billion annually.

He also illuminated the risks that universities and colleges pose, both in the sense that they are targeted for their cutting-edge research and technological development and they serve as an abundant grounds for spies to intimidate Chinese students and professors critical of the country’s policies, and shape academics in their favor.

“They combine this with an aggressive cyber-espionage effort,” Lewis said. “They want to have a much more active role in defining the international order and ensure it reflects Chinese interests.”

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And in his view, even homegrown technology companies are moving more towards the firing line in exchange for their own bottom line.

“Agribusiness, financials, chip makers, aerospace – China is working to exploit the recent 737 incident in an effort to undercut Boeing and enhance their budding aerospace desires,” he claimed. “All of our giant tech companies are significant targets, (some) are deciding to end contracts with the government in exchange to access the Chinese market. The components or outsourced labor can and have been found to be faulty in the past.”

Westlake Legal Group fl_yujing_zhang__1720 What Chinese spies want from Americans Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 0bc350e3-ff6e-5ec5-b1ca-3f7537f7dacc   Westlake Legal Group fl_yujing_zhang__1720 What Chinese spies want from Americans Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 0bc350e3-ff6e-5ec5-b1ca-3f7537f7dacc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Judge denies lower bond for ex-priest accused of abuse

Westlake Legal Group judge-denies-lower-bond-for-ex-priest-accused-of-abuse Judge denies lower bond for ex-priest accused of abuse fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc CLAYTON, Mo. c21ff97f-b617-5fc1-95c8-c9473d829459 Associated Press article
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Judge denies lower bond for ex-priest accused of abuse fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc CLAYTON, Mo. c21ff97f-b617-5fc1-95c8-c9473d829459 Associated Press article

A St. Louis County judge has refused to lower bail for a former Catholic priest who was previously imprisoned and labeled sexually violent.

Fred Lenczycki of suburban Chicago was charged in February with two counts of sodomy for allegedly abusing two boys in the early 1990s at a north St. Louis County parish. He is jailed on $500,000 cash-only bond and sought an unspecified reduction.

Circuit Judge Gloria Glark Reno declined the request at a hearing Monday.

Lenczycki is 74. He was removed from the ministry in 2002, when he was charged with sexually abusing three boys in Hinsdale, Illinois, in the 1980s. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to five years in prison.

Court and church files say Lenczycki admitted abusing up to 30 boys in Illinois, Missouri and California over 25 years.

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Family charged with scheme to get Masters tickets for resale

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Family charged with scheme to get Masters tickets for resale fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc AUGUSTA, Ga. Associated Press article 50aed4ee-284b-5211-9587-22ee87a1fcec

Four members of a Texas family are facing federal charges in what prosecutors say was a scheme that used stolen identities to get tickets to the Masters golf tournament, then resell those tickets at a healthy profit.

Documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Augusta charged Stephen Michael Freeman of Katy, Texas, with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud as well as aggravated identity theft. Freeman’s parents and a sister were also charged with conspiracy.

Court records say that since 2013 the family has used names chosen from a bulk mailing list to enter the lottery Augusta National Golf Club uses to sell Masters tickets. The names were submitted with email addresses the family controlled.

Court records did not list attorneys for Freeman or his charged relatives.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Family charged with scheme to get Masters tickets for resale

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Family charged with scheme to get Masters tickets for resale fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc AUGUSTA, Ga. Associated Press article 50aed4ee-284b-5211-9587-22ee87a1fcec

Four members of a Texas family are facing federal charges in what prosecutors say was a scheme that used stolen identities to get tickets to the Masters golf tournament, then resell those tickets at a healthy profit.

Documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Augusta charged Stephen Michael Freeman of Katy, Texas, with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud as well as aggravated identity theft. Freeman’s parents and a sister were also charged with conspiracy.

Court records say that since 2013 the family has used names chosen from a bulk mailing list to enter the lottery Augusta National Golf Club uses to sell Masters tickets. The names were submitted with email addresses the family controlled.

Court records did not list attorneys for Freeman or his charged relatives.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Video released of suspect in 2017 killings of Indiana girls

Westlake Legal Group video-released-of-suspect-in-2017-killings-of-indiana-girls Video released of suspect in 2017 killings of Indiana girls RICK CALLAHAN fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc c1cb3e92-6364-56ae-b34d-a13e31bd6025 Associated Press article

Authorities released video Monday of a man suspected of killing two Indiana teenagers two years ago and urged the public to scrutinize the footage, which shows the man walking on an abandoned railroad bridge the girls visited while out hiking the day they were slain.

The Indiana State Police also released a new sketch of the suspect, which State Police Superintendent Doug Carter said was produced thanks to “new information and intelligence” collected during the investigation into the killings of 14-year-old Liberty German and 13-year-old Abigail Williams. During a briefing in the girls’ hometown of Delphi, he said that a composite sketch that was previously released based on accounts from eyewitnesses who believe they saw the man is now secondary to the new sketch.

Carter said investigators believe the man is between the ages of 18 and 40, and that he either lives or lived in Delphi or regularly visits or works in the area. He vowed that police will solve the case and, during the briefing, he addressed the suspect directly.

“We believe you are hiding in plain sight. For more than two years, you never thought we would shift gears to a different investigative strategy, but we have,” he said.

The video of the suspect and additional audio that was also released Monday came from German’s cellphone. Authorities have hailed her as a hero for recording potentially crucial evidence before she was killed.

Carter urged the public to pay close attention to the mannerisms of the man in the video, which shows him walking across an abandoned railroad bridge near Delphi, which is about 60 miles (95 kilometers) northwest of Indianapolis.

“Do you recognize the mannerisms as being someone you might know? And remember, he is walking on the former railroad bridge, and because of the deteriorated condition of the bridge the suspect is not walking naturally, due to the spacing between the ties,” he said.

The girls’ bodies were found in a rugged, wooded area the day after they went hiking during a day off of school.

Within days of the killings, investigators released two grainy photos of a suspect walking on the bridge and an audio recording of a man believed to be him saying “down the hill.”

The audio clip released Monday includes that same audio but is longer and captures the suspect saying, “Guys, down the hill,” said Sgt. Kim Riley with the State Police.

Investigators have reviewed thousands of leads looking for the man, but no arrest warrants have been issued and no arrests have been made.

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Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-1d058b36533c4e60849fa8ccabfa5f2b Video released of suspect in 2017 killings of Indiana girls RICK CALLAHAN fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc c1cb3e92-6364-56ae-b34d-a13e31bd6025 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-1d058b36533c4e60849fa8ccabfa5f2b Video released of suspect in 2017 killings of Indiana girls RICK CALLAHAN fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc c1cb3e92-6364-56ae-b34d-a13e31bd6025 Associated Press article

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