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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/crime (Page 90)

Case against partygoer who snapped terracotta warrior’s thumb off at museum ends in mistrial

The case against a Delaware man who admitted to snapping the thumb off a $4.5 million terracotta warrior statue at a Philadelphia museum ended in a mistrial on Tuesday after jurors couldn’t reach a verdict.

The jury deliberated for 11 hours about whether Michael Rohana, 25, should be found guilty on counts including theft and concealment of an object of cultural heritage.

“These charges were made for art thieves — think like ‘Ocean’s Eleven’ or ‘Mission: Impossible,'” federal public defender Catherine C. Henry said in closing arguments. Rohana “wasn’t in ninja clothing sneaking around the museum. He was a drunk kid in a bright green ugly Christmas sweater.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19100529080657 Case against partygoer who snapped terracotta warrior's thumb off at museum ends in mistrial Katherine Lam fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/delaware fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 7be13c0f-5327-5c6b-b44f-c38a4fd9b088

Michael Rohana leaves the James A. Byrne U.S. Federal Courthouse in Center City Philadelphia. (AP)

Rohana was attending an Ugly Sweater Party at the Franklin Institute on Dec. 21, 2017 when he entered the “Terra-cotta Warriors of the First Emperor” exhibit, according to an arrest affidavit. Rohana proceeded to take selfies with the 2,000-year-old statue, known as “The Cavalryman,” then snapped off the left thumb and walked away, authorities said.

LOUVRE TOURISTS REPORTEDLY DESTROYED SPECIAL ART INSTALLATION OVERNIGHT

The museum noticed the missing thumb on Jan. 8 — more than two weeks after the alleged incident — and reported it to police.

Rohana was also caught on surveillance video vandalizing the life-sized statue that’s considered one of China’s most prized archaeological discoveries.

“I don’t know why I broke it. It didn’t just happen, but there was never a thought of, ‘I should break this,'” Rohana testified in his case. “Every time I see this video now, I’m trying to figure out, ‘What was going through your mind? What were you thinking?’ I don’t know how I could have been so stupid.”

PENNSYLVANIA WOMAN WITH RARE BONE DISEASE DONATES SKELETON TO PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM

Although Rohana admitted to the crime, his lawyers argued their client was charged under the right law. Federal prosecutors said they’ll decide by May whether to retry the case.

Westlake Legal Group rtx46x61 Case against partygoer who snapped terracotta warrior's thumb off at museum ends in mistrial Katherine Lam fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/delaware fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 7be13c0f-5327-5c6b-b44f-c38a4fd9b088

Terracotta Army was built in China’s Qin Dynasty. (Reuters)

The incident angered Chinese officials, who demanded Rohana to face “severe punishment” for snapping off the sacred statue’s thumb.

The thumb was eventually returned to China, but has not been reattached to the terracotta warrior, museum officials said.

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The museum currently holds 10 of the statues that are part of a collection of 8,000, according to the BBC. The Terracotta Army, made of clay and built by Qin Shi Huang in the Qin Dynasty before he died in 210 B.C., were discovered in 1974.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19100529080657 Case against partygoer who snapped terracotta warrior's thumb off at museum ends in mistrial Katherine Lam fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/delaware fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 7be13c0f-5327-5c6b-b44f-c38a4fd9b088   Westlake Legal Group AP19100529080657 Case against partygoer who snapped terracotta warrior's thumb off at museum ends in mistrial Katherine Lam fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/delaware fox-news/us/crime/trials fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 7be13c0f-5327-5c6b-b44f-c38a4fd9b088

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Another Dem Capitol staffer implicated in Senate data theft ‘doxxing’ scheme

Westlake Legal Group another-dem-capitol-staffer-implicated-in-senate-data-theft-doxxing-scheme Another Dem Capitol staffer implicated in Senate data theft 'doxxing' scheme Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ef77109-4a5e-5516-b890-5f6dca0cbcba
Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5844237933001_5844240828001-vs Another Dem Capitol staffer implicated in Senate data theft 'doxxing' scheme Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ef77109-4a5e-5516-b890-5f6dca0cbcba

Another aide to Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan has been implicated in the crime stemming from the case of former staffer Jackson Cosko who admitted to posting the personal information of GOP senators online and stealing Congressional data.

Cosko, who formerly worked for Hassan before his firing, pleaded guilty on Friday to five federal offenses for “doxxing” personal information of five Republican senators, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, during the hearings for then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

EX-DEM STAFFER PLEADS GUILTY TO ‘DOXXING’ MCCONNELL, OTHERS IN GOP DURING KAVANAUGH HEARINGS

He also confessed to stealing gigabytes-worth of data, including dozens of user names and passwords, Social Security numbers, and credit card information belonging to Senate employees,

Prosecutors said Cosko concocted an “extraordinarily extensive data-theft scheme, copying entire network drives, sorting and organizing sensitive data, and exploring ways to use that data to his benefit.”

But prosecutors now say that a second aide to Hassan has been involved in the data-stealing scheme, alleging that she helped Cosko to conduct the operation.

Samantha G. DeForest-Davis, whose LinkedIn states she’s a staff assistant to the senator, though Senate records indicate that she’s no longer working there, is being implicated in the crime, with a case being opened that names her, according to the Daily Caller.

SUSPECTED SENATE DOXXER HAD SECRET TWITTER ACCOUNT REPEATEDLY ATTACKING GOP, KAVANAUGH

DeForest-Davis hasn’t yet been charged with anything, though she allegedly provided a key that Cosko used to enter the senate office at night in an effort to set up the scheme to steal the data. Prosecutors said in courts records that she was aware of Cosko’s intentions.

The now-former staffer also reportedly filed an affidavit that could be used to determine whether she’s eligible for a public defender, the outlet reported.

Cosko worked for Hassan as a computer systems administrator until May 2018 when he was fired for failing to follow office procedures. This prompted him to enter the office and steal the information.

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He went on to become an intern for Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas. He was fired again amid his arrest for doxxing GOP senators after getting angry about their support Kavanaugh in the midst of allegations of impropriety. He intended to intimidate the senators and their families, according to court records.

Fox News’ Stephen Sorace contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5844237933001_5844240828001-vs Another Dem Capitol staffer implicated in Senate data theft 'doxxing' scheme Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ef77109-4a5e-5516-b890-5f6dca0cbcba   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5844237933001_5844240828001-vs Another Dem Capitol staffer implicated in Senate data theft 'doxxing' scheme Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ef77109-4a5e-5516-b890-5f6dca0cbcba

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Kentucky police fatally shoot man who wounded another man

Westlake Legal Group kentucky-police-fatally-shoot-man-who-wounded-another-man Kentucky police fatally shoot man who wounded another man LOUISVILLE, Ky. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc dff6b698-6152-54de-bc72-2b7075b5a47a Associated Press article
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Kentucky police fatally shoot man who wounded another man LOUISVILLE, Ky. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc dff6b698-6152-54de-bc72-2b7075b5a47a Associated Press article

Police officers in Kentucky have fatally shot a man who wounded another man in the parking lot of an apartment complex.

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad told news outlets that when officers arrived at Spring Manor Apartments on Tuesday afternoon they ordered the man to drop his gun and attempted to use non-lethal means to stop him. He said they fired their weapons when the man “ran at officers and pointed his gun at them.”

Conrad said the gunman was taken to a hospital and pronounced dead.

Police said the wounded man was shot multiple times and is in critical condition at a local hospital.

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Family hopes to prove man’s innocence, even after his death

Westlake Legal Group family-hopes-to-prove-mans-innocence-even-after-his-death Family hopes to prove man's innocence, even after his death MARTHA WAGGONER fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0c2ac63e-018b-5f94-93ec-92d576e18bb6

Lee Wayne Hunt died a prisoner, officially deemed guilty of a double murder — even though a co-defendant absolved him in a conversation with a lawyer that remained secret for decades.

Attorney Staples Hughes said a client who also was convicted in the case told him not long after the 1984 slayings of a Fayetteville couple that Hunt wasn’t involved. Hughes risked disbarment when he told a judge in 2007 about the confession, after the client, Jerry Cashwell, had died.

“If you believe what my client told me, and I believe my client, that Mr. Hunt didn’t do this, then it just becomes so terrible and so sad,” Hughes told The Associated Press.

Hunt, 59, died alone Feb. 13 at Rex Hospital in Raleigh, where he had been taken about a week earlier for treatment of heart problems, his daughter, Heather Allen, told the AP. Prison officials didn’t tell Hunt’s relatives that he’d been moved from Maury Correctional Institution to the hospital until the family got word he had died, Allen said. He’d spent more than half his life in state prisons.

The AP received a tip that Hunt had died and is the only news organization to interview members of the families of both Hunt and the Matthews’ couple since his death.

Hunt, Cashwell and a third man were convicted in the deaths of Roland and Lisa Matthews, who were shot and stabbed in their home in Fayetteville. Their 2-year-old daughter was found in a bedroom, physically unharmed.

Prosecutors said the couple was killed because Roland Matthews stole marijuana from Hunt, who ran a drug ring.

The only physical evidence tying Hunt to the crimes was a lead-content comparison of bullets that Hunt owned to bullets found at the crime scene — a comparison technique the FBI abandoned in 2005 after the method faced scientific criticism. Other evidence included testimony from an associate who received immunity and from a prison informant.

That’s not to say Hunt had no criminal history.

In November 1985, Hunt was sentenced for felony drug possession and other charges. He was released in September 1986. Less than a month later, on Oct. 17, 1986, he was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Hunt’s supporters were certain the lack of physical evidence, along with Cashwell’s posthumously released confession, would eventually free him in the murder case.

But it didn’t. Judges repeatedly ruled against him. North Carolina’s unique Innocence Inquiry Commission couldn’t take his case because there was no new evidence, said Chris Mumma, executive director of the nonprofit N.C. Center on Actual Innocence, which handled Hunt’s case at one point.

Yet Hunt believed until the end that he would be exonerated, his daughter said. “He never let go of hope,” Allen said.

He told her “If they don’t find out while I’m here, hopefully the truth will come out when I’m not here,” she said. “… He always talked about the Lord and he always believed things would come to a light one day.”

Hughes, now 67, kept Cashwell’s confession secret because of attorney-client privilege until after Cashwell died by suicide in prison in 2002. Hughes signed an affidavit for Hunt’s attorneys in 2004. When Hughes came forward at a hearing for Hunt in 2007, the judge admonished him and reported him to the State Bar, which declined to take action against him.

Last fall, Hughes visited Hunt for the first time in prison. They talked for more than two hours.

“He completely understood the situation I was in,” Hughes said. “He bore me no ill will.”

But in his last few phone calls with his daughter, Hunt shared his worries about his health and the lack of care he believed he received behind bars, Allen said. When Allen received his personal belongings from prison officials, she found complaints about his medical care.

Correction Department spokesman John Bull said laws prohibit him from discussing a prisoner’s health record. He said he’d share the Hunt family’s concerns with prison medical officials.

The victims’ family, meanwhile, is certain of Hunt’s guilt and relieved he’s finally gone.

Roland Matthews’ sister, Paula Holland of Hope Mills, believes Hughes lied about Cashwell’s confession. When asked what trial evidence convinced her of Hunt’s guilt, Holland responded: “Because of who he is. Because of who he was. Because of his reputation.”

Holland said her niece, Crystal Mayfield, was 22 months old when her parents were killed. She was found sitting on her bed, with her dog.

And when an exonerated ex-prisoner commented in a public Facebook post that Hunt died an innocent man, Mayfield responded: “I am very relieved that justice has finally been served and my family can have some peace now.”

Mayfield didn’t reply to a Facebook message from the AP. Her relatives said she didn’t want to be interviewed.

It’s not uncommon for prisoners who have evidence of innocence to die in custody. Responding to an email query, lawyers nationwide listed cases in multiple states where prisoners with strong evidence, including DNA, have died awaiting a chance to prove their innocence.

At least 21 people have been exonerated posthumously, with about half dying in prison, according to the National Registry of Exonerations.

Hunt, who learned to read and write in prison, was a woodworker. He enjoyed reading about log cabins and talked about the one he’d build when free, his family said. He used plastic knives and wood from pallets to carve animal figures, then dyed them with coffee grounds and decorated them with pastel crayons, Allen said.

The victims’ family thinks Allen is lucky to have those memories.

“Lee Wayne Hunt was very fortunate,” Holland said. “His family could go to prison and visit him. The only joy we had left was putting flowers on my brother’s grave. I hate it for them, but I hate it for us, too … We didn’t take his life. … We just had to wait and bide our time.”

Hunt’s supporters believe time did him no favors.

“Everything I knew about this case makes me believe he didn’t do this,” Hughes said. “And that’s pretty terrible. I had hoped this would turn out different. And it didn’t. It just turned out overwhelmingly sadly.”

___

Associated Press reporter Allen G. Breed contributed to this story.

___

Follow Martha Waggoner on Twitter at http://twitter.com/mjwaggonernc

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-53b3239243bc4fdfbf222da9ac4b2fc9 Family hopes to prove man's innocence, even after his death MARTHA WAGGONER fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0c2ac63e-018b-5f94-93ec-92d576e18bb6   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-53b3239243bc4fdfbf222da9ac4b2fc9 Family hopes to prove man's innocence, even after his death MARTHA WAGGONER fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0c2ac63e-018b-5f94-93ec-92d576e18bb6

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Police: Mom with gun returns fire, forces burglar to retreat

Westlake Legal Group police-mom-with-gun-returns-fire-forces-burglar-to-retreat Police: Mom with gun returns fire, forces burglar to retreat fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc BURLINGTON, N.C. Associated Press article 5230f53f-20f4-54a9-85ec-75ca62212e61
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Police: Mom with gun returns fire, forces burglar to retreat fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc BURLINGTON, N.C. Associated Press article 5230f53f-20f4-54a9-85ec-75ca62212e61

Police say a North Carolina mother exchanged gunfire with a burglar in her kitchen, forcing him to retreat through a window.

In a news release, the Burlington Police Department says the 31-year-old woman and her 10-year-old son were sleeping early Wednesday morning in their home when she awoke to the sound of someone breaking in.

Police say she confronted the burglar with a pistol and he opened fire. The woman wasn’t injured and returned fire, causing the suspect to leave through the window he’d used to break in. Police arrived shortly thereafter, around 3:55 a.m.

It wasn’t clear if the suspect was injured. No arrests had been made as of mid-morning.

The woman won’t face any charges. Her son was also uninjured.

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Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer’s trial

Westlake Legal Group bodycam-footage-may-be-shown-at-minneapolis-officers-trial Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article AMY FORLITI 5a279260-af50-5a79-a082-39eab918ab4c

Prosecutors could introduce body camera video as early as Wednesday in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer who shot and killed an unarmed woman.

Mohamed Noor, who shot and killed Justine Ruszczyk Damond as she approached his squad car after calling 911, was reacting to a loud noise and feared an ambush, his attorney said Tuesday, calling the shooting “a perfect storm with tragic consequences.”

Noor and his partner were rolling down a dark alley in response to a call from Damond, a dual citizen of the U.S. and Australia, who contacted police about a possible sexual assault. That’s when a bicyclist appeared in front of them and they heard “a bang,” defense attorney Peter Wold said in his opening statement at Noor’s trial on murder and manslaughter charges.

“It is the next split second that this case is all about,” Wold said.

Noor fired a single shot, killing Damond, whose death rocked both countries and led to changes in the Minneapolis Police Department. The shooting came just two weeks after an officer in New York was ambushed and killed in a parked vehicle.

Attorneys for Noor, who was fired after being charged in the case and has never talked to investigators about what happened, argued that he used reasonable force to defend himself and his partner from a perceived threat. But prosecutors say there is no evidence he faced a threat that justified deadly force.

Prosecutor Patrick Lofton, in his opening remarks, questioned a statement from Noor’s partner, Matthew Harrity, that he heard a thump right before the shooting. Lofton said Harrity never said anything at the scene about such a noise, instead mentioning it for the first time some days later in an interview with investigators.

Investigators found no forensic evidence to show that Damond had touched the squad car before she was shot, raising the possibility that she had not slapped or hit it upon approaching the officers, Lofton said.

Neither Noor nor Harrity had their body cameras on until after the shooting, and there was no squad car video. Other officers who responded to the scene did not consistently have their cameras switched on either, Lofton said.

A sergeant taking statements had her camera on when she talked to Harrity, but it was off when she talked to Noor.

“We’ll never hear what he said,” Lofton said.

Damond, 40, was a life coach who was engaged to be married in a month. Noor, 33, is a Somali American whose arrival on the force just a couple of years earlier had been trumpeted by city leaders working to diversify the police force.

Damond called 911 twice that night, then called her fiance and hung up when police arrived, Lofton said. One minute and 19 seconds later, she was holding her wounded abdomen and saying, “I’m dying,” Lofton added.

Prosecutors charged Noor with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Damond’s fiance, Don Damond, was the first witness for prosecutors. Damond sobbed as he described calls from investigators the night of Justine’s death, saying he wasn’t told an officer had shot her until a second phone call.

He said calling Justine’s father in Australia was “painful, and traumatic, and the worst phone call I’ve ever had to make in my life.” Members of Justine’s family from Australia, including her father, stepmother, brother and sister-in-law, were in the courtroom Tuesday. Her father cried during portions of Damond’s testimony.

Justine Damond had taken her fiance’s name professionally before their marriage.

Earlier Tuesday, Hennepin County District Judge Kathryn Quaintance relented on restrictions that would have prevented the public and media from viewing video evidence introduced in the case. That’s expected to include body camera video that shows efforts to save Damond. Quaintance had cited a desire to protect Damond’s privacy, but a coalition of media groups including The Associated Press had challenged the ban.

“The court, like the jury, must follow the law — even if I disagree with it,” Quaintance said.

Noor’s attorneys have not said whether he will testify. If he does, prosecutors may be able to introduce some evidence that the defense wanted to keep out of the state’s case, including that he has refused to talk to investigators. They also could bring up a 2015 psychological test that showed Noor disliked being around people and had difficulty confronting others. Despite that test, a psychiatrist found him fit to be a cadet officer.

The shooting raised questions about Noor’s training. The police chief defended Noor’s training, but the chief was forced to resign days later. The shooting also led to changes in the department’s policy on use of body cameras.

___

Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti

___

Check out the AP’s complete coverage of Mohamed Noor’s trial.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-490afa1a02994b54bac2db0c46a41b8b Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article AMY FORLITI 5a279260-af50-5a79-a082-39eab918ab4c   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-490afa1a02994b54bac2db0c46a41b8b Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article AMY FORLITI 5a279260-af50-5a79-a082-39eab918ab4c

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Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer’s trial

Prosecutors could introduce body camera video as early as Wednesday in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer who shot and killed an unarmed woman.

Mohamed Noor, who shot and killed Justine Ruszczyk Damond as she approached his squad car after calling 911, was reacting to a loud noise and feared an ambush, his attorney said Tuesday, calling the shooting “a perfect storm with tragic consequences.”

Noor and his partner were rolling down a dark alley in response to a call from Damond, a dual citizen of the U.S. and Australia, who contacted police about a possible sexual assault. That’s when a bicyclist appeared in front of them and they heard “a bang,” defense attorney Peter Wold said in his opening statement at Noor’s trial on murder and manslaughter charges.

“It is the next split second that this case is all about,” Wold said.

Noor fired a single shot, killing Damond, whose death rocked both countries and led to changes in the Minneapolis Police Department. The shooting came just two weeks after an officer in New York was ambushed and killed in a parked vehicle.

Attorneys for Noor, who was fired after being charged in the case and has never talked to investigators about what happened, argued that he used reasonable force to defend himself and his partner from a perceived threat. But prosecutors say there is no evidence he faced a threat that justified deadly force.

Prosecutor Patrick Lofton, in his opening remarks, questioned a statement from Noor’s partner, Matthew Harrity, that he heard a thump right before the shooting. Lofton said Harrity never said anything at the scene about such a noise, instead mentioning it for the first time some days later in an interview with investigators.

Investigators found no forensic evidence to show that Damond had touched the squad car before she was shot, raising the possibility that she had not slapped or hit it upon approaching the officers, Lofton said.

Neither Noor nor Harrity had their body cameras on until after the shooting, and there was no squad car video. Other officers who responded to the scene did not consistently have their cameras switched on either, Lofton said.

A sergeant taking statements had her camera on when she talked to Harrity, but it was off when she talked to Noor.

“We’ll never hear what he said,” Lofton said.

Damond, 40, was a life coach who was engaged to be married in a month. Noor, 33, is a Somali American whose arrival on the force just a couple of years earlier had been trumpeted by city leaders working to diversify the police force.

Damond called 911 twice that night, then called her fiance and hung up when police arrived, Lofton said. One minute and 19 seconds later, she was holding her wounded abdomen and saying, “I’m dying,” Lofton added.

Prosecutors charged Noor with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Damond’s fiance, Don Damond, was the first witness for prosecutors. Damond sobbed as he described calls from investigators the night of Justine’s death, saying he wasn’t told an officer had shot her until a second phone call.

He said calling Justine’s father in Australia was “painful, and traumatic, and the worst phone call I’ve ever had to make in my life.” Members of Justine’s family from Australia, including her father, stepmother, brother and sister-in-law, were in the courtroom Tuesday. Her father cried during portions of Damond’s testimony.

Justine Damond had taken her fiance’s name professionally before their marriage.

Earlier Tuesday, Hennepin County District Judge Kathryn Quaintance relented on restrictions that would have prevented the public and media from viewing video evidence introduced in the case. That’s expected to include body camera video that shows efforts to save Damond. Quaintance had cited a desire to protect Damond’s privacy, but a coalition of media groups including The Associated Press had challenged the ban.

“The court, like the jury, must follow the law — even if I disagree with it,” Quaintance said.

Noor’s attorneys have not said whether he will testify. If he does, prosecutors may be able to introduce some evidence that the defense wanted to keep out of the state’s case, including that he has refused to talk to investigators. They also could bring up a 2015 psychological test that showed Noor disliked being around people and had difficulty confronting others. Despite that test, a psychiatrist found him fit to be a cadet officer.

The shooting raised questions about Noor’s training. The police chief defended Noor’s training, but the chief was forced to resign days later. The shooting also led to changes in the department’s policy on use of body cameras.

___

Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti

___

Check out the AP’s complete coverage of Mohamed Noor’s trial.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-490afa1a02994b54bac2db0c46a41b8b Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article AMY FORLITI 5a279260-af50-5a79-a082-39eab918ab4c   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-490afa1a02994b54bac2db0c46a41b8b Bodycam footage may be shown at Minneapolis officer's trial fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article AMY FORLITI 5a279260-af50-5a79-a082-39eab918ab4c

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Texas home invasion suspect shot dead by homeowner’s son: reports

Westlake Legal Group texas-home-invasion-suspect-shot-dead-by-homeowners-son-reports Texas home invasion suspect shot dead by homeowner's son: reports fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 517f87f0-1f63-5d31-8ed5-fb7db312f278

A suspected home intruder was fatally shot in the head in Houston on Tuesday while trying to escape with two other culprits, police said.

Shortly after arriving at his southwest Houston home, a father was pistol-whipped by three suspects who had forced him to open the door, police said. The father’s two daughters managed to hide in the closet and hit a panic alarm. The girls were eventually found and the suspects continued ransacking the home, First Coast News reported.

BUTCHER KNIFE-WIELDING MAN SEXUALLY ASSAULTS STUDENT, STABS BROTHER DURING ILLINOIS HOME INVASION, POLICE SAY

When the father’s wife and son arrived home, the suspects fled, the report said. As they were fleeing, the son retrieved a gun and shot one of the suspects in the head, reports said.

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The mom managed to drive to a local police station unharmed, but the other two suspects stole the father’s car and fled the scene, KRTK-TV reported. The suspect who was shot was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. No other details were released.

Westlake Legal Group 6259efa8-Capture Texas home invasion suspect shot dead by homeowner's son: reports fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 517f87f0-1f63-5d31-8ed5-fb7db312f278   Westlake Legal Group 6259efa8-Capture Texas home invasion suspect shot dead by homeowner's son: reports fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 517f87f0-1f63-5d31-8ed5-fb7db312f278

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Charges dropped against man accused of abandoning pet fish

Westlake Legal Group charges-dropped-against-man-accused-of-abandoning-pet-fish Charges dropped against man accused of abandoning pet fish WILMINGTON, N.C. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 076abf1f-4d54-5f78-8024-50c0e411cbe1
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Charges dropped against man accused of abandoning pet fish WILMINGTON, N.C. fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 076abf1f-4d54-5f78-8024-50c0e411cbe1

Charges have been dropped against a North Carolina man accused of leaving his pet fish behind without food when he was evicted.

New Hanover County District Attorney Ben David told news outlets Tuesday that 53-year-old Michael Hinson is no longer charged with animal cruelty and abandonment. He says fish aren’t protected under related statues that define “animal” as amphibians, reptiles, bird and mammals, excluding humans.

Officials say Hinson was evicted from his Wilmington home last month and left behind an unhealthy Oscar fish in a dirty tank. He was arrested last week after officials found the 6-inch fish, which is being nursed back to health at an aquarium store.

Sheriff’s Lt. Jerry Brewer said this was the county’s first animal cruelty case involving a fish.

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Time runs out for prisoner trying to prove his innocence

Westlake Legal Group time-runs-out-for-prisoner-trying-to-prove-his-innocence Time runs out for prisoner trying to prove his innocence MARTHA WAGGONER fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0c2ac63e-018b-5f94-93ec-92d576e18bb6

Lee Wayne Hunt died a prisoner, officially deemed guilty of a double murder — even though a co-defendant absolved him in a conversation with a lawyer that remained secret for decades.

Attorney Staples Hughes said a client who also was convicted in the case told him not long after the 1984 slayings of a Fayetteville couple that Hunt wasn’t involved. Hughes risked disbarment when he told a judge in 2007 about the confession, after the client, Jerry Cashwell, had died.

“If you believe what my client told me, and I believe my client, that Mr. Hunt didn’t do this, then it just becomes so terrible and so sad,” Hughes told The Associated Press.

Hunt, 59, died alone Feb. 13 at Rex Hospital in Raleigh, where he had been taken about a week earlier for treatment of heart problems, his daughter, Heather Allen, told the AP. Prison officials didn’t tell Hunt’s relatives that he’d been moved from Maury Correctional Institution to the hospital until the family got word he had died, Allen said. He’d spent more than half his life in state prisons.

The AP received a tip that Hunt had died and is the only news organization to interview members of the families of both Hunt and the Matthews’ couple since his death.

Hunt, Cashwell and a third man were convicted in the deaths of Roland and Lisa Matthews, who were shot and stabbed in their home in Fayetteville. Their 2-year-old daughter was found in a bedroom, physically unharmed.

Prosecutors said the couple was killed because Roland Matthews stole marijuana from Hunt, who ran a drug ring.

The only physical evidence tying Hunt to the crimes was a lead-content comparison of bullets that Hunt owned to bullets found at the crime scene — a comparison technique the FBI abandoned in 2005 after the method faced scientific criticism. Other evidence included testimony from an associate who received immunity and from a prison informant.

That’s not to say Hunt had no criminal history.

In November 1985, Hunt was sentenced for felony drug possession and other charges. He was released in September 1986. Less than a month later, on Oct. 17, 1986, he was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Hunt’s supporters were certain the lack of physical evidence, along with Cashwell’s posthumously released confession, would eventually free him in the murder case.

But it didn’t. Judges repeatedly ruled against him. North Carolina’s unique Innocence Inquiry Commission couldn’t take his case because there was no new evidence, said Chris Mumma, executive director of the nonprofit N.C. Center on Actual Innocence, which handled Hunt’s case at one point.

Yet Hunt believed until the end that he would be exonerated, his daughter said. “He never let go of hope,” Allen said.

He told her “If they don’t find out while I’m here, hopefully the truth will come out when I’m not here,” she said. “… He always talked about the Lord and he always believed things would come to a light one day.”

Hughes, now 67, kept Cashwell’s confession secret because of attorney-client privilege until after Cashwell died by suicide in prison in 2002. Hughes signed an affidavit for Hunt’s attorneys in 2004. When Hughes came forward at a hearing for Hunt in 2007, the judge admonished him and reported him to the State Bar, which declined to take action against him.

Last fall, Hughes visited Hunt for the first time in prison. They talked for more than two hours.

“He completely understood the situation I was in,” Hughes said. “He bore me no ill will.”

But in his last few phone calls with his daughter, Hunt shared his worries about his health and the lack of care he believed he received behind bars, Allen said. When Allen received his personal belongings from prison officials, she found complaints about his medical care.

Correction Department spokesman John Bull said laws prohibit him from discussing a prisoner’s health record. He said he’d share the Hunt family’s concerns with prison medical officials.

The victims’ family, meanwhile, is certain of Hunt’s guilt and relieved he’s finally gone.

Roland Matthews’ sister, Paula Holland of Hope Mills, believes Hughes lied about Cashwell’s confession. When asked what trial evidence convinced her of Hunt’s guilt, Holland responded: “Because of who he is. Because of who he was. Because of his reputation.”

Holland said her niece, Crystal Mayfield, was 22 months old when her parents were killed. She was found sitting on her bed, with her dog.

And when an exonerated ex-prisoner commented in a public Facebook post that Hunt died an innocent man, Mayfield responded: “I am very relieved that justice has finally been served and my family can have some peace now.”

Mayfield didn’t reply to a Facebook message from the AP. Her relatives said she didn’t want to be interviewed.

It’s not uncommon for prisoners who have evidence of innocence to die in custody. Responding to an email query, lawyers nationwide listed cases in multiple states where prisoners with strong evidence, including DNA, have died awaiting a chance to prove their innocence.

At least 21 people have been exonerated posthumously, with about half dying in prison, according to the National Registry of Exonerations.

Hunt, who learned to read and write in prison, was a woodworker. He enjoyed reading about log cabins and talked about the one he’d build when free, his family said. He used plastic knives and wood from pallets to carve animal figures, then dyed them with coffee grounds and decorated them with pastel crayons, Allen said.

The victims’ family thinks Allen is lucky to have those memories.

“Lee Wayne Hunt was very fortunate,” Holland said. “His family could go to prison and visit him. The only joy we had left was putting flowers on my brother’s grave. I hate it for them, but I hate it for us, too … We didn’t take his life. … We just had to wait and bide our time.”

Hunt’s supporters believe time did him no favors.

“Everything I knew about this case makes me believe he didn’t do this,” Hughes said. “And that’s pretty terrible. I had hoped this would turn out different. And it didn’t. It just turned out overwhelmingly sadly.”

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Associated Press reporter Allen G. Breed contributed to this story.

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Follow Martha Waggoner on Twitter at http://twitter.com/mjwaggonernc

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-53b3239243bc4fdfbf222da9ac4b2fc9 Time runs out for prisoner trying to prove his innocence MARTHA WAGGONER fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0c2ac63e-018b-5f94-93ec-92d576e18bb6   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-53b3239243bc4fdfbf222da9ac4b2fc9 Time runs out for prisoner trying to prove his innocence MARTHA WAGGONER fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0c2ac63e-018b-5f94-93ec-92d576e18bb6

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