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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/disasters/tornado

Fourth day of nasty storms ravages central US

An outbreak of nasty storms in the Midwest spawned tornadoes that razed homes, flattened trees and tossed cars across a dealership lot, injuring about two dozen people in Missouri’s capital city and killing at least three others elsewhere in the state.

The National Weather Service confirmed that a large and destructive twister moved over Jefferson City shortly before midnight Wednesday.

Officials said the tornado packed winds of up to 160 miles per hour (257.48 kilometers per hour) and cut a path about 3 miles (4.83 kilometers) long and a mile (1.6 kilometer) wide. Emergency workers reported about two dozen injuries but no fatalities in the city of about 40,000 people.

For the fourth consecutive day, tornadoes strafed the middle of the country Thursday, this time concentrated in sparsely populated panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas. The weather service received reports of more than a dozen tornadoes, along with numerous reports of large hail and torrential rain.

Storms this week in the central U.S. have left at least seven people dead, including three near Golden City, Missouri.

Kenneth Harris, 86, and his 83-year-old wife, Opal, were found dead about 200 yards (180 meters) from their home, and Betty Berg, 56, was killed and her husband, Mark, seriously injured when their mobile home was destroyed, authorities said.

While forecasters said the threat of severe weather would ease Friday and into the weekend, another natural disaster could be imminent in Jefferson City. Most of the city, including the tornado-ravaged section, sits on a bluff overlooking the south side of the Missouri River. The swollen river is projected to top a levee on the north side of the river by Friday, potentially flooding the city’s airport, which already has been evacuated.

Many in Jefferson City considered themselves fortunate to survive the tornado.

David Surprenant watched the storm approach then rushed to join his family in the basement. By then, the windows had started shattering and the pressure dropped.

“It was just the eeriest sound ever, and it felt like it was taking your breath right out of you,” Surprenant, 34, said. He and his family were unharmed.

Kerry Ann Demetrius locked herself in the bathroom of her Jefferson City apartment as the storm approached.

“It sounded like stuff was being thrown around, everything was just banging together, and then it just went dead silent,” she said. She emerged to find the roof had been blown off her apartment building.

The National Weather Service said preliminary information indicates the tornado at Jefferson City was an EF-3, which typically carry winds up to 160 mph (260 kph).

The severe weather moved in from Oklahoma, where rescuers struggled to pull people from high water.

Flood waters along the Arkansas River could approach or surpass record levels for about 120 miles (193 kilometers) from Tulsa, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas. More than 1,000 homes have been damaged and 35 to 40 highways closed by flood waters in Oklahoma, Gov. Kevin Stitt told reporters Thursday evening.

The heavily traveled Interstate 40 bridge over the Arkansas River at Webbers Falls, Oklahoma, reopened after a dam escaped major damage when a pair of loose barges rammed into it.

The barges, carrying a total of about 3,800 pounds (1,700 kilograms) of fertilizer, broke loose Wednesday and floated down the swollen river. They eventually hit the dam and sank, causing only “minimal damage,” The Army Corps of Engineers said.

A twister also caused damage and several injuries in the town of Carl Junction, not far from Joplin, on the eighth anniversary of the catastrophic tornado that killed 161 people in that city. Police Chief Delmar Haase said nearly three dozen homes had significant damage and several people sustained minor injuries.

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Associated Press writers Summer Ballentine in Jefferson City; Jill Bleed in Little Rock, Arkansas; John Hanna in Topeka, Kansas; Jim Salter in St. Louis; and Ken Miller and Tim Talley in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-cec90a5c1b3f49269cd5ceb83ce74930 Fourth day of nasty storms ravages central US fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc DAVID A. LIEB cad350b8-044f-5ef6-b1e4-2b7c77929e76 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-cec90a5c1b3f49269cd5ceb83ce74930 Fourth day of nasty storms ravages central US fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc DAVID A. LIEB cad350b8-044f-5ef6-b1e4-2b7c77929e76 Associated Press article

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3 dead, state capital battered as storms rake Missouri

An outbreak of nasty storms spawned tornadoes that razed homes, flattened trees and tossed cars across a dealership lot, injuring about two dozen people in Missouri’s capital city and killing at least three others elsewhere in the state.

The National Weather Service confirmed that a large and destructive twister moved over Jefferson City shortly before midnight Wednesday.

The tornado cut a path about 3 miles long and a mile wide from the south end of Jefferson City north toward the Missouri River, said police Lt. David Williams. Emergency workers reported about two dozen injuries, Williams said, and around 100 of people went to shelters. Hospitals reported treating injuries such as cuts and bruises.

There were no immediate reports of any deaths or missing people in the capital city of about 40,000, and it appeared everyone was accounted for after door-to-door checks that were nearly complete Thursday evening, police Lt. David Williams said.

Many in Jefferson City considered themselves fortunate to survive.

David Surprenant watched the storm approach then rushed to join his family in the basement. By then, the windows had started shattering and the pressure dropped.

“It was just the eeriest sound ever, and it felt like it was taking your breath right out of you,” Surprenant, 34, said. He and his family were unharmed.

Kevin Riley operates a car dealership next to Surprenant’s home, where he sells Chevys and Toyotas. He figured that 98 percent of the approximately 750 vehicles on the lot were damaged.

Lincoln University President Jerald Woolfolk rode out the tornado in the basement of her official residence, and it may have saved her life. University spokeswoman Misty Young told the Jefferson City News-Tribune that the home, built 103 years ago, was so badly damaged it appeared to be uninhabitable.

Weather forecasters had been tracking the storm before it arrived, and sirens first sounded in Jefferson City at 11:10 p.m. — about 30 minutes before the first property damage. Gov. Mike Parson credited the warning system for saving lives.

The three deaths happened more than 150 miles (240 kilometers) away near Golden City in Missouri’s southwestern corner.

Kenneth Harris, 86, and his 83-year-old wife, Opal, were found dead about 200 yards (180 meters) from their home, and Betty Berg, 56, was killed and her husband, Mark, seriously injured when their mobile home was destroyed, authorities said.

The National Weather Service said preliminary information indicates the tornado at Jefferson City was an EF-3, which typically carry winds up to 160 mph (260kph).

The severe weather moved in from Oklahoma, where rescuers struggled to pull people from high water. This week has seen several days of twisters and torrential rains in the Southern Plains and Midwest.

Kerry Ann Demetrius locked herself in the bathroom of her Jefferson City apartment as the storm approached.

“It sounded like stuff was being thrown around, everything was just banging together, and then it just went dead silent,” she said. She emerged to find the roof had been blown off her apartment building.

Another natural disaster could be imminent in Jefferson City. Most of the city, including the tornado-ravaged section, sits on a bluff overlooking the south side of the Missouri River. But the swollen river is projected to top a levee on the north side of the river by Friday, potentially flooding the city’s airport, which already has been evacuated.

The Missouri Office of Administration said several state office buildings sustained damage, mostly roof damage.

A tornado also skipped through the town of Eldon, population 4,900, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) outside Jefferson City, where it damaged the business district and “tore up several neighborhoods,” Miller County Emergency Management Director Mike Rayhart said.

But Mayor Larry Henderson said people in Eldon were counting their blessings: Despite all the damage, just one man was hurt, when the wind flipped his truck. Henderson did not have any details about the man’s injuries.

A twister also caused damage and several injuries in the town of Carl Junction, not far from Joplin, on the eighth anniversary of the catastrophic tornado that killed 161 people in that city. Police Chief Delmar Haase said nearly three dozen homes had significant damage and several people sustained minor injuries. He estimated total damage in Carl Junction was “in the millions.”

The National Weather Service says the EF-3 tornado that hit Carl Junction was among four tornadoes that hit that area of the state Wednesday night over a path of roughly 50 miles. Meteorologist Mark Burchfield in Springfield, Missouri, said Thursday that the tornado that hit Carl Junction was on the ground for about nine miles. He said the deadly EF-3 tornado outside Golden City was on the ground for 12 miles.

The severe weather was expected to push eastward Thursday, with forecasters saying parts of the Ohio Valley and the mid-Atlantic — including Baltimore and Pittsburgh — could see tornadoes, large hail and strong winds.

Storms and torrential rains have ravaged the Midwest, from Texas through Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and Illinois, in the past few days.

Two barges carrying a total of about 3,800 pounds (1,700 kilograms) of fertilizer broke loose Thursday and floated down the swollen Arkansas River in Oklahoma, spreading alarm downstream as they hit a dam and sank. On Facebook, Webbers Falls, Oklahoma, warned the town’s 600 residents: “If the dam breaks, it will be catastrophic!! Leave now!!”

The barges had been floating out of control, on and off again, since Wednesday night near the town of 600, which was under a mandatory evacuation order due to flooding concerns. Aerial footage from the Oklahoma City television station KFOR showed the moment of impact shortly before noon Thursday. The Army Corps of Engineers was checking the dam for damage.

The Army Corps of Engineers immediately inspected the dam and said only “minimal” damage was found. However, the wrecked barges sank and are blocking three of the dam’s 12 flood gates.

Near Tulsa, about a dozen homes were evacuated as the Arkansas River continued to swell. The potential for further flooding also prompted the HolleyFrontier Tulsa Refinery to temporarily shut down.

Officials in Tulsa said additional residents may be asked to evacuate as the Army Corps of Engineers increases the flow rate at a dam northwest of the city to help drain a watershed flooded by severe storms.

Missouri’s three tornado fatalities bring to seven the number of deaths from storms this week.

___

This version of the story corrects the gender of Lincoln University president.

___

Associated Press writers Summer Ballentine in Jefferson City; Jill Bleed in Little Rock, Arkansas; John Hanna in Topeka, Kansas; Jim Salter in St. Louis; and Ken Miller and Tim Talley in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-9e79e3ff076e413cb2bee6db92d63c4f 3 dead, state capital battered as storms rake Missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press article 9c0fd56d-da50-5c4a-b90c-624bbeffc09b   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-9e79e3ff076e413cb2bee6db92d63c4f 3 dead, state capital battered as storms rake Missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press article 9c0fd56d-da50-5c4a-b90c-624bbeffc09b

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3 deaths in Missouri as tornado strikes state capital

A tornado has caused heavy damage in Missouri’s capital city as severe weather swept across the state overnight, causing three deaths and trapping dozens of people in the wreckage of their homes.

The National Weather Service confirmed that the large and destructive tornado moved over Jefferson City shortly before midnight on Wednesday.

Gov. Mike Parson said three people died. Missouri Public Safety said they were killed in the Golden City area of Barton County. The governor is praising first responders who have worked through the night to free people from homes that have been ripped apart in the storm.

Jefferson City Police Lt. David Williams says no deaths were reported in the capital, but 20 people have been rescued by emergency personnel.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-51f211539033460c9c2e100992bec6cc 3 deaths in Missouri as tornado strikes state capital fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press article 9c0fd56d-da50-5c4a-b90c-624bbeffc09b   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-51f211539033460c9c2e100992bec6cc 3 deaths in Missouri as tornado strikes state capital fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press article 9c0fd56d-da50-5c4a-b90c-624bbeffc09b

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A ‘violent tornado’ has touched down in Missouri

A “violent tornado” touched down in Jefferson City, Missouri, causing heavy damage Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service.

The service reported that a “confirmed large and destructive tornado” was observed over Jefferson City at 11:43 p.m. Wednesday, moving northeast at 40 mph (64 kph). The capital city is located 130 miles (209 kilometers) west of St. Louis.

No fatalities have been reported but Jefferson City Police Lt. David Williams said they have received multiple calls of people being trapped in their homes.

“It’s a chaotic situation right now,” Williams said. “We need people who are not affected to stay out of those areas.”

Williams spoke from the Cole County Sheriff’s office, where debris such as insulation, roofing shingles and metal pieces lay on the ground outside the front doors.

Power outages are being reported in parts of the city.

“More dangerous severe weather — tornadoes and flash flooding —expected overnight,” according to a tweet from Missouri Public Safety.

The National Weather Service said it had received 22 reports of tornadoes by late Wednesday evening, although some of those could be duplicate reporting of the same twister.

One tornado skirted just a few miles north of Joplin, Missouri, on the eighth anniversary of a catastrophic tornado that killed 161 people in the city. The tornado caused some damage in the town of Carl Junction, about 4 miles (6.44 kilometers) north of the Joplin airport.

The Arkansas River was approaching historic highs, while the already high Missouri and Mississippi Rivers were again rising after a multi-day stretch of storms that produced dozens of tornadoes. Forecasters predicted parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday night into Thursday.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-de9a2a4c52814053825c28401bd62d4c A 'violent tornado' has touched down in Missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc ff34ef0d-a738-500f-9b23-f50f2332cb76 DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-de9a2a4c52814053825c28401bd62d4c A 'violent tornado' has touched down in Missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc ff34ef0d-a738-500f-9b23-f50f2332cb76 DAVID A. LIEB Associated Press article

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Tornado in Jefferson City, Mo., may have caused ‘catastrophic damage’: reports

Westlake Legal Group c65b811b-crime-scene-iStock Tornado in Jefferson City, Mo., may have caused ‘catastrophic damage’: reports fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 40c25131-3b10-5035-bce5-a2450729af52

Jefferson City, the capital city of Missouri, has taken a direct hit from a tornado and suffered possibly “catastrophic” damage, according to reports.

According to the National Weather Service, a “confirmed large and destructive tornado” was observed over Jefferson City, at 11:43 p.m., moving northeast at 40 mph.

DOZENS OF TORNADOS SLAM MIDWEST AS FLOODWATERS RISE; AT LEAST 2 DEAD

The Missouri Department of Public Safety reported extensive damage along Ellis Boulevard near Highway 54 and warned of downed power lines. Authorities warned residents that all downed lines should be considered live — and advised that people stay away from areas that have experienced heavy damage.

News accounts and posts on social media refer to people possibly trapped in apartment complexes, gas leaks, possible damage to the Missouri Statehouse and other impacts.

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There were no immediate reports about fatalities or injuries.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group c65b811b-crime-scene-iStock Tornado in Jefferson City, Mo., may have caused ‘catastrophic damage’: reports fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 40c25131-3b10-5035-bce5-a2450729af52   Westlake Legal Group c65b811b-crime-scene-iStock Tornado in Jefferson City, Mo., may have caused ‘catastrophic damage’: reports fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 40c25131-3b10-5035-bce5-a2450729af52

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The Latest: Handful of homes evacuated in Missouri’s capital

The Latest on storm damage in the Southern Plains and Midwest (all times local):

4:35 p.m.

A handful of residents in Missouri’s capital city and some businesses have been ordered to leave as the Missouri River rises.

Jefferson City issued a mandatory evacuation order Wednesday for residents and businesses on the north side of the river. The capitol building, state penitentiary and nearly all of the city’s homes are on the south side of the river.

Residents of several communities in Oklahoma and Kansas also have been urged to evacuate as rivers and streams rise.

Jefferson City police Lt. Dave Williams estimated that only about five to 10 homes are in the area that’s under a mandatory evacuation.

As a precaution, the Missouri National Guard also moved four helicopters out of the city’s airport, which also is on the north side of the river. And a Memorial Day weekend airshow was canceled.

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3:40 p.m.

Recent rains are creating new flooding risks along the Missouri River.

The Army Corps of Engineers says about 50 levees in Missouri could be overtopped by Saturday as high water levels move downstream. Most of the threatened area is farmland.

Recent storms in the central U.S. are also causing flooding woes in Kansas and Oklahoma.

The Missouri is expected to crest Thursday at 36.1 feet (11 meters) near the town of Glasgow, Missouri, overtopping agricultural levees and inundating some homes, highways and parkland. The National Weather Service has warned of moderate flooding in several other river towns.

The river has been flooding off and on since March, breaching dozens of levees and causing billions of dollars of damage to farmland, homes and businesses across the Midwest.

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2:50 p.m.

More Oklahoma residents are being encouraged to evacuate because of expected flooding that’s also prompted concerns in Missouri and Kansas.

Authorities on Wednesday encouraged people living along the Arkansas River in the Tulsa suburb of Bixby and low-lying areas near creeks both north and south of Okmulgee, about 35 miles (56 kilometers) south of Tulsa. to leave their homes.

Residents in the Tulsa suburb of Sand Springs; Fort Gibson, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) southwest of Tulsa; and Webbers Falls, some 70 miles (113 kilometers) southeast of Tulsa, were advised earlier to evacuate because of flooding forecast on the Arkansas River.

Residents along the Cimarron River were evacuating as the riverbank eroded beneath their homes about 34 miles (55 kilometers) north of Oklahoma City.

One unoccupied home rolled off the river bank and into the Cimarron River on Tuesday. Authorities say parts of others ae hanging over the riverbank and are threatened with collapsing.

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2:25 p.m.

Some residents along a rain-swollen Oklahoma river are evacuating after swift currents eroded the riverbank and undermined the soil beneath their homes.

Erosion along the Cimarron River has caused several homes to be threatened with collapsing into the river near Crescent, about 34 miles (55 kilometers) north of Oklahoma City.

Severe storms that have spawned tornadoes in Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Iowa, has also dropped up to 9 inches (23 centimeters) of rain on parts of Oklahoma during the past week. That’s caused many rivers and streams to overflow their banks.

One unoccupied home rolled off the river bank and into the Cimarron River on Tuesday. Authorities say parts of others ae hanging over the riverbank and are threatened with collapsing.

Logan County Sheriff Damon Devereaux didn’t immediately return a call seeking comment.

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12:30 p.m.

Residents of two more Oklahoma towns are being encouraged to leave their homes ahead of expected flooding that has also prompted flooding concerns in Missouri and Kansas.

Residents in the Tulsa suburb of Sand Springs and in Fort Gibson, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) southwest of Tulsa are being urged to evacuate because of flooding forecast on the Arkansas River.

Residents of Webbers Falls, some 70 miles (113 kilometers) southeast of Tulsa, were advised earlier to evacuate.

The National Weather Service reports the river was at 37 feet (11 meters) late Wednesday morning, 9 feet (2.74 meters) above flood stage and expected to reach 41 feet (12.5 meters) by Friday morning.

River levels were rising Wednesday, after days of severe weather that has been blamed on at least three deaths.

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11:55 a.m.

Severe storms that churned up tornadoes have prompted flooding concerns in Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma.

River levels were rising Wednesday, after days of severe weather that has been blamed on at least three deaths.

The deluge inundated roadways, closing highways in 17 Kansas counties, along with more than 330 Missouri roads.

Amtrak also suspended train service Wednesday and Thursday along a route between St. Louis and Kansas City because of congestion and flood-related delays.

In Oklahoma, officials are urging residents of Webbers Falls to evacuate as the Arkansas River heads toward near-historic levels.

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday night into Thursday.

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9:35 a.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt says more rain in the forecast is a big concern with parts of the state already flooded following severe weather that’s blamed for at least three deaths after also battering Iowa, Kansas and Missouri.

Stitt spoke at a news conference Wednesday in Tulsa following an aerial tour with Tulsa Mayor G.W. Bynum and other officials.

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday, the latest in a multi-day stretch of storms that have spawned dozens of tornadoes.

The National Weather Service has issued flood warnings in the northeastern corner of Oklahoma through the weekend. More than 8 inches (20 centimeters) of rain has fallen since Sunday in parts of Oklahoma after an already rainy spring .

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9:05 a.m.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says a woman apparently drowned after driving around a barricade into high water.

The unidentified woman’s body was sent to the state medical examiner’s office to confirm the cause of death. Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain said she isn’t yet listed as what would be the state’s first storm-related death.

The OHP says the woman drove onto the water covered roadway near Perkins, about 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City and was swept off the highway.

A storm system that spawned numerous tornadoes since Sunday in Oklahoma has been followed by heavy rains that dumped more than 8 inches of rain in parts of the state.

The National Weather Service has issued flood and flash flood warnings for the northeastern corner of the state through the remainder of the week.

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8:40 a.m.

Authorities say one person has been killed and another injured by what may have been a tornado that damaged a farmstead in southwest Iowa’s Adair County.

The Adair County Sheriff’s Office says first responders found the body of 74-year-old Linda Brownlee early Wednesday morning at the farm just east-southeast of Adair. Seventy-eight-year-old Harold Brownlee was flown to a Des Moines hospital.

Robert Kempf, emergency management coordinator for Adair and Guthrie counties, says the Brownlee home sits atop a hill, so the extensive damage could have been caused by straight-line winds. The National Weather Service is sending an assessment team to determine whether a tornado was involved.

Kempf says three outbuildings were destroyed at the farm, and two nearby houses were damaged as well.

The weather service says debris from the farmstead landed on nearby Interstate 80.

___

6:40 a.m.

A small town in Oklahoma is urging residents to evacuate as the Arkansas River heads toward near-historic levels.

Forecasters say major flooding is expected in Webbers Falls, a town of about 600 people about 140 miles (225 kilometers) east of Oklahoma City.

According to the National Weather Service, the Arkansas River was at 34.5 feet (10.5 meters), or 6.5 feet (2 meters) above flood stage, as of Wednesday morning. The river was expected to rise to 40 feet (12 meters) by Thursday morning. The National Weather Service says the flooding poses an “extremely dangerous and life-threatening situation.”

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see severe weather Wednesday, the latest in a multi-day stretch of storms that have spawned dozens of tornadoes and caused two deaths in Missouri.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-196e96fa673148599e6ab039a8a95606 The Latest: Handful of homes evacuated in Missouri's capital Oklahoma City fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 20ced992-1487-50b5-bcd6-dd99c9a008a2   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-196e96fa673148599e6ab039a8a95606 The Latest: Handful of homes evacuated in Missouri's capital Oklahoma City fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 20ced992-1487-50b5-bcd6-dd99c9a008a2

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Tornado warning? Who cares? The Blues are playing for a title!

When your city’s hockey team has its first chance in nearly a half-century to reach the Stanley Cup Final, something as trivial as a tornado warning can wait.

After all, tornadoes come around all the time in these parts. Not so with hockey championships.

That was the message from St. Louis Blues fans on Tuesday night before their favorite team was to play the San Jose Sharks in Game 6 of the NHL’s Western Conference championship series.

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Though a tornado warning was in effect until 10 p.m. local time, a huge crowd gathered inside the Enterprise Center, where the game was played, and more fans congregated at Ballpark Village, the entertainment district several blocks away from the arena.

“You know St. Louis is a sports town when we are more worried about watching this Blues game than the tornado warning. LGB!!” fan Tyler Wright wrote on Twitter.

Many others watching at home were worried that TV weather alerts and public-safety sirens would interrupt their enjoyment of the game.

Westlake Legal Group c6ec89c2-SHARKS-BLUES-HOCKEY Tornado warning? Who cares? The Blues are playing for a title! fox-news/weather fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/sports/stanley-cup-playoffs fox-news/sports/nhl/st-louis-blues fox-news/sports/nhl/san-jose-sharks fox-news/sports/nhl fox news fnc/sports fnc Dom Calicchio article 02862168-94bb-57e5-a0cc-68b606cc5719

San Jose Sharks right wing Joonas Donskoi (27), of Finland, passes the puck away from St. Louis Blues center Tyler Bozak (21) during the second period in Game 6 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Western Conference final series Tuesday in St. Louis. (Associated Press)

“Yes, I know there is a tornado warning,” Twitter user Becky Schwartz wrote. “Now please take the message off of my tv so I can keep watching the @StLouisBlues game.”

“Lol. Tornado sirens going off downtown St. Louis, and not a Blues fan flinches,” Andrew Thompson observed.

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“Definitely risking dying from a tornado to sit and watch this blues game,” Hannah Lorsbach wrote.

Up 3-2 in the series, the Blues had a chance to eliminate the Sharks — which they ultimately did, defeating San Jose 5-1.

Next up: St. Louis will play for the Stanley Cup against the Boston Bruins — the very same team they played in the Final the last time, way back in 1970, before many Blues fans were born.

One thing was clear Tuesday: St. Louis fans are with the Blues all the way — come hell, high water or tornadoes.

Westlake Legal Group SHARKS-BLUES-HOCKEY Tornado warning? Who cares? The Blues are playing for a title! fox-news/weather fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/sports/stanley-cup-playoffs fox-news/sports/nhl/st-louis-blues fox-news/sports/nhl/san-jose-sharks fox-news/sports/nhl fox news fnc/sports fnc Dom Calicchio article 02862168-94bb-57e5-a0cc-68b606cc5719   Westlake Legal Group SHARKS-BLUES-HOCKEY Tornado warning? Who cares? The Blues are playing for a title! fox-news/weather fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/sports/stanley-cup-playoffs fox-news/sports/nhl/st-louis-blues fox-news/sports/nhl/san-jose-sharks fox-news/sports/nhl fox news fnc/sports fnc Dom Calicchio article 02862168-94bb-57e5-a0cc-68b606cc5719

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Another day of tornadoes in Midwest, but St. Louis spared

Dangerous storms in the Midwest produced dozens of tornadoes for the second consecutive day Tuesday, demolishing a racetrack grandstand and damaging buildings in a wild animal park in Missouri but mostly sparing St. Louis, the biggest city in its path.

Two deaths, both in Missouri, were blamed on the severe weather that started in the Southern Plains Monday night and moved to the northeast. Missouri and parts of Illinois and Arkansas were in the crosshairs Tuesday. By Wednesday, the storm will move into Great Lakes region, where it will weaken. But another storm system was gathering steam for later this week, potentially covering an area from Texas to Chicago, according to the National Weather Service.

The skies grew dark over St. Louis before nightfall Tuesday and a tornado warning was issued for the city and surrounding suburbs, but the storm passed overhead without producing the rotation that often spawns tornadoes and the city was mostly spared except for heavy rain.

A tornado early Tuesday near Tulsa International Airport injured one person and damaged about a dozen homes. The airport was unscathed, but passengers were moved into shelters for about 30 minutes and several flights were delayed.

Tulsa Area Emergency Management spokeswoman Kim MacLeod said crews rescued a man who was pinned under a tree. In Arkansas, crews were working Tuesday afternoon to free a woman trapped under a tree topped by strong winds. Arkansas Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Melody Daniel said the woman was alert and talking.

Storms Monday evening flipped campers at Lucas Oil Speedway in Hickory County, Missouri, injuring seven people, four of whom were taken to hospitals. The speedway’s grandstand also was destroyed, forcing cancellation of racing this weekend that was expected to draw about 3,000 campers.

Another twister Tuesday afternoon hit a hit a drive-thru wild animal park in southern Missouri. Webster County Emergency Management Director Tom Simmons said buildings were damaged at the Wild Animal Safari near Strafford, but there were no reports that people or animals were injured. All of the animals were accounted for.

Simmons said about a half-dozen homes were damaged in the county. A tractor-trailer was blown off a highway.

Heavy rain was called a contributing factor in the deaths of two people in a traffic accident Tuesday near Springfield, Missouri. The Missouri State Highway Patrol said an SUV skidded across the center of U.S. 160 and struck a tractor-trailer, killing both people in the SUV, Brandon Beasley, 23, and his 24-year-old wife, Christin, of Willard, Missouri.

Missouri authorities also reported several water rescues from flash flooding. Among them was an 18-year-old woman who was swept off a flooded road near Joplin Monday and stranded overnight until nearby residents heard her yelling. She had only minor injuries.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson declared a state of emergency, citing worsening flood concerns and soil inundation, as well as forecasts calling severe storms and possible tornadoes into Wednesday morning.

“The very heavy rainfall yesterday and today, combined with saturated soil and very high water levels on many rivers and streams have created dangerous conditions around the state,” Parson, a Republican, said in a statement.

Flooding was also an issue in Oklahoma, where the Oklahoma Department of Transportation shut down Interstate 40 in El Reno, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City, because of high water. The National Weather Service says up to 5 inches (13 centimeters) of rain had fallen since Monday. In El Reno and Stillwater, home to Oklahoma State University about 55 miles (88 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City, emergency responders rescued people from their homes.

With a potentially dangerous storm bearing down on St. Louis, baseball’s Cardinals were taking no chances, calling off a Tuesday night game against the cross-state rival Kansas City Royals. Sure enough, a severe storm rumbled through downtown St. Louis around the time the game would have started.

The storm forced Lambert Airport in St. Louis to halt all flights for about an hour, before resuming Tuesday evening. There were no immediate reports of major damage in the region.

Heavy snow melt from the north and significant spring rains have led to waves of flooding in Missouri, and President Donald Trump on Monday issued a major disaster declaration for 13 counties in the state damaged by March flooding.

The Missouri River is expected to reach major flood stage by the end of the week at Jefferson City, Hermann, St. Charles and elsewhere. The levee near Jefferson City’s airport holds back water up to 30 feet (9.14 meters), Cole County Emergency Manager Bill Farr said, but the National Weather Service expects a crest of 32.3 feet (9.85 meters) Thursday. Sandbagging won’t help because the levee is too long, he said.

“We’re just keeping our fingers crossed,” Farr said.

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Miller reported from Oklahoma City. Associated Press writers Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Mo.; Hannah Grabenstein in Little Rock, Ark.; and David A. Lieb in Jefferson City, Mo., contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-fe95c1882b6546688de687930c321782 Another day of tornadoes in Midwest, but St. Louis spared JIM SALTER and KEN MILLER fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 076876a3-6e46-539a-b9c5-e9a9539c9c96   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-fe95c1882b6546688de687930c321782 Another day of tornadoes in Midwest, but St. Louis spared JIM SALTER and KEN MILLER fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 076876a3-6e46-539a-b9c5-e9a9539c9c96

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The Latest: Confirmed tornado spotted near Tulsa airport

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news The Latest: Confirmed tornado spotted near Tulsa airport Oklahoma City fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc e39824da-5d1a-5de7-b800-f018a2bc5652 Associated Press article

The Latest on severe weather in the central United States (all times local):

6:45 a.m.

The National Weather Service says a confirmed tornado has been spotted near the Tulsa International Airport.

A tornado warning was issued early Tuesday morning for the area. Forecasters say the tornado is moving to the northeast at about 50 mph (80 kph).

The tornado comes as part of a powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings Monday and caused significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma. The stormy weather is expected to continue Tuesday in eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois.

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6:15 a.m.

A powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings is now causing significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation shut down Interstate 40 in El Reno, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City, because of high water Tuesday morning. The National Weather Service says up to 5 inches of rain has fallen since Monday.

In Stillwater, emergency responders were rescuing people from their homes because of high water.

The Storm Prediction Center had warned of an unusually high risk for severe weather Monday for parts of Oklahoma and Texas. Damage was reported in many areas, including the town of Mangum, but no deaths have been reported.

Forecasters say more stormy weather is expected Tuesday, especially in Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois.

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The Latest: NWS confirms EF2 tornado in southern Oklahoma

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news The Latest: NWS confirms EF2 tornado in southern Oklahoma GERONIMO, Okla. fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 80b45661-1e33-5125-96bd-eb0c1e2df96d

The Latest on severe weather in the Southern Plains (all times local):

5:15 p.m.

Authorities have confirmed a tornado with winds up to 130 mph (209 kph) touched down in southern Oklahoma.

The National Weather Service says the EF2 twister Saturday morning traveled for about a half a mile in Geronimo, about 80 miles (129 kilometers) southwest of Oklahoma City, damaging two homes and sending one injured person to the hospital as a precaution.

They’re also investigating reported wind damage in the southeast and north of the state.

In northwest Arkansas, a state official said multiple people are stranded on recreational trails due to downed trees.

Meanwhile, energy companies for both states are reporting tens of thousands of people are without power.

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4:00 p.m.

Arkansas officials say suspected tornadoes have damaged homes, downed trees and cut power to some areas in the western part of the state.

Melody Daniel, spokeswoman for the state’s emergency management department, says fallen trees have blocked all lanes of traffic on Route 64 in northwestern Arkansas, while a possible tornado in Fort Smith has caused roof damage to “numerous” homes.

In Paris, about 600 homes as well as the county’s emergency dispatch office have lost power, but Daniel says the office has redundancies to provide dispatch services.

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3:30 p.m.

A spate of tornadoes raked across the Southern Plains, leaving damage and causing few injuries, and parts of the region were bracing for more severe thunderstorms and possible flooding.

Tornadoes touched down Friday in Kansas and rural parts of Nebraska, tearing up trees and powerlines, and damaging some homes and farm buildings, according to the National Weather Service. More twisters destroyed at least two homes and left one person with minor injuries in southwestern Oklahoma early Saturday, KWTV television reports.

The National Weather Service issued a tornado watch until 8 p.m. Saturday for the western half of Arkansas. Portions of North Texas were under a tornado watch until 5 p.m. and a flash flood warning was issued in the Dallas area until 4:45 p.m.

Forecasters warned of heavy rain, lightning, pingpong ball-sized hail and flooding as a line of storms moves west to east through afternoon, covering an area from south of Killeen, Texas, to north of the Oklahoma state line.

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