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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/disasters/tornado

South Dakota tornado leaves 13,000 without power; reports of structural damage

Westlake Legal Group 03_AP19149107626620 South Dakota tornado leaves 13,000 without power; reports of structural damage fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/south-dakota fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 6588babb-f4bb-508b-974c-a1c007e8db83

A tornado tearing through South Dakota’s largest city on Tuesday night knocked down power lines and caused some significant structural damage, according to a report.

There were no early indications of injuries or fatalities from the twister that struck the south side of Sioux Falls around 11:40 p.m., the Argus Leader reported.

TORNADOES HIT CAROLINAS AS HURRICANE DORIAN FLOODS CHARLESTON; 200K WITHOUT POWER

Nearly 13,000 utility customers were left without electricity, Xcel Energy reported, according to the newspaper.

A flash flood warning remained in effect for the area while the tornado moved on to Minnesota and Iowa, the report said.

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The newspaper reported via Twitter that Avera Heart Hospital lost parts of its roof and some patients “need attention.”

A Best Buy store and other businesses also suffered roof damage, social media posts said.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group 03_AP19149107626620 South Dakota tornado leaves 13,000 without power; reports of structural damage fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/south-dakota fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 6588babb-f4bb-508b-974c-a1c007e8db83   Westlake Legal Group 03_AP19149107626620 South Dakota tornado leaves 13,000 without power; reports of structural damage fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/south-dakota fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 6588babb-f4bb-508b-974c-a1c007e8db83

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House sends long-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill to Trump

A long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill has sailed through the House and headed to President Donald Trump for his expected signature, overcoming months of infighting, misjudgment and a feud between Trump and congressional Democrats.

Lawmakers gave the measure final congressional approval on Monday by 354-58 in the House’s first significant action after returning from a 10-day recess. It was backed by all 222 voting Democrats and 132 Republicans, including the GOP’s top leaders and many of its legislators from areas hit by hurricanes, floods, tornadoes and fires. Fifty-eight Republicans voted “no,” including many of the party’s most conservative members.

Trump hailed passage of the bill, tweeting, “Farmers, Puerto Rico and all will be very happy.” The Republican president also suggested, incorrectly, that the bill would now see action in the Senate. That chamber had already passed the bill by a sweeping 85-8 vote on its way out of Washington May 23, a margin that reflected a consensus that the bill is long overdue.

But conservative Republicans in the House held up the bill last week, objecting on three occasions to efforts by Democratic leaders to pass the bill by a voice vote requiring unanimity. They said the legislation — which reflects an increasingly permissive attitude in Washington on spending to address disasters that sooner or later hit every region of the country — shouldn’t be rushed through without a recorded vote.

Along the way, House and Senate old-timers seemed to outmaneuver the White House, though Trump personally prevailed upon Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., to drop a bid to free up billions of dollars for dredging and other harbor projects.

The measure was initially held up over a fight between Trump and Democrats over aid to Puerto Rico that seems long settled.

“Some in our government refused to assist our fellow Americans in Puerto Rico who are still recovering from a 2017 hurricane. I’m pleased we’ve moved past that,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y. “Because when disaster strikes, we shouldn’t let a ZIP code dictate our response.”

The measure also faced delays amid failed talks on Trump’s $4 billion-plus request to care for thousands of mostly Central American migrants being held at the southern border. The sides narrowed their differences but couldn’t reach agreement in the rush to go on recess, but everyone agrees that another bill will be needed almost immediately to refill nearly empty agency accounts to care for migrants.

“We must work together quickly to pass a bill that addresses the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border and provides law enforcement agencies with the funding they need,” said top Appropriations Committee Republican Kay Granger of Texas. “The stakes are high. There are serious — life or death — repercussions if the Congress does not act.”

The measure is largely the same as a version that passed the House last month. Republicans opposed it for leaving out the border funding.

Among the reasons was a demand by House liberals to block the Homeland Security Department from getting information from federal social welfare authorities to help track immigrants residing in the U.S. illegally who take migrant refugee children into their homes.

As the measure languished, disasters kept coming — with failed levees in Arkansas, Iowa and Missouri and tornadoes across Ohio just the most recent examples. The measure is supported by the bipartisan party leadership in both House and Senate.

The legislation is also being driven by Florida and Georgia lawmakers steaming with frustration over delays in delivering help to farmers, towns and military bases slammed by hurricanes last fall. Flooding in Iowa and Nebraska this spring added to the coalition behind the measure, which delivers much of its help to regions where Trump supporters dominate.

The bill started out as a modest $7.8 billion measure passed in the last days of House GOP control. A $14 billion version advanced in the Democrat-led chamber in January and ballooned to $19.1 billion by the time it emerged from the floor last month, fed by new funding for community rehabilitation projects, Army Corps of Engineers water and flood protection projects, and rebuilding funds for several military bases, including Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska.

Many Republicans opposed funding to mitigate future disasters as part of rebuilding projects when Superstorm Sandy funding passed in 2013, only to embrace it now that areas such as suburban Houston need it. Democrats, for their part, held firm for what ended up as roughly $1.4 billion for Puerto Rico, letting Trump feud with the U.S. territory’s Democratic officials for weeks and deflecting political blame for stalling the bill.

___

This story has been corrected to show that more than 130 Republicans voted for bill, rather than “more than 50.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-c02261d012d946a4a2a03c9a0a0c89ed House sends long-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill to Trump fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article ANDREW TAYLOR 00f84045-539d-59f0-a4d0-4140fd5f00c7   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-c02261d012d946a4a2a03c9a0a0c89ed House sends long-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill to Trump fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article ANDREW TAYLOR 00f84045-539d-59f0-a4d0-4140fd5f00c7

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Congress finally sends $19B disaster aid bill to Trump

A long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill sailed through the House on Monday and headed to President Donald Trump for his expected signature, overcoming months of infighting, misjudgment and a feud between Trump and congressional Democrats.

Lawmakers gave the measure final congressional approval by 354-58 in the House’s first significant action after returning from a 10-day recess. It was backed by all 222 voting Democrats and 132 Republicans, including the GOP’s top leaders and many of its legislators from areas hit by hurricanes, floods, tornadoes and fires. Fifty-eight Republicans voted “no,” including many of the party’s most conservative members.

Conservative Republicans held up the bill during the break, objecting on three occasions to efforts by Democratic leaders to pass the bill by a voice vote requiring unanimity. They said the legislation — which reflects an increasingly permissive attitude in Washington on spending to address disasters that sooner or later hit every region of the country — shouldn’t be rushed through without a recorded vote.

Along the way, House and Senate old-timers seemed to outmaneuver the White House, though Trump personally prevailed upon Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., to drop a bid to free up billions of dollars for dredging and other harbor projects. The Senate passed the bill by a sweeping 85-8 vote on its way out of Washington May 23, a margin that reflected a consensus that the bill is long overdue.

The measure was initially held up over a fight between Trump and Democrats over aid to Puerto Rico that seems long settled.

“Some in our government refused to assist our fellow Americans in Puerto Rico who are still recovering from a 2017 hurricane. I’m pleased we’ve moved past that,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y. “Because when disaster strikes, we shouldn’t let a ZIP code dictate our response.”

The measure also faced delays amid failed talks on Trump’s $4 billion-plus request to care for thousands of mostly Central American migrants being held at the southern border. The sides narrowed their differences but couldn’t reach agreement in the rush to go on recess, but everyone agrees that another bill will be needed almost immediately to refill nearly empty agency accounts to care for migrants.

“We must work together quickly to pass a bill that addresses the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border and provides law enforcement agencies with the funding they need,” said top Appropriations Committee Republican Kay Granger of Texas. “The stakes are high. There are serious — life or death — repercussions if the Congress does not act.”

The measure is largely the same as a version that passed the House last month. Republicans opposed it for leaving out the border funding.

Among the reasons was a demand by House liberals to block the Homeland Security Department from getting information from federal social welfare authorities to help track immigrants residing in the U.S. illegally who take migrant refugee children into their homes.

As the measure languished, disasters kept coming — with failed levees in Arkansas, Iowa and Missouri and tornadoes across Ohio just the most recent examples. The measure is supported by the bipartisan party leadership in both House and Senate.

The legislation is also being driven by Florida and Georgia lawmakers steaming with frustration over delays in delivering help to farmers, towns and military bases slammed by hurricanes last fall. Flooding in Iowa and Nebraska this spring added to the coalition behind the measure, which delivers much of its help to regions where Trump supporters dominate.

The bill started out as a modest $7.8 billion measure passed in the last days of House GOP control. A $14 billion version advanced in the Democrat-led chamber in January and ballooned to $19.1 billion by the time it emerged from the floor last month, fed by new funding for community rehabilitation projects, Army Corps of Engineers water and flood protection projects, and rebuilding funds for several military bases, including Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska.

Many Republicans opposed funding to mitigate future disasters as part of rebuilding projects when Superstorm Sandy funding passed in 2013, only to embrace it now that areas such as suburban Houston need it. Democrats, for their part, held firm for what ended up as roughly $1.4 billion for Puerto Rico, letting Trump feud with the U.S. territory’s Democratic officials for weeks and deflecting political blame for stalling the bill.

__

This story corrects that more than 130 Republicans voted for bill, rather than “more than 50.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-6ce86cf7682649cda58ec04676c23318 Congress finally sends $19B disaster aid bill to Trump fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article ANDREW TAYLOR 00f84045-539d-59f0-a4d0-4140fd5f00c7   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-6ce86cf7682649cda58ec04676c23318 Congress finally sends $19B disaster aid bill to Trump fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article ANDREW TAYLOR 00f84045-539d-59f0-a4d0-4140fd5f00c7

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Tornadoes in Pennsylvania, New Jersey catch many in the danger zone off-guard

Tornadoes bore down on the western edge of New Jersey and the eastern edge of Pennsylvania this week, leaving some residents prepared for the worst, while others were caught off guard.

“Shepard Smith Reporting” producer Julia Palmer recounted how a large tree triggered damage Wednesday when it crashed to the ground in front of her home in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, while she and her family tried to stay safe.

“My mom said the sky first turned pitch black and then dark green and she couldn’t see anything out the window, and that’s when she heard what sounded like a freight train and ran in the basement,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group Storm-1 Tornadoes in Pennsylvania, New Jersey catch many in the danger zone off-guard Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/us fnc article 689092d4-f97c-59a8-b370-6faa88823481

Many people on the East Coast are unaccustomed to such storms and not conditioned to hear or heed warnings. (Julia Palmer)

The tree fell inches from her home. “It knocked down our flag pole that hangs off our front porch. Power lines shredded, and one of our neighbors’ houses got knocked off of its foundation. And, we’re still without power, and… it could take a week” for the electricity to return, she said.

10 DEADLIEST U.S. TORNADOES ON RECORD

tornado hit near the border of Lehigh and Bucks counties in Pennsylvania at around 3:15 p.m. that day.

Many people on the East Coast had been unaccustomed to such storms and not conditioned to hear or heed warnings.

A survey team from the National Weather Service determined a twister caused storm damage in Stanhope, N.J., on Tuesday night. The team had yet to determine specifics about its strength and path.

New Jersey gets a handful of tornadoes per year on average. Two twisters hit New York City on one day in 2012, but only about 60 had hit the area in the 50 years before that, according to the National Weather Service.

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Tuesday’s tornado damaged Lenape Valley Regional High School’s facade and ripped up a softball dugout, depositing the roof on its side on the ground in Stanhope. Toppled trees and power lines left most residents without electricity.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Storm-3 Tornadoes in Pennsylvania, New Jersey catch many in the danger zone off-guard Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/us fnc article 689092d4-f97c-59a8-b370-6faa88823481   Westlake Legal Group Storm-3 Tornadoes in Pennsylvania, New Jersey catch many in the danger zone off-guard Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/us fnc article 689092d4-f97c-59a8-b370-6faa88823481

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Storms damage Arkansas apartments, leave damage in South

Westlake Legal Group storms-damage-arkansas-apartments-leave-damage-in-south Storms damage Arkansas apartments, leave damage in South PINE BLUFF, Ark. fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 33240bf0-7196-5fe3-ab83-d0ff0fa80d3e

Several people were injured when a possible tornado tore the roof off an Arkansas apartment building, part of a powerful line of thunderstorms that was dumping more rain Thursday on waterlogged areas throughout the nation’s midsection.

The severe weather moved eastward after forcing people from their homes in Kansas, soaking Houston once again , and straining levees along the surging Mississippi River on Wednesday.

The flooding has caused billions of dollars of damage to farmland, homes and businesses across the Midwest, with some rivers above flood stage for more than six weeks now.

The National Weather Service issued flood warnings as more than 5 inches of rain fell in parts of Mississippi. The downpours swelled streams and made driving difficult.

Trees were down in north Alabama after the storm system moved through, prompting multiple tornado warnings. No injuries were reported but officials said several farm buildings were damaged.

In Arkansas, about 150 people were displaced Wednesday after the storm ripped the roof from an apartment complex in Pine Bluff, about 40 miles southeast of Little Rock.

Pine Bluff Police Chief Kelvin Sergeant said there was extensive damage to buildings, and four injuries at the apartment.

“One of those is probably going to be pretty severe,” Sergeant said of the injured people. “Three others walked out of the scene, and we may have had one who was having chest pains.”

Resident Carla Jackson told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette that she heard a loud boom and that the storm moved in quickly.

“First there were real high winds and then a loud boom, and next thing you know the lights started blinking. We heard the transformer blow, then another transformer blow, and then it just went black,” she said.

The weather service planned to send a survey team to Pine Bluff to determine whether it was a tornado or straight-line winds that caused the damage.

In Kansas, flooding waterways forced evacuations and school closures Wednesday. Problems continued Thursday, with a 19-year-old rescued from the roof of her car near Emporia. And the Kansas Turnpike remained closed near the Oklahoma border.

The weather service predicted the Missouri River would crest Thursday in St. Joseph, Missouri, at a level that causes parkland and a residential area to flood.

In northwestern Missouri’s Holt County, emergency management director Tom Bullock said a few people who had moved back home after March’s flooding busted levees were forced out again late Wednesday by rising water. His own home is now unreachable.

“The water won’t go away,” he said.

Wind-driven water caused more flooding in southeastern Michigan along western Lake Erie following recent rainfall that contributed to high water levels in the Great Lakes.

Firefighters in Monroe County’s Berlin Township used a boat to reach those stranded at homes by high water near Lake Erie. In nearby Frenchtown Township, pumps were used to clear roadways.

More severe weather is possible through the weekend.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-70c32251ddd04a6cbc6b3980f70affe9 Storms damage Arkansas apartments, leave damage in South PINE BLUFF, Ark. fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 33240bf0-7196-5fe3-ab83-d0ff0fa80d3e   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-70c32251ddd04a6cbc6b3980f70affe9 Storms damage Arkansas apartments, leave damage in South PINE BLUFF, Ark. fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/floods fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 33240bf0-7196-5fe3-ab83-d0ff0fa80d3e

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Report: Hurricane Florence killed 22, caused $24B in damage

Westlake Legal Group report-hurricane-florence-killed-22-caused-24b-in-damage Report: Hurricane Florence killed 22, caused $24B in damage miami fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 09706351-a209-5ab6-91ba-07a9fd5cf5e4
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Report: Hurricane Florence killed 22, caused $24B in damage miami fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/disasters/hurricanes-typhoons fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 09706351-a209-5ab6-91ba-07a9fd5cf5e4

Hurricane Florence killed 22 people across three Southeastern states, was the ninth most destructive storm in terms of property damage in U.S. history and spawned 44 tornadoes, a report from the National Hurricane Center said Friday.

The report described Florence as “a long-lived, category 4 hurricane” which was named on Aug. 31 and lingered until Sept. 17. The hurricane made landfall along the southeastern coast of North Carolina as a Category 1.

Fifteen people were killed in North Carolina, the report said, with 11 of those dying because of flooding. Four people were killed in South Carolina, all from flooding. In each instance, people either drove into floodwaters or were swept off the road by floodwaters.

Three people died in Virginia as a direct result of the storm, two of them from flooding, the report said.

In addition to the 22 storm-related deaths, the report said, the storm was responsible for 30 indirect fatalities, including 25 in North Carolina. Indirect deaths are classified as those resulting from heart attacks, house fires, electrocutions and traffic accidents.

Of the tornadoes caused by Florence, the report said an EF-2 in Chesterfield County, Virginia, on Sept. 17 caused significant structure damage. One building collapsed, killing a man inside.

In all, Florence made an impact on four states. Damage from Florence was estimated at $24 billion. North Carolina bore the brunt of that total, with an estimated $22 million in damage. Another $2 billion in damage was recorded in South Carolina and $200 million in Virginia. Florence had weakened significantly and was little more than a tropical storm when it passed near the Georgia border with South Carolina. As a result, damage in Georgia was estimated at $30 million.

According to the report, the storm left 1.1 million residents without power, all but 100,000 in North Carolina.

Among other findings, the report said Florence produced rainfall exceeding 10 inches (25 centimeters) across parts of North Carolina and South Carolina. Some totals exceeded 20 inches (50 centimeters) from the North Carolina-South Carolina border east to southeastern North Carolina. The slow forward speed of the storm created persistent rain bands over the area, leading to almost 36 inches (90 centimeters) of rain near Elizabethtown, shattering the record of 24.06 inches (61.11 centimeters) in Southport during Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

In South Carolina, 23.93 inches (60.78 centimeters) of rain was recorded at Loris, beating the previous record of 17.45 inches (44.32 centimeters) near Lake Jocassee when Tropical Storm Beryl soaked the state in 1994.

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The Latest: 2 dead in Louisiana tornado were mother and son

Westlake Legal Group the-latest-2-dead-in-louisiana-tornado-were-mother-and-son The Latest: 2 dead in Louisiana tornado were mother and son RUSTON, La. fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0abf7e0f-11a3-5ca6-a087-623cc091b00f
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news The Latest: 2 dead in Louisiana tornado were mother and son RUSTON, La. fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0abf7e0f-11a3-5ca6-a087-623cc091b00f

The Latest on a tornado that tore through Louisiana early Thursday(all times local):

10:10 a.m.

A mother and son in northern Louisiana were killed by a tree that fell on their home during a tornado that tore through the area.

Mike Steele is communications director for Louisiana’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness and said those were currently the only two known deaths in Louisiana from the storm. But he said rescue workers were still combing through the area. He could not give their names or ages.

National Weather Service hydrologist C. S. Ross says it appears the tornado cut a track over 130 miles (209 kilometers) from eastern Texas to the Louisiana-Arkansas border.

The city of Ruston sustained some of the worst damage and Louisiana Tech University there was forced to cancel classes Thursday.

___

8:30 a.m.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards says two people have been killed by a tornado that tore through the northern city of Ruston early Thursday.

The tornado caused severe damage to buildings, vehicles and power lines and forced a local university to cancel classes.

National Weather Service hydrologist C. S. Ross says it appears the tornado cut a track over 130 miles (209 kilometers) from eastern Texas to the Louisiana-Arkansas border.

Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice said on Twitter that classes were canceled Thursday. The university said no students were reported injured.

The tornado was part of a severe weather system that pounded Texas with rain Wednesday, killing a woman and two children caught in flash flood waters.

The storm moved into Mississippi on Thursday morning.

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Storms in South kill girl in Florida, bring tornado threat

A strong storm system barreling through the South on Friday killed an 8-year-old girl in Florida and threatened to bring tornadoes to large parts of the Carolinas and southern Virginia.

A tree fell onto a house in Woodville, Florida, south of Tallahassee, killing the girl and injuring a 12-year-old boy, according to the Leon County Sheriff’s Office. The office said in a statement that the girl died at a hospital while the boy suffered non-life-threatening injuries. Their names weren’t immediately released.

The same storm system was blamed for the deaths a day earlier of three people in Mississippi and a woman in Alabama.

The threat on Friday shifted farther east, where tornado warnings covered parts of northeast Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia.

The national Storm Prediction Center said 9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia were at a moderate risk of severe weather. The region includes the Charlotte, North Carolina metro area.

Torrential downpours, large hail and a few tornadoes were among the hazards, the National Weather Service in Raleigh, North Carolina, warned.

Radar readings appeared to show a tornado formed in western Virginia’s Franklin County, south of Roanoke, though damage on the ground still must be assessed, said National Weather Service Meteorologist Phil Hysell. In South Carolina, authorities urged motorists to avoid part of Interstate 26 — the main artery from Upstate through Columbia and all the way to Charleston — because downed trees had left the roadway scattered with debris.

In Georgia, the storm system knocked down trees, caused flooding and cut off power to tens of thousands of people.

A tree came down on an apartment complex in an Atlanta suburb, but only one person reported a minor injury and was treated at the scene, Gwinnett County fire spokesman Capt. Tommy Rutledge told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

In Forsyth County northeast of Atlanta, three firefighters suffered minor injuries when their firetruck overturned during heavy rain and wind, Fire Department Division Chief Jason Shivers told the newspaper.

Meanwhile, hundreds of people cleaned up part of a central Mississippi town hit hard by a tornado on Thursday.

Volunteers and family members were swarming the north side of Morton, where the National Weather Service says a twister with winds as high as 132 mph (212 kph) hit a neighborhood. More than 20 homes were heavily damaged or destroyed. The town of 3,500 is about 30 miles (48 kilometers) east of Jackson.

“When it stopped, there was nothing left,” Morton resident Sharon Currie told WAPT-TV. “I was going, ‘Oh my God. My house is gone.'”

Damage from the storm system was reported in at least 24 of Mississippi’s 82 counties. Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant declared a state of emergency — the second one he has declared in less than a week due to tornadoes.

Authorities on Friday reported a third storm-related death in the state. Freddie Mobley, 63, died while helping cut a tree that had fallen on a house, Lincoln County Coroner Clay McMorris told the Daily Leader of Brookhaven. Mobley had made a few cuts on the tree and backed away when the trunk shifted before he could move, Deputy Coroner Ricky Alford said.

Two other people who were driving are being counted as storm-related deaths in Mississippi. A woman also died in Alabama when a tree fell on her mobile home Thursday.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-09325648192844b49635e1824da8fc49 Storms in South kill girl in Florida, bring tornado threat The Associated Press fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 8e61f266-3e52-52e6-b988-3e20f300f4f7   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-09325648192844b49635e1824da8fc49 Storms in South kill girl in Florida, bring tornado threat The Associated Press fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 8e61f266-3e52-52e6-b988-3e20f300f4f7

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Strong storms roar eastward through Louisiana, Mississippi

Westlake Legal Group strong-storms-roar-eastward-through-louisiana-mississippi Strong storms roar eastward through Louisiana, Mississippi JEFF AMY and ROGELIO SOLIS fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 28f10fa5-8a68-55ff-b85b-c16bf10871a6

Strong storms again roared across the South on Thursday, toppling trees and leaving more than 100,000 people without power across Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas.

National Weather Service forecasters say they believe multiple tornadoes hit southwest and central Mississippi, although they won’t be sure until damage is surveyed. Heavy wind and hail also was reported in central and southeastern Louisiana.

The storm system is expected to push east overnight through Alabama and Georgia.

Two injuries were reported in Harvey, Louisiana, a suburb of New Orleans, when a power pole fell on two vehicles. Mississippi Emergency Management Agency spokesman Ray Coleman says no deaths or injuries have been reported in that state.

Damage was heavy in the tiny hamlet of Learned, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) southwest of Jackson. Large oaks were uprooted from saturated ground, landing on at least a dozen houses.

One belongs to the family of Jesse Qualls, a Mississippi State University student who was on his way home for Easter when the storms hit. He says his mother had gone to pick up his sister from school and returned to find a pecan tree had crashed through Qualls’ bedroom and bathroom. His dog Dukey was uninjured.

Qualls said he got a tearful call from his mother, but he struggled to make it home, using his truck to push fallen trees off roads leading into town.

“I saw the house and I started freaking out,” Qualls said, as residents and emergency workers sawed up other trees off streets in the 100-resident town. “My dad passed away a while ago and this is all I have left of him.”

Qualls, though, said his family will be fine and the storm is likely to spark a long-delayed renovation.

“We’ve got a lot of people to help,” Qualls said. He said his family likely would stay with relatives in nearby Clinton, where two cars were flipped in a Walmart parking lot.

To the northeast, Scott County Emergency Management Director Mike Marlow said reports indicated a number of homes were damaged near Morton and the roof blew off a gas station near Lena.

Schools and colleges sent students home early across much of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. In Jackson, state Auditor Shad White said his staff huddled in a stairway in a high-rise state office building while tornado sirens wailed, winds howled and rains poured. Spokeswoman Cathy Hayden said employees at Hinds Community College in Raymond hid in an underground bookstore storage room.

The same system produced tornadoes and hail earlier in North Texas, the Texas Panhandle, Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas.

Seven tornadoes were reported across the Plains from the northeastern Texas Panhandle to southeastern Kansas. Strong winds hit elsewhere Wednesday evening, toppling utility poles and trees and downing power lines in parts of North Texas.

No significant structural damage was reported, but heavy rainfall caused flash flooding that prompted the shutdown of Interstate 30 in central Arkansas and the closure of several schools around Little Rock.

The National Weather Service received numerous reports of hail pelting the storm-struck areas. Egg-size hail was reported about 60 miles (95 kilometers) northwest of Fort Worth.

The threat came days after more than 40 tornadoes from East Texas to Georgia left at least nine dead. That outbreak damaged more than 250 homes, businesses and public buildings across Mississippi.

___

Amy reported from Jackson, Mississippi.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-23c174d5dacb48398ac1bb2730c19513 Strong storms roar eastward through Louisiana, Mississippi JEFF AMY and ROGELIO SOLIS fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 28f10fa5-8a68-55ff-b85b-c16bf10871a6   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-23c174d5dacb48398ac1bb2730c19513 Strong storms roar eastward through Louisiana, Mississippi JEFF AMY and ROGELIO SOLIS fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 28f10fa5-8a68-55ff-b85b-c16bf10871a6

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Mississippi bar owner explains why he kicked patrons out of bar as tornado loomed

Westlake Legal Group mississippi-bar-owner-explains-why-he-kicked-patrons-out-of-bar-as-tornado-loomed Mississippi bar owner explains why he kicked patrons out of bar as tornado loomed Kathleen Joyce fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc bb2e97b9-6c20-5d05-8625-4465c2fd8936 article
Westlake Legal Group Bin-612-GE Mississippi bar owner explains why he kicked patrons out of bar as tornado loomed Kathleen Joyce fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc bb2e97b9-6c20-5d05-8625-4465c2fd8936 article

The owner of a bar popular with the students of Mississippi State University explained why he kicked patrons out of his business as the threat of a tornado loomed.

Bar 612 in Starksville, along with other nearby restaurants, shuttered their doors after a tornado warning was issued for the area. The patrons inside the bar were asked to leave, The Washington Post reported.

What followed was a disaster — that had nothing to do with a tornado.

The Starkville Police Department said they received a “report of a disturbance” from the bar as they were trying to shut down.

“Approximately one hundred people were trying to fight security from leaving the building and trying to stay inside at this time,” police said in a statement.

DEATH TOLL FROM TORNADOES, SEVERE STORMS IN SOUTH RISES TO 8

After officers arrived, police reported “a physical altercation and intervened.” Police said they subdued a man who was involved in a physical altercation. The department confirmed they “did not initiate an evacuation of Bin 612” or “any other business during this time.”

Some patrons posted videos on social media showing the chaos that occurred following the evacuation. Social media users slammed the bar for shutting it down instead of giving people shelter in the business’ basement from the tornado, The Washington Post reported.

The bar owner and chef Ty Thames clarified the reasoning for the closure.

“We’ve been talking to the National Weather Service and other experts and all of them said we needed to get everyone out of that glass building and into a safer structure,” Thames told the Starkville Daily News. “We started clearing everyone out 40 minutes before, but a lot of people didn’t want to leave. They wanted to stay and hang out with their friends and felt it was a cry wolf scenario.”

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Thames said the bar’s basement could not hold 100 people.

“The [basement] floors aren’t set up for a nighttime influx of 100 people and it can only hold 15 to 20 people,” Thames said. “How do you judge who goes down there? The best thing we could do was shut the business down and escort everyone out to a better shelter.”

Thames told the Commercial Dispatch that he has a contract with the security company, Average Joe’s Security. He said he does not condone the guards’ “language or aggressive behavior.”

The owner said he was in contact with the National Weather Service and meteorologists on what was the best plan would be going forward if another tornado hit the area.

“What we’d like to do is get them involved and get them to help me write a clear plan of action and do training so something like this won’t ever happen again,” he said.

Powerful storms across the South left at least eight people dead. The National Weather Service confirms a tornado struck Starkville.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Bin-612-GE Mississippi bar owner explains why he kicked patrons out of bar as tornado loomed Kathleen Joyce fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc bb2e97b9-6c20-5d05-8625-4465c2fd8936 article   Westlake Legal Group Bin-612-GE Mississippi bar owner explains why he kicked patrons out of bar as tornado loomed Kathleen Joyce fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/disasters/tornado fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc bb2e97b9-6c20-5d05-8625-4465c2fd8936 article

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