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Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124381639001_6124379679001-vs Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Daniel Hoffman article 158a2dc7-a828-5fe3-986c-7436b6d68d76

America’s military involvement in Iraq and our fight against the ISIS terrorist group there is not over – despite initial concerns about U.S. troops being expelled from the country after President Trump ordered a drone strike that killed Iranian terrorist Gen. Qassem Soleimani in Iraq Jan. 3.

Soleimani’s fellow terrorist leader – Kataib Hezbollah militia head Abu Mahdi al Muhandis – was also killed in the U.S. strike, along with eight other terrorists.

Iraqi critics of the killings denounced the U.S. strikes as a violation of their nation’s sovereignty. And in the heat of the moment, Iraqi nationalist Muqtada al Sadr – who holds the most seats in Iraq’s Parliament – demanded that the remaining 5,000 U.S. troops in the country withdraw.

IRAN ROCKET ATTACK ON IRAQI MILITARY BASE INJURED 11 US SERVICE MEMBERS, OFFICIAL REVEALS

The second-largest faction in the Parliament – Hadi al Amiri’s Iranian proxy Badr Corps – joined with Sadr’s faction to pass a nonbinding resolution expelling U.S. troops. But significantly, lawmakers from Kurdish and Sunni parties abstained from the vote against the U.S. presence in Iraq.

While the U.S. media have shifted their focus to the impeachment trial of President Trump, you may have missed the fact that cooler heads now seem to be prevailing in Iraq. That’s very good news.

The caretaker prime minister of Iraq – Adil Abdul-Mahdi – has left it to his successor to deal with the issue of the U.S. troop presence in Iraq.

And after a 10-day hiatus, joint U.S.-Iraqi operations against ISIS have resumed. This is a positive development benefiting both our nations.

The bottom line: right now it doesn’t look like U.S. troops are exiting Iraq any time soon.

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And while the Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives voted 224-194 Jan. 9 to approve a nonbinding resolution demanding that President Trump seek consent from Congress before taking new military action against Iran, there is no indication the Republican-controlled Senate will approve the measure.

Fortunately, no Americans were killed when Iran fired missiles Jan. 8 at two military bases in Iraq where U.S. troops were stationed, in a retaliatory attack for the Soleimani killing. However, the Defense Department announced Thursday that 11 U.S. military members were treated for symptoms of concussions resulting from the Iranian strikes.

Now the time is ripe for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his brave, talented Baghdad Embassy team to double-down on engaging, especially with the many Iraqis who see the value in repelling Iran’s effort to subjugate their country while carrying on the fight against the ISIS terrorists who threaten us all.

Trump’s strategic goal in taking out Soleimani – a mass murderer responsible for the deaths of more than 600 Americans and thousands of others – was to restore strategic deterrence in the U.S.-Iran relationship. The president made a calculated risk that Iran would not respond with a significant retaliatory attack.

Going forward, Iran’s leaders know they will be in our crosshairs if they plan attacks against the U.S., including our embassy in Baghdad. Soleimani was responsible for an attack in which Iranian proxy militia forces penetrated the U.S. Embassy compound in the Iraqi capital shortly before his death.

Rather than precipitating a U.S.-Iran war that neither the Trump administration nor the Iranian regime desires, the killing of Soleimani has the potential to bolster efforts both to thwart Iranian influence in Iraq and to counter ISIS.

The elimination of the so-called ISIS “caliphate” by U.S. and allied forces under President Trump’s leadership was a major accomplishment. But we learned from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on our country that terrorists can plot against our homeland from ungoverned space in failed states.

So we can’t afford to turn a blind eye to ISIS. The group is down but not out. There are reportedly 18,000 ISIS fighters still at large, threatening to melt into an insurgency in Iraq, as well as roughly 10,000 ISIS jihadists in detention.

U.S. forces need to continue the fight against ISIS to eliminate any remaining threat the group poses to Iraq and to prevent ISIS from threatening our own shores. This requires a modest ongoing presence in Iraq of deployed U.S. military, diplomats and intelligence officers who can leverage local partners in the fight against our common terrorist enemy.

How did we get to this point?

Following the overthrow of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein in 2003 after the U.S. invasion of his country, Iran took advantage by directing its ally Syria to provide the Al Qaeda terrorist group with a safe haven to launch attacks on U.S. troops.

Iran also deliberately benefited from Al Qaeda’s attacks on defenseless Shiite civilians in Iraq, which drove them into the arms of Iran’s proxy militias and enabled the militias to grow stronger as a result.

Soleimani directed Iran’s penetration of Iraqi government ministries and Parliament. He created Iranian proxy militias in Iraq, which developed into the popular mobilization units charged with fighting ISIS. But these militias also pursued Iran’s sectarian agenda by exacting revenge against the disenfranchised Sunni population in Iraq, most notoriously in Mosul after it was liberated from ISIS control.

Iraq’s toxic cocktail of failed governance, endemic corruption and ethno-sectarian violence – of which Soleimani was the architect – created the petri dish in which ISIS grew with impunity.

Over the past few months, Soleimani, whom the Obama administration designated a terrorist, dialed up the intensity and frequency of attacks on Iraqi bases that house U.S. service personnel.

Iran sought to induce the U.S. to withdraw its military from Iraq even if it meant striking Iraqi military bases housing US service personnel. Iran’s goal was to shape Iraq’s domestic political future, especially following the resignation of Prime Minister Abdul-Mahdi in November. For now, Abdul-Mahdi continues in office in a caretaker role.

President Trump’s decision to eliminate Soleimani may indeed have opened a pathway to counter the two greatest threats to Iraq’s stability and sovereignty: ISIS and Iran.

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Iraqi protests over the past few months against Iranian influence led to the attacks on Iranian consulates in the Iraqi holy cities of Najaf and Karbala.

Because he is opposed to Iranian domination of Iraq, Sadr might see the value of an ongoing U.S.-Iraqi partnership in the fight against ISIS, especially if there is some prospect that Iraqi territory will not be used in a U.S-Iran proxy war.

Predicting the future – especially in the Middle East, where sectarian conflict has carried on for centuries – is fraught with difficulty.

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President Trump’s bold decision to target Soleimani has the potential to benefit U.S. national security by weakening Iran’s ability to conduct asymmetric warfare in the region and beyond, as well as reducing Iran’s pernicious influence in Iraq.

Those who are critical of Trump’s calculated risk in ordering the killing of Soleimani should ask this question: Would the Middle East’s future look brighter if the terrorist mass murderer was still alive and continuing to lead Iran’s vicious Islamic Revolutionary Guards Quds Force in deadly attacks?

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DAN HOFFMAN

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124381639001_6124379679001-vs Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Daniel Hoffman article 158a2dc7-a828-5fe3-986c-7436b6d68d76   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124381639001_6124379679001-vs Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Daniel Hoffman article 158a2dc7-a828-5fe3-986c-7436b6d68d76

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Former Gitmo commander found guilty of obstructing justice in civilian’s 2015 death

A federal jury on Friday convicted former Naval Station Guantanamo Bay commander Capt. John Nettleton of obstructing justice and other offenses during the Navy’s investigation of a civilian’s death in 2015.

Nettleton, 54, was also found guilty of making false statements, concealing information and falsifying records as the military probed Christopher M. Tur’s death, the Justice Department (DOJ) said. He could face up to 75 years in prison, but it’s likely he will serve much less time based on sentencing guidelines. His sentencing has not been scheduled yet.

Westlake Legal Group Nettleton-AP Former Gitmo commander found guilty of obstructing justice in civilian's 2015 death Melissa Leon fox-news/world/world-regions/cuba fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/terror/guantanamo fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/justice-department fox news fnc/us fnc article 4c6eeb9f-ee3e-5555-bcee-e50170deb9ce

Navy Capt. John R. Nettleton, then-commanding officer of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, spoke during a Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony on June 3, 2014. (Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Goff/U.S. Navy via AP)

Tur, 42, was the loss-prevention safety manager at the station’s Naval Exchange, a shopping complex operated by the Navy. He was found dead in the Guantanamo Bay waters off the base on the southeastern coast of Cuba on Jan. 11, 2015. An autopsy later revealed he was injured — including fractured ribs and a cut to his head — prior to drowning, the DOJ said.

On Jan. 9, the night he disappeared, Tur confronted Nettleton, who was serving as commanding officer, at a party at the Officer’s Club, where he alleged that his wife, Lara, was having an affair with Nettleton, according to evidence presented at trial, the Justice Department said.

The men had “consumed several alcoholic drinks,” the indictment said.

NAVY MAY ARM NEW DESTROYED WITH CONVENTIONAL MISSILE ABLE TO HIT ANYWHERE ON EARTH IN AN HOUR

Tur later went to Nettleton’s house the same night and a “physical altercation” ensued, and Tur was injured. Nettleton’s daughter said she heard noises and came downstairs to see her father on the ground and Tur standing over him before he left and wasn’t seen again. A friend of Tur’s said he received a call from the man not long after that and Tur told him he had been at the captain’s house and had “just knocked the skipper out.”

Tur was reported missing on Jan. 10.

During the Navy’s investigation into Tur’s death, Nettleton failed to report that the man had accused him of having the affair, that the two had a fight or that Tur was injured in the altercation, according to the DOJ.

GUANTANAMO BAY PRISON COMMANDER FIRED OVER ‘LOSS OF CONFIDENCE IN HIS ABILITY TO COMMAND’

Nettleton denied the affair, but it was later determined that it took place, according to prosecutors in Jacksonville, Florida. Tur’s wife also admitted to the affair when she testified during the trial.

The former commander continued to make false statements and not report relevant information to the case while authorities searched for Tur’s body and later, during the investigation into his death, the Justice Department said.

“Captain Nettleton dishonored his oath and impeded the investigation into a civilian’s tragic death, preventing much-needed closure for the family and friends of the deceased,” Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski said.  “Today’s verdict demonstrates the department’s steadfast commitment to holding accountable those who abuse their positions of public trust and obstruct justice.”

WHAT IS GUANTANAMO BAY?

Tur’s siblings issued a statement Friday thanking prosecutors and the jury but added “unfortunately this trial has brought us more questions. … We will not stop until we have answers.”

Tur’s blood had been found inside the entry of Nettleton’s base residence and on a paper towel in the backyard, the investigation found.

“By deliberately misleading NCIS [Naval Criminal Investigative Service] during the investigation into the tragic death of Mr. Tur, Captain Nettleton delayed justice and wasted valuable Department of the Navy resources,” NCIS Special Agent in Charge Matthew Lascell said. “NCIS is dedicated to holding those who unlawfully impede investigations accountable for their actions.”

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Nettleton commanded the Navy base but had no role in the operation of the Guantanamo Bay detention center, which is located on the base and run by a joint task force. His was named commanding officer at Guantanamo Bay in June 2012.

Tur came to Guantanamo in May 2011 with his wife and two children.

Fox News’ Sam Chamberlain and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group John-Nettleton-US-NAVY Former Gitmo commander found guilty of obstructing justice in civilian's 2015 death Melissa Leon fox-news/world/world-regions/cuba fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/terror/guantanamo fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/justice-department fox news fnc/us fnc article 4c6eeb9f-ee3e-5555-bcee-e50170deb9ce   Westlake Legal Group John-Nettleton-US-NAVY Former Gitmo commander found guilty of obstructing justice in civilian's 2015 death Melissa Leon fox-news/world/world-regions/cuba fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/terror/guantanamo fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime fox-news/politics/justice-department fox news fnc/us fnc article 4c6eeb9f-ee3e-5555-bcee-e50170deb9ce

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Trey Gowdy: Lev Parnas’ claims are great for headlines, but not for a courtroom

The damning allegations from Lev Parnas, the indicted former associate of Rudy Giuliani, against President Trump in his handling of Ukraine may be good for headlines but would not hold up in a court of law, former Rep. Trey Gowdy said Friday.

Appearing on “America’s Newsroom” with hosts Bill Hemmer and Sandra Smith, the Fox News contributor said that he would encourage viewers to listen to Parnas and Igor Fruman’s full interview with MSNBC host Rachel Maddow and “not just the snippets.”

“Remember, Parnas was upset because he expected Giuliani and Trump to come to his defense,” said Gowdy. “This is a guy charged with falsifying records, making a false statement, conspiracy to defraud the FEC.”

KELLYANNE CONWAY: LEV PARNAS IS A ‘PROVEN LIAR,’ ‘NOBODY NEEDS ANY HELP BEATING JOE BIDEN’

Parnas and his business partner Igor Fruman – both U.S. citizens who emigrated from the former Soviet bloc – have been indicted by federal prosecutors on charges of conspiracy, making false statements and falsification of records related to allegations that they made outsized campaign donations to Republican causes after receiving millions of dollars originating from Russia.

In addition, Parnas has previously sought to testify in the impeachment probe.

Westlake Legal Group AP20013742869046-1-1 Trey Gowdy: Lev Parnas' claims are great for headlines, but not for a courtroom Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/us/military fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/law fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/mike-pence fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 77559595-4ba0-552c-b465-8f0e892d9876

FILE – In this Dec. 2, 2019, file photo, Lev Parnas arrives at court in New York. Parnas, a close associate of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, has provided a trove of text messages and photos to the House committee leading the impeachment inquiry. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

During Wednesday’s interview — just a day after he provided a slew of new documents and text messages to House investigators — Parnas told Maddow that the president was contemplating cutting all forms of financial assistance to Ukraine in exchange for an investigation into Joe Biden, not just military aid — and, he said, the plot had a clear political motivation.

Parnas said Giuliani instructed him to deliver a “harsh” message to Ukraine that “all aid” to the country would be halted unless “there was an announcement of the Biden investigation,” among other demands.

“He was aware of all of my movements,” Parnas said, referring to Trump. “I wouldn’t do anything without the consent of Rudy Giuliani, or the president. I have no intent, I have no reason to speak to any of these officials. I mean, they have no reason to speak with me.”

Parnas also claimed Vice President Mike Pence wouldn’t show up to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s inauguration unless an investigation was announced.

Gowdy pointed out that, when asked the same question about Pence, Parnas “gave three different answers to the same question.”

“His first answer is, ‘I’m absolutely certain Pence knew about.’ And then, about three seconds later, he said, ‘Well, he had to have, right?’ And then, the last answer was: ‘Well, it’s possible,'” he continued.

“Those three answers don’t do you well in the courtroom. They do great if you’re writing headlines; they do not do well in the courtroom,” Gowdy said.

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“You know,” Gowdy directed at Hemmer, “what I didn’t hear was the follow-up.”

“Okay, with total certitude you say President Trump knew what we were doing. Convince us of that. Give us the evidence,” Gowdy prompted. “Remember, he also said Bill Barr was in the loop and then — when cited for evidence — he said, ‘Well, he’s friends with Joseph DiGenova and Victoria Toensing and his name was mentioned in the transcript.'”

“If that’s the only evidence you have that Bill Barr is part of a conspiracy to defraud the United States and get a foreign government to investigate a political opponent…that ain’t much evidence, Bill,” Gowdy said.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson, Gregg Re, and Edmund DeMarche contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group TREY Trey Gowdy: Lev Parnas' claims are great for headlines, but not for a courtroom Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/us/military fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/law fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/mike-pence fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 77559595-4ba0-552c-b465-8f0e892d9876   Westlake Legal Group TREY Trey Gowdy: Lev Parnas' claims are great for headlines, but not for a courtroom Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/us/military fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/executive/law fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/mike-pence fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 77559595-4ba0-552c-b465-8f0e892d9876

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Rep. Brian Mast: Politically motivated Dems tried to ‘steal’ moment of reflection for fallen soldiers

Westlake Legal Group MAST Rep. Brian Mast: Politically motivated Dems tried to 'steal' moment of reflection for fallen soldiers Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/congress fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 315bc431-b6a8-56f5-9855-0f28e97951d3

Congressional Democrats in a hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday tried to “steal” a moment of reflection about fallen U.S. military members because it didn’t align with their political agenda, retired Army Ranger and double amputee Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla., said Friday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” along with Virginia Republican congressional candidate Rob Jones and Wisconsin Republican congressional candidate Jason Church, Mast argued that the criticism of the operation that took out Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani further proved the need for veterans in Congress. All three men lost their legs in combat.

REP. MAST WAITS SILENTLY AFTER ASKING FOR NAMES OF ANY FALLEN AMERICANS WHOSE DEATHS DIDN’T JUSTIFY SOLEIMANI STRIKE

The hearing Mast was alluding to had been called to discuss U.S. foreign policy with regard to Iran, following Soleimani’s death and the rogue nation’s retaliatory attack on American coalition forces in Iraq.

When it came his turn to speak, Mast told lawmakers: “If you walk out this hallway, you are going to come to several beautiful walls that have the names of our fallen service members from the war on terror. And, I would ask: can any of you provide me one name on that wall that doesn’t justify killing Soleimani?” he asked to resounding silence.

“I got two minutes and 30 seconds,” the Florida Republican continued. “I’ll be more than happy to sit here and wait. Somebody provide me with a name on that wall that does not justify his killing.”

As Mast sat and waited, House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., attempted to move the hearing along, telling Mast, “you’ve made your point” and “you’re out of order.”

“Look, I just wanted them to have to answer an honest question, because they are trying to debate all of these semantics about whether we should have killed this terrorist that killed Americans…hundreds of Americans across the country that was because of Soleimani and force them to answer this question. Not give them a pass on it,” Mast explained.

“And, what did they do?” he asked. “They tried to steal a moment of reflection about our fallen service members — friends of mine, friends of Jason, friends of Rob — because it didn’t fit their political agenda.”

“They tried to silence us; we can’t let them do it,” he told Hegseth.

“I think veterans are kind of necessary representatives in Congress because we are experts at selflessness and we are experts at sacrificing of ourselves for the greater good,” Jones remarked. “And, those are two requirements – in my opinion – for somebody that’s going to be a representative.”

Church added that watching Mast take a stand showed “the power of an individual that’s inspired by something that he has seen and experienced in the harshest of circumstances.”

“And, we have all seen that,” he said. “And, we have seen the destruction that Qassem Soleimani has done. We have seen it firsthand.”

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“This man was a terrorist,” Church continued, “So, I applaud Brian for what you were talking about there and I applaud the president for his actions. Because, at the end of the day, this has saved countless lives and – in my opinion – is preventing another war.”

“The one thing I can tell you if you want to serve in Washington: do it the way that people did in combat — without personal gain and without regard for personal sacrifice,” Mast said. “Any other way, you don’t belong here.”

Fox News’ Nick Givas contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group MAST Rep. Brian Mast: Politically motivated Dems tried to 'steal' moment of reflection for fallen soldiers Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/congress fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 315bc431-b6a8-56f5-9855-0f28e97951d3   Westlake Legal Group MAST Rep. Brian Mast: Politically motivated Dems tried to 'steal' moment of reflection for fallen soldiers Julia Musto fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/virginia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/congress fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 315bc431-b6a8-56f5-9855-0f28e97951d3

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Soldier killed in Arizona ‘free fall’ exercise is 3rd military fatality from Chicago area in less than 2 weeks

U.S. Army officials have identified the soldier who was killed in Arizona on Tuesday during a “free fall” parachute training exercise.

Fort Bragg Master Sgt. Nathan Goodman, 36, from the Chicago suburb of Lansing, Ill., died near Eloy, Ariz., officials said.

Goodman had enlisted in the Army in 2002. His service included four deployments to Afghanistan, one to Iraq, two to Africa and one to Kyrgyzstan, Chicago’s WLS-TV reported.

ARMY SAYS SOLDIER DIED IN ARIZONA DURING ‘FREE FALL’ PARACHUTING EXERCISE

“Nathan was a beloved member of 3rd Special Forces Group and an exceptional leader in the Special Operations community,” Col. Nathan Prussian, commander of the 3rd Special Forces Group’s 2nd Battalion, said in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group good55 Soldier killed in Arizona ‘free fall’ exercise is 3rd military fatality from Chicago area in less than 2 weeks fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc f6b73cd7-fdae-5f0a-8ddb-937eba790546 Dom Calicchio article

Fort Bragg Master Sgt. Nathan Goodman, 36, from the Chicago suburb of Lansing, Ill., died Tuesday near Eloy, Ariz., officials said.

He became the third U.S. military fatality from the Chicago area in less than two weeks.

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Previously, Private First Class Miguel Villalon, 21, of Aurora, Ill., was one of two soldiers killed Saturday in Afghanistan’s Kandahar Province.

Earlier in January, Army Specialist Henry Mayfield Jr. of Hazel Crest, Ill., was among three Americans killed when Al-Shabab extremists attacked a base in Kenya where U.S. and Kenyan troops were stationed.

Westlake Legal Group good55 Soldier killed in Arizona ‘free fall’ exercise is 3rd military fatality from Chicago area in less than 2 weeks fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc f6b73cd7-fdae-5f0a-8ddb-937eba790546 Dom Calicchio article   Westlake Legal Group good55 Soldier killed in Arizona ‘free fall’ exercise is 3rd military fatality from Chicago area in less than 2 weeks fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc f6b73cd7-fdae-5f0a-8ddb-937eba790546 Dom Calicchio article

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US military families receiving ‘menacing’ messages: ‘Leave the Middle East. Go back to your country’

Relatives of U.S. paratroopers deployed to Kuwait earlier this month, amid heightening tensions with Iran, have been receiving “menacing” messages on social media, prompting an alert this week from the U.S. Army to family members of service members, according to reports.

The 82nd Airborne Division out of Fort Bragg, N.C., reminded family members to limit who is able to see social media posts after some received pro-Iranian messages that in one message warned them to “Go back to your country,” according to The Military Times.

“Families have reported instances where they have received unsolicited contact with some menacing messaging,” Lt. Col. Mike Burns, a division spokesman, told The Times.

IRANIAN CYBERATTACKS COULD CAUSE ‘REAL DAMAGE,’ WARNS CYBERSECURITY EXPERT

One Instagram message obtained by The Times seemed particularly threatening.

“If you like your life and you want to see your family again, pack up your stuff right now and leave the Middle East,” the message read. “Go back to your country. You and your terrorist clown president brought nothing but terrorism. You fools underestimate the power of Iran. The recent attack on your [expletive] bases was just a little taste of our power. By killing our general, you dug your own grave. Before having more dead bodies, just leave the region for good and never look back.”

“You and your terrorist clown president brought nothing but terrorism. You fools underestimate the power of Iran.”

— Instagram message sent to U.S. military families

The Times reported there was no evidence the message came from the Iranian government, and it was a typical “psychological operations-styled warning.”

Some of the other messages included fake kidnapping threats, the outlet reported.

The division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team was told to leave behind any personal communication devices that could be compromised when they deployed in early January.

The decision was made so soldiers weren’t put at risk,” Burns told The Times.

Westlake Legal Group AP20006730882541 US military families receiving 'menacing' messages: 'Leave the Middle East. Go back to your country' fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 79262787-765a-5f72-a215-b3ea3581af0c

​​​​​​​Paratroopers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division walk as they prepare equipment and load aircraft bound for the U.S. Central Command area of operations from Fort Bragg, N.C., Jan. 4, 2020. (Spc. Hubert Delany III/U.S. Army via AP, File)

The Army also reminded family members to never post personal details that could help nefarious actors determine where they are and to curb talking about their associations with the military online, WTSP-TV of St. Petersburg, Fla., reported.

The Department of Homeland Security has warned of potential cyber-attacks by the Iranian government in the wake of the U.S. airstrike that killed top Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani on Jan. 3.

A few days after Soleimani’s death, the Federal Depository Library Program’s website was hacked by a pro-Iranian group that defaced the U.S. government website with anti-American, pro-Iranian images.

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The website was back up within about 24 hours, The Washington Post reported.

Westlake Legal Group AP20006730882541 US military families receiving 'menacing' messages: 'Leave the Middle East. Go back to your country' fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 79262787-765a-5f72-a215-b3ea3581af0c   Westlake Legal Group AP20006730882541 US military families receiving 'menacing' messages: 'Leave the Middle East. Go back to your country' fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 79262787-765a-5f72-a215-b3ea3581af0c

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Judge Andrew Napolitano: US killing of Soleimani was odd, out of place, untimely and unlawful

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122730388001_6122737080001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: US killing of Soleimani was odd, out of place, untimely and unlawful fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Andrew Napolitano 8fb8a561-e7a0-5cee-8b54-50f5495d0759

When witnesses testify in a courtroom and offer varying, contradictory or even unlawful explanations of the events under scrutiny, juries tend not to believe them. The same is now happening with the Trump administration’s defense of its killing Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani by the use of an unmanned drone while he was being driven peacefully along a public highway in Iraq. Why the shifting justifications?

Here is the backstory.

The general was the commander of Iran’s elite military and intelligence forces. He was a fierce opponent of ISIS and the American military presence in Iraq. Iraq and Iran were belligerents for generations owing to, among other factors, ancient disputes between the two main branches of Islam, Shiite and Sunni. For generations, Iran’s elites were predominantly Shiite and Iraq’s were predominantly Sunni.

KT MCFARLAND ON IRAN LEADER’S LATEST THREATS: ‘THEY DON’T HAVE A LOT OF OPTIONS’

When the U.S., under President George W. Bush, invaded Iraq in 2002, pursuant to a congressional Authorization for Use of Military Force, the government did so by deceiving the American public and Congress into believing it was searching for weapons of mass destruction. Since none were there, none were found.

But the American invasion did destroy the Sunni government and its true target, the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. That created a power vacuum, which was soon filled by Shiite politicians. Slowly but inexorably, Iran’s and Iraq’s governments became friendly and they jointly sponsored militias against ISIS. Soleimani even consulted with President Obama in the Oval Office about using these militias to topple ISIS.

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The general’s assassination was odd, out of place, untimely and unlawful. Odd, because the general’s folks had worked with our intelligence folks in Iraq against ISIS. Out of place, because the Iranian general was welcomed by the Iraqi government and was not engaged in any violence or war crimes at the time he was killed. Untimely, because whatever he may have been planning to do was not an imminent attack on the U.S. or on Americans. We know this because Trump administration officials revealed that the president gave the kill order seven months ago, in June 2019. How imminent could an attack have been in June if it had not occurred by January?

And unlawful, because we are not at war with Iran, and political assassinations have been prohibited by still valid executive orders signed by Presidents Gerald R. Ford and Ronald Reagan. The U.S. Constitution limits the federal government’s lawful power to kill to foreign troops in wartime and after due process, neither of which abides here. Moreover, international treaties to which the U.S. is party, as well as the laws of war to which the U.S. subscribes, prohibit preemptive killings except when the target is just about — “certainty” is the standard — to strike.

Now, back to the shifting sands of justification.

Shortly after the general’s death, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo argued that Soleimani’s attacks on Americans were imminent. President Trump himself claimed Soleimani was planning to attack four U.S. embassies in the Middle East.

When Secretary of Defense Mark Esper was asked if he saw any intelligence data about attacking four embassies, he said he had not. When Pompeo was pressed for his understanding of Trump’s four embassies claim, he offered that the intelligence data did not reveal when or where or how, but he knew Soleimani was “probably” up to no good.

When the State Department spokesperson was asked if any alerts of likely attacks had been sent to any American embassies in the region, she said that none had.

Then the White House sent CIA Director Gina Haspel, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chair Gen. Mark Milley, and Pompeo and Esper, to brief members of Congress on the administration’s intelligence, moral and legal justifications for killing the general.

None of the briefers mentioned four embassies or any data showing where or when or how he might strike — just probabilities.

When Republican Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky challenged the briefers, the president weighed in with a startling tweet on Monday: “The Fake News Media and their Democrat Partners are working hard to determine whether or not the future attack by terrorist Soleimani was “eminent” or not, & was my team in agreement. The answer to both is a strong YES, but it doesn’t really matter because of his horrible past!”

That boast of killing the general “because of his horrible past” sent off bells and whistles in the Department of Justice. Trump’s retribution argument does not legally justify killing a person who is not engaged in violence at the time of the killing, and, arguably, is a war crime.

Thereupon, Attorney General William Barr revealed that the DOJ had been consulted on the lawfulness of the killing and signed off on it if the general’s attacks on Americans were imminent. Now that the imminence argument had been undermined by the administration’s own folks — including the president himself — the attorney general argued that Soleimani needed to die as a deterrence to others pursuant to the old 2002 AUMF.

These shifting justifications are contrary to reason and cannot survive a simple cross-examination. When did we start killing generals from countries with which we are not at war? Never in our history.

When did we start killing foreign generals because of their “horrible past”? Never in our history.

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How can the government use the 2002 AUMF, whose stated target was Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, but whose true target was Saddam Hussein, as a legal justification to kill a non-Iraqi general 18 years later? Except in the minds of extreme administration loyalists, it cannot legally or rationally do so.

Why is truth always the first casualty of government violence?

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122730388001_6122737080001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: US killing of Soleimani was odd, out of place, untimely and unlawful fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Andrew Napolitano 8fb8a561-e7a0-5cee-8b54-50f5495d0759   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6122730388001_6122737080001-vs Judge Andrew Napolitano: US killing of Soleimani was odd, out of place, untimely and unlawful fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate article Andrew Napolitano 8fb8a561-e7a0-5cee-8b54-50f5495d0759

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US mulls sending more missile-defense systems to Middle East: report

Just over a week after Iran fired 16 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where U.S. troops were stationed, the Pentagon is considering sending more missile-defense systems and other capabilities to the Middle East, according to a report.

Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy discussed the proposals with reporters Wednesday at a meeting of the Defense Writers Group, Military.com reported.

KT MCFARLAND ON IRAN LEADER’S LATEST THREATS: ‘THEY DON’T HAVE A LOT OF OPTIONS’

“They are a very capable enemy,” McCarthy said of Iran. “They have capabilities that can strike and hit Americans, so we are looking at additional capabilities that we could send to the region.”

“They are a very capable enemy. They have capabilities that can strike and hit Americans, so we are looking at additional capabilities that we could send to the region.”

— U.S. Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy

But McCarthy declined to be specific about exactly which technologies were under consideration.

“It could be a variety of enablers like missile defense, so we are looking at that,” he told the news outlet.

The attacks launched by Iran targeted the Al-Assad Air Base in Iraq as well as a separate base at Erbil. U.S. officials said 11 missiles struck Al-Assad, one struck Erbil and four missiles malfunctioned.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-afbd20d1b84b44e0b9edaf06b90af749 US mulls sending more missile-defense systems to Middle East: report fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 5433f8f0-9e5b-5178-a011-2850a3fca79d

​​​​​​​Missiles are fired from Kermanshah in western Iran targeting the Islamic State group in Syria, in this photo released by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard, Oct. 1, 2018. (Sepahnews via Associated Press)

No U.S. casualties were reported.

The missile strikes Jan. 7 were viewed as Iran’s response to a U.S. drone strike four days earlier in Baghdad that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Meanwhile, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has continued using strong rhetoric against the West in the aftermath of last week’s attacks.

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On Wednesday, Rouhani warned in a televised speech that European forces, in addition to U.S. troops, “could be in danger” after leaders of Britain, France and Germany initiated a so-called “dispute process” as spelled out in the 2015 Iran nuclear deal negotiated with the West during the Obama administration.

The European leaders have argued that Iran has been violating terms of the pact, which could lead to the restoration of U.N. sanctions against the country.

Fox News’ Danielle Wallace contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-afbd20d1b84b44e0b9edaf06b90af749 US mulls sending more missile-defense systems to Middle East: report fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 5433f8f0-9e5b-5178-a011-2850a3fca79d   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-afbd20d1b84b44e0b9edaf06b90af749 US mulls sending more missile-defense systems to Middle East: report fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 5433f8f0-9e5b-5178-a011-2850a3fca79d

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Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend

In the wake of deadly anti-Semitic attacks on synagogues across the country, Jewish congregations should deploy uniformed law enforcement officers as armed security personnel rather than private guards or volunteers from its community, a group of security experts recommended Wednesday in a detailed, first-of-its-kind report.

Michael Masters, the national director of the Secure Community Network, which created the report, said security-related worries among American Jews have intensified since the October 2018 massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, where 11 people were killed.

One major consequence of the attacks, Masters said, is that pleas for synagogues to remain gun-free are fading as more Jews accept the need for armed security.

“We are facing generally well-armed, often highly motivated individuals who are intent on taking life,” Masters said. “Our safety and security personnel need to be in a position to do their job well.”

Created in response to questions from Jewish communities nationwide as to whether and how they should make use of armed security, the new report emphasizes that there is no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to security and firearms policies for synagogues and Jewish organizations.

“Introducing firearms into a facility is a decision to be made carefully and must be part of a broader security strategy,” said Masters. “There are countless considerations, and if organizations overlook them, they may put their congregants at risk.”

HANUKKAH STABBING SUSPECT CHARGED WITH HATE CRIMES AS FBI FIND JOURNALS IN HOME THAT APPEAR TO ‘EXPRESS ANTI-SEMITIC SENTIMENTS’

Westlake Legal Group Synagogue-AP Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend Frank Miles fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox news fnc/us fnc dfc04529-ca8b-554a-a2aa-1c31aade4220 article

FILE – In this Dec. 11, 2019 file photo, Orthodox Jewish men pass New York City police guarding a Brooklyn synagogue prior to a funeral for Mosche Deutsch, a rabbinical student from Brooklyn who was killed in a shooting at a Jersey City, N.J. market. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

If a congregation decides to have an armed presence at its synagogue, the report offered various options: uniformed or plainclothes on-duty police officers, off-duty or retired officers, current or former members of the military, private security contractors or volunteer armed congregants.

The best option, the report said, would be uniformed on- or off-duty law enforcement officers or recently retired officers who are up to date with certifications and training.

Private security personnel or people deployed because of military backgrounds are likely to lack the specialized training in civilian security that police officers receive, the report said.

Volunteers from the congregation could be considered a possible “last resort” in event of attack, the report said. It warned that they are likely to lack experience and training in confronting high-stress situations and deciding whether to use lethal force.

The report also cautions that use of armed personnel other than law enforcement officers can raise thorny legal questions — for example, in cases when a shooting was determined to be unjustified or negligent, or when physical restraints are used on a suspected assailant.

The experts urged congregations to carefully consider the long-term costs of armed security, so it could be made a core part of the synagogue’s operations budget rather than a special expense that might be difficult to sustain over time.

“If the source of the funding runs out, the congregation will be confronted with difficult decisions,” the report said. “If the funding for the armed security comes from one individual or group of individuals, they are likely to feel empowered to set the terms of how the security is provided and what the employed individuals are required to do, creating a potential source of conflict.”

In a section of the report titled “Beware, Things Can Go Wrong,” the experts noted that synagogues may face potentially violent threats that aren’t fueled by anti-Semitic hatred, including incidents involving an emotionally disturbed person.

“How would an armed congregant determine whether a belligerent passerby, including someone with a mental health issue, is actually a security threat?” the report asks. “Communities are best served by security personnel who are trained for the full spectrum of responses to a range of threats.”

The Secure Community Network, founded in 2004 by a coalition of Jewish organizations, describes itself as “the official safety and security organization” of the Jewish community in North America.

Work on the new security report began six months ago.

Last year, in another attack blamed on anti-Semitic hatred, one worshipper was killed at a synagogue in Poway, California.

Two subsequent attacks in December further fueled the sense of alarm.

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In Jersey City, New Jersey, a man and woman killed a police officer and then stormed into a kosher grocery, fatally shooting three people before dying in a gunfight with police. The slayings happened in a neighborhood where Hasidic families had recently been relocating.

In Monsey, New York, a man rushed into a rabbi’s home during a Hanukkah celebration, hacking at people with a machete. Five people were wounded.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Synagogue-AP Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend Frank Miles fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox news fnc/us fnc dfc04529-ca8b-554a-a2aa-1c31aade4220 article   Westlake Legal Group Synagogue-AP Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend Frank Miles fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox news fnc/us fnc dfc04529-ca8b-554a-a2aa-1c31aade4220 article

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Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend

In the wake of deadly anti-Semitic attacks on synagogues across the country, Jewish congregations should deploy uniformed law enforcement officers as armed security personnel rather than private guards or volunteers from its community, a group of security experts recommended Wednesday in a detailed, first-of-its-kind report.

Michael Masters, the national director of the Secure Community Network, which created the report, said security-related worries among American Jews have intensified since the October 2018 massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, where 11 people were killed.

One major consequence of the attacks, Masters said, is that pleas for synagogues to remain gun-free are fading as more Jews accept the need for armed security.

“We are facing generally well-armed, often highly motivated individuals who are intent on taking life,” Masters said. “Our safety and security personnel need to be in a position to do their job well.”

Created in response to questions from Jewish communities nationwide as to whether and how they should make use of armed security, the new report emphasizes that there is no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to security and firearms policies for synagogues and Jewish organizations.

“Introducing firearms into a facility is a decision to be made carefully and must be part of a broader security strategy,” said Masters. “There are countless considerations, and if organizations overlook them, they may put their congregants at risk.”

HANUKKAH STABBING SUSPECT CHARGED WITH HATE CRIMES AS FBI FIND JOURNALS IN HOME THAT APPEAR TO ‘EXPRESS ANTI-SEMITIC SENTIMENTS’

Westlake Legal Group Synagogue-AP Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend Frank Miles fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox news fnc/us fnc dfc04529-ca8b-554a-a2aa-1c31aade4220 article

FILE – In this Dec. 11, 2019 file photo, Orthodox Jewish men pass New York City police guarding a Brooklyn synagogue prior to a funeral for Mosche Deutsch, a rabbinical student from Brooklyn who was killed in a shooting at a Jersey City, N.J. market. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

If a congregation decides to have an armed presence at its synagogue, the report offered various options: uniformed or plainclothes on-duty police officers, off-duty or retired officers, current or former members of the military, private security contractors or volunteer armed congregants.

The best option, the report said, would be uniformed on- or off-duty law enforcement officers or recently retired officers who are up to date with certifications and training.

Private security personnel or people deployed because of military backgrounds are likely to lack the specialized training in civilian security that police officers receive, the report said.

Volunteers from the congregation could be considered a possible “last resort” in event of attack, the report said. It warned that they are likely to lack experience and training in confronting high-stress situations and deciding whether to use lethal force.

The report also cautions that use of armed personnel other than law enforcement officers can raise thorny legal questions — for example, in cases when a shooting was determined to be unjustified or negligent, or when physical restraints are used on a suspected assailant.

The experts urged congregations to carefully consider the long-term costs of armed security, so it could be made a core part of the synagogue’s operations budget rather than a special expense that might be difficult to sustain over time.

“If the source of the funding runs out, the congregation will be confronted with difficult decisions,” the report said. “If the funding for the armed security comes from one individual or group of individuals, they are likely to feel empowered to set the terms of how the security is provided and what the employed individuals are required to do, creating a potential source of conflict.”

In a section of the report titled “Beware, Things Can Go Wrong,” the experts noted that synagogues may face potentially violent threats that aren’t fueled by anti-Semitic hatred, including incidents involving an emotionally disturbed person.

“How would an armed congregant determine whether a belligerent passerby, including someone with a mental health issue, is actually a security threat?” the report asks. “Communities are best served by security personnel who are trained for the full spectrum of responses to a range of threats.”

The Secure Community Network, founded in 2004 by a coalition of Jewish organizations, describes itself as “the official safety and security organization” of the Jewish community in North America.

Work on the new security report began six months ago.

Last year, in another attack blamed on anti-Semitic hatred, one worshipper was killed at a synagogue in Poway, California.

Two subsequent attacks in December further fueled the sense of alarm.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In Jersey City, New Jersey, a man and woman killed a police officer and then stormed into a kosher grocery, fatally shooting three people before dying in a gunfight with police. The slayings happened in a neighborhood where Hasidic families had recently been relocating.

In Monsey, New York, a man rushed into a rabbi’s home during a Hanukkah celebration, hacking at people with a machete. Five people were wounded.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Synagogue-AP Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend Frank Miles fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox news fnc/us fnc dfc04529-ca8b-554a-a2aa-1c31aade4220 article   Westlake Legal Group Synagogue-AP Synagogues should use uniformed law enforcement for security, experts recommend Frank Miles fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox news fnc/us fnc dfc04529-ca8b-554a-a2aa-1c31aade4220 article

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