web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military

NKorea issues mild criticism of Bolton over media interview

Westlake Legal Group nkorea-issues-mild-criticism-of-bolton-over-media-interview NKorea issues mild criticism of Bolton over media interview SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc bc8c5e61-7eda-5af1-bc37-e9544b8c392d Associated Press article
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news NKorea issues mild criticism of Bolton over media interview SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc bc8c5e61-7eda-5af1-bc37-e9544b8c392d Associated Press article

North Korea has issued a relatively mild criticism of White House national security adviser John Bolton over a recent interview he gave.

State media on Saturday cited First Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui as criticizing Bolton for telling Bloomberg News that the U.S. would need more evidence of North Korea’s disarmament commitment before a third leaders’ summit.

Choe described Bolton’s comments as having “no charm” and being “dim-sighted”

Her criticism is much softer than the North’s typical fiery rhetoric usually directed at the U.S. and South Korea.

North Korea blames the U.S. for deadlocked nuclear negotiations. Some observers say the North is avoiding harsh rhetoric at the U.S. to keep diplomacy alive.

On Thursday, the North demanded U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo be removed from nuclear negotiations.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources

President Trump is expected to formally nominate Patrick M. Shanahan to be his permanent defense secretary as soon as next week, two administration officials tell Fox News. This, after an internal Pentagon investigation concluded that the acting defense secretary did not show any bias in favor of his former employer, aerospace giant Boeing.

Shanahan worked at Boeing for over 30 years before coming to the Pentagon as then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’s deputy at the start of the Trump administration.

Shanahan’s nomination had been held up by the White House since the Pentagon inspector general opened an investigation into Shanahan’s conduct following a report in Politico days after taking over for Mattis alleging Shanahan called Boeing-rival Lockheed Martin’s advanced F-35 program “f—ed up” and said the company didn’t know how to run a defense program following years of cost overruns and delays to the fifth-generation fighter jet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Shanahan has been serving as acting defense chief since the president forced Jim Mattis to leave the job early following his resignation in December.

Shanahan faces a potentially contentious confirmation hearing in the Republican-controlled Senate in order to assume the role as defense secretary.

President Trump found an early supporter and point man in Shanahan for the creation of a sixth branch of the military, the Space Force.

In an exclusive interview with Fox News’s Bret Baier, Shanahan spoke about his urgency in developing the new branch.

“We have a $19 trillion economy that runs on space.  Our military runs on space.  It is vitally important,” said Shanahan. “[The] Chinese and Russians are deploying capability to put our economy and our military at risk in the time of crisis.”

Asked for comment a spokesman for the acting defense secretary would not answer the question directly if Shanahan was expecting to be nominated next week.

“Acting Secretary Shanahan remains focused SOLELY on the Department, on our global military options, on our servicemembers, civilians, and their families,” said Army Lt. Col. Joseph Buccino.

A defense official added Shanahan will be “ready for a confirmation hearing, should he be nominated.”

Jennifer Griffin, Kevin Corke and Chad Pergram contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group shanahan Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e504080-1fa5-59a6-9118-c1181cec0beb   Westlake Legal Group shanahan Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e504080-1fa5-59a6-9118-c1181cec0beb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

North Korea nuclear impasse looms over US-Japan talks

Westlake Legal Group north-korea-nuclear-impasse-looms-over-us-japan-talks North Korea nuclear impasse looms over US-Japan talks MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 156d0904-2d2a-5af0-93ad-304b3a2f076b
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news North Korea nuclear impasse looms over US-Japan talks MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 156d0904-2d2a-5af0-93ad-304b3a2f076b

Stalled negotiations over dismantling North Korea’s nuclear program are looming over high-level talks between the U.S. and Japan.

Just a day after North Korea called for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to be removed as President Donald Trump’s top negotiator, he and acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan were meeting at the State Department Friday with their Japanese counterparts to plot a way forward.

U.S. officials say they remain open to resuming the talks with North Korea but Pompeo has not yet reacted to the North Korean demand, which followed what it said was a test of a new tactical weapon.

The nuclear talks have been at an impasse since Trump’s second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un failed to reach an agreement in Vietnam in late February.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile

Westlake Legal Group pentagon-confirms-nk-test-launch-says-not-ballistic-missile Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan is confirming that North Korea conducted a test launch on Wednesday, but he declined to provide any details.

He is the first U.S. official to confirm the launch. He tells reporters at the Pentagon that North Korea conducted a test, but it didn’t involve a ballistic weapon and didn’t trigger any change in U.S. military operations.

North Korea has said it test-fired a new type of tactical guided weapon. The test didn’t appear to be of a banned mid- or long-range ballistic missile that could scuttle ongoing nuclear negotiations.

Pyongyang also is demanding that Washington remove Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from nuclear negotiations. The State Department says it’s aware of the report and the U.S. remains ready to engage North Korea in constructive negotiations.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42a6d0d6ee8f4276a4dbf85fde13464b Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42a6d0d6ee8f4276a4dbf85fde13464b Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban

Westlake Legal Group military-academies-begin-to-follow-military-transgender-ban Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/armed-forces fnc/us fnc b09aa483-b86f-56e7-b4e7-bd01ccafa136 Associated Press article

The elite academies that educate officers for the nation’s armed forces have begun to implement the Trump administration‘s ban on transgender service members.

The U.S. Naval Academy will ban people who are transgender from attending the school, beginning with the 2020 school year. The Defense Department confirmed that change to the Capital Gazette newspaper on Monday. The school in Annapolis, Maryland, currently accepts transgender students and retains midshipmen who transition to another gender.

The administration’s new policy took effect last week, stripping transgender troops of rights to serve openly and denying servicemen and women medical care if they choose to transition to another gender.

POLICE: TEXAS MAN OFFERED $200 TO BEAT TRANSGENDER WOMAN

The Obama administration had lifted restrictions on transgender service members in 2016, allowing them to serve openly, and covered gender affirmation surgery.

A current Naval Academy student, Midshipman Regan Kibby, is one of six service members suing the Trump administration over its ban.

The U.S. Coast Guard has also implemented the new policy, as of April 12, the agency states on its website.

Coast Guard Academy spokesman David Santos confirmed in an email Wednesday that the policy change applies to the school in New London, Connecticut. A lengthy explanation on the Coast Guard’s website states that past medical treatment, such as gender-reassignment surgery or hormone therapy, may disqualify future applicants from joining up.

The Trump administration’s new policy also bars future applicants who’ve been diagnosed with gender dysphoria, a condition that can apply to people who identify as another gender and experience distress. Doctors say counseling, hormone therapy or surgery can lessen the anxiety.

There are some exceptions for people who’ve been diagnosed with gender dysphoria. For instance, someone can join the Coast Guard if their doctor says they can demonstrate three years of “stability in his/her biological sex immediately before applying to serve.” The Defense Department says transgender people can serve if they remain in their “biological sex.”

The administration’s policy calls for troops diagnosed with gender dysphoria to be medically evaluated before they are discharged to see if they qualify as having a disability. Otherwise gender dysphoria can be considered a “condition that interferes with military service” like sleepwalking, bed wetting, motion sickness and personality disorders.

The American Medical Association has blasted the administration’s transgender policy for military service. It told The Associated Press last week that the new policy and its wording mischaracterize transgender people as having a “deficiency.”

The Defense Department said its use of the words “deficiencies” is military lingo for when an individual fails to meet standards to maintain a lethal force. It is not a reference to gender dysphoria, Lt. Col. Carla Gleason said.

An estimated 14,700 troops identify as transgender. An organization that represents transgender service members said several are attending each academy, although many haven’t come out.

“The policy turns off access to some of our best and brightest, and that’s not what our country needs to win future wars,” said B Fram, communications director for Service Members, Partners and Allies for Respect and Tolerance for All, or SPARTA.

The nation has five service academies. They include the U.S. Air Force Academy, the U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy.

The Air Force Academy will conform with Defense Department policy when admitting future cadets, said Lt. Col. Tracy Bunko, an academy spokeswoman.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

That means transgender people can serve “in their biological sex” if they meet Defense Department standards for that sex, she said. People who have had cross-sex hormone therapy, sex reassignment surgery or genital reconstruction surgery are disqualified.

People with a history of gender dysphoria cannot be admitted unless they meet certain conditions, including having no dysphoria in the previous three years, Bunko said.

The Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security. The Merchant Marine is part of the Maritime Administration, which is within the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Westlake Legal Group annapolis-image Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/armed-forces fnc/us fnc b09aa483-b86f-56e7-b4e7-bd01ccafa136 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group annapolis-image Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/armed-forces fnc/us fnc b09aa483-b86f-56e7-b4e7-bd01ccafa136 Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran’s parliament labels US troops in Mideast as terrorist

Westlake Legal Group irans-parliament-labels-us-troops-in-mideast-as-terrorist Iran's parliament labels US troops in Mideast as terrorist Tehran (Iran) fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 8bad06ac-29b7-5fdf-8a4c-79901585f29e
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Iran's parliament labels US troops in Mideast as terrorist Tehran (Iran) fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 8bad06ac-29b7-5fdf-8a4c-79901585f29e

Iran’s lawmakers on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved a bill labeling U.S. forces in the Middle East as terrorist, a day after the U.S. terrorism designation for Iran’s Revolutionary Guard formally took effect, state TV reported.

Defense Minister Gen. Amir Hatami introduced the bill authorizing the government to act firmly in response to “terrorist actions” by U.S. forces. It demands authorities use “legal, political and diplomatic” measures to neutralize the American move, without elaborating.

The U.S. move aims at “thwarting Iran’s influence,” and shows that America’s longstanding sanctions against Iran have become ineffective, Hatami told lawmakers.

During the debate, some hard-liner lawmakers had demanded listing the entire U.S. army and security forces as terrorist.

The TV report said 204 lawmakers approved the bill, out of 207 present at the session in the 290-seat chamber. Two lawmakers voted against the bill and one abstained.

However, it remains unclear how the bill’s passage in parliament would affect the Gourd’s activities in the Persian Gulf, where the U.S. Navy has in the past accused Iranian patrol boats of harassing American warships.

The Revolutionary Guard has forces and wields influence in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen, and is in charge of Iranian missiles that have U.S. bases in their range.

The Guard’s designation — the first-ever for an entire division of another government — adds another layer of sanctions to the powerful paramilitary force and makes it a crime under U.S. jurisdiction to provide it with material support.

Iranian media reported Tuesday that Instagram suspended accounts believed to belong to four Guard commanders, including its commander, Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari; the leader of the Guard’s foreign wing, or Quds Force, Qassem Soleimani; Chief of General Staff of Iranian Armed Forces Maj. Gen. Mohammad Hossein Bagheri, and one of his deputies, Gen. Musa Kamali.

Depending on how broadly “material support” is interpreted, the designation may complicate U.S. diplomatic and military cooperation with certain third-country officials, notably in Iraq and Lebanon, who deal with the Guard.

President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the designation with great fanfare last week.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Marine killed, 2 others injured in Camp Pendleton tactical vehicle accident

A Marine was killed and two others were injured in a tactical vehicle accident at Camp Pendleton in California during the weekend, officials said.

The Marine Corps announced Monday the serviceman was one of three members of the elite Marine Raiders unit involved in the accident during a unit training exercise.

The Marine Raider suffered critical injuries and was medically evacuated to a hospital, but died Sunday night.

MARINE ACCUSED OF SHOOTING, KILLING ANOTHER MARINE IN SOUTH CAROLINA

“Our thoughts are with his family and teammates,” Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command said on Twitter.

Westlake Legal Group Polaris-MRZR-DVDIDS Marine killed, 2 others injured in Camp Pendleton tactical vehicle accident Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 81e5125b-6b93-51e8-a1cb-edb8aa6f38f5

A Marine was killed and two others were injured in a tactical vehicle accident over the weekend at Camp Pendleton in California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Nathaniel Q. Hamilton)

The Marine’s identity is being withheld pending notification of next of kin, according to base officials. The two other Marine Raiders received minor injuries.

CAMP PENDLETON MARINE MISSING IN CALIFORNIA MOUNTAINS LIKELY DIED, MARINE CORPS SAYS

An investigation into the deadly incident is underway.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The death was the second tragedy at Camp Pendleton in less than a week.

Last week, the Marine Corps announced a missing Marine from Camp Pendleton, who failed to return from a ski trip through California’s rugged Sierra Nevada, likely died of exposure from severe winter weather.

Westlake Legal Group Polaris-MRZR-DVDIDS Marine killed, 2 others injured in Camp Pendleton tactical vehicle accident Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 81e5125b-6b93-51e8-a1cb-edb8aa6f38f5   Westlake Legal Group Polaris-MRZR-DVDIDS Marine killed, 2 others injured in Camp Pendleton tactical vehicle accident Travis Fedschun fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 81e5125b-6b93-51e8-a1cb-edb8aa6f38f5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Redaction nation: US history brims with partial deletions

Westlake Legal Group redaction-nation-us-history-brims-with-partial-deletions Redaction nation: US history brims with partial deletions HILLEL ITALIE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc c8bf9c80-fdea-52f0-9597-bf1fea84fe16 Associated Press article

Somewhere in the shadows of federal bureaucracy, there was an issue about the drinking habits of Augusto Pinochet.

The National Security Archive, an advocate for open government, had for years tried to gain access to intelligence files about the Chilean dictator, his human rights abuses and his ties to the United States. In 2003, the Defense Intelligence Agency declassified documents that included a biographical sketch of Pinochet assembled in 1975, two years after he seized power. Parts of the sketch had been blacked out, “redacted,” for national security. The archive had no trouble discovering that the missing information included Pinochet’s liking for scotch and pisco sours.

“The sketch been published in full by the government in 1999,” notes Tom Blanton, director of the archive. But, he says, “all it takes to change that is a single objection.”

The censoring of government reports isn’t new, but since Robert Mueller turned in his report last month on alleged ties between Russian officials and Donald Trump presidential campaign, “redacted” has joined “collusion” and “obstruction” as a national buzzword. Attorney General William Barr’s announcement that he would release a “redacted” version of Mueller’s findings, expected Thursday, will likely set off a long debate over what’s behind the darkened blotches.

Barr’s stated guidelines range from protecting intelligence sources to the privacy of those not under investigation. But over the past few decades, the government has redacted everything from the most sensitive information to the most harmless trivia.

“We believe there are real secrets, common-sense secrets, like names of people in the field who would be killed or specifications of weapons of systems,” Blanton says. “But redactions also are overused.”

David Cole, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, says any government official who ever had a security clearance will say the same thing: Whether under Clinton, Bush or Obama, “the problem of overclassification is rampant.”

“It’s partly the consequence of what is safest for the government to do,” Cole says. “If you make a mistake and disclose something you shouldn’t have, that mistake is public. If you decide to keep something secret that doesn’t need to be secret, that mistake is private.”

The secrecy reflex is as old as the country: The American government itself was created behind closed doors, and windows. Framers of the Constitution gathered at the Pennsylvania State House from May to September in 1787 and, anxious to speak freely, were so resolved to keep the public away they kept windows shut (in pre-air conditioned times) even on the hottest days. No official transcripts were logged, and much of our understanding of the debate has been shaped by James Madison’s (revised) notes, which didn’t come out until 1836, after Madison and fellow delegates were dead.

“I think they are pretty reliable,” historian Gordon Wood says of Madison’s notes. “But they may only account for a fraction of what was said at the convention.”

At the time of the Constitution’s drafting, there was no system for classifying government documents and no process for the public to obtain them. Our redaction nation formed over the course of the 20th century as the federal government expanded, the country became an international superpower and means of communication and surveillance grew more sophisticated. By the start of the Cold War, just after World War II ended, new bureaucracies such as the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Council were defined by what they couldn’t, or wouldn’t, reveal.

“In 1947, when you have creation of the CIA and the NSC, you have the production of literally billions of papers and billions of secrets contained within them,” says Tim Weiner, whose “Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA” won the National Book Award in 2007. “And the machinery of secrecy far outstripped the ability to demand an open government.”

For years, the general public had few means to request records, and little awareness of how much it wasn’t being told.

The Freedom of Information Act wasn’t enacted until 1966, and broad demands for accountability only began with the jarring revelations of the 1970s: years of official deceit about the Vietnam War as detailed in the Pentagon Papers; the Watergate scandal which forced President Nixon to resign; the Senate’s Church Committee of 1975-76, which confirmed reports of the government’s history of backing the assassination of foreign leaders.

Ever since, it’s been an exhausting process of keeping up.

Names and events change, whether the assassination of President John F. Kennedy or the torture of prisoners during the Iraq War, but millions of documents each year continue to be classified. The NSA and others have even compiled lists of some of the more unlikely information to be withheld:

—Some files from World War I, including a method for opening sealed letters without detection and a formula for German secret ink, were not declassified until 2011. “When historical information is no longer sensitive, we take seriously our responsibility to share it with the American people,” CIA Director Leon Panetta said at the time. (The release followed years of lawsuits and formal requests).

—The redaction in 2014 of remarks about the Cuban Missile Crisis made 50 years earlier by Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. The remarks were made in a public speech.

—FBI files about Marilyn Monroe’s alleged Communist sympathies were redacted until 2012, 50 years after her death and more than 20 years after the Cold War ended.

Sometimes, history itself is censored. Daniel Ellsberg, the former defense department analyst famous for leaking the Pentagon Papers, remembers the long process to make all of the documents public. The Pentagon Papers were a Defense Department-commissioned study about U.S. policy in Vietnam from 1945-67. It took decades, long after the Vietnam War ended, for the full report to come out. When it did, Ellsberg noticed that one of the sections originally redacted referred to the so-called Haiphong Massacre of 1946.

“The French attacked Haiphong and killed 6,000 people,” Ellsberg says. “The entire reference was whited out. The government didn’t want people to know that an ally was seeking to conquer and colonize Vietnam.”

___

Follow AP National Writer Hillel Italie on Twitter at @hitalie.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-74800f67eb8742a68407cdc195e68784 Redaction nation: US history brims with partial deletions HILLEL ITALIE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc c8bf9c80-fdea-52f0-9597-bf1fea84fe16 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-74800f67eb8742a68407cdc195e68784 Redaction nation: US history brims with partial deletions HILLEL ITALIE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc c8bf9c80-fdea-52f0-9597-bf1fea84fe16 Associated Press article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

US-Russia chill stirs worry about stumbling into conflict

Westlake Legal Group us-russia-chill-stirs-worry-about-stumbling-into-conflict US-Russia chill stirs worry about stumbling into conflict ROBERT BURNS fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 19c11d24-f3f4-5627-bbed-6251d4bbd64e

It has the makings of a new Cold War, or worse.

The deep chill in U.S.-Russian relations is stirring concern in some quarters that Washington and Moscow are in danger of stumbling into an armed confrontation that, by mistake or miscalculation, could lead to nuclear war.

American and European analysts and current and former U.S. military officers say the nuclear superpowers need to talk more. A foundational arms control agreement is being abandoned and the last major limitation on strategic nuclear weapons could go away in less than two years. Unlike during the Cold War, when generations lived under threat of a nuclear Armageddon, the two militaries are barely on speaking terms.

“During the Cold War, we understood each other’s signals. We talked,” says the top NATO commander in Europe, U.S. Army Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, who is about to retire. “I’m concerned that we don’t know them as well today.”

Scaparrotti, in his role as Supreme Allied Commander Europe, has met only twice with Gen. Valery Gerasimov, the chief of the Russian general staff, but has spoken to him by phone a number of other times.

“I personally think communication is a very important part of deterrence,” Scaparrotti said, referring to the idea that adversaries who know each other’s capabilities and intentions are less likely to fall into conflict. “So, I think we should have more communication with Russia. It would ensure that we understand each other and why we are doing what we’re doing.”

He added: “It doesn’t have to be a lot.”

The United States and Russia, which together control more than 90 percent of the world’s nuclear weapons, say that in August they will leave the 1987 treaty that banned an entire class of nuclear weapons. And there appears to be little prospect of extending the 2010 New Start treaty that limits each side’s strategic nuclear weapons.

After a period of post-Cold War cooperation on nuclear security and other defense issues, the relationship between Washington and Moscow took a nosedive, particularly after Russian forces entered the former Soviet republic of Georgia in 2008. Tensions spiked with Russia’s annexation of the Crimea in 2014 and its military intervention in eastern Ukraine. In response, Congress in 2016 severely limited military cooperation with Russia.

The law prohibits “military-to-military cooperation” until the secretary of defense certifies that Russia “has ceased its occupation of Ukrainian territory” and “aggressive activities.” The law was amended last year to state that it does not limit military talks aimed at “reducing the risk of conflict.”

Relations frayed even further amid U.S. allegations that Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, although President Donald Trump has doubted Russian complicity in what U.S. intelligence agencies assert was an effort by Moscow to boost Trump’s chances of winning the White House. After a Helsinki summit with Putin in July, Trump publicly accepted the Kremlin leader’s denial of interference.

Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in an interview Friday that Russian behavior is to blame for the strained relationship.

“It’s very difficult for us to have normal relationships with a country that has not behaved normally over the last few years,” Dunford said. “There are major issues that affect our bilateral relationship that have to be addressed, to include where Russia has violated international laws, norms and standards.”

Dunford said he speaks regularly with Gerasimov, his Russian counterpart, and the two sides talk on other levels.

“I’m satisfied right now with our military-to-military communication to maintain a degree of transparency that mitigates the risk of miscalculation,” he said. “I think we have a framework within to manage a crisis, should one occur, at the senior military-to-military level.”

James Stavridis, a retired Navy admiral who was the top NATO commander in Europe from 2009 to 2013, says the West must confront Russia where necessary, including on its interventions in Ukraine and Syria. But he believes there room for cooperation on multiple fronts, including the Arctic and arms control.

“We are in danger of stumbling backward into a Cold War that is to no one’s advantage,” he said in an email exchange. “Without steady, political-level engagement between the defense establishments, the risk of a true new Cold War rises steadily.”

No one is predicting a deliberate Russian act of war in Europe, but the decline in regular talks is a worry to many.

Moscow says it is ready to talk.

“Russia remains open for interaction aimed at de-escalating tension, restoring mutual trust, preventing any misinterpretations of one another’s intentions, and reducing the risk of dangerous incidents,” the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement last week in response to NATO’s 70th anniversary celebration.

Sam Nunn, who served in the Senate as a Democrat from Georgia from 1972 to 1997, argues that dialogue with Russia is too important to set aside, even if it carries domestic political risk.

“You can’t call time out,” he said in an interview. “The nuclear issues go on, and they’re getting more dangerous.”

Nunn co-wrote an opinion piece with former Secretary of State George Shultz and former Defense Secretary William Perry arguing that the U.S. and its allies and Russia are caught in a “policy paralysis” that could lead to a military confrontation and potentially the first use of nuclear weapons since the U.S. bombed Japan in August 1945.

“A bold policy shift is needed,” they wrote in the Wall Street Journal on Thursday, “to support a strategic re-engagement with Russia and walk back from this perilous precipice. Otherwise, our nations may soon be entrenched in a nuclear standoff more precarious, disorienting and economically costly than the Cold War.”

A group of U.S., Canadian, European and Russian security experts and former officials in February issued a call for talks with Russia on crisis management.

“The risks of mutual misunderstanding and unintended signals that stem from an absence of dialogue relating to crisis management … are real,” the Euro-Atlantic Security Leadership Group said in a statement.

It said this could lead to conventional war with Russia or, in a worst case scenario, “the potential for nuclear threats, or even nuclear use, where millions could be killed in minutes.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-734f1fda431e483e8fb95c0bc87be8c7 US-Russia chill stirs worry about stumbling into conflict ROBERT BURNS fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 19c11d24-f3f4-5627-bbed-6251d4bbd64e   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-734f1fda431e483e8fb95c0bc87be8c7 US-Russia chill stirs worry about stumbling into conflict ROBERT BURNS fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 19c11d24-f3f4-5627-bbed-6251d4bbd64e

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Japan says US serviceman kills woman, self in Okinawa

Westlake Legal Group japan-says-us-serviceman-kills-woman-self-in-okinawa Japan says US serviceman kills woman, self in Okinawa fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc David Aaro baf45a8a-87bf-5fdb-a272-4c90b7159b4e article

A U.S. serviceman fatally stabbed a Japanese woman and then killed himself in Okinawa on Saturday, Japan’s Foreign Ministry said, amid growing resentment about American troops in southwestern Japan.

U.S. Forces Japan said the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) was working with local police to look into the deaths of a Navy sailor assigned to a Marine unit and an Okinawa resident. “This is an absolute tragedy and we are fully committed to supporting the investigation,” it said in a statement, according to the reporting on the crime from The Associated Press.

WRECKAGE OF MISSING JAPAN’S F-35 FIGHTER JET FOUND, PILOT REMAINS MISSING

AP said Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Takeo Akiba telephoned U.S. Ambassador William Hagerty, asking for cooperation with both the inquiry and efforts to prevent a recurrence.

Although Okinawa makes up less than 1 percent of Japan’s land space, AP said, it hosts about half of the 54,000 American troops stationed in Japan, and is home to 64 percent of the land used by U.S. bases in the country.

JAPANESE WOMAN ARRESTED IN CONNECTION TO STABBING DEATH OF US AIRMAN

People there have long complained about crime, noise and the destruction of the environment as a consequence of the military presence.

A plan to relocate a Marine Corps air station called Futenma to a less populated part of Okinawa has also been contentious, AP said, and Denny Tamaki, Okinawa’s governor, is pushing to have the base moved off the island altogether.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 19103348240439 Japan says US serviceman kills woman, self in Okinawa fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc David Aaro baf45a8a-87bf-5fdb-a272-4c90b7159b4e article   Westlake Legal Group 19103348240439 Japan says US serviceman kills woman, self in Okinawa fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc David Aaro baf45a8a-87bf-5fdb-a272-4c90b7159b4e article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com