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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military (Page 10)

Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports

Westlake Legal Group satellite-images-show-china-is-building-its-third-and-largest-aircraft-carrier-reports Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946
Westlake Legal Group 24a00673-download Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946

Images released by a Washington-based think-tank show construction on China’s third and largest aircraft carrier, activity analysts believe could eventually challenge U.S. strategic superiority in East Asia.

The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington released images from April that reveal construction on China’s third aircraft carrier in the Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai over the past six months, Reuters reported.

US WARSHIPS SAIL NEAR DISPUTED ISLANDS CLAIMED BY CHINA, AS TENSIONS ESCALATE: REPORT

China has not confirmed it is building a third carrier. But the Pentagon said last week that work had begun on a vessel that would “probably be larger than the first two and fitted with a catapult launch system to accelerate aircraft during takeoff.”

The CSIS images support the Pentagon’s claims. The satellite photographs show China’s Type 002 aircraft carrier is slightly smaller than U.S. carriers but larger than France’s Charles de Gaulle, analysts said. It remains unclear whether the vessel would have nuclear capability.

Changing political relationships have motivated the Chinese government to accelerate the modernization of its armed forces over the past few years, the CSIS reports. Both Asian and Western militaries are seeking information regarding the purpose of China’s newest aircraft carrier.

Meanwhile, some analysts view its construction as a way for China to slowly undermine U.S. strategic superiority in the region, according to a series of Reuters Special Reports.

Singapore-based regional security analyst Ian Storey told Reuters that China’s Type 002 might put added stress on the relationship between the U.S. and China as other nations in the region become threatened by China’s growing military presence.

“Once completed, it will outclass any warship from any Asian country, including India and Japan,” said Storey, of the ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute. “It is yet another indication that China has emerged as Asia’s paramount naval power.”

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China’s second, smaller aircraft carrier is not set to go into service until the year 2020. The U.S. operates 11 aircraft carriers in the region. State media has previously reported the Chinese military needs 6 aircraft carriers.

Westlake Legal Group 24a00673-download Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946   Westlake Legal Group 24a00673-download Satellite images show China is building its third and largest aircraft carrier: reports fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 0161db03-573d-5089-b6b6-5e072577a946

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US-Iran tensions rise ahead of anniversary of deal pullout

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news US-Iran tensions rise ahead of anniversary of deal pullout JON GAMBRELL fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc db12d9b1-3b16-5204-8eac-09b4077b2b4d Associated Press article

A sudden White House announcement that a U.S. aircraft carrier and a bomber wing would be deployed in the Persian Gulf to counter Iran comes just days ahead of the anniversary of President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw America from Tehran’s nuclear deal.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is said to be planning a speech Wednesday on the anniversary to discuss the next steps Tehran will take in confronting the U.S. Officials in the Islamic Republic previously warned that Iran might increase its uranium enrichment, potentially pulling away from a deal it has sought to salvage for months.

The military has almost always had an aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf as part of its sprawling military presence in the strategic region, but had begun to scale back its presence as the air campaign against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria wound down.

Sunday night’s statement from national security adviser John Bolton said the USS Abraham Lincoln, other ships in the carrier’s strike group and a bomber wing would deploy to the Mideast. Bolton blamed “a number of troubling and escalatory indications and warnings,” without elaborating.

“The United States is not seeking war with the Iranian regime, but we are fully prepared to respond to any attack, whether by proxy, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, or regular Iranian forces,” Bolton said.

In Iran, the semi-official ISNA news agency on Monday quoted an anonymous official as saying that Rouhani planned a broadcast address Wednesday and may discuss the “counteractions” Tehran will take over America’s withdrawal from the nuclear deal. It said Iranian officials have informed their European counterparts — with whom Iran has been trying to salvage the agreement — of the planned speech.

“Partial and total reduction of some of Iran’s commitments and resumption of some nuclear activities which were ceased following (the deal) are the first step,” ISNA said. Iranian state television and the semi-official Fars news agency similarly suggested an Iranian response loomed.

A spokesman for Iran’s Supreme National Security Council, Keivan Khosravi, also dismissed Bolton’s comments as “psychological warfare.”

The United Nations’ nuclear watchdog says Iran has continued to comply with the terms of the 2015 nuclear deal, which saw it limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. But American sanctions have wreaked havoc on Iran’s already-anemic economy, while promised help from European partners in the deal haven’t alleviated the pain.

The U.S. last week stopped issuing waivers for countries importing Iranian crude oil, a crucial source of cash for Iran’s government.

It’s unclear what specific threat American officials perceive coming from Iran. A U.S. official, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters, said American troops at land and sea could be targeted.

The USS Abraham Lincoln had been in the Mediterranean Sea conducting operations alongside the USS John C. Stennis, another aircraft carrier that has twice been in the Persian Gulf in recent months.

However, American military officials have stopped the near-continuous presence of aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf, a pattern set following the 1991 Gulf War. American air bases spanning the region can scramble fighter jets and drones, lessening the necessity of an aircraft carrier as U.S. officials also worry about China and Russia.

Already in the Persian Gulf is a group of U.S. Navy warships led by the USS Kearsarge, an amphibious assault ship carrying troops from the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit. The Kearsarge also carries AV-8B Harrier fighter jets, MH-60 helicopters and MV-22 Osprey airplanes.

Across the wider 5th Fleet, there were 17 warships deployed, according to the most-recent count by the U.S. Naval Institute, which tracks deployments around the world.

The Bahrain-based 5th Fleet declined to comment on the White House announcement when reached by the AP on Monday.

It also remains unclear what bomber wing would be deployed to the region. Typically, the al-Udeid Air Base in Qatar, home to the forward headquarters of the U.S. military’s Central Command, hosts such bomber deployments.

In late March, the Air Force acknowledged a rare gap in bomber cover in the Mideast after a squadron of B-1 Lancers left al-Udeid to return to Texas. B-52 bombers also had been deployed to the area to keep up attacks on the Islamic State group, the first time the aging aircraft had deployed to the region in 25 years.

Officials at al-Udeid, which also hosts the F-35 fighter jet, declined to answer questions from the AP.

The Trump administration, which abruptly announced in December that it was pulling out of Syria, still maintains 2,000 U.S. troops in the northern part of the war-torn country. Officials suggest they serve as a check on Iranian ambitions and help ensure that Islamic State fighters do not regroup. No significant U.S. forces have so far withdrawn from Syria.

Trump has also said he has no plans to withdraw the 5,200 troops stationed in Iraq as part of a security agreement to advise, assist and support the country’s troops in the fight against IS. Earlier this year, Trump angered Iraqi politicians and Iranian-backed factions by saying troops should stay there to keep an eye on neighboring Iran.

___

Associated Press writers Nasser Karimi in Tehran, Iran, and Zeina Karam in Beirut contributed to this report.

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US sending aircraft carrier to Mideast, citing Iran threats

Westlake Legal Group us-sending-aircraft-carrier-to-mideast-citing-iran-threats US sending aircraft carrier to Mideast, citing Iran threats LOLITA BALDOR and ZEKE MILLER fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 826f11a7-7eb0-5fc2-9582-4eb593f1c9dd

The U.S. is sending an aircraft carrier group to the Middle East ahead of schedule and warning that Iran and its proxy forces are showing “troubling and escalatory” indications of a possible attack on American forces in the region.

Exactly what prompted the action was unclear, but it marked a further step in sharply rising tensions between the Trump administration and the Islamic Republic.

National security adviser John Bolton said Sunday night the U.S. was deploying the USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group and a bomber task force to the Middle East, intending to send a message that “unrelenting force” will meet any attack on American forces or allies.

“The United States is not seeking war with the Iranian regime, but we are fully prepared to respond to any attack, whether by proxy, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps or regular Iranian forces,” Bolton said.

Neither Bolton nor other officials would provide any details about the supposed threat, which comes as the Trump administration wages a campaign of intensifying pressure against Iran and nearly a year after it withdrew from an Obama-era nuclear deal with Tehran.

In Iran, the semi-official ISNA news agency on Monday quoted an anonymous official as saying that Iranian President Hassan Rouhani planned a broadcast address Wednesday and might discuss “counteractions” Tehran will take over America’s withdrawal from the international nuclear deal.

The agreement limited Iran’s enrichment of uranium amid Western concerns that Tehran’s program could allow it to build nuclear weapons. Iran insists its program is for peaceful purposes.

With its pressure campaign, the U.S. administration is trying to get Iran to halt activities such as supporting militant activities that destabilize the Middle East and threaten U.S. allies, including Israel, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said.

“Our objective is to get the Islamic Republic of Iran to behave like a normal nation,” Pompeo told reporters during a visit to Finland. “When they do that, we will welcome them back.”

The order to the carrier group would get the Abraham Lincoln into the Middle East about two weeks earlier than initially planned following exercises in the Mediterranean region, according to a U.S. defense official who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly, so spoke on the condition of anonymity. It forces the ships to cancel a planned stop in Croatia.

For years, the U.S. maintained a carrier presence in the Persian Gulf and Middle East region. During the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, there were two carriers in the area, but that was reduced to one.

Last year the administration decided to end the continuous carrier presence, and send a strike group only intermittently into the region. The U.S. Navy currently has no aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf.

Bolton said the U.S. wants to send a message that “unrelenting force” will meet any attack on U.S. interests or those of America’s allies.

Jon Alterman, senior vice president at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, questioned whether the U.S. adequately understands Iranian motivations and actions, and whether the military move was warranted.

“I don’t think we should let the Iranians pull our chain at the time and place of their choosing,” he said. “You can communicate seriousness to the Iranians without moving a lot of assets around, because moving assets is expensive and keeps assets from being in other places.”

He added, however, that Iran has the capability to harm Americans, but it’s difficult to assess the situation without knowing more about the intelligence that prompted the move.

Mark Dubowitz, who studies Iran for the Washington-based policy institute Foundation for Defense of Democracies, said a credible threat of overwhelming force “will make war less likely.”

“If past is prologue, the regime will always move aggressively forward when it senses American weakness and recoil when it sensed American strength,” Dubowitz said.

Along with the Lincoln, Bolton mentioned “a bomber task force,” which suggested the Pentagon is deploying land-based bomber aircraft somewhere in the region, perhaps on the Arabian Peninsula.

Pompeo said the actions undertaken by the U.S. have been in the works for a while. The request for the accelerated move came over the weekend from the military’s U.S. Central Command after reviewing various intelligence reports for some time, according to the U.S. official. Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan approved the request on Sunday.

“It is absolutely the case that we have seen escalatory actions from the Iranians and it is equally the case that we will hold the Iranians accountable for attacks on American interests,” Pompeo said. “If these actions take place, if they do by some third-party proxy, a militia group, Hezbollah, we will hold the Iranian leadership directly accountable for that.”

Asked about “escalatory actions,” Pompeo replied, “I don’t want to talk about what underlays it, but make no mistake, we have good reason to want to communicate clearly about how the Iranians should understand how we will respond to actions they may take.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said Monday that the carrier move sends an important message to Iran but the administration needs to give Congress more information.

“I worry that it could be misinterpreted,” Blumenthal said. “I’m trusting that it isn’t meant as a provocative act, but I need to know what the thought process and justifications are.”

Asked if the Iranian action was related to the deadly events in Gaza and Israel — militants fired rockets into Israel on Sunday and Israel responded with airstrikes — Pompeo said, “It is separate from that.”

The Trump administration has been intensifying its pressure campaign against Iran.

Last month, President Donald Trump announced the U.S. would no longer exempt any countries from U.S. sanctions if they continue to buy Iranian oil, a decision that primarily affects the five remaining major importers: China and India and U.S. treaty allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey.

The U.S. also recently designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard as a terrorist group, the first ever for an entire division of another government.

Trump withdrew from the Obama administration’s landmark nuclear deal with Iran in May 2018 and, in the months that followed, reimposed punishing sanctions including those targeting Iran’s oil, shipping and banking sectors.

___

Associated Press writers Robert Burns and Matthew Lee contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-bb7bcfb7841544d6a710f6ae0653e697 US sending aircraft carrier to Mideast, citing Iran threats LOLITA BALDOR and ZEKE MILLER fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 826f11a7-7eb0-5fc2-9582-4eb593f1c9dd   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-bb7bcfb7841544d6a710f6ae0653e697 US sending aircraft carrier to Mideast, citing Iran threats LOLITA BALDOR and ZEKE MILLER fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 826f11a7-7eb0-5fc2-9582-4eb593f1c9dd

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Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice

Westlake Legal Group dying-u-s-solider-fighting-for-the-right-to-sue-military-over-medical-malpractice Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice Hollie McKay fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc article 890fdd16-9247-50b1-8fcc-e82f446341c5

Sgt. 1st Class Richard Stayskal survived three combat deployments to Iraq and even an enemy bullet through the chest. But now the dying Purple Heart recipient says he’s enduring one of the toughest fights of his life: the right to sue the U.S. government for medical malpractice.

“This isn’t about the money. This is about accountability. You can’t say whoops and play with people’s lives and say nothing can be done,” Stayskal, who is stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, told Fox News. “Right now, I am being deprived of my rights as a U.S. citizen. An inmate can sue for medical malpractice, but as a member of our military, I cannot.”

The now 37-year-old’s ordeal began in January 2017 as he was preparing to head to dive school and was ordered to have a CT scan, given the wound he suffered in Iraq about 13 years earlier.

“I was having a little trouble breathing, some coughing and wheezing but I passed the test just fine,” he recalled.

Only his symptoms quickly started to become worse.

The ensuing six months, Stayskal said, brought a series of medical mishaps, including being misdiagnosed with pneumonia, shuffled among a variety of doctors and dismissed from the emergency room — despite having a notable mass on his lung, throat bleeding and excruciating pain.

MEDICAL MIRACLES: CHILD BURN VICTIMS IN SYRIA BROUGHT TO US FOR LAST SHOT AT LIFE

Concerned superiors in his chain-of-command finally demanded that Stayskal be able to seek help off-base, a process that took several more weeks and red tape, he said. All the while, the true cause of his dwindling health continued to ravage his body.

Finally, in late June 2017, the diagnosis came, some six months after his first appointment. The father-of-two had stage three lung cancer, and the mass had doubled in size and spread to the left side of his neck, spleen, lymph nodes, liver and his right hip joint.

Stayskal, after almost 17 years of service — first as a Marine and later as a Special Forces soldier in the Army — is no longer able to finish a warrant officer course and is in the process of being medically discharged. But amid the family’s search for answers and any legal recourse, he learned he could not take his medical malpractice case to a court of law.

What stands in the way is the Feres Doctrine – which was born out of a 1950 Supreme Court case – which was put in place to block a deluge of lawsuits against the government for injuries sustained in combat or in military training.

Westlake Legal Group rich4 Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice Hollie McKay fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc article 890fdd16-9247-50b1-8fcc-e82f446341c5

Happier times: Rich and his wife Megan, with their two daughters.

But it also prevents service members and their families from seeking legal recourse for ailments caused by negligence under the military medical system. Furthermore, the doctrine stops service members from being able to seek accountability from a chain of command that may have been lax in preventing a harmful incident in the first place.

US MILITARY TO PROVIDE MEDICAL CARE, TRAINING TO PUERTO RICO

Despite being now classified as having stage four and terminal cancer, and with only months to live, Stayskal says he’s determined to keep fighting — not just for himself, but so other families don’t have to endure the same bureaucratic roadblocks.

Following emotional testimony in front of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel on April 30, a bi-partisan bill named after Stayskal has since been introduced and is working its way through Congress.

The Sergeant First Class Richard Stayskal Military Medical Accountability Act of 2019 would protect the Feres Doctrine’s original mission — not opening the floodgates for a service member to sue based on job or battlefield-related injuries — but ultimately would allow military service members to sue the Department of Defense for “instances of medical malpractice unrelated to their militaries duties.”

“For nearly 70 years, service members have not been able to sue military medical providers after being misdiagnosed, mistreated, or subjected to botched surgeries, even though this malpractice occurred in health care settings in which all other Americans have that right,” said Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., who introduced the new legislation. “By creating an exemption to allow service members to sue the military for medical malpractice, the Stayskal Act would give service members the same right as the fellow citizens they serve to protect.”

The bill is also co-sponsored by Republican Rep. Richard Hudson, whose congressional district includes Fort Bragg. The Feres Doctrine can only be reversed through a Supreme Court decision or an act of Congress.

Stayskal is represented by Natalie Khawam of the Tampa-based Whistleblower Law Firm, who took the case after the soldier said he and his wife contacted numerous attorneys across the country who simply told them nothing could be done.

“This is not just a military issue, this is an equal rights issue,” Khawam told Fox News. “I believe most Americans would be shocked to learn that inmates can sue the government for medical malpractice but that our great soldiers who risk their lives for our country cannot sue for medical malpractice unrelated to combat duty.”

Westlake Legal Group rich2-e1557162747339 Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice Hollie McKay fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc article 890fdd16-9247-50b1-8fcc-e82f446341c5

Rich and his wife Megan following his testimony in Washington D.C. on April 30th (Megan Stayskal)

She said her firm in recent months has received calls from hundreds of victims and their families informing them of the harrowing experiences they suffered at military hospitals.

Standing alongside Stayskal in pushing back against the decades-old legislation is 29-year-old Capt. Katie Blanchard – who allegedly cautioned her superiors for months about an Army civilian working for her at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas – before being doused in gasoline and set on fire by that individual in September 2016. Blanchard is unable to sue despite having had to endure more than 100 surgeries.

Also working to change the law is Alexis Witt – the widow of Staff Sgt. Dean Witt, who died after receiving a fatal dose of fentanyl and allegedly having a breathing tube incorrectly forced down his esophagus during what should have been a standard appendectomy.

“We are just hoping to gain support from legislators who see this as unjust and withholding of our rights,” Stayskal said.

Westlake Legal Group rich3-e1557162646371 Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice Hollie McKay fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc article 890fdd16-9247-50b1-8fcc-e82f446341c5

Sgt. Rich Stayskal undergoing treatment for stage four cancer (Megan Stayskal)

Stayskal’s wife, Megan, and their two daughters, ages 10 and 12, are providing support as Stayskal fights what may be his last battle.

“We aren’t trying to abolish the Feres Doctrine, we know that it serves a purpose as far as wartime goes,” Megan said. “But at home, our servicemen and women deserve full rights.”

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A petition to promote the bill has already attracted over 100,000 signatures. Moreover, a Washington D.C. march to further the cause and honor Stayskal, along with other military members and their families who are enduring similar circumstances, is slated for June 12. It’s set to go from Freedom Plaza to the National Mall.

The DOD did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group rich1 Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice Hollie McKay fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc article 890fdd16-9247-50b1-8fcc-e82f446341c5   Westlake Legal Group rich1 Dying U.S. solider fighting for the right to sue military over medical malpractice Hollie McKay fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/politics fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc article 890fdd16-9247-50b1-8fcc-e82f446341c5

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Iranian threat that prompted deployment of US carrier, bombers to Middle East ‘is real’, official warns

The Iranian threat to American troops that prompted the deployment of an aircraft carrier and a bomber task force to the Middle East “is real,” a U.S. official told Fox News on Monday.

The official’s underscoring of the danger posed by the Islamic Republic comes amid an Associated Press report in which a source identified “clear indications” that Iranian and Iranian proxy forces were preparing for a possible attack on American troops in the region.

“The threat is real,” Fox News was told by the U.S. official, who also confirmed the AP report.

The defense official who spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity said the Pentagon approved the deployments and that U.S. forces at sea and on land were thought to be the potential targets. The official declined to be more specific.

Westlake Legal Group USS-Abraham-Lincoln-Getty Iranian threat that prompted deployment of US carrier, bombers to Middle East ‘is real’, official warns Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc article 8c8b3d72-fc36-59a3-ad4c-72f9bfd7ab93

The USS Abraham Lincoln in the waters of Western Pacific Ocean in 2004. The ship is now heading to the Middle East.

SAUDI OFFICIALS CONDEMN IRAN OVER ITS ROLE IN YEMEN

White House national security adviser John Bolton said in a statement Sunday night that the U.S. is deploying the USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group and a bomber task force to the U.S. Central Command region, an area that includes the Middle East.

“The United States is not seeking war with the Iranian regime, but we are fully prepared to respond to any attack, whether by proxy, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, or regular Iranian forces,” he said.

Bolton also said the move was in response to “a number of troubling and escalatory indications and warnings,” without elaborating.

The Abraham Lincoln, its strike group of ships – which include the guided missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf and destroyers from Destroyer Squadron 2 — and combat aircraft have been operating in the Mediterranean Sea recently. Last Wednesday a group of senior Albanian government officials visited aboard the Lincoln as it sailed in the Adriatic.

Bolton’s reference to the Central Command area, the AP says, suggests the Lincoln is now headed east to the Red Sea and perhaps then to the Arabian Sea or the Persian Gulf. The U.S. Navy currently has no aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf.

DISSIDENTS CALL FOR IRAN’S EMBASSIES IN EUROPE TO BE SHUT DOWN AMID TERROR THREAT

Speaking to reporters while flying to Europe, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the actions undertaken by the U.S. had been in the works for a little while.

“It is absolutely the case that we have seen escalatory actions from the Iranians and it is equally the case that we will hold the Iranians accountable for attacks on American interests,” Pompeo said. “If these actions take place, if they do by some third-party proxy, a militia group, Hezbollah, we will hold the Iranian leadership directly accountable for that.”

Asked about “escalatory actions,” Pompeo replied, “I don’t want to talk about what underlays it, but make no mistake, we have good reason to want to communicate clearly about how the Iranians should understand how we will respond to actions they may take.”

And asked if the Iranian action were related to the deadly events in Gaza and Israel — militants fired rockets into Israel on Sunday and Israel responded with airstrikes — Pompeo said, “It is separate from that.”

The Trump administration lately has been intensifying a pressure campaign against Iran.

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Last month, President Trump announced the U.S. will no longer exempt any countries from U.S. sanctions if they continue to buy Iranian oil, a decision that primarily affects the five remaining major importers: China and India and U.S. treaty allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey.

The U.S. also recently designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard as a terrorist group, the first ever for an entire division of another government.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson, Samuel Chamberlain and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group USS-Abraham-Lincoln-Getty Iranian threat that prompted deployment of US carrier, bombers to Middle East ‘is real’, official warns Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc article 8c8b3d72-fc36-59a3-ad4c-72f9bfd7ab93   Westlake Legal Group USS-Abraham-Lincoln-Getty Iranian threat that prompted deployment of US carrier, bombers to Middle East ‘is real’, official warns Greg Norman fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc article 8c8b3d72-fc36-59a3-ad4c-72f9bfd7ab93

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Funeral set for Navy recruit who died at boot camp

Westlake Legal Group funeral-set-for-navy-recruit-who-died-at-boot-camp Funeral set for Navy recruit who died at boot camp MOBILE, Ala. fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 6d7501d0-42a2-53db-8361-ce09781840c3
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Funeral set for Navy recruit who died at boot camp MOBILE, Ala. fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 6d7501d0-42a2-53db-8361-ce09781840c3

Friends and family are remembering an 18-year-old Navy recruit from Alabama who died at boot camp.

A funeral is scheduled Monday for Kelsey Nobles of Mobile. She died last month after collapsing during training at the Navy Recruit Training Center in Great Lakes, Illinois.

The pastor at Cottage Hill Baptist Church, Alan Floyd, tells WKRG-TV that Noble is being buried with full military honors in Mobile.

Nobles graduated from Baker High School last year and joined the military.

Nobles’ father told news outlets that she passed out after a physical fitness test and went into cardiac arrest. She was pronounced dead at a civilian hospital.

Nobles was the second person to die at the training facility under similar circumstances in recent months. The Navy is investigating.

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US dispatched aircraft carrier to send message to Iran

Westlake Legal Group us-dispatched-aircraft-carrier-to-send-message-to-iran US dispatched aircraft carrier to send message to Iran ROBERT BURNS and CATHERINE LUCEY fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0f4c8109-3e47-5505-a3c3-60b413851476
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news US dispatched aircraft carrier to send message to Iran ROBERT BURNS and CATHERINE LUCEY fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0f4c8109-3e47-5505-a3c3-60b413851476

A White House decision to dispatch an aircraft carrier and other military resources to send a message to Iran followed “clear indications” that Iranian and Iranian proxy forces were preparing to possibly attack U.S. forces in the region, a defense official told the Associated Press.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive information, said the Pentagon approved the deployments and that U.S. forces at sea and on land were thought to be the potential targets. The official declined to be more specific.

White House national security adviser John Bolton said in a statement Sunday night that the U.S. is deploying the USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group and a bomber task force to the U.S. Central Command region, an area that includes the Middle East.

Bolton said the move was in response to “a number of troubling and escalatory indications and warnings.” He didn’t provide details, but said the U.S. wants to send a message that “unrelenting force” will meet any attack on U.S. interests or those of its allies.

“The United States is not seeking war with the Iranian regime, but we are fully prepared to respond to any attack, whether by proxy, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, or regular Iranian forces,” he said.

The Pentagon had no immediate comment on the Bolton statement.

The Abraham Lincoln and its strike group of ships and combat aircraft have been operating in the Mediterranean Sea recently. Last Wednesday a group of senior Albanian government officials visited aboard the Lincoln as it sailed in the Adriatic.

Bolton’s reference to the Central Command area would mean the Lincoln is headed east to the Red Sea and perhaps then to the Arabian Sea or the Persian Gulf. The U.S. Navy currently has no aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf.

Bolton’s mention of deploying a bomber task force suggests the Pentagon is deploying land-based bomber aircraft somewhere in the region, perhaps on the Arabian Peninsula.

Speaking to reporters while flying to Europe, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the actions undertaken by the U.S. had been in the works for a little while.

“It is absolutely the case that we have seen escalatory actions from the Iranians and it is equally the case that we will hold the Iranians accountable for attacks on American interests,” Pompeo said. “If these actions take place, if they do by some third-party proxy, a militia group, Hezbollah, we will hold the Iranian leadership directly accountable for that.”

Asked about “escalatory actions,” Pompeo replied, “I don’t want to talk about what underlays it, but make no mistake, we have good reason to want to communicate clearly about how the Iranians should understand how we will respond to actions they may take.”

Asked if the Iranian action were related to the deadly events in Gaza and Israel — militants fired rockets into Israel on Sunday and Israel responded with airstrikes — Pompeo said, “It is separate from that.”

The Trump administration has been intensifying a pressure campaign against Iran.

Last month, President Donald Trump announced the U.S. will no longer exempt any countries from U.S. sanctions if they continue to buy Iranian oil, a decision that primarily affects the five remaining major importers: China and India and U.S. treaty allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey.

The U.S. also recently designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard as a terrorist group, the first ever for an entire division of another government.

Trump withdrew from the Obama administration’s landmark nuclear deal with Iran in May 2018 and, in the months that followed, reimposed punishing sanctions including those targeting Iran’s oil, shipping and banking sectors.

Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have in recent months spoken stridently about Iran and its “malign activities” in the region.

___

AP Diplomatic Writer Matthew Lee contributed to this report.

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AP source: Possible attack on US forces led to deployments

Westlake Legal Group ap-source-possible-attack-on-us-forces-led-to-deployments AP source: Possible attack on US forces led to deployments ROBERT BURNS and CATHERINE LUCEY fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0f4c8109-3e47-5505-a3c3-60b413851476
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news AP source: Possible attack on US forces led to deployments ROBERT BURNS and CATHERINE LUCEY fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 0f4c8109-3e47-5505-a3c3-60b413851476

A White House decision to dispatch an aircraft carrier and other military resources to send a message to Iran followed “clear indications” that Iranian and Iranian proxy forces were preparing to possibly attack U.S. forces in the region, a defense official told the Associated Press.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive information, said the Pentagon approved the deployments and that U.S. forces at sea and on land were thought to be the potential targets. The official declined to be more specific.

White House national security adviser John Bolton said in a statement Sunday night that the U.S. is deploying the USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group and a bomber task force to the U.S. Central Command region, an area that includes the Middle East.

Bolton said the move was in response to “a number of troubling and escalatory indications and warnings.” He didn’t provide details, but said the U.S. wants to send a message that “unrelenting force” will meet any attack on U.S. interests or those of its allies.

“The United States is not seeking war with the Iranian regime, but we are fully prepared to respond to any attack, whether by proxy, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, or regular Iranian forces,” he said.

The Pentagon had no immediate comment on the Bolton statement.

The Abraham Lincoln and its strike group of ships and combat aircraft have been operating in the Mediterranean Sea recently. Last Wednesday a group of senior Albanian government officials visited aboard the Lincoln as it sailed in the Adriatic.

Bolton’s reference to the Central Command area would mean the Lincoln is headed east to the Red Sea and perhaps then to the Arabian Sea or the Persian Gulf. The U.S. Navy currently has no aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf.

Bolton’s mention of deploying a bomber task force suggests the Pentagon is deploying land-based bomber aircraft somewhere in the region, perhaps on the Arabian Peninsula.

The Trump administration has been intensifying a pressure campaign against Iran.

Last month, President Donald Trump announced the U.S. will no longer exempt any countries from U.S. sanctions if they continue to buy Iranian oil, a decision that primarily affects the five remaining major importers: China and India and U.S. treaty allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey.

The U.S. also recently designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard as a terrorist group, the first ever for an entire division of another government.

Trump withdrew from the Obama administration’s landmark nuclear deal with Iran in May 2018 and, in the months that followed, reimposed punishing sanctions including those targeting Iran’s oil, shipping and banking sectors.

Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have in recent months spoken stridently about Iran and its “malign activities” in the region.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Taliban says gap closing in talks with US for troop withdrawal

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Peace talks between the Taliban and a U.S. peace envoy over a timetable for the withdrawal of American troops in Afghanistan are narrowing a gap between the two sides, a spokesman for the insurgent group said Saturday.

Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen said both sides have offered proposals for drawing down the presence of U.S. and NATO forces, a major step toward ending a nearly two-decades-long conflict. The two sides continue to meet in Doha, Qatar, where the Taliban has a political office.

“There are proposals to lower the gap between the two sides, but (it) still needs negotiation to reach a final agreement,” Shaheen said in an English-language statement.

LARGE US TROOP PULLOUT PLANNED IN AFGHANISTAN, OFFICIALS SAY

The U.S. was seeking 18 months to withdraw its 14,000 troops while the Taliban wanted it done in six months. Talks between the two sides began last year with the appointment of Washington’s peace envoy, Zalmay Khalilzad.

American officials want a guarantee that the Taliban won’t harbor terrorists and that it will help in the fight against an Islamic State affiliate that has taken root in eastern Afghanistan. The Taliban has waged battles with the group in the past.

Khalilzad has laid out four “inter-connected issues: troop withdrawal, counter-terrorism assurances, intra-Afghan dialogue and negotiations and reduction in violence leading to a comprehensive cease-fire.”

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Some Taliban officials said the group has concerns about a cease-fire, namely that some commanders are unlikely to accept a truce while foreign troops remain in the country.

Khalilzad has urged both sides to find a middle ground.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19124301094638 Taliban says gap closing in talks with US for troop withdrawal Louis Casiano fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 3e242cad-21d7-57ba-8cfc-367f94e0149a   Westlake Legal Group AP19124301094638 Taliban says gap closing in talks with US for troop withdrawal Louis Casiano fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 3e242cad-21d7-57ba-8cfc-367f94e0149a

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US still pondering military options in Venezuela

The Trump administration ended a week of pointed but vague threats of a military response to the Venezuelan political crisis with a meeting at the Pentagon to consider its options, though there was still no sign any action was on the horizon.

Shortly after Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan and other senior officials reviewed options in light of a failed effort earlier this week by Venezuelan opposition leaders to fuel an uprising, President Donald Trump said he discussed the situation with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Trump, whose administration is seeking the ouster of President Nicolas Maduro and has recognized opposition leader Juan Guaido as president, said he and Putin share the goal of a peaceful end to the crisis.

“He is not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela, other than he’d like to see something positive happen for Venezuela,” Trump said. “And I feel the same way. We want to get some humanitarian aid. Right now people are starving.”

Trump’s reference to a hands-off Russian approach stands in contrast to assertions by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo that Russia is part of the problem in Caracas. Pompeo said earlier this week that Maduro was set to flee Venezuela until Russia persuaded him to stay.

In its description of the Trump-Putin conversation, the Kremlin said Putin stressed the need to respect Venezuelans’ right to determine their own future. He told Trump that outside interference in internal affairs and attempts at forceful regime change in Caracas undermine the prospects for a political settlement of the crisis.

The Pentagon has no direct role in Venezuela but has been consulting with the White House on ways it can support U.S. diplomacy and prepare for contingencies that could arise, including a crisis that endangers Americans in Venezuela.

In an interview with a small group of reporters Friday, Shanahan said Navy Adm. Craig Faller, commander of U.S. Southern Command, flew to Washington to meet with him and other senior officials, including Pompeo and John Bolton, Trump’s national security adviser.

The session highlighted the administration’s effort to suggest the possibility of military action, perhaps as a way of increasing public pressure on Maduro, although there appears to be little likelihood of direct U.S. military intervention.

They reviewed and refined military planning and options for responding to the crisis, Shanahan said. He declined to provide details and gave no indication they made decisions to take any military action.

“We have a comprehensive set of options tailored to certain conditions, and I’m just going to leave it at that,” he said. Pressed to say whether the options include direct military intervention, he said, “I’ll leave that to your imagination. All options are on the table.”

Faller’s area of responsibility includes Venezuela, and U.S. air and naval forces in the region are capable of conducting surveillance that could support intelligence collection inside Venezuela. The Trump administration’s emphasis has been on diplomatic and economic pressure to try to compel Maduro to step aside.

Asked whether Venezuela poses a national security threat to the United States that would justify using U.S. military force, Shanahan said Russia, China and Iran are involved in Venezuela, and then added, “Right now it’s about Maduro and his illegitimate regime, and Guaidó and making sure that the people of Venezuela have the environment and the conditions to correct for all these humanitarian shortcomings.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, wrote on Twitter, “Where is our aircraft carrier?” Asked to comment on that suggestion, Shanahan told reporters, “All (options) would include all.”

Shanahan said he wanted an update on the situation in light of this week’s developments in which Guaidó called for a military uprising two days earlier. The attempted uprising failed to push Venezuela’s military into rebellion but was followed by deadly clashes between protesters and police in cities across the country.

“This was really a true review, and then making sure we’re all in alignment” within the administration, he said.

Asked whether the failed attempt to spark an uprising to oust Maduro suggests faulty U.S. intelligence, Shanahan said, “I feel very confident in the quality and the accuracy of the information that we’re getting.” He added, “I don’t feel like we have an intelligence gap.”

Pompeo told Fox News on Thursday evening that he remained hopeful that Venezuelans will rise up.

“The military didn’t fracture in the way that we would hope, but it’s just a matter of time,” he said. “It’s the case that Maduro may rule for a little while longer, but he’s not going to govern. Structurally, there’s no way he stays in power. It’s time for him to leave, and we need the Cubans and the Russians to follow him out the door.”

Also attending the Faller briefing were Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, and Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Shanahan canceled a trip to Europe this week to remain in Washington for meetings on Venezuela.

AP Diplomatic writer Matthew Lee, AP writer Jill Colvin and AP Radio correspondent Sagar Meghani contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group a8c365b2-ContentBroker_contentid-3a625ab749d9437a9f8253ec777cbe4f US still pondering military options in Venezuela ROBERT BURNS fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 80b15833-a021-5405-9d17-e7e20776b5e0   Westlake Legal Group a8c365b2-ContentBroker_contentid-3a625ab749d9437a9f8253ec777cbe4f US still pondering military options in Venezuela ROBERT BURNS fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 80b15833-a021-5405-9d17-e7e20776b5e0

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