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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military (Page 15)

Trump, other leaders mark D-Day’s 75th anniversary in Normandy, France

President Trump planned to join other world leaders in Europe on Thursday to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, a monumental event that was largely responsible for shaping the outcome of World War II.

The ceremony was to take place on the edge of Omaha Beach in Normandy where thousands of American and Allied soldiers lost their lives.

Trump, continuing the tradition of his predecessors, will stand alongside leaders from Britain, Canada, France, and even Germany to pay homage to the troops who stormed the fortified Normandy to help turn the tide of the war.

D-DAY VETERAN, 99, GETS OVATION FROM THE QUEEN AND TRUMP AS HE LEADS TRIBUTES

Westlake Legal Group D-Day-US-Flag-THUMB Trump, other leaders mark D-Day's 75th anniversary in Normandy, France fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 625ef661-5ae0-59d6-8e5f-c1e09c133b98

Udo Hartung from Frankfurt, Germany, a World War II reenactor, holds the U.S. flag as he stands at dawn on Omaha Beach, in Normandy, France on Thursday. (Associated Press)

In a Twitter message early Thursday, the president seemed to be looking forward to the day’s events.

“Heading over to Normandy to celebrate some of the bravest that ever lived. We are eternally grateful!” the president wrote.

The message included a retweet of a Defense Department message that included the remembrances of some veterans who participated in the D-Day invasion.

Earlier, the president tweeted an excerpt from his D-Day remarks.

“They did not know if they would survive the hour,” the president wrote. “They did not know if they would grow old. But they knew that America had to prevail. Their cause was this Nation, and generations yet unborn.”

Remembrances will continue to take place throughout the day. Trump will deliver a speech later Thursday at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, where more than 9,000 American military dead are buried.

On Wednesday, Trump joined British Prime Minister Theresa May and about 300 veterans – ages 91 to 101 – on the southern coast of England where he read a prayer delivered by President Franklin Roosevelt on D-Day.

Westlake Legal Group D-Day-Memorial-THUMB Trump, other leaders mark D-Day's 75th anniversary in Normandy, France fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 625ef661-5ae0-59d6-8e5f-c1e09c133b98

floral tributes are placed at the National Guard Monument Memorial as members of the USAREUR band play in the background near Omaha Beach, in Normandy, France, on Thursday. (Associated Press)

D-Day was the largest invasion – by both air and sea – in history. On June 6, 1944, 160,000 Allied troops carried by 7,000 boats landed on the beaches code-named Omaha, Utah, Juno, Sword, and Gold.

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When the day was over, 4,414 Allied troops – including 2,501 Americans – were killed, and 5,000 were injured. That summer, Allied troops would advance their fight, take Paris, and race against the Soviets to control as much German territory as possible by the time Hitler committed suicide in a Berlin Bunker in May 1945.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19157171832578 Trump, other leaders mark D-Day's 75th anniversary in Normandy, France fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 625ef661-5ae0-59d6-8e5f-c1e09c133b98   Westlake Legal Group AP19157171832578 Trump, other leaders mark D-Day's 75th anniversary in Normandy, France fox-news/world fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article 625ef661-5ae0-59d6-8e5f-c1e09c133b98

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Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble

Operation Overlord — or D-Day as it came to be known — was the highest risk venture of World War II. Researching my upcoming book, “Three Days at the Brink: FDR’s Daring Gamble to Win World War II,” I was struck by the drama involved in the decision to launch an invasion across the English Channel on Western Europe.

At a critical conference in Tehran in November 1943, the “Big Three” – President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin –fiercely debated the wisdom and timing of such a launch. They all knew it was a high-stakes gamble and that failure could lead to a catastrophic bloodbath that would turn the war in German leader Adolf Hitler’s favor. And yet, they decided it must be done.

Supreme Commander Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was aware that, despite the peril, Overlord was a necessity.

ROBERT CHARLES: I TALKED WITH A D-DAY VET — HERE’S WHY YOU NEED TO DO SO, TOO

“Every obstacle must be overcome, every inconvenience suffered and every risk run to ensure that our blow is decisive,” Eisenhower wrote to his commanders. “We cannot afford to fail.”

Westlake Legal Group Three-Days-at-the-Brink1 Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1dc5de3-2fdf-5264-8943-0e7d5d398bd0 Bret Baier article

He had devised an elaborate plan, choreographed to the last detail, but he knew that some circumstances were out of his control.

On June 4, 1944, hearing discouraging weather reports and already having delayed the invasion a day because of storms, Eisenhower faced an agonizing moment of decision: to go on June 6 or wait for better weather.

When President Trump delivers his D-Day remarks Thursday at the U.S. Cemetery in Normandy, he has the rare opportunity to pay tribute with emotion, personal stories, and soaring words to the service and the sacrifice of those who died on those beaches and saved the world.

At Southwick House, the invasion headquarters in the southern English town of Portsmouth, Eisenhower sat bowed, head in hands, and contemplated a seemingly impossible choice. He wasn’t all-knowing; he could only judge circumstances as they were set before him.         

Further delay might mean scrapping the mission altogether; the tides allowed only the narrowest window for invasion, and the troops were already poised. “How can you keep this invasion on the end of a limb and let it hang there?” he asked.

On the other hand, if Allied forces invaded as a storm rolled across the Channel, landing craft would be overwhelmed, air support would be impossible, and thousands could perish to no avail.

Westlake Legal Group Three-Days-in-January Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1dc5de3-2fdf-5264-8943-0e7d5d398bd0 Bret Baier article

Indeed, unbeknownst to Eisenhower, German Gen. Erwin Rommel had already decided the Allies would never risk the invasion and had left the theater to meet with Hitler in Germany.

Eisenhower finally rose from his seat, unwilling to decide just yet. He suggested to his team that they try to get a few hours sleep and reconvene later.

At 3:30 a.m. on June 5, Eisenhower brought his team back together and polled them for their opinions, pacing the room as they spoke. He was heartened by an improved weather forecast.

After everyone had finished speaking, he paused, and then said, “OK, we’ll go.”

The invasion was on for the following day.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0ee0760d7d664bf5b422145d38209bd4 Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1dc5de3-2fdf-5264-8943-0e7d5d398bd0 Bret Baier article

FILE — June 6, 1944: U.S. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, left, gives the order of the day to paratroopers in England prior to boarding their planes to participate in the first assault of the Normandy invasion. (U.S. Army Signal Corps via AP)

Back in his quarters, Eisenhower privately agonized over the decision. He wrote a note in longhand, which he folded into his wallet, accepting responsibility in the event of Overlord’s failure.

The note said: “Our landings in the Cherbourg-Havre area have failed to gain a satisfactory foothold and I have withdrawn the troops. My decision to attack at this time and place was based upon the best information available. The troops, the air, and the navy did all that Bravery and devotion to duty could do. If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt it is mine alone.”

That night Eisenhower drove to Newbury, where the 101st Airborne Division was preparing to fly out. He walked among the paratroopers, with their blackened faces, and spoke to as many of them as he could. Then he waited until the last of them were in the air before returning to headquarters around midnight, his mind filled with thoughts of the brave men who would risk their lives at dawn.

Westlake Legal Group Three-Days-in-Moscow Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1dc5de3-2fdf-5264-8943-0e7d5d398bd0 Bret Baier article

On Thursday, as we commemorate the 75th Anniversary of D-Day, we know the story of what happened on the Normandy coast. The scenes of courage, of horror, of loss and ultimately triumph are stamped on our minds.

It was the beginning of the end for Hitler, and although VE Day would not occur until May 8, 1945, we know we have the brave forces who fought on D-Day to thank for our victory.         

On the evening of June 6, as the early positive reports from the invasion reached his desk in the Oval Office, President Roosevelt, who had accepted the risk of the invasion back in Tehran, was filled with a mixture of relief and also heartache over the sacrifices suffered that day. He chose to broadcast to the nation — not a speech, but a prayer.

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President Roosevelt said this prayer to radio listeners: “Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity … they will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again; and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph … Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.”

When President Trump delivers his D-Day remarks Thursday at the U.S. cemetery in Normandy, he has the rare opportunity to pay tribute with emotion, personal stories, and soaring words to the service and the sacrifice of those who died on those beaches and saved the world.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FROM BRET BAIER

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-880b1524e20c4053b13b930290f9ec9c Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1dc5de3-2fdf-5264-8943-0e7d5d398bd0 Bret Baier article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-880b1524e20c4053b13b930290f9ec9c Bret Baier: D-Day was a grand gamble fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1dc5de3-2fdf-5264-8943-0e7d5d398bd0 Bret Baier article

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Former West Point cadet sentenced to 21 years in classmate rape case can return to academy after conviction overturned

Westlake Legal Group West20Point20Academy Former West Point cadet sentenced to 21 years in classmate rape case can return to academy after conviction overturned fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a8230ac6-a5dd-55c8-a7b4-6873039adecb

A former military cadet who was sentenced to 21 years behind bars for allegedly raping a female classmate will be able to return to West Point Military Academy after his conviction was overturned two years later on Monday.

VP PENCE TELLS WEST POINT GRADS IT’S A ‘VIRTUAL CERTAINTY’ THEY WILL FIGHT ON A BATTLEFIELD FOR AMERICA

U.S. Military Academy Cadet Jacob Whisenhunt, originally a member of the class of 2019 at West Point, was dismissed from the Army and removed from the school after he was convicted of raping a female cadet while she slept in her sleeping bag during a summer field training event on July 7, 2016.

An appellate court threw out the conviction on Monday, citing a lack of evidence to prove the sex wasn’t consensual. A judge concluded the woman did not audibly struggle and Whisenhunt did not attempt to silence her, hide his identity or remove evidence.

“The defense theory was that the appellant and [the victim] engaged in a consensual sexual encounter while taking active measures to avoid detection,” the written decision by three military judges said, according to Military Times.

“In our view, the circumstantial evidence in support of this defense theory severely undercuts the government’s case.”

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Whisenhunt can now be fully reinstated at West Point or can request his disenrollment. Because he was removed from school before completing two years at the university, he’s not required to serve in the military further or pay back his education.

Westlake Legal Group West20Point20Academy Former West Point cadet sentenced to 21 years in classmate rape case can return to academy after conviction overturned fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a8230ac6-a5dd-55c8-a7b4-6873039adecb   Westlake Legal Group West20Point20Academy Former West Point cadet sentenced to 21 years in classmate rape case can return to academy after conviction overturned fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article a8230ac6-a5dd-55c8-a7b4-6873039adecb

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US to launch new program to fight extremism in Philippines

U.S. and Philippine officials on Tuesday were discussing a new program to thwart efforts by Muslim extremists to recruit and mobilize followers in the country’s south after a bloody siege by jihadists aligned with the Islamic State group.

The three-year program involves helping local officials identify issues that foster extremism and find ways to address them, said U.S. Assistant Secretary Denise Natali of the State Department’s Bureau of Conflict & Stabilization Operations.

American and Australian surveillance aircraft helped Filipino troops quell the disastrous 2017 siege by hundreds of mostly local militants in southern Marawi city, where the commercial and residential center remains in ruins and off-limits to the public. Despite the militants’ defeat, Philippine officials say surviving militants have continued efforts to recruit new followers and plot new attacks.

More than 1,100 militants were killed and hundreds of thousands of residents were displaced in the five-month siege in the mosque-studded city, which renewed fears that the Islamic State group was stepping up collaboration with local jihadists to gain a foothold in the region.

“We are focusing on how to prevent further and future incidences of violent extremism and radicalization from occurring so that we don’t have another Marawi ever again,” Natali said at a news conference.

The State Department bureau and the Philippine government are finalizing details of the program to help provincial governments and nongovernment groups design and enforce effective projects to counter extremism, Natali said.

She said she was to meet President Rodrigo Duterte’s national security adviser and other officials in Manila on Tuesday.

Natali emphasized the importance of basing such projects on facts and evidence instead of assumptions, citing a five-month survey commissioned by the U.S. last year in four southern Muslim provinces that showed which issues were helping spark extremism and radicalization the most.

The survey showed that while some people may back local jihadists, there was significantly lower support for foreign militant groups such as the Islamic State group and the Al Qaida militant network. Religious intolerance, dire economic conditions and exposure to violence spark extremism more than religion, Natali cited the survey as showing.

“It’s not about religion; it is about living conditions. There is an economic component to this,” Natali told reporters.

The survey also showed that there was strong public support for the government’s effort to combat extremism, she said.

The Philippines has been one of Washington’s strongest Asian allies in the fight against terrorism since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the U.S.

Duterte, who has been a vocal critic of U.S. security policies, said after taking office in mid-2016 that he wanted U.S. counterterrorism forces out of the southern Philippines while he rebuilt frayed relations with China.

The Philippine military, however, has maintained robust relations with the U.S. More than 100 U.S. military counterterrorism advisers and personnel remain in southern Mindanao region to help Filipino forces battling extremists on a string of impoverished islands.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-52f854eef57e4f51b26867b179fa52c5 US to launch new program to fight extremism in Philippines JIM GOMEZ fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc ba047b20-3bd3-51aa-a997-2d2b0b96d242 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-52f854eef57e4f51b26867b179fa52c5 US to launch new program to fight extremism in Philippines JIM GOMEZ fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc ba047b20-3bd3-51aa-a997-2d2b0b96d242 Associated Press article

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Judge rejects Congress’ challenge of border wall funding

A federal judge on Monday denied a House request to prevent President Donald Trump from tapping Defense Department money for his proposed border wall with Mexico, saying Congress lacked authority to sue.

Trump’s victory is muted by a federal ruling in California last month that blocked construction of key sections of the wall. The California case was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of the Sierra Club and Southern Border Communities Coalition.

U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden, a Trump appointee, wrote that the House’s lawsuit was “about whether one chamber of Congress has the ‘constitutional means’ to conscript the Judiciary in a political turf war with the President over the implementation of legislation.”

McFadden said Congress didn’t have authority in this case but that he didn’t mean to imply the legislative body could never challenge the president in court over separation of powers.

“An old maxim in politics holds that, ‘Where you stand depends on where you sit,'” he wrote. “At law too, whether a plaintiff has standing often depends on where he sits. A seat in Congress comes with many prerogatives, but legal standing to superintend the execution of laws is not among them.”

The Justice Department welcomed the decision, saying the judge “rightly ruled that the House of Representatives cannot ask the judiciary to take its side in political disputes and cannot use federal courts to accomplish through litigation what it cannot achieve using the tools the Constitution gives to Congress.”

Lawyers for the House didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment, including whether they will appeal.

A federal judge in Oakland, California, ruled May 24 that Trump overstepped his authority and blocked work from beginning on two of the highest-priority, Pentagon-funded wall projects — one spanning 46 miles (74 kilometers) in New Mexico and another covering 5 miles (8 kilometers) in Yuma, Arizona. The administration plans to appeal the ruling by Haywood Gilliam Jr., an appointee of President Barack Obama.

At stake is billions of dollars that would allow Trump to make progress on a signature campaign promise heading into his bid for a second term. The administration faces several lawsuits over the emergency declaration but only two sought to block construction during the legal challenge.

Trump declared a national emergency in February after losing a fight with the Democratic-led House that led to a 35-day government shutdown and identified up to $8.1 billion for wall construction. The funds include $3.6 billion from military construction funds, $2.5 billion from Defense Department counterdrug activities and $600 million from the Treasury Department’s asset forfeiture fund.

The Defense Department has already transferred the counterdrug money. Patrick Shanahan, the acting defense secretary, is expected to decide any day whether to transfer the military construction funds.

___

Spagat reported from San Diego.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-2d32263fa6c04474af02281315a49a5a Judge rejects Congress' challenge of border wall funding fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc ELLIOT SPAGAT and COLLEEN LONG Associated Press article 98b50ab8-5dde-5b72-b806-875b472e566e   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-2d32263fa6c04474af02281315a49a5a Judge rejects Congress' challenge of border wall funding fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc ELLIOT SPAGAT and COLLEEN LONG Associated Press article 98b50ab8-5dde-5b72-b806-875b472e566e

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US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation

A U.S. military B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago still resonates with three Danish citizens who were involved in the cleanup.

The Air Force B-52 Stratofortress with four hydrogen bombs on board crashed Jan. 21, 1968, 7 miles from Thule Air Base, where the Danes were working for a military contractor from Denmark. They each now have cancer and blame their illnesses on exposure to weapons-grade plutonium scattered by the crash.

Since 2010 the three men have been pursuing benefits through a U.S. government workers’ compensation program that covers foreigners who worked at a military base and were injured or disabled on the job.

US B-52 BOMBERS LAND IN QATAR OVER UNSPECIFIED IRAN THREAT

“It is important to emphasize that the workers’ compensation that has been requested is entirely based on our belief that the particular health challenges many of us have been suffering is fair and reasonable because of what we did at the time,” Jeffrey Carswell, one of the Danes, told Fox News by email from his home in Denmark.

Now 76, Carswell has undergone numerous operations since being diagnosed with stomach cancer in 1984. Doctors have removed part of his stomach and esophagus.

Westlake Legal Group b52-crash-2-getty US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation Robert Gearty fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 86bdabc0-3c08-56e7-8393-029792ad5cf2

The U.S. Air Force begins cleanup operations at Camp Hunziker after the crash of a B-52 bomber near Thule, Greenland, late in January. The plane was carrying four unarmed hydrogen bombs when it crashed.  (Getty)

The other two Danes, Ben Hansen, 80, and Heinz Eriksen, 74, had large tumors removed after each was diagnosed with kidney cancer. Hansen was diagnosed with his cancer in 2002; Eriksen in 2005.

Their lawyer, Ian Anderson of New York, told Fox News his clients are entitled to the benefits they are seeking.

“These are not money-grubbers, these are ordinary people,” Anderson said. “Here you have workers who volunteered to work in a dangerous situation, helping to clean up radiation for the benefit of Greenlanders and for the benefit of the American and Danish governments.”

The B-52 disintegrated when it struck the sea ice and the bombs burned but never detonated. The B-52 was in the air when an electrical fire broke out and spread.

Westlake Legal Group B52-Crash-1-USAF US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation Robert Gearty fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 86bdabc0-3c08-56e7-8393-029792ad5cf2

Cleanup crew searches for radioactive debris after the crash of a B-52 nuclear bomber near Thule Air Base in Greenland. (U.S. Air Force)

The pilot and five crew members ejected and were rescued. Co-pilot Capt. Leonard Svitenko was killed, bailing out through a chute.

Carswell recalled he was in Thule’s NCO Club when the plane crashed.

“The massive building shook as if an earthquake had hit,” he said. His job the next day was to arrange for Svitenko’s body to be repatriated to the U.S.

Hundreds of U.S. military personnel and Danish workers participated in the cleanup, working long shifts in the bitter cold and perpetual darkness to gather aircraft debris and remove contaminated ice and snow. Greenland was a Danish province in 1968. The cleanup lasted nine months.

PLUTONIUM HAS BEEN LEAKING INTO PACIFIC FROM US COLD WAR NUKE TEST SITE FOR YEARS

Carswell said radiation detection devices and protective face masks and suits were never issued to them and their levels of radiation exposure were never known.

He worked at Thule as a shipping clerk and claimed he was exposed to plutonium in the hangar where loading operations were staged. Hansen was a carpenter and claimed he was exposed in building shelters at the crash site. Eriksen was a firefighter and claimed he was exposed standing by as tanks for the contaminated snow and ice were being welded together.

Carswell also claimed he was exposed to plutonium when he drank alcoholic beverages at the NCO Club. The ice cubes came from the fjord where the crash occurred.

“The employer kept no records of its workers’ exposure and the Danish government refused to allow access to its records, which would have helped our doctors devise appropriate treatment protocols,” he said.

Carswell said it was only 11 years ago that he became aware that what they were exposed to at Thule was “extremely dangerous.”

Westlake Legal Group B52-Crash-2-USAF US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation Robert Gearty fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 86bdabc0-3c08-56e7-8393-029792ad5cf2

A B-52 crew member is helped to safety after ejecting from aircraft that crashed in Greenland on Jan. 21, 1968.  (U.S. Air Force )

Carswell’s fight for compensation for him and other Danish clean-up workers has been a decades-long effort.

In 1988, he joined the Association of Irradiated Thule Workers to lobby the Danish government for compensation, resulting in a $14 million payout to 1,500 people. He also petitioned the European Parliament for access to Denmark’s radiation records.

U.S. military veterans who worked at Thule have also sought compensation for their radiation-related illnesses in a lawsuit against the U.S. government that was thrown out of court after it was filed, Anderson said.

WEAPONS-GRADE PLUTONIUM WAS SECRETLY SHIPPED FROM SOUTH CAROLINA TO NEVADA, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAYS

“The military veterans were blocked from suing the U.S. for illnesses by the ‘Freres’ doctrine, barring claims for injuries on ‘active service,’” he said. Court records show the case was dismissed in 1995.

After submitting their workers’ compensation claims to the U.S. Labor Department, an administrative law judge was assigned the case. After holding hearings, she denied them benefits, saying they failed to prove their cancers was caused by their exposure to plutonium radiation.

Westlake Legal Group B52-Stratofortress-bomber-Getty US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation Robert Gearty fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 86bdabc0-3c08-56e7-8393-029792ad5cf2

The B-52A Stratofortress was a long-range heavy bomber used extensively by the United States military for a period of a year. (Getty)

“For me to conclude that the claimants’ health conditions were due to any plutonium radiation exposure at Thule, I would have to discount the opinions of highly-credentialed physicians and ignore a multitude of medical and epidemiological studies,” the judge, Adele Odegard, wrote in 2017 in a 164-page decision that was upheld by the Labor Department’s Benefits Review Board. The board ruled in December.

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Anderson has now taken the case to the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals.

The defendants in the case were E. Pihl & Sons in Denmark and, over Anderson’s objections, the Labor Department’s Office of Workers’ Compensation Program.

The firm Carswell, Hansen and Eriksen worked for at Thule no longer exists. E. Pihl is a subsidiary that has declared bankruptcy. Those circumstances made the Labor Department liable for any benefits if the decision had gone the other way.

The claimants’ face an uphill battle in federal court, E. Pihl attorney Sarah Biser of New York said.

“I think that the medical and scientific evidence against the three claimants is absolutely overwhelming and I don’t think the claimants have any path whatsoever to prevail on any issue,” Biser said

Carswell said he was not ready to concede.

“Clearly we hope to finally receive the fair treatment that we, for many years, have been waiting for in recognition of having unknowingly put our lives at risk,” he told Fox News. “We have been waiting far too long for this and accepting that we are all getting old.”

Westlake Legal Group b52-crash-1-Getty US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation Robert Gearty fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 86bdabc0-3c08-56e7-8393-029792ad5cf2   Westlake Legal Group b52-crash-1-Getty US B-52 nuclear bomber crash in Greenland 51 years ago has ill Danes seeking compensation Robert Gearty fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 86bdabc0-3c08-56e7-8393-029792ad5cf2

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Jim DeFelice: On D-Day’s 75th anniversary, learning about the sacrifice is more crucial than ever

Westlake Legal Group 0f0edf07-GettyDDay1944 Jim DeFelice: On D-Day's 75th anniversary, learning about the sacrifice is more crucial than ever Jim DeFelice fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c10f218f-c5bf-50bc-af13-45bb0decd623 article

Seventy-five years ago this June 6, over 150,000 men ran through the waves at Normandy, France, braving artillery, mortar shells, mines, and machine guns in the biggest seaborne invasion of all time. D-Day has come to be remembered as the 20th century’s iconic battle, and with good reason. The operation was the largest if not the bloodiest of the war, itself the largest and certainly the bloodiest of the century, and perhaps our entire existence.

But that was 75 years ago, ancient history for many of us. Ask a high school student today about D-Day, and at best you’ll get a sentence or two related to the war: VE Day, VJ Day. unless they are a current internet meme or perhaps part of a video game, you’re unlikely to get more than a blank stare.

This is not necessarily their fault. Even in high school, history classes spend scant time on either of the world wars and in many cases, the lessons convey only shallow clichés and worthless, if well-meaning, bromides.

D-DAY VETERANS REVISIT NORMANDY, RECALL HORROR AND TRIUMPH

Twenty, 30 or 40 years ago, this was not necessarily a big deal. There were plenty of people around who not only knew about the war, but had lived through it, fighting in Europe or Asia, sacrificing on the home front.

Find them — in your family, in a nursing home. Make the connection while it’s still possible. The future depends on it.

Those people are rapidly disappearing. The very youngest soldier on D-Day today is in his 90s. Having just done a book on the battle, I can tell you from personal experience there are not many survivors left. Perhaps a handful of men can still bear witness to the first wave at Omaha Beach; most will be gone by the 76th anniversary.

We won’t really know how much we’ve missed.

Fortunately, many stories of D-Day and the war have been recorded, directly from veterans in interviews and memoirs. We have countless photos and souvenirs. These tell us, and future generations, much about war.

But even the best and most vivid lack the truly emotional connection that comes from shaking the hand of a man who was there, after he tells you how cold the water was, or hugging him when he recounts how the soldier next to him died.

For all our technology and its ability to revive memory and conjure emotion, we have not yet found a way to replace the impact of another human one-on-one. Even the most vivid imagination cannot quite recreate the full color of experience without the presence of the man or woman who first lived it.

Not that we shouldn’t try, and not that we shouldn’t avail ourselves of technology to learn all that we can. But still privileged with the presence of the men and women who survived World War II, it behooves us all to seek them out and hear their stories.

They are called the Greatest Generation. They are also the Silent Generation, in that many of the soldiers who fought in the war never thought of themselves as heroes, much less bragged about their exploits.

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While we can learn a great deal from such modesty, silence now does not help us. Their memories help us reach back to the past. The struggles they made it through inspire us to persevere through our own. The more vivid the tale, the deeper the inspiration.

Find them — in your family, in a nursing home. Make the connection while it’s still possible. The future depends on it.

Westlake Legal Group 0f0edf07-GettyDDay1944 Jim DeFelice: On D-Day's 75th anniversary, learning about the sacrifice is more crucial than ever Jim DeFelice fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c10f218f-c5bf-50bc-af13-45bb0decd623 article   Westlake Legal Group 0f0edf07-GettyDDay1944 Jim DeFelice: On D-Day's 75th anniversary, learning about the sacrifice is more crucial than ever Jim DeFelice fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c10f218f-c5bf-50bc-af13-45bb0decd623 article

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Newt Gingrich: Remembering the heroes of D-Day

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f099a9055f44721ba210a01f66a2d4b Newt Gingrich: Remembering the heroes of D-Day Newt Gingrich fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b2813b52-7f2d-5b26-a24e-64eadab30f10 article

Seventy-five years ago this week, on June 6, 1944, 156,000 Allied Forces stormed the beaches of Normandy, France.

It was D-Day, a bloody day that marked a significant turning point of World War II, when Allied Forces began to beat back the depraved tyranny of Adolf Hitler and his Nazis in Western Europe. D-Day would prove decisive to the Allied victory, although it came at great cost. According to the U.S. National D-Day Memorial Foundation, 4,413 Allied troops gave their lives to take the beaches, including 2,499 Americans.

I decided to focus on D-Day – and specifically the historic radio address by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt the evening of the invasion – in this week’s episode of my Newt’s World podcast.

VIRGINIA TOWN REMEMBERS THE HIGH PRICE PAID ON D-DAY

D-Day took years of planning, by the Americans, British, and Canadians (in coordination with Soviets). The top-secret invasion was called “Operation Overlord” and was led by future president Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, who served as the Supreme Allied Commander.

It was among the most brutal, challenging, unforgiving military maneuvers in World War II. Allied Forces had to be shipped up to the beach in incredibly rough surf. Before they could even fight the Nazis who were holding the beach, Allied troops had to fight the tide and waves, as they waded – under fire and carrying all their equipment – to the shore.

When they got there, they were on the lowest ground of the battlefield. They faced a fully fortified bank that they had to charge and climb to take the beach. In addition to constant gunfire, they had to avoid barricades, mines, and all manner of threats.

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If you have never been to the Normandy American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, it is well worth visiting to get a sense of the sacrifice these soldiers made to protect freedom in Europe.

I hope you will take a moment this week to listen to the episode and remember the bravery, courage, and faith of the Allied soldiers who dared to take this beach and defeat tyranny and evil.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY NEWT GINGRICH

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f099a9055f44721ba210a01f66a2d4b Newt Gingrich: Remembering the heroes of D-Day Newt Gingrich fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b2813b52-7f2d-5b26-a24e-64eadab30f10 article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-3f099a9055f44721ba210a01f66a2d4b Newt Gingrich: Remembering the heroes of D-Day Newt Gingrich fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc b2813b52-7f2d-5b26-a24e-64eadab30f10 article

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Trump tweets in support of LGBT people to mark Pride Month

President Donald Trump is tweeting in support of LGBT people to mark LGBT Pride Month. His tweets come one week after his administration moved to revoke newly won health care discrimination protections for transgender people.

That move was the latest in a series of actions by the Trump administration that aim to reverse gains by LGBTQ Americans in areas including the military, housing and education.

In his tweets Friday, Trump says he wants to “recognize the outstanding contributions LGBT people have made to our great Nation.”

The president says other nations “punish, imprison or even execute individuals on the basis of sexual orientation.” He says the U.S. has a “global campaign to decriminalize homosexuality.”

Advocates for LGBT people say the Trump administration has been undermining nondiscrimination protections.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-b9b7c8f8d69b451894f3896afeb4dbf3 Trump tweets in support of LGBT people to mark Pride Month Washington fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc de5c6472-23e5-5ba4-ac64-476409a02b70 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-b9b7c8f8d69b451894f3896afeb4dbf3 Trump tweets in support of LGBT people to mark Pride Month Washington fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc de5c6472-23e5-5ba4-ac64-476409a02b70 Associated Press article

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Trump, Defense boss Shanahan both deny link to USS John S. McCain ‘out of sight’ directive

A mystery continues to surround a reported U.S. military email that called for the USS John S. McCain to be “out of sight” during President Trump’s recent visit to U.S. troops stationed in Japan, where the ship was docked.

On Wednesday, both President Trump and acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan denied any knowledge of the order, which led to the ship’s name first being covered with a tarp and then being obscured by a paint barge prior to Trump’s visit over Memorial Day weekend.

“I was not informed about anything having to do with the Navy Ship USS John S. McCain during my recent visit to Japan,” President Trump wrote on Twitter late Wednesday. “Nevertheless, @FLOTUS and I loved being with our great Military Men and Women – what a spectacular job they do!”

USS JOHN S MCCAIN LEAVES DRY DOCK MORE THAN YEAR AFTER FATAL COLLISION

A spokesman for Secretary Shanahan later issued the following statement: “Secretary Shanahan was not aware of the directive to move the USS John S McCain nor was he aware of the concern precipitating the directive.”

“Secretary Shanahan was not aware of the directive to move the USS John S McCain nor was he aware of the concern precipitating the directive.”

— Statement from office of Patrick Shanahan, acting secretary of defense

That statement appeared to contradict a Wall Street Journal story, which cited an unnamed U.S. official as saying that Shanahan was “aware of the concern about the presence of the USS John McCain in Japan and approved measures to ensure it didn’t interfere with the president’s visit.”

The existence of the email – sent by an unnamed U.S. Indo-Pacific Command official to U.S. Navy and Air Force officials – was first reported by the Journal. The newspaper’s story claimed that orders referring to the USS John S. McCain originated from “the White House,” but named no specific official.

The ship is named for the father and grandfather of the late U.S. Sen. John S. McCain III, with whom President Trump had feuded prior to the Arizona Republican’s death from cancer last year at age 81.

The emergence of the Journal story apparently infuriated Meghan McCain, daughter of the late senator and a co-host of ABC’s “The View” – who, like her late father, is a frequent Trump critic.

MEGHAN MCCAIN DISMISSES ‘VIEW’ CONVERSATION: ‘I’M NOT CHANGING YOUR MINDS THIS MORNING’

In a tweet Wednesday that preceded the president’s message, Meghan McCain appeared to insinuate that the order to obscure the ship’s name had come from the president.

Meghan McCain retweeted the Journal story, adding the following comment: “Trump is a child who will always be deeply threatened by the greatness of my dads [sic] incredible life. There is a lot of criticism of how much I speak about my dad, but nine months since he passed, Trump won’t let him RIP. So I have to stand up for him. It makes my grief unbearable.”

Since McCain’s death, the late senator’s 34-year-old daughter has been quick to defend his legacy. Just two days earlier, Meghan McCain aimed her ire at Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., a candidate for the 2020 Democratic Party presidential nomination.

Klobuchar recently claimed that the late senator “kept reciting to me names of dictators” during President Trump’s inaugural address in 2017, suggesting that the elder McCain dreaded the thought of a Trump presidency.

Westlake Legal Group trump-mccains Trump, Defense boss Shanahan both deny link to USS John S. McCain ‘out of sight’ directive fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc ef6c67f4-ad3c-541d-bf1b-9c36db3f5e36 Dom Calicchio article

President Trump has feuded with both Sen. John McCain, who died last year, and with his daughter Meghan McCain.

But Meghan McCain said she and her family would prefer if the late senator’s name not be invoked at all during the 2020 election season.

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“On behalf of the entire McCain family, [Amy Klobuchar], please be respectful to all of us and leave my father’s legacy and memory out of presidential politics,” the late senator’s daughter wrote.

Ultimately, the Journal reported, the tarp that covered the name of the USS John S. McCain was removed Saturday and the paint barge that obscured the name was removed as well – both ahead of Trump’s visit, Cmdr. Clayton Doss, a spokesman for the Navy’s Seventh Fleet, told the newspaper.

President Trump spoke to the Japan-based U.S. troops Tuesday while aboard the USS Wasp, which was docked at the same naval base as the USS John S. McCain.

Westlake Legal Group trump-mccains Trump, Defense boss Shanahan both deny link to USS John S. McCain ‘out of sight’ directive fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc ef6c67f4-ad3c-541d-bf1b-9c36db3f5e36 Dom Calicchio article   Westlake Legal Group trump-mccains Trump, Defense boss Shanahan both deny link to USS John S. McCain ‘out of sight’ directive fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc ef6c67f4-ad3c-541d-bf1b-9c36db3f5e36 Dom Calicchio article

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