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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military (Page 3)

Harry Kazianis: Trump wise to avoid a devastating war with Iran in wake of attack on Saudi Arabia

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6087543073001_6087540267001-vs Harry Kazianis: Trump wise to avoid a devastating war with Iran in wake of attack on Saudi Arabia Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4320d53c-52a0-5601-b1dd-978260da2228

There’s an old saying that wars are easy to get into but hard to get out of. President Trump understands this, which is why he wisely resisted the temptation to launch a military strike against Iran after that nation launched a missile and drone attack last week against Saudi Arabian oil facilities.

When he was running for president, Trump promised the American people he would not jump into endless conflicts in the greater Middle East, where thousands of members of the U.S. military have been killed and wounded in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Fighting began in 2001 in Afghanistan and 2003 in Iraq and still continues in both countries. U.S. forces have also fought on a smaller scale in Syria to strike at terrorist targets.

ATTACK ON SAUDI ARABIA OIL FIELD WOULD LIKELY NOT HAVE BEEN STOPPED BY ANY COUNTRY: EXPERT

U.S. taxpayers have spent trillions of dollars on these wars, but our involvement has done little or nothing to make our nation more secure.

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And Trump is old enough to remember the Vietnam War. That started as a small-scale conflict with U.S. advisers and wound up claiming the lives of more than 58,000 members of the U.S. military and wounding more than 150,000. Trump does not want to see anything approaching that scale happen in a war with Iran.

The president announced Friday that he is imposing new sanctions on Iran’ national bank in response to the attack on Saudi Arabia. And Pentagon officials announced they will deploy several hundred additional U.S. troops and air defense assets to Saudi Arabia to help the Saudis defend their nation against future attacks.

Those measured actions are a smart move by the president. He understands going further could start a war with Iran that would have devastating consequences in terms of U.S. lives and treasure.

Trump would be justified in striking Iran, which has recently been acting like a rogue nation looking for a fight. Tehran has attacked oil tankers, shot down a U.S. drone, and continued aid to terrorists in civil wars in Syria, Yemen and around the borders of Israel. Iran remains the world’s largest sponsor of terrorism in the world today.

Trump would be justified in striking Iran, which has recently been acting like a rogue nation looking for a fight.

I suspect Trump, despite all the reasons for striking Iran, will hold out unless his back is completely against the wall because he understand that striking Iran could set off a bloody war that would not be easy to win.

“Going into Iran would be a very easy decision,” Trump said at the White House on Friday. “Most people thought I would go in within two seconds” of the attack on Saudi Arabia. “I think I’m showing great restraint.”

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif warned Friday that a military attack on his country by the U.S. or Saudi Arabia would lead to “all-out war.” His warning needs to be taken seriously.

What would a war with Iran be like?

I have “fought” Iran many times in simulations in my national security work at the Center for the National Interest in Washington.

Going back as far as 2013, a bipartisan group of experts has gathered semi-regularly to test out scenarios if a war broke out.

In one scenario, Tehran is upset over a large increase in U.S. forces to the region to counter recent Iranian military advances in new submarines and missile platforms. Tehran decides to push back, testing a salvo of intermediate-range missiles – with an ICBM test looming in the next few months.

When Iran decides to test a second batch of missiles just days later – with the missiles flying close to U.S. missile defenses in the Persian Gulf – the U.S. destroys the Iranian missiles in mid-flight to teach Tehran a lesson.

Iran then declares a “naval exclusion zone” where it claims to be conducting nay exercises. The problem: the exclusion zone encompasses the Strait of Hormuz, where millions of barrels of oil pass through daily. Tehran declares that for the next month the strait will be closed during the exercise.

Global economic panic ensues. In only the first hours of the closure, oil prices spike 10 percent. In response, America demands the so-called exercise end in 24 hours. If not, U.S. military forces will clear the area of any naval or military forces in the area.

How does Iran respond? Tehran senses America is bluffing and doubles down, increasing the amount of naval and missile forces in the area. Additionally, Iran tests several new ballistic missiles that could, in theory, sink a U.S. naval warship.

America then strikes hard, making sure that if military force is going to be used, Washington gets the maximum amount of benefit with such an escalation. U.S. forces in the region attack with a series of cruise missile strikes from U.S. nuclear attack submarines sitting offshore. The attacks focus on clearing out the strait of Iranian naval assets and damaging Tehran’s nuclear and missile infrastructure.

At first, it seems the move is a resounding success. But then Iran decides that America must pay a price for its actions, with an attack on the symbol of U.S. military might, a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier that is operating in the region.

Iran launches a salvo of over 100 missiles, the U.S. carrier’s defenses are overwhelmed, and the 100,000-ton vessel is destroyed and 2,000 America’s die – the worst loss of U.S. lives since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Then things get even worse. Iran knows a massive U.S. counterattack is coming, so Tehran decides to go all in, striking U.S. naval assets in the region to limit such actions and hopefully get Washington to stand down and come to the bargaining table.

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What should America do now that U.S. men and women are dying in combat? As the simulation had fixed time limits, we never found out. With only a five-day window in our wargame, and with Iran’s last move now over, time expired.

Over the years, I have rerun this and other similar scenarios and all end in a similar way: no clear victory for the U.S. without sending in more forces to destroy Tehran’s military capabilities in a conflict that could last months or even years.

Would a real war play out like the simulation? No one can say for sure, but it easily could.

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Our simulations should stand as a giant caution flag waving in front of President Trump and his military advisers. A military attack on Iran could quickly spiral out of control and spark a long and costly war.

My advice to President Trump: think very carefully about your actions. And if you do decide to strike Iran, strike with overwhelming force.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY HARRY KAZIANIS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6087543073001_6087540267001-vs Harry Kazianis: Trump wise to avoid a devastating war with Iran in wake of attack on Saudi Arabia Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4320d53c-52a0-5601-b1dd-978260da2228   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6087543073001_6087540267001-vs Harry Kazianis: Trump wise to avoid a devastating war with Iran in wake of attack on Saudi Arabia Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4320d53c-52a0-5601-b1dd-978260da2228

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13 Marines charged in human smuggling case

Westlake Legal Group Pendleton-Entrance 13 Marines charged in human smuggling case Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 1afcadcc-8e4e-5d28-a663-61abb92071bb

Thirteen Marines have been formally charged with playing a role in the smuggling of undocumented immigrants into the U.S., the Marine Corps announced Friday.

In addition to the smuggling charges, the Marines will face military court proceedings for charges including failure to obey an order, drunkenness, endangerment, larceny and perjury, according to a statement from the 1st Marine Division Press Office.

Two of the Marines were specifically named — Lance Cpls. Byron Law and David Salazar-Quintero — but the other names were withheld. These two have also been charged federally with transporting and conspiring to transport illegal immigrants into the country for financial gain. Both were based at Camp Pendleton, in California.

YEMEN’S HOUTHI REBELS ANNOUNCE HALT IN ATTACKS ON SAUDI ARABIA

According to a criminal complaint filed in July, Border Patrol agents were making normal rounds when they saw a black car pull off the road around seven miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border. They pulled the vehicle over and found Law driving and Salazar-Quintero in the front passenger seat. They had three undocumented immigrants in the back seat; the three reportedly told the agents they were Mexican citizens and did not have documents to enter the U.S. legally.

TRUMP NOMINATES WAVE OF CALIFORNIA JUDGES, IN FRESH BID TO RESHAPE COURTS

All five were arrested and questioned. Law and Salazar-Quintero each pointed fingers at the other. Law told an agent that Salazar-Quintero had asked him on July 2 if he wanted to make $1,000 to pick up an illegal. They drove to the Mexican border, then dropped the first immigrant off at a McDonald’s in Del Mar, Calif. They weren’t paid that day and on July 3 they agreed to pick up three more people to be paid for that day and the day before’s work.

Salazar-Quintero said that Law had been the one to introduce him to smuggling.

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Two of the immigrants from the car admitted they were going to pay $8,000 to be smuggled into the country.

Westlake Legal Group Pendleton-Entrance 13 Marines charged in human smuggling case Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 1afcadcc-8e4e-5d28-a663-61abb92071bb   Westlake Legal Group Pendleton-Entrance 13 Marines charged in human smuggling case Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 1afcadcc-8e4e-5d28-a663-61abb92071bb

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‘Almost impossible mission’: The 8,000-mile non-stop flight to save a US soldier’s life

Westlake Legal Group c5942644-US-troops-Afghanistan 'Almost impossible mission': The 8,000-mile non-stop flight to save a US soldier's life Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 608aa2d8-bb0c-58c2-8e04-04d3b20fa25d

The Taliban have stepped up attacks across Afghanistan after President Trump scrapped high-level peace talks between Afghan and Taliban leaders at Camp David earlier this month.

This week alone, three major suicide attacks killed dozens of people, including 26 at a campaign rally for Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. The Taliban claimed responsibility for all the attacks.

In all, 17 U.S. troops have been killed and more than 100 wounded, some of them severely.  One of them — a special operations soldier — lost his right arm and leg last month after a grenade exploded during close-quarters combat.

Three military aircraft, 18 medical personnel, 24,000 gallons of fuel and 26 gallons of blood were spent to save the life of this critically wounded soldier, whom Fox News agreed not to identify at the request of the U.S. military.

Officials credit a recent decision to have assault forces carry blood on the battlefield, as well as and lifesaving surgery at Bagram Airbase.

More than 100 troops stood in line outside the base hospital to donate blood to help their wounded brother-in-arms. Then the Air Force sprang into action to bring him home.

A C-17 flight crew based at Dover Air Force Base flew from Germany to Afghanistan on short notice, then made the 8,000-mile non-stop journey to Texas.

RETIRED SEAL MCRAVEN SAYS US WILL BE IN AFGHANISTAN FOR ‘VERY LONG TIME’

“The crew members that were on board, we kind of know what was at stake should anything fall out of line,” said Maj.  Dan Kudlacz, the aircraft commander for the mission dubbed REACH 797. “I know I didn’t really get great sleep the night prior just because I knew what was at stake.”

The mission required two night time mid-air refuelings, one over Europe and the other over Maine. For Kudlacz, it was the first time this type of mission had been attempted in his career.

“To do it with air medical evacuation patients on board was definitely something that I have never heard of,” he said.

“There was quite a bit of critical urgency to this,” said Air Force Staff Sgt. Andrew Hathaway, the C-17 loadmaster.  “You could hear in their voice the stress of the pilots when they were calculating the fuel.”

C-17 crew chief Staff Sgt. Terrance Williamson said there was no question the flight was a high priority.

“We knew like we had to get this done,” he told Fox News. “We could make this almost impossible mission happen.”

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Nineteen hours after taking off from Afghanistan, the C-17 landed in San Antonio to transport the soldier to Brooke Army Medical Center.  The Air Force flight crew had completed their mission without breaking the sacred oath among U.S. forces in combat.

“You can expect that we, being the United States military, are going to do everything that we can in our power and we are going to spare no expense to bring you home,” Kudlacz said.

The soldier was still in critical condition Friday night.

Fox News’s Ben Florance and Mary Beth Hughes contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group US-troops-Afghanistan 'Almost impossible mission': The 8,000-mile non-stop flight to save a US soldier's life Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 608aa2d8-bb0c-58c2-8e04-04d3b20fa25d   Westlake Legal Group US-troops-Afghanistan 'Almost impossible mission': The 8,000-mile non-stop flight to save a US soldier's life Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/conflicts/afghanistan fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 608aa2d8-bb0c-58c2-8e04-04d3b20fa25d

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Pentagon announces more US troops — but ‘not thousands’ more — will deploy to Mideast

The U.S. will deploy more troops to the Middle East to deter Iran’s increasingly aggressive behavior in the region, top military officials said Friday night.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper announced more U.S. troops will deploy, but they’ll be “defensive” in nature. He did not offer specific numbers or say precisely when they’d go, but he did say there would be air and missile defense units.

When asked how many troops were going overseas, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford said “not thousands,” and added there had been “no decision on specific units.”

Esper said this was a first step toward addressing Iran’s increasingly violent acts in the region — including the recent drone attack on Saudi Arabian oil facilities — and he called on other nations to step up and condemn the attacks.

Westlake Legal Group Saudi-Refiner-AP Pentagon announces more US troops -- but 'not thousands' more -- will deploy to Mideast Melissa Leon Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/energy fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc ff8b3373-81c6-5f15-ba3a-807412525f81 article

This Saturday, Sept. 14 satellite image from Planet Labs Inc. shows thick black smoke rising from Saudi Aramco’s Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq, Saudi Arabia. (Planet Labs Inc via AP)

The world’s largest oil processing plant and a major oil field in Saudi Arabia were hit by a massive drone attack on Saturday. Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen claimed responsibility for the attack, but the U.S. and Saudi Arabia blamed Iran directly. Iran denied involvement in the attack.

“It is clear […] that the weapons used were Iranian-produced and were not launched from Yemen,” Esper said Friday. He and Dunford gave an unscheduled press conference after meeting with President Trump earlier in the day.

All signs indicate “Iran was responsible for the attack,” Esper said.

“The U.S. does not seek conflict with Iran,” he noted. “That said, we have many other military options available if necessary.”

IRAN WARNS OF ‘ALL-OUT WAR’ IF US RETALIATES IN WAKE OF SAUDI OIL FACILITY BOMBINGS 

Officials said the U.S. urges Iran to immediately cease its aggressive and destabilizing activities in the region.

The Kingdom has “full U.S. commitment” to help defend Saudi Arabia and its oil infrastructure, they noted.

Dunford said a “moderate” amount of troops would deploy. Defense officials told Fox News on Thursday that the Trump administration was weighing the option to send more troops to the Middle East.

“We have a robust presence in the Gulf already,” Esper said. “We feel quite confident in terms of our own defense posture and the ability to do anything else as necessary.”

There are 70,000 service members stationed in the region.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned on Thursday that there could be an “all-out war” that would cause “a lot of casualties” if Tehran is attacked in retaliation for the bombings of Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities.

“I am making a very serious statement that we don’t want to engage in a military confrontation,” Zarif told CNN. “But we won’t blink to defend our territory.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had tweeted a day before that the “Iranian regime’s threatening behavior will not be tolerated,” calling the bombings an “act of war.”

POMPEO ACCUSES IRAN OF ‘UNPRECEDENTED ATTACK’ AFTER DRONES HIT SAUDI OIL FACILITIES 

Trump said earlier this week it was “looking like” Iran was responsible for the attack but stopped short of directly accusing Tehran.

The Saudis on Wednesday displayed what they said were Iranian weapons collected after the attack and showed video footage of what was said to be a drone coming in from the north. However, Yemen – where Houthi rebels are – is south of the country.

A Saudi military official said 18 drones and seven cruise missiles were launched, with three missiles failing to hit their targets. The missiles were said to have a range of 435 miles, which weapons experts told The Associated Press could not have been fired from Yemen.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson, Edmund DeMarche, Sam Dorman, Greg Norman and Morgan Phillips contributed to this report, as well as The Associated Press. 

Westlake Legal Group pentagon092019 Pentagon announces more US troops -- but 'not thousands' more -- will deploy to Mideast Melissa Leon Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/energy fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc ff8b3373-81c6-5f15-ba3a-807412525f81 article   Westlake Legal Group pentagon092019 Pentagon announces more US troops -- but 'not thousands' more -- will deploy to Mideast Melissa Leon Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/energy fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/us fnc ff8b3373-81c6-5f15-ba3a-807412525f81 article

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Rebecca Grant: After Saudi Arabia is attacked, will US military attack Iran? Here are options

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086400169001_6086400404001-vs Rebecca Grant: After Saudi Arabia is attacked, will US military attack Iran? Here are options Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 0a3d3b15-5ea1-53e0-bf96-e95d506410bf

Only the Iranians, the world’s worst diplomats, would mastermind a significant attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities just days before the United Nations General Assembly opens.

Yet that’s what all signs point too. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted after the Saturday attack that “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the energy supply. There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.”

Iran has the technology to mount such an attack. It has gotten help from Russia and China over the years. And we’ve seen Iran do things like this before.

BEHNAM BEN TALEBLU: ATTACK ON SAUDI OIL FACILITY SHOWS TRUMP WAS RIGHT TO PULL OUT OF IRAN NUKE DEAL

The attack Saturday on the Saudi oil facilities was the second recent strike against the Saudi Aramco oil company. On Aug. 17, 20 drones hit the Shaybah liquid natural gas facility in Saudi Arabia, causing a small fire.

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On Aug. 25, Israel launched a preemptive strike against an Iranian drone base in Syria.

Back in 2017, American F-15 pilots shot down Iranian drones over Syria when the drones tried to bomb U.S. forces working with allies on the ground.

Whatever Iran is up to, the Saudi Aramco strike was a significant escalation. Seventeen points of impact were precisely targeted, U.S. officials said. This surveillance and planning required for this strike were evidence of a whole new level of sophistication.

Oil storage facilities are soft targets. Hit them, spill some fuel, and the result is a really big fire.

Saudi Aramco has been in the oil business for a long time, so pre-surveying the site for target coordinates would not be hard. Still, the accuracy of the strikes suggests advanced help. Russia and China could easily have provided know-how at some point. Or Iran may have used unmanned drones to determine the coordinates.

The Saudi Aramco strike shows Iran can hit other targets throughout the region – directly or by proxy. The Dubai airport, the new nuclear plant under construction in the United Arab Emirates and other Saudi oil infrastructure are all vulnerable to Iran’s drones and cruise missiles.

Right now, the Trump administration is playing it cool. Pompeo and other senior officials are pointing at Iran as being behind the Saturday attack but are keeping American options open. Step 1, of course, is security for our military forces in the region.

U.S. military leaders will certainly review options to strike Iran. That’s their job. Commanders at Central Command must prepare options available to President Trump.

Strikes on a drone base would be one option. So would a limited attack on Iranian oil facilities, like the 1988 strikes by the U.S. Navy on Iranian offshore oil rigs and naval vessels.

Any strike options would be limited and proportional. Most of all, an attack would be carried out only in consultation with Saudi Arabia and other allies – especially Britain, Australia and Bahrain. Those nations are part of Operation Sentinel, the maritime stability force protecting Persian Gulf shipping.

Could the drones and missiles have come from Yemen? Maybe. Iran has been supporting the Houthi rebels in Yemen’s civil war, while a Saudi-led coalition is assisting the government of Yemen.

However, Pompeo’s statement that the attacks did not come from Yemen must be taken seriously. In this case, the U.S., Saudi Arabia and other allies have plenty of “eyes in the skies” watching everything that moves over the Persian Gulf region.

U.S. military leaders will certainly review options to strike Iran. That’s their job.

For example, drones and/or cruise missiles inbound from Iran’s coast to Saudi Aramco’s Abqaiq oil facility in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia could have been seen by military forces.

The Iranian cruise missile specter has worried military planners for quite some time. Novator, the Russian company that made the 9M729 missile that led to the end of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, began marketing the Club-K “cruise missile in a box” several years ago.

This devastating system could hide inside a standard shipping container, giving customers a “long-range precision strike capability to ordinary vehicles that can be moved to almost any place on earth without attracting attention,” venerable Jane’s Defense Weekly reported in 2010.

The point is that Russia, China and others have sold Iran advanced missile technology. And they have been egging Iran on as President Hassan Rouhani plays at nuclear blackmail and refuses to talk.

President Trump need not rush to action. He’s proven to be methodical and cautious with the use of military force. He prefers talks to strikes. A lot hinges on what the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia chooses to do.

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Here in the U.S., the Strategic Petroleum Reserve gives us ample time for Saudi Aramco to repair damage and restore output. The reserve of over 700 million barrels is stored in salt caves in Texas and Louisiana. It was tapped during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and Trump on Sunday authorized the release of oil from the reserve to keep oil markets stable.

To my mind, the pressure is now on the United Nations. The U.N. General Assembly, which opens in New York on Tuesday, needs to address Iran’s behavior.

The U.N., after all, is the big honcho behind the Iran nuclear deal. The U.N. also runs the International Atomic Energy Agency, which has confirmed Iran’s nuclear violations.

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The world body shouldn’t focus only on climate change and sustainable development and shirk its core mission of conflict resolution. It will lose a lot of credibility if it can’t deal more effectively with Iran.

One thing is for certain: Iran must never acquire a nuclear weapon.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY REBECCA GRANT

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086400169001_6086400404001-vs Rebecca Grant: After Saudi Arabia is attacked, will US military attack Iran? Here are options Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 0a3d3b15-5ea1-53e0-bf96-e95d506410bf   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086400169001_6086400404001-vs Rebecca Grant: After Saudi Arabia is attacked, will US military attack Iran? Here are options Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 0a3d3b15-5ea1-53e0-bf96-e95d506410bf

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Behnam Ben Taleblu: Attack on Saudi oil facility shows Trump was right to pull out of Iran nuke deal

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086457485001_6086452566001-vs Behnam Ben Taleblu: Attack on Saudi oil facility shows Trump was right to pull out of Iran nuke deal fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/energy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/counterpoints fox news fnc/opinion fnc c56575f8-5887-55d0-bea0-6d164f098ef6 Behnam Ben Taleblu article

The devastating attack Saturday against a major oil facility in Saudi Arabia dramatically illustrates why the Iran nuclear deal that was accepted by the Obama administration and rejected by President Trump failed to end the Iranian threat to peace and stability in the Middle East.

While the nuclear deal put temporary restrictions on the Iranian nuclear program, it did absolutely nothing to stop Iran’s aggressive conventional and asymmetric military actions against its neighbors and threats against Israel. This is partly why President Trump ultimately withdrew from this deeply flawed agreement.

In fact, the nuclear deal aided Iranian military aggression and support of terrorist groups by lifting international economic sanctions against Iran and freeing up Iranian funds frozen by foreign banks. Iran has supported several terrorist groups in the region, including Houthi rebels in Yemen, Hezbollah based in Lebanon, the Palestinian group Hamas that rules the Gaza Strip, and the brutal regime of Syrian dictator Bashar Assad.

TRUMP: US ‘LOCKED AND LOADED’ AGAINST ATTACKERS OF SAUDI OIL FACILITY ‘DEPENDING ON VERIFICATION’

The attack Saturday on Saudi oil facilities – which temporarily cut Saudi oil production in half – was carried out by either drones or cruise missiles (or a combination of the two), according to news reports. About 5.7 million barrels of crude oil production were interrupted by the Saturday attack, amounting to more than 5 percent of the world’s daily oil supply.

Opinion

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a tweet Saturday that “Tehran is behind nearly 100 attacks on Saudi Arabia … Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the energy supply. There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.”

And President Trump tweeted Sunday night: “Saudi Arabia oil supply was attacked. There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!”

The president notably refrained from saying who the U.S. government believes is responsible for the attack on Saudi Arabia, but U.S. officials previously pointed to Iran.

The Islamic Republic of Iran is playing a game of three-dimensional chess against the U.S. and its regional partners – a game aiming to induce weakness and irresolution in the face of the Iranian challenge.

Yemen’s Houthi rebels are claiming credit for the strike against the Saudi oil facilities. However, satellite photos released by the U.S. government showed at least “17 points of impact” that officials said indicated the attack came from the direction of Iran or Iraq rather than the Houthi’s home base of Yemen.

Iranian officials denied their government was responsible for the strikes against Saudi Arabia.

In late 2014, the Houthis burst forth from their stronghold in northern Yemen, conquered the capital city of Sanaa, and plunged the Arab world’s poorest country into deep chaos. Since then, humanitarian suffering caused by the Houthi insurgency has mushroomed across the nation on a medieval scale.

Since 2015, Saudi Arabia has led a multinational military coalition to restore the U.N.-backed government in Yemen. The Saudis prosecution of the war has made their nation the primary target of international criticism – even as Saudi bases, cities, airports and oil installations come under attack from Houthi rockets, missiles and drones.

Other foreign belligerents have mostly escaped blame.

Iran’s involvement in Yemen is more nefarious. Tehran seeks to co-opt the Houthi insurgency into a tool with which to bleed and bludgeon its regional rival, Saudi Arabia. This competition between Iran and Saudi Arabia is a struggle for both the sacred and profane: for leadership of the Muslim world, for individual Muslim hearts and minds, for the Middle East regional balance, and for oil.

Iran has provided the Houthis with anti-tank missiles, ballistic missiles of varying ranges, cruise missiles, and suicide drones – which can function as cruise missiles. As a result, Iran has been able to grow the long-arm of Houthi military capabilities, and at a low cost to Iran.

Iranian-supplied weapons allow the Houthi insurgents to strike at the Saudi heartland from a distance and respond to battlefield developments at a time and place of their own choosing.

In additions to the tweets from Pompeo and Trump,

There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.elsewhere on Twitter, there has been increased chatter about, and even video alleging, that the strikes on Saudi Arabia originated in Iraq. If that were the case, Iran-backed Shiite militias in Iraq, which are part of Tehran’s broad proxy network across the Middle East, would be to blame rather than the Houthis.

Should the thesis of Iraqi involvement hold, it would be a measure of the Houthis’ deference to Iran that they claimed credit for an attack they did not carry out.

It would also be an indicator of Tehran’s tolerance for risk and retaliation in places like Yemen – which is far away, unlike Iraq, which is right next door to Iran.

Conversely, should Iran have launched cruise missiles from its own territory – which is less likely – it would mean Tehran is confident that its adversaries would not respond using military force against the origin of the strikes.

While Iran is known as a ballistic missile powerhouse in the region, copies of its cruise missiles are increasingly winding up in the hands of terrorist groups, be they anti-ship variants with Hezbollah in Lebanon or land-attack cruise missiles with the Houthis in Yemen.

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Either way, the launching of cruise missiles and/or drones at a vital artery of the international economy conveys a broader strategic point: Iran’s threats to oil shipping are not limited to the Strait of Hormuz, where over one-fifth of seaborne traded oil passes daily. This signifies that the regime is comfortable broadening the scope of its harassment from oil tankers at sea to oil installations on land. Consider this an attempt to make good on old threats.

With the blaze of Saudi oil facilities in hindsight, the priority for Washington should not be to covet a high-level meeting with the Islamic Republic on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York City in coming days. It must be how better to contest Iran’s asymmetric military capabilities, as well as those of its proxies and partners in the region.

Since May, Washington has been hardening and growing its military footprint in the region through enhanced deployments. This process, as well as tough sanctions, should continue.

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Slowing economic pressure, recalling assets – or worse, talking to Tehran only about the nuclear issue – would replicate the mistakes that got the U.S. into the flawed 2015 nuclear deal, which in turn underwrote the expansion of Iran’s regional threat network.

The Trump administration should not make the same mistake as the Obama administration, and should instead continue to hold Iran accountable for its latest hostile actions.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086457485001_6086452566001-vs Behnam Ben Taleblu: Attack on Saudi oil facility shows Trump was right to pull out of Iran nuke deal fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/energy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/counterpoints fox news fnc/opinion fnc c56575f8-5887-55d0-bea0-6d164f098ef6 Behnam Ben Taleblu article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086457485001_6086452566001-vs Behnam Ben Taleblu: Attack on Saudi oil facility shows Trump was right to pull out of Iran nuke deal fox-news/world/world-regions/saudi-arabia fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/energy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/columns/counterpoints fox news fnc/opinion fnc c56575f8-5887-55d0-bea0-6d164f098ef6 Behnam Ben Taleblu article

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Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack

The remains of two U.S. military veterans, who were killed in Pearl Harbor on the same day in 1941, have finally been laid to rest —  on the same day, nearly 78 years later.

Harold Kendall “Bud” Costill, an 18-year-old Navy fireman 3rd class sailor on the battleship USS West Virginia, and Wilbur Clayton Barrett, a 26-year-old Navy seaman 2nd class who was aboard the USS Oklahoma, both died on Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

OLDEST LIVING AMERICAN WWII VETERAN CELEBRATES 100TH BIRTHDAY

On Saturday, they were both buried, in Clayton, N.J., and El Dorado, Kan., respectively, after both of their remains were identified through DNA testing.

Costill’s remains were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in a “unknowns” casket among the 106 killed aboard the West Virginia, and in June his brother was informed Costill’s remains were located and positively identified through a DNA exam, according to the Cherry Hill Courier-Post.

Westlake Legal Group Harold-Costill Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640

The remains of Harold Kendall “Bud” Costill, 18, were buried in Clayton, N.J., on Saturday, nearly 78 years after he was killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency)

Scientists from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) used dental and anthropological analysis to identify Costill’s remains — and a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis was performed by scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System.

Costill’s name, along with others who are still missing from World War II, is recorded on the Walls of the Missing in Honolulu. The DPAA said a rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for — which they were, in April 2019.

PEARL HARBOR SAILORS FINALLY LAID TO REST 77 YEARS LATER THANKS TO DNA TESTING

Barrett’s remains were positively identified last year, also through a DNA test. They were previously commingled in mass graves in Hawaii with hundreds of others killed on the USS Oklahoma, The Wichita Eagle reported.

Westlake Legal Group SeamanBarrett Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640

Wilbur Clayton Barrett was 26 years old when he died in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. His remains were buried in El Dorado, Kan. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency)

Barrett’s great nephew said the Navy used DNA from one of his aunts to identify the sailor. The DPAA said his remains were accounted for in June 2018.

The USS Oklahoma seaman’s great niece, Nancy Binter, told KSNW the fact her great uncle will be buried in Kansas, where he was from, “just makes me feel happy.”

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Of the 16 million Americans who served in WWII, more than 400,000 died during the conflict, according to the DPAA. Currently, there are 72,704 service members still unaccounted for.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Barrett-Costil Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640   Westlake Legal Group Barrett-Costil Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640

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Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack

The remains of two U.S. military veterans, who were killed in Pearl Harbor on the same day in 1941, have finally been laid to rest —  on the same day, nearly 78 years later.

Harold Kendall “Bud” Costill, an 18-year-old Navy fireman 3rd class sailor on the battleship USS West Virginia, and Wilbur Clayton Barrett, a 26-year-old Navy seaman 2nd class who was aboard the USS Oklahoma, both died on Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

OLDEST LIVING AMERICAN WWII VETERAN CELEBRATES 100TH BIRTHDAY

On Saturday, they were both buried, in Clayton, N.J., and El Dorado, Kan., respectively, after both of their remains were identified through DNA testing.

Costill’s remains were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in a “unknowns” casket among the 106 killed aboard the West Virginia, and in June his brother was informed Costill’s remains were located and positively identified through a DNA exam, according to the Cherry Hill Courier-Post.

Westlake Legal Group Harold-Costill Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640

The remains of Harold Kendall “Bud” Costill, 18, were buried in Clayton, N.J., on Saturday, nearly 78 years after he was killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency)

Scientists from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) used dental and anthropological analysis to identify Costill’s remains — and a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis was performed by scientists from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System.

Costill’s name, along with others who are still missing from World War II, is recorded on the Walls of the Missing in Honolulu. The DPAA said a rosette will be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for — which they were, in April 2019.

PEARL HARBOR SAILORS FINALLY LAID TO REST 77 YEARS LATER THANKS TO DNA TESTING

Barrett’s remains were positively identified last year, also through a DNA test. They were previously commingled in mass graves in Hawaii with hundreds of others killed on the USS Oklahoma, The Wichita Eagle reported.

Westlake Legal Group SeamanBarrett Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640

Wilbur Clayton Barrett was 26 years old when he died in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. His remains were buried in El Dorado, Kan. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency)

Barrett’s great nephew said the Navy used DNA from one of his aunts to identify the sailor. The DPAA said his remains were accounted for in June 2018.

The USS Oklahoma seaman’s great niece, Nancy Binter, told KSNW the fact her great uncle will be buried in Kansas, where he was from, “just makes me feel happy.”

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Of the 16 million Americans who served in WWII, more than 400,000 died during the conflict, according to the DPAA. Currently, there are 72,704 service members still unaccounted for.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Barrett-Costil Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640   Westlake Legal Group Barrett-Costil Pearl Harbor sailors laid to rest on same day in NJ, Kansas 78 years after 1941 attack Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/kansas fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/honors/pearl-harbor fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/us fnc article 0bf29b8f-ef09-58fb-b38c-e3ee09a98640

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Oldest living American WWII veteran celebrates 110th birthday

Lawrence Brooks — a man considered to be the nation’s oldest living World War II veteran — celebrated a huge milestone in Louisiana last week: his 110th birthday.

Brooks, born on Sept. 12, 1909, was honored on Thursday at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. Spotted with a bright lipstick kiss on his cheek at the event, Brooks served in the 91st Engineer Battalion stationed in New Guinea and then the Philippines — a predominately African-American unit of the U.S. Army.

MONTANA MEN WHO LIED ABOUT EING VETERANS SENTENCED, ORDERED TO WRITE NAMES OF AMERICANS WHO DIED IN WARS

Westlake Legal Group AP19255602776759 Oldest living American WWII veteran celebrates 110th birthday Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox news fnc/us fnc article 1a6552a8-e5ad-5fd3-a1d9-86639bf99f46

Lawrence Brooks, believed to be the oldest American veteran of World War II, celebrated his 110th birthday at the National World War II museum in New Orleans, La., on Thursday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

The 110-year-old, who served between 1940 and 1945, was a servant to three white officers and his daily routine included cleaning their sheets and uniforms and shining their shoes. He attained the rank of Private 1st Class during the war.

LAUREN BRUNER, ONE OF LAST SURVIVORS OF USS ARIZONA, DIES AT 98

Brooks’ newfound title comes after the death of Richard Overton, previously the oldest living WWII veteran. Formerly a member of the U.S. Army, Overton died in December at age 112.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255602607040 Oldest living American WWII veteran celebrates 110th birthday Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox news fnc/us fnc article 1a6552a8-e5ad-5fd3-a1d9-86639bf99f46

Lawrence Brooks received a dog tag honoring him as the oldest living veteran of the war. He was born Sept. 12, 1909. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

The museum has been celebrating Brooks’ birthdays since his 105th, in 2014, according to The Times-Picayune and The New Orleans Advocate.

“We absolutely love Mr. Brooks,” the museum’s vice president, Peter Crean, told the news outlet. “We’ve told him, ‘As long as you keep having birthdays, we are going to keep having birthday parties for you here.'”

“We consider him ‘our veteran,'” Crean said.

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Brooks, who uses a walker, is blind in one eye and has poor vision in the other. He does suffer from low blood pressure and dehydration, but his hearing, however, is good, and he’s never suffered from any major diseases or cancers.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255602831331 Oldest living American WWII veteran celebrates 110th birthday Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox news fnc/us fnc article 1a6552a8-e5ad-5fd3-a1d9-86639bf99f46

Brooks’ birthdays have been celebrated at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans since 2014.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

“I’ve started to think about not having many birthdays left. But I’m not worried about it, because God has let me live this long already,” Brooks said. “I think it’s because I’ve always liked people so much. Oh yes, I do.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19255602776759 Oldest living American WWII veteran celebrates 110th birthday Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox news fnc/us fnc article 1a6552a8-e5ad-5fd3-a1d9-86639bf99f46   Westlake Legal Group AP19255602776759 Oldest living American WWII veteran celebrates 110th birthday Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox news fnc/us fnc article 1a6552a8-e5ad-5fd3-a1d9-86639bf99f46

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California Marine filmed violently tackling two brawling students to the ground

A Marine was caught on camera this week blindside tackling two California high school students who were fighting.

Westlake Legal Group Pre-impact California Marine filmed violently tackling two brawling students to the ground Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/high-school fox news fnc/us fnc c5fa5019-c773-545f-963e-42f11f4fa6b1 article

A U.S. Marine sprints to tackle two high school students in Stockton, Calif., to break up their fight. (Courtesy of 209 Times)

The video shows two students at Edison High School in Stockton throwing punches on Wednesday before the Marine, identified as 18-year-old Pfc. Josue Valdez Sarmiento, sprints in and abruptly knocks the grappling duo to the ground.

The video was first posted by 209 Times and has more than 1.2 million views on Facebook.

The Marine then held the students briefly down on the ground before getting up. One of the students is picked up by an adult and the other is seen lying on the ground after being tackled.

In a statement to KCRA-TV, the school district said it was aware of the incident and is investigating the situation.

Westlake Legal Group Impact California Marine filmed violently tackling two brawling students to the ground Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/high-school fox news fnc/us fnc c5fa5019-c773-545f-963e-42f11f4fa6b1 article

A U.S. Marine tackles two high school students in Stockton, Calif. (Courtesy of 209 Times)

“Stockton Unified is aware of the student matter that took place on 9/11/19 [Wednesday] at Edison High School and the recording circulating on social media. We are actively investigating the situation,” the district said.

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Valdez Sarmiento is a recent graduate of the school and was there to help with recruiting but is not a recruiter, the U.S. Marine Corps said.

“He saw a dangerous fight break out. Upon observing that situation, he moved over and broke up the fight,” Maj. Thomas Driscoll told KCRA. “Although, the manner in which he did [could] have been improved, we are proud of Pfc. Valdez Sarmiento for his decision to intervene.”

Westlake Legal Group Marine-holds-down California Marine filmed violently tackling two brawling students to the ground Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/high-school fox news fnc/us fnc c5fa5019-c773-545f-963e-42f11f4fa6b1 article

A U.S. Marine held down two high school students in Stockton, Calif., after tackling them to break up their fight. (Courtesy of 209 Times)

Valdez Sarmiento has received counseling and been reassigned to office duties, according to the Corps.

The 209 Times said the students had been fighting for “over a minute uninterrupted in the open.”

“[… What] we are posting that parents may find concerning is a Marine recruiter blindside tackling a student so hard to break up the fight that if appears he hurts the student and does more damage than the actual fight itself. He ran full-speed from over 30 yards out,” they said. “Also of concern is the lack of response from actual school staff, as the fight lasted for over a minute uninterrupted in the open.”

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People had mixed reactions to how Valdez Sarmiento broke up the fight.

“It was just too excessive … how he came toward the kids,” student Johnny Hempill told KCRA. “I feel like going at a kid, especially when he’s not looking, makes more of an impact.”

But a parent told Fox40 Sacramento the action was justified.

“It could have been a little less of a tackle, but I believe in discipline. These kids were not behaving. Someone’s got to stop it,” the parent said.

Many social media users backed up the Marine’s actions.

“That was a soft tackle to stop a fight using non-lethal force. Crybaby parents need to learn to teach his or her child better,” Twitter user Rudolph Hernandez wrote, while another user said the tackle “looked pretty effective.”

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However, user Scott Baerst said, “That was dumb and dangerous. Hope that kid’s back/neck is OK.”

The condition of the students has not been released, according to reports.

The school and Stockton Police Department are investigating the incident.

Westlake Legal Group Impact California Marine filmed violently tackling two brawling students to the ground Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/high-school fox news fnc/us fnc c5fa5019-c773-545f-963e-42f11f4fa6b1 article   Westlake Legal Group Impact California Marine filmed violently tackling two brawling students to the ground Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/military/marines fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/high-school fox news fnc/us fnc c5fa5019-c773-545f-963e-42f11f4fa6b1 article

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