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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military (Page 3)

More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran

Hundreds of people showed up at a Michigan funeral Wednesday to mourn a Vietnam War veteran who passed away with no surviving family members.

Friends of Wayne Lee Wilson anticipated that only a few people would pay their respects, but the Brown Funeral Home in Niles changed that by posting Wilson’s obituary on Facebook and inviting the public to pay their respects.

FUNERAL FOR VIETNAM WAR VET, 77, WHO DIED ALONE, DRAWS HUNDREDS OF MOURNERS

“Dignitaries have funerals like this,” Wilson’s close friend Charlotte Andrews told the Detroit Free Press. “Who would have thought that a simple man with simple ideas and a simple way of life would have been able to have such an enormous amount of people to be able to send him off?”

Westlake Legal Group AP19199480263211 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe

U.S. Army members carry a folded flag along with the remains of Vietnam War veteran Wayne Wilson during the memorial service in Niles Wednesday. (Emil Lippe/Kalamazoo Gazette via AP)

Wilson died May 28 with no close family members, so his friends arranged for him to be buried with military honors. Wilson served in the Army from 1971 to 1977 and was wounded during his military service.

“We found out that this particular veteran does not have any family; and as color guard, we honor every veteran,” said Petra Bernard of the Osceola American Legion Post 308. “Every veteran deserves to have their military rights, so we made sure that we came out here to pay our respects to this soldier.”

Wilson often wore his service medals, flew a flag on his motorized scooter and would place flags at the graves of deceased veterans in Silverbrook Cemetery, where he was ultimately laid to rest, according to to the Free Press. People around Niles often called him “Sarge.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19199098111090 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe

Flags, flowers and letters alike lie near the remains of Wayne Wilson at the conclusion of the memorial service at the Silverbrook Cemetery in Niles, Mich., Wednesday, July 17, 2019. (Emil Lippe/Kalamazoo Gazette via AP)

Mourners came from several states away to honor him.

“It said on Facebook he didn’t have any family. He does have family,” Ohio resident Kenneth Creech told WNDU-TV. “Everybody that stepped foot in Vietnam is a brother.”

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In brief remarks, Niles Mayor Nick Shelton thanked Wilson and others like him.

“General George S. Patton Jr. said it best: ‘It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather, we should thank God that such men lived,'” Shelton said. “Thank God for Wayne Wilson and thank you all for being a part of his legacy.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19199480263211 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe   Westlake Legal Group AP19199480263211 More than 1,000 people attend Michigan funeral for Vietnam veteran Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox news fnc/us fnc article 795db98b-ea21-553c-be5c-82a82a7c48fe

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Retired Marine stands up to Nike with Betsy Ross flag tattoo

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6056113457001_6056116114001-vs Retired Marine stands up to Nike with Betsy Ross flag tattoo Sam Dorman fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/patriotism fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox news fnc/politics fnc article 1bdf0779-77bc-59f0-ae79-ea6b15968442

Retired marine Johnny (Joey) Jones was so adamant in his support for the Betsy Ross flag, he decided to tattoo it on his arm as a rebuke to Nike’s decision to pull a set of shoes bearing the iconic flag’s design.

“You don’t get to control the narrative on everything that is a symbol to this country,” Jones told “Fox & Friends” while discussing his tattoo on Saturday.

BETSY ROSS FLAG NOW DECRIED BY 2020 DEMS, PUNDITS, WAS FLOWN DURING OBAMA’S 2ND INAUGURATION

TRUMP JR. BLASTS NIKE WITH PHOTO OF SOVIET-STYLE SHOE DESIGN: ‘MORE IN LINE WITH THEIR VIEWS’

Jones, who placed the tattoo on his bicep, said he couldn’t think of a better symbol than the Betsy Ross flag, which flew during the American Revolutionary War.

Colin Kaepernick presented this opportunity to me on a silver platter,” Jones said, referring to the controversial football player who reportedly influenced Nike’s decision.

Sources told The Wall Street Journal that Kaepernick said he felt the use of the Betsy Ross flag was offensive, with slavery connotations.

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Citing people familiar with the matter, the paper’s report stated, “After images of the shoe were posted online, Mr. Kaepernick, a Nike endorser, reached out to company officials saying that he and others felt the Betsy Ross flag is an offensive symbol because of its connection to an era of slavery.”

But for Jones, the flag sparked a “fire that still burns today in people’s hearts.”

“That flag is absolutely a symbol. It’s a symbol of what people can do in this country. Even in times when they feel oppressed, they can rise above, have a direct impact.”

Fox News’ Talia Kaplan contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6056113457001_6056116114001-vs Retired Marine stands up to Nike with Betsy Ross flag tattoo Sam Dorman fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/patriotism fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox news fnc/politics fnc article 1bdf0779-77bc-59f0-ae79-ea6b15968442   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6056113457001_6056116114001-vs Retired Marine stands up to Nike with Betsy Ross flag tattoo Sam Dorman fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/education/patriotism fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox news fnc/politics fnc article 1bdf0779-77bc-59f0-ae79-ea6b15968442

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Trump sings praises of American exceptionalism in elaborate July 4 salute

With the Lincoln Memorial in the background and flanked on both sides by camouflaged Bradley fighting vehicles, President Trump used his “Salute to America” speech Thursday evening to praise the men and women of the Armed Forces and American exceptionalism.

Despite concerns that he would use the Fourth of July event as a glorified campaign rally, Trump stuck mainly to the script during his speech – praising the spirit that “runs through the veins of every American patriot” and attempting to strike a more unifying  and conciliatory tone than he is generally known to take.

“Today, we come together as one nation with this very special Salute to America,” a smiling Trump said. “We celebrate our history, our people, and the heroes who proudly defend our flag — the brave men and women of the United States military.”

‘SALUTE TO AMERICA’ CRITICS FUELED BY ‘HATE FOR PRESIDENT TRUMP’: KAYLEIGH MCENANY

From George Washington leading the Continental Army to the Apollo 11 moon landing, Trump rattled off a list of American accomplishments and inventions in the name of freedom, while surreptitiously sneaking in a boast about his administration’s accomplishments.

“Americans love our freedom and no one will ever take it away from us,” Trump said to chants of “U-S-A.” “Our nation is stronger today than it ever was before, it is stronger now stronger than ever.”

Trump followed his speech with an individual honor to each branch of the U.S. military — Coast Guard, Navy, Army, Air Force and Marines.

DEMS FUME AS TRUMP MOVES TO AMEND DC’S JULY 4 CELEBRATION

Despite the cloudy skies, Trump’s speech was punctuated by flyovers by military aircraft ranging from the Air Forces F-22 Raptors and B-2 Stealth Bomber to the Navy’s F-18 Super Hornets and Army Apache helicopters.

“Today, just as it did 243 years ago, the future of American Freedom rests on the shoulders of men and women willing to defend it,” Trump said. “As long as we stay true to our cause — as long as we remember our great history — and as long as we never stop fighting for a better future—then there will be nothing that America cannot do.”

“We will never forget that we are Americans, and the future belongs to us,” he said. “We share one home, one heart and we are all made by one almighty God.”

Trump’s speech was capped off with a performance by the Navy Blue Angels flight team.

While Trump’s speech set a unifying tone, the lead-up to the event was far from pacific – with Trump’s opponents slamming him on everything from the cost of the event to the perceived exploitation of the holiday for a political purpose.

Rep. Betty McCollum, D-Minn., who is among the lawmakers overseeing the Interior Department, which has jurisdiction over the National Mall and federal parks, said it was “absolutely outrageous” that the administration will use park money to help defray Thursday’s event costs. The National Park Service plans to use nearly $2.5 million intended to help improve parks nationwide, The Washington Post reported late Tuesday, citing anonymous sources.

“These fees are not a slush fund for this administration to use at will,” McCollum said in a statement. She promised a congressional hearing.

Two outside groups, the National Parks Conservation Foundation and Democracy Forward, want the department’s internal watchdog to investigate what they say may be a “potentially unlawful decision to divert” national parks money to Trump’s “spectacle.”

Former high-ranking members of the Armed Forces also weighed on Trump’s celebration, with retired U.S. Army Gen. Barry McCaffrey – a frequent critic of the president – calling the “Salute to America” “narcissistic” and that it will set up “another vile political fight.”

“He’s turning it into a “narcissistic display for his own purpose,” McCaffrey said on MSNBC on Wednesday. “It undoubtedly is a political event which makes everyone uneasy in the Pentagon.”

Trump defended the cost of the event on Wednesday, tweeting that cost “will be very little compared to what it is worth.”

“We own the planes, we have the pilots, the airport is right next door (Andrews), all we need is the fuel,” he said, referring to Maryland’s Joint Base Andrews, home for some of the planes that are to fly over the Mall on Thursday. “We own the tanks and all. Fireworks are donated by two of the greats.”

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Washington has held an Independence Day celebration for decades, featuring a parade along Constitution Avenue, a concert on the Capitol lawn with music by the National Symphony Orchestra and fireworks beginning at dusk near the Washington Monument.

Trump altered the lineup by adding his speech, moving the fireworks closer to the Lincoln Memorial and summoning the tanks and warplanes.

Trump originally wanted a parade with military tanks and other machinery rolling through downtown Washington ever since he was enthralled by a two-hour procession of French military tanks and fighter jets in Paris on Bastille Day in July 2017. Later that year, Trump said he’d have a similar parade in Washington on the Fourth of July 2018, and would “top” the Paris show.

The event ended up being pushed to Veterans Day, which conflicted with one of Trump’s trips abroad, before it was scuttled after cost estimates exceeding $90 million were made public.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19185818757264 Trump sings praises of American exceptionalism in elaborate July 4 salute fox-news/us/military fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 99eb9ce1-b349-5a97-ba8e-ddfa735b8404   Westlake Legal Group AP19185818757264 Trump sings praises of American exceptionalism in elaborate July 4 salute fox-news/us/military fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 99eb9ce1-b349-5a97-ba8e-ddfa735b8404

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Trump delivers ‘Salute to America’ speech in DC

Westlake Legal Group AP19185818757264 Trump delivers 'Salute to America' speech in DC fox-news/us/military fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 99eb9ce1-b349-5a97-ba8e-ddfa735b8404

With the Lincoln Memorial in the background and flanked on both sides by camouflaged Bradley fighting vehicles, President Trump used his “Salute to America” speech Thursday evening to praise the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces and American exceptionalism.

Despite concerns that he would use the Fourth of July event as a glorified campaign rally, Trump stuck mainly to the script during his speech – praising the spirit that “runs through the veins of every American patriot” and attempting to strike a more unifying  and conciliatory tone than he is generally known to take.

“Today, we come together as one nation with this very special Salute to America,” a miling Trump said. “We celebrate our history, our people, and the heroes who proudly defend our flag—the brave men and women of the United States Military.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19185818757264 Trump delivers 'Salute to America' speech in DC fox-news/us/military fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 99eb9ce1-b349-5a97-ba8e-ddfa735b8404   Westlake Legal Group AP19185818757264 Trump delivers 'Salute to America' speech in DC fox-news/us/military fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andrew O'Reilly 99eb9ce1-b349-5a97-ba8e-ddfa735b8404

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Harry Kazianis: Trump haters wrong to criticize him for Fourth of July celebration

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6055333007001_6055328088001-vs Harry Kazianis: Trump haters wrong to criticize him for Fourth of July celebration Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/us/military fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 025ab462-2b02-5ea5-8ba0-2a0695882894

Once again, the radical left has found a new way to create a national controversy over something that should be celebrated by all Americans as a source of pride. But this time, they’ve gone too far and need to be called out.

Fueled by their hatred of President Trump, some on the left are telling us it is politically incorrect to honor America’s battle for freedom against tyranny and what keeps such tyranny at bay – our world-class armed forces.

In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.

RUSH LIMBAUGH: LEFT ‘SCARED OUT OF THEIR WITS’ ABOUT TRUMP JULY 4 PARADE, KAEPERNICK ‘FOOLED EVERYBODY’

Keep in mind, when the Declaration of Independence was issued on July 4, 1776, it did not transform America from 13 British colonies into an independent nation. It was just a statement of what our founders wanted.

It took the Revolutionary War – fought by brave patriots with the best weapons they could get their hands on – to convince the British to give up their colonies and recognize the United States of America was now truly independent.

Without a military force, which was led by Gen. George Washington, the 13 colonies might have remained under British rule for decades longer. Keep in mind that our neighbor Canada did not gain independence from Britain until 1867, and Britain held onto colonies in other parts of the world well into the 20th century.

Yet progressives, NeverTrumpers and of course The New York Times are outraged that President Trump is showcasing our armed forces in the celebration of Independence Day in our nation’s capital, which the president is calling a Salute to America.

The Greatest Generation didn’t defeat Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan and Fascist Italy by staging peace rallies and protest marches, or by diplomatic negotiations. It took the deadliest war in history – claiming an estimated 70 million to 85 million lives – to end the dreams of world conquest by the Axis powers.

Let’s face it: without a strong military, we not only would have failed to win our freedom in the Revolutionary War, we would have failed to keep it in later conflicts.

The Greatest Generation didn’t defeat Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan and Fascist Italy by staging peace rallies and protest marches, or by diplomatic negotiations. It took the deadliest war in history – claiming an estimated 70 million to 85 million lives – to end the dreams of world conquest by the Axis powers.

So the idea that the U.S. armed forces will play a big role in this year’s Independence Day festivities should not be considered shocking, offensive or inappropriate. Without a strong military, we could be dominated by another nation today.

The firepower on display on the National Mall will be impressive – as it should be. M1 Abrams tanks and world-class military gear will be displayed – and no, they aren’t rolling down the streets, but will be stationary.

There will also be a flyover by some of America’s most powerful aircraft, such as the B-2 stealth bomber, and the F-22 and F-35 fighter jets.

President Trump is showing off the best America’s armed forces have to offer – and calling attention to the brave men and women who have volunteered to put their lives on the line defending our nation.

But that is not all you will see if you head to the festivities or view them on TV. The celebration will be capped off by a speech by President Trump and a grand fireworks display.

This is something we should do every year – regardless of whether a Democrat or a Republican occupies the Oval Office.

No American should ever fear symbols of our national power. There are countless airshows, National Guard events, and open military base events around the country that act as symbols of pride in our country.

I will never forget how when I was a boy I was able to get close to a now-retired F-117 stealth fighter and speak at length to the pilot who flew it. That interaction might even be part of the reason why I work in think tank studying national security issues today.

In fact, the only people that should ever fear our awesome weapons are our foreign adversaries.  

What am I missing? What is wrong with taking pride in a U.S. military that is the finest in the world? How can we be upset by celebrating the wonderful men and women who defend our country and keep us free?

I would be willing to wager most Americans are – like me – are proud to see such a display of our nation’s strength. In fact, it was President Trump who made it a centerpiece of his presidential campaign to ensure our armed forces would receive the military equipment they need after years of lean budgets and budget sequestration when President Barack Obama was in the White House.

The support our current president gives daily to our military and his constant shows of patriotism should be a unifying force. These should be universal principles we all support, regardless of party, politics or anything else.

However, any conservative knows by now that anything involving President Trump is a triggering event to the left – and that’s a real shame.

Clearly, our nation has much bigger concerns to worry about these days than the celebration of our independence. Let’s have a meaningful debate on things like immigration reform, what to do about Iran or North Korea, how to fund our entitlement programs, how to keep our promises to seniors, or the state of America’s crumbling infrastructure.

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Fighting over the celebration of the Fourth of July is simply a waste of our time.

Happy Fourth America, and thank you to all who serve in our armed forces to keep us free.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY HARRY KAZIANIS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6055333007001_6055328088001-vs Harry Kazianis: Trump haters wrong to criticize him for Fourth of July celebration Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/us/military fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 025ab462-2b02-5ea5-8ba0-2a0695882894   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6055333007001_6055328088001-vs Harry Kazianis: Trump haters wrong to criticize him for Fourth of July celebration Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/us/military fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 025ab462-2b02-5ea5-8ba0-2a0695882894

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Iraqi general testifies Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher did not stab ISIS detainee

Westlake Legal Group AP19177591793243 Iraqi general testifies Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher did not stab ISIS detainee Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox news fnc/us fnc Dan Gallo article 7c06f50e-31d1-5d75-a8db-5f6b366dab88

The Iraqi general at the scene of an alleged murder of an Islamic State prisoner in Iraq in 2017 testified in a deposition video played in court Thursday that Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher never stabbed the teenage detainee. The recording was made earlier this month.

Maj. Gen. Abbas al-Jubouri testified that he never saw Gallagher stab the detainee in the neck. Gallagher served alongside Abbas’ unit in an advise and assist capacity in Mosul.

“At any time did you see Chief Gallagher take out the knife while he was treating the ISIS fighter?” asked Maj. Nelson Candelario, one of Gallagher’s military lawyers.

PROSECUTOR, IN OPENING STATEMENT, SAYS GALLAGHER WAS ‘READY TO KILL

“No,” Abbas replied.

“You never saw him put the knife near the ISIS fighter’s neck?” “No,” he replied.

Abbas told the defense lawyer if had he witnessed improper conduct from SEALs, he would have taken action.

“I would have stepped in,” Abbas said.

“Had you seen Chief Gallagher do anything wrong…you would have reported it?” Candelario asked.

“Exactly,” Abbas replied. “I would have stopped him…I would be very upset.”

SNIPERS TESTIFY THAT NAVY SEAL EDWARD GALLAGHER SHOT YOUNG GIRL AND OLD MAN IN IRAQ

As commander of the Iraqi Emergency Response Division, Abbas said he was in the compound when the injured ISIS prisoner was brought in.

Exactly one week ago, a Navy SEAL testified that Abbas’ unit tortured, raped and murdered prisoners.

The SEAL, Special Operator 1st Class Corey Scott, said he killed the ISIS prisoner by putting his thumb over his breathing tube in order to save him from falling into the hands of Abbas’ unit.

“I knew he was going to die anyway,” Scott told defense attorney Timothy Parlatore. “I wanted to save him from what was going to happen next to him.”

Iraqi forces have been accused by human rights groups of abuses in the battle to oust ISIS from Mosul. Witnesses have said Iraqi soldiers beat unarmed boys and men and routinely abused enemy combatants.

Prosecutors said Scott never mentioned asphyxiation in the many conversations they had with him before trial. Scott — who was granted immunity in exchange for his testimony — said they never asked him the cause of death. He could face perjury charges, Navy officials said, if he is found to have been untruthful on the stand.

The government rested its case Tuesday after calling its last witness — a  computer specialist who testified that Gallagher had texted a photo to a comrade in which he clutched the hair of the dead captive in one hand and a knife in the other.

Gallagher’s superior, Master Chief Petty Officer Brian Alazzawi, also testified Tuesday that some members of Gallagher’s platoon were upset despite the praise they received for their 2017 tour in Iraq.

He said Special Operator First Class Craig Miller told him in October that Gallagher stabbed a prisoner while deployed. Miller said he shared the information because Gallagher was being promoted and had been nominated for the Silver Star.

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Alazzawi said he reported the alleged war crime, but it never went up to the chain of command until 2018.  Gallagher is also accused of shooting two civilians — an elderly man and a school-age girl — from sniper perches in Iraq in 2017.

The seven-man jury is made up of mostly combat veterans in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19177591793243 Iraqi general testifies Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher did not stab ISIS detainee Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox news fnc/us fnc Dan Gallo article 7c06f50e-31d1-5d75-a8db-5f6b366dab88   Westlake Legal Group AP19177591793243 Iraqi general testifies Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher did not stab ISIS detainee Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox news fnc/us fnc Dan Gallo article 7c06f50e-31d1-5d75-a8db-5f6b366dab88

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Official: Soldiers found dead at Mexico-Arizona border died by suicide

Two Army soldiers found dead this month while deployed to the Mexican border in Arizona died of self-inflicted gunshot wounds, a medical examiner said.

The deaths of Pfc. Steven Hodges of Menifee, Calif., and 21-year-old Pfc. Kevin Christian of Haslet, Texas, occurred weeks apart. Pima County Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Greg Hess announced his determination on Thursday.

GUATEMALAN MIGRANTS VOW TO KEEP TRYING TO REACH US BORDER AFTER MEXICO RAMPS UP PRESSURE

Westlake Legal Group Soldiers-wall Official: Soldiers found dead at Mexico-Arizona border died by suicide Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox news fnc/us fnc article 96de1616-8b9d-5d12-9a20-56e83ca4862a

Army engineers install concertina wire on Nov. 5, 2018, on the Anzalduas International Bridge, Texas. (US Air Force photo by Airman First Class Daniel A. Hernandez)

Hodges was found June 1 near the border city of Nogales; Christian died Sunday, 200 miles away in Ajo.

Both men were assigned to the Southwest Border Support Mission, which has some 2,400 service members.

President Trump has deployed active-duty soldiers to the U.S.-Mexico border to support the Border Patrol amid a surge of migrants from Central America. Duties have included placing hundreds of miles of concertina wire and reinforcing points of entry.

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Military officials said the deaths are still under investigation.

Westlake Legal Group Soldiers-wall Official: Soldiers found dead at Mexico-Arizona border died by suicide Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox news fnc/us fnc article 96de1616-8b9d-5d12-9a20-56e83ca4862a   Westlake Legal Group Soldiers-wall Official: Soldiers found dead at Mexico-Arizona border died by suicide Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox news fnc/us fnc article 96de1616-8b9d-5d12-9a20-56e83ca4862a

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Trasa Cobern: The Medal of Honor lesson – Ordinary people can do extraordinary things

I expected a week of superheroes when I signed up for the summer graduate program Medal of Honor Legacy: Cold War.

Having grown up in a military family and on Army bases, I knew all about the Medal of Honor. It is given for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of … life above and beyond the call of duty.” Only 3,506 have been issued since it was first awarded during the Civil War. Most since World War II have been given posthumously, and there are only 70 recipients still with us.

Therefore I jumped at the chance to attend this workshop at Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge during my summer hiatus from teaching American history to 11th graders. I was interested in the Cold War aspect of the program, but far more so in the Medal of Honor Legacy piece. We would get to meet a medal recipient and hear from the Medal of Honor Foundation about character development. I wanted to hear about these superheroes.

EX-ARMY STAFF SERGEANT TO GET MEDAL OF HONOR FOR IRAQ VALOR

Westlake Legal Group mccloughan Trasa Cobern: The Medal of Honor lesson – Ordinary people can do extraordinary things Trasa Cobern fox-news/us/military fox-news/opinion fox-news/faith-values/values fox news fnc/opinion fnc d6c7b55b-6a01-5113-bd9e-434c5ba3f6aa article

James McCloughan jokes with teachers after speaking to them at Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge on June 19. (Photo by Darryl Moran)

I came away disappointed — and for good reason. While Medal of Honor recipients do indeed perform heroic deeds under extremely difficult circumstances, they are not superheroes.

James C. McCloughan, a combat medic who served in Vietnam, spoke to our class. He is not superhuman, nor does he even try to be. He is humble and genuine, loving, and funny. As I watched him during his talk, or when he sat down with us for lunch, I saw a regular person who acted bravely and saved the lives of many men with whom he served. Then he returned home and taught social studies to middle and high school students for almost four decades. He also coached football, wrestling, and baseball. He touched the lives of more than ten thousand students.

Medal of Honor recipients did not act heroically to receive an award. In almost every case, they acted to save the lives of others.

McCloughan told me that teachers are warriors, too. Like soldiers, we have a bond that can’t be broken, and we protect and support one another. At education conferences, we are impatient hearing about classroom management from those lacking teacher experience. Like soldiers, we will listen to those who have been in the thick of it, who have stared at 60 pairs of young eyes looking for information and direction.

Teachers respect and cheer on colleagues who have acted with “gallantry and intrepidity.” Medal of Honor recipient Patrick Brady says intrepidity is doing something for which you could get court-martialed, but then it works. Teachers do this in classrooms every day, all across the country. We don’t always follow the curriculum, or pay attention to mandates from above, or listen to administrators. We do what is best for the kids in our classrooms.

It boils down to individuals and the relationships they form. We teach people, not content.

Medal of Honor recipients did not act heroically to receive an award. In almost every case, they acted to save the lives of others. And they don’t claim the medal as their own. They are caretakers or trustees of an honor that belongs to all those who served, those who made it home and those who did not.

Iraq veteran David Bellavia, who will receive the Medal of Honor Tuesday, understands this. In “House to House: A Soldier’s Memoir,” he wrote, “I witnessed the best of the human condition – the loyalty, the self-sacrifice, the love that the brotherhood of arms evokes. I am complete for having experienced that.”

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Teachers are much the same way. We don’t do what we do for the money, or social respect, or even to touch the future. We teach children because we love them because we want to care for them and guide them. We are their caretakers, their trustees.

I didn’t get the superhero experience I expected. I came away with something far more valuable. I learned about ordinary people who do fantastic things. “Each and every person has the potential to do something extraordinary,” Medal of Honor recipient Paul Bacha says. That’s a message I want to take home to my students.

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Boy, 5, who wanted to be ‘Army Man’ dies from cancer; family asks for military members to attend funeral

Westlake Legal Group River-Nimmo-Freedom-Hard-Facebook Boy, 5, who wanted to be 'Army Man' dies from cancer; family asks for military members to attend funeral Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 791f5ec7-474b-5891-90d8-300bf4a38fa3

A 5-year-old boy from Arkansas who dreamed of being an “Army Man” died last week after fighting cancer — and his family asked those he idolized to support him at his funeral.

River “Oakley” Nimmo passed away on Thursday after suffering from an “extensive battle” with neuroblastoma for more than three years.

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Described in his obituary as “feisty, courageous, smart and full of life,” his family said Oakley “often talked of being an ‘Army Man,’ as he called it, when he grew up,” and often played with his Power Wheels and shot his toy guns when he had free time outside of the hospital visits.

In honor of Oakley’s big dreams, his family requested military service members or veterans to attend the 5-year-old’s funeral service — in uniform — on Tuesday, which was scheduled to take place at 10 a.m. at Cullendale First Baptist Church in Camden, Ark. A burial was to take place at Furr Cemetery in Locust Bayou after.

“We are going to give Oakley a full military service in honor of his wish to become an ‘Army Man,’ one day,” his family wrote on Facebook. “We really want to pay tribute to this soldier.”

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Social media users were quick to send their prayers to Oakley’s family from around the U.S., as many had followed his journey.

One user said that despite it all, Oakley “is all army, after all he was in combat for 3 of his 5 year enlistment,” referencing that the boy was sick for more than three years.

“He was a fine soldier, and a proud American. God bless you little dude,” one user wrote. “He was as brave as any Navy Seal. We live in Georgia or my husband would be there in dress uniform,” another person added.

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Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper sends first memo to troops as Pentagon boss

On his first day on the job as the new acting secretary of defense, Mark Esper on Monday sent a memorandum to all Pentagon employees, laying out the Defense Department’s “path forward.”

In the memo, titled “Initial Message to the Department,” Esper wrote, “As we continue to advance the Nation’s security, let me reaffirm our path forward. The National Defense Strategy remains our guiding document and everything we do should support its stated objectives.”

Esper was named the new acting secretary of defense by President Trump last Tuesday after Patrick Shanahan withdrew his nomination.

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Esper, 56, has served as the 23rd secretary of the United States Army since Nov. 17, 2017. His duties included the recruitment, organization, training, equipping and care of 1.4 million active duty, National Guard, Reserve Soldiers, Department of the Army Civilians and their families, according to his Pentagon biography.

Esper said Monday the department’s priorities would “remain unchanged” and everything the department did “should support its stated objectives.”

He then went on to explain “three mutually reinforcing lines of effort” used to continue to expand the competitive space. They included building “a more lethal force,” strengthening alliances and attracting new partners, as well as reforming the department “for greater performance and affordability.”

In his memo, Esper explained that building a more lethal force would be the “surest way to deter adversary aggression” and included fully preparing for war. He wrote that it’s important to “continue to build readiness to fight” while “modernizing key capabilities for future conflict.”

Esper explained that U.S. allies and partners “play an essential role in helping us deter conflict and defend freedom around the world.” He added that through continued engagement the country will “grow these relationships and deepen our interoperability.”

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Esper graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1986. He received his commission in the infantry and completed Ranger and Pathfinder training.

He served on active duty for over a decade. In the early ’90s, he served with the 101st Airborne Division in the Gulf War. He later commanded an airborne rifle company in Europe.

Westlake Legal Group Mark-Esper-1 Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper sends first memo to troops as Pentagon boss Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8faaf065-8edf-596b-bb43-76d53956dc00

Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper arriving at the Pentagon on Monday. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Following his service on active duty, he served in both the Virginia and District of Columbia National Guard and Army Reserve. He retired in 2007.

“Having previously served in the Regular Army, National Guard, and Reserve, I understand well the sacrifices our Service Members, Civilians, and their Families make to protect this great country,” Esper wrote in the memo. “This is why I am committed to taking care of Families and ensuring they have the resources they need to thrive.”

He encouraged soldiers, sailors, airmen marines and civilians to stay focused on their mission and “always do the right thing.”

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“Together, we will remain the most ready and capable military force in the world, which is what our nation expects and deserves,” Esper said.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson and Stephen Sorace contributed to this report.

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