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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military (Page 7)

Agents find 3-year-old migrant boy alone near Texas border

Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Agents find 3-year-old migrant boy alone near Texas border McAllen Texas fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc e43849c1-dd91-5c2c-a991-15f1b204e994 Associated Press article

U.S. Border Patrol agents found a 3-year-old boy alone in a field after likely being abandoned by smugglers at the southern border, authorities said.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said late Tuesday that the boy’s name and phone numbers were written on his shoes when agents found him that morning. The agency said it is trying to reach the boy’s family.

NBC News, which first reported the story, said the boy was crying and in distress when the agents found him near Brownsville, which is at the eastern edge of the U.S.-Mexico border in South Texas’ Rio Grande Valley. The child will likely be sent to a facility for unaccompanied minors operated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The Border Patrol apprehended nearly 9,000 unaccompanied minors just in March and more than 20,000 since January, as border crossings surged compared to recent levels. The agency said Wednesday that it could not provide a breakdown by age.

Most minors are usually teenagers from Central America who travel north on their own, but some are young children who arrived with an adult relative or a human smuggler. And parents carrying infants or holding the hands of young children arrive daily .

That surge of families has put pressure on the Border Patrol, which says it doesn’t have the staff or facilities to care for hundreds of children at a time.

While U.S. authorities have ended the large-scale family separations that spurred outrage last year, the Border Patrol says it still must take children from adults who are not biological parents or legal guardians or when it suspects fraud or neglect. Agency officials said this month that from April 2018 through most of March, the Border Patrol identified more than 3,100 parents and children whom it accused of making “fraudulent claims.”

During a March visit to the Border Patrol’s main processing center in McAllen, reporters from The Associated Press saw a 4-year-old boy sitting with adult staff watching cartoons. Authorities said the adult who brought the boy wasn’t his parent and had a criminal record.

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Ambassador: US had no prior knowledge of Sri Lanka threat

Westlake Legal Group ambassador-us-had-no-prior-knowledge-of-sri-lanka-threat Ambassador: US had no prior knowledge of Sri Lanka threat JON GAMBRELL fox-news/us/religion fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc fa630c60-7c31-501b-b702-75cd7d1e4642 Associated Press article

The U.S. had no prior knowledge of the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka that killed over 350 people, the American ambassador said Wednesday, despite local claims that foreign officials had been warned an attack was looming.

As the investigation into Sunday’s Islamic State-claimed attack continues, FBI agents and U.S. military personnel are in Sri Lanka assisting the probe, Ambassador Alaina Teplitz said.

While declining to say whether U.S. officials had intelligence on the local extremists and their leader who allegedly carried out the assault, Teplitz said America remained concerned over militants at large.

She also said that “clearly there was some failure in the system” that caused Sri Lankan officials to fail to share the warnings they received prior to the attack.

“I can tell you definitively we were not warned and we did not have any prior knowledge of this,” Teplitz told foreign journalists from her office at the U.S. Embassy in Colombo. “We did not know because believe me, if we had, we would have tried to do something about it.”

Sunday’s bombings ripped through Christian worshippers at church celebrating Easter and at hotels in Sri Lanka, an island nation off the southern tip of India. The attacks killed at least 359 people and wounded some 500 others, marking Sri Lanka’s worst violence since its 26-year civil war ended a decade ago.

Authorities have blamed a local Islamic extremist group called National Towheed Jamaat, whose leader, alternately known as Mohammed Zahran or Zahran Hashmi, became known to Muslim leaders three years ago for his incendiary speeches online.

On Tuesday, the Islamic State group asserted responsibility for the attack, sharing images of the leader and other men with their face covered before an IS flag to bolster its claim. The extremist group, which has lost all the territory it once held in Iraq and Syria, has made unfounded claims previously.

Asked about whether American officials received warnings or knew about the group and its leader before the bombings, Teplitz declined to comment, saying she would not discuss intelligence matters.

“If you look at the scale of the attacks, the level of coordination, again, the sophistication of them, it’s not implausible to think there are foreign linkages,” she said. She added that the U.S. believes “the terrorist plotting is ongoing” and said that’s why America continued to warn its citizens in Sri Lanka to be careful.

Prior to the bombings, Sri Lankan officials received intelligence reports and warnings that such an attack could be looming. However, that information failed to stop the assault.

Teplitz said the current political situation in Sri Lanka could have exacerbated that. President Maithripala Sirisena ousted Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe in October and dissolved the Cabinet, but Sri Lanka’s Supreme Court later reversed his actions.

“Certainly the fractious and fragmented political environment has not been good on a number of fronts,” Teplitz said.

She later added: “The Sri Lankans themselves have said they received information . and they had their own lapses that resulted in a failure to either mitigate or warn. So that’s incredibly tragic.”

Wickremesinghe has said some people might lose their job over the intelligence failures.

Teplitz also acknowledged that she heard “legitimate” concerns about civil rights in Sri Lanka after the government announced that it was allowing the military to conduct warrantless searches and hold prisoners for 14 days before bringing them before a judge.

“There is a legacy from that conflict era of human rights abuse, again an issue that the government here has been struggling to move past,” she said. “We definitely remain concerned about human rights here and democratic policing; the ability to respect people’s rights even in the midst of a crisis like this.”

Teplitz said the U.S. also was concerned that the bombings could spark reprisals targeting Muslims in Sri Lanka. The Buddhist-majority country of 21 million, which includes large Hindu, Muslim and Christian minorities, is rife with ethnic and sectarian conflict.

“I think the recognition that this could be a spark is out there and that there’s a pretty significant effort to try and blunt that,” Teplitz said.

___

Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellap

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-6a1fd7d32c8b43048aa4b351c5e1ceb6 Ambassador: US had no prior knowledge of Sri Lanka threat JON GAMBRELL fox-news/us/religion fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc fa630c60-7c31-501b-b702-75cd7d1e4642 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-6a1fd7d32c8b43048aa4b351c5e1ceb6 Ambassador: US had no prior knowledge of Sri Lanka threat JON GAMBRELL fox-news/us/religion fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc fa630c60-7c31-501b-b702-75cd7d1e4642 Associated Press article

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Navy working on guidelines to make it easier to report UFOs

Westlake Legal Group navy-working-on-guidelines-to-make-it-easier-to-report-ufos Navy working on guidelines to make it easier to report UFOs Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 1f38a235-bd6a-5ba9-830b-9f070236349f

The U.S. Navy is updating its protocol for how pilots and other personnel report encounters with “unidentified aircraft” in response to strange aerial sightings and the need to destigmatize the reporting of them.

“There have been a number of reports of unauthorized and/or unidentified aircraft entering various military-controlled ranges and designated air space in recent years,” the Navy said in a statement to Politico. “For safety and security concerns, the Navy and the [U.S. Air Force] takes these reports very seriously and investigates each and every report.

COULD MYSTERIOUS ‘ALIEN SPACECRAFT’ BE NOTHING MORE THAN COSMIC DUST?

“As part of this effort, the Navy is updating and formalizing the process by which reports of any such suspected incursions can be made to the cognizant authorities,” it added. “A new message to the fleet that will detail the steps for reporting is in draft.”

The new protocol doesn’t mean the Navy believes its personnel has seen UFOs, but rather that the strange sightings warrant an investigation and need to be formally documented.

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“Right now, we have situation in which UFO (unidentified flying objects)s and UAP (unexplained aerial phenomena)s are treated as anomalies to be ignored rather than anomalies to be explored,” Chris Mellon, a former Pentagon intelligence official and ex-staffer on the Senate Intelligence Committee, told the news site. “We have systems that exclude that information and dump it.”

The military has been criticized in the past for paying little attention to such sightings. The Navy said that it has provided briefings on the matter in response to requests from Congress, but declined to identify who was briefed.

Westlake Legal Group MW Navy working on guidelines to make it easier to report UFOs Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 1f38a235-bd6a-5ba9-830b-9f070236349f   Westlake Legal Group MW Navy working on guidelines to make it easier to report UFOs Louis Casiano fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article 1f38a235-bd6a-5ba9-830b-9f070236349f

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Coast Guard offloads seized drugs worth $62.5M

Westlake Legal Group coast-guard-offloads-seized-drugs-worth-62-5m Coast Guard offloads seized drugs worth $62.5M fox-news/us/military/coastguard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/drugs fnc/us fnc bc648f46-8b4c-5a96-91e2-cd53651e5762 Associated Press article

The U.S. Coast Guard is offloading marijuana and cocaine with an estimated street value of $62.5 million dollars at The agency said in a news release that the drugs seized in international waters in the Eastern Pacific Ocean will arrive in Fort Lauderdale Thursday morning on the Coast Guard Cutter Bear, which is based in Portsmouth, Virginia.

The stash includes some 14,000 pounds of marijuana and 3,660 pounds of cocaine.

Westlake Legal Group 1000w_q95 Coast Guard offloads seized drugs worth $62.5M fox-news/us/military/coastguard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/drugs fnc/us fnc bc648f46-8b4c-5a96-91e2-cd53651e5762 Associated Press article

Crewmembers on the flight deck of Coast Guard Cutter Bear. Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Murray. (U.S. Coast Guard)

Officials say operation involved two Coast Guard cutters and a Navy ship off the coasts of Mexico and Central and South America.

Westlake Legal Group COASTGUARD Coast Guard offloads seized drugs worth $62.5M fox-news/us/military/coastguard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/drugs fnc/us fnc bc648f46-8b4c-5a96-91e2-cd53651e5762 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group COASTGUARD Coast Guard offloads seized drugs worth $62.5M fox-news/us/military/coastguard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/crime/drugs fnc/us fnc bc648f46-8b4c-5a96-91e2-cd53651e5762 Associated Press article

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NKorea issues mild criticism of Bolton over media interview

Westlake Legal Group nkorea-issues-mild-criticism-of-bolton-over-media-interview NKorea issues mild criticism of Bolton over media interview SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc bc8c5e61-7eda-5af1-bc37-e9544b8c392d Associated Press article
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news NKorea issues mild criticism of Bolton over media interview SEOUL, South Korea fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc bc8c5e61-7eda-5af1-bc37-e9544b8c392d Associated Press article

North Korea has issued a relatively mild criticism of White House national security adviser John Bolton over a recent interview he gave.

State media on Saturday cited First Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui as criticizing Bolton for telling Bloomberg News that the U.S. would need more evidence of North Korea’s disarmament commitment before a third leaders’ summit.

Choe described Bolton’s comments as having “no charm” and being “dim-sighted”

Her criticism is much softer than the North’s typical fiery rhetoric usually directed at the U.S. and South Korea.

North Korea blames the U.S. for deadlocked nuclear negotiations. Some observers say the North is avoiding harsh rhetoric at the U.S. to keep diplomacy alive.

On Thursday, the North demanded U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo be removed from nuclear negotiations.

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Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources

President Trump is expected to formally nominate Patrick M. Shanahan to be his permanent defense secretary as soon as next week, two administration officials tell Fox News. This, after an internal Pentagon investigation concluded that the acting defense secretary did not show any bias in favor of his former employer, aerospace giant Boeing.

Shanahan worked at Boeing for over 30 years before coming to the Pentagon as then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’s deputy at the start of the Trump administration.

Shanahan’s nomination had been held up by the White House since the Pentagon inspector general opened an investigation into Shanahan’s conduct following a report in Politico days after taking over for Mattis alleging Shanahan called Boeing-rival Lockheed Martin’s advanced F-35 program “f—ed up” and said the company didn’t know how to run a defense program following years of cost overruns and delays to the fifth-generation fighter jet.

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Shanahan has been serving as acting defense chief since the president forced Jim Mattis to leave the job early following his resignation in December.

Shanahan faces a potentially contentious confirmation hearing in the Republican-controlled Senate in order to assume the role as defense secretary.

President Trump found an early supporter and point man in Shanahan for the creation of a sixth branch of the military, the Space Force.

In an exclusive interview with Fox News’s Bret Baier, Shanahan spoke about his urgency in developing the new branch.

“We have a $19 trillion economy that runs on space.  Our military runs on space.  It is vitally important,” said Shanahan. “[The] Chinese and Russians are deploying capability to put our economy and our military at risk in the time of crisis.”

Asked for comment a spokesman for the acting defense secretary would not answer the question directly if Shanahan was expecting to be nominated next week.

“Acting Secretary Shanahan remains focused SOLELY on the Department, on our global military options, on our servicemembers, civilians, and their families,” said Army Lt. Col. Joseph Buccino.

A defense official added Shanahan will be “ready for a confirmation hearing, should he be nominated.”

Jennifer Griffin, Kevin Corke and Chad Pergram contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group shanahan Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e504080-1fa5-59a6-9118-c1181cec0beb   Westlake Legal Group shanahan Trump to nominate Shanahan as permanent defense secretary: sources Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e504080-1fa5-59a6-9118-c1181cec0beb

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North Korea nuclear impasse looms over US-Japan talks

Westlake Legal Group north-korea-nuclear-impasse-looms-over-us-japan-talks North Korea nuclear impasse looms over US-Japan talks MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 156d0904-2d2a-5af0-93ad-304b3a2f076b
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news North Korea nuclear impasse looms over US-Japan talks MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 156d0904-2d2a-5af0-93ad-304b3a2f076b

Stalled negotiations over dismantling North Korea’s nuclear program are looming over high-level talks between the U.S. and Japan.

Just a day after North Korea called for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to be removed as President Donald Trump’s top negotiator, he and acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan were meeting at the State Department Friday with their Japanese counterparts to plot a way forward.

U.S. officials say they remain open to resuming the talks with North Korea but Pompeo has not yet reacted to the North Korean demand, which followed what it said was a test of a new tactical weapon.

The nuclear talks have been at an impasse since Trump’s second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un failed to reach an agreement in Vietnam in late February.

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Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile

Westlake Legal Group pentagon-confirms-nk-test-launch-says-not-ballistic-missile Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan is confirming that North Korea conducted a test launch on Wednesday, but he declined to provide any details.

He is the first U.S. official to confirm the launch. He tells reporters at the Pentagon that North Korea conducted a test, but it didn’t involve a ballistic weapon and didn’t trigger any change in U.S. military operations.

North Korea has said it test-fired a new type of tactical guided weapon. The test didn’t appear to be of a banned mid- or long-range ballistic missile that could scuttle ongoing nuclear negotiations.

Pyongyang also is demanding that Washington remove Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from nuclear negotiations. The State Department says it’s aware of the report and the U.S. remains ready to engage North Korea in constructive negotiations.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42a6d0d6ee8f4276a4dbf85fde13464b Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-42a6d0d6ee8f4276a4dbf85fde13464b Pentagon confirms NK test launch, says not ballistic missile LOLITA C. BALDOR fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 59e28d8e-5e5a-5d6f-82ea-b5ebfb276350

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Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban

Westlake Legal Group military-academies-begin-to-follow-military-transgender-ban Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/armed-forces fnc/us fnc b09aa483-b86f-56e7-b4e7-bd01ccafa136 Associated Press article

The elite academies that educate officers for the nation’s armed forces have begun to implement the Trump administration‘s ban on transgender service members.

The U.S. Naval Academy will ban people who are transgender from attending the school, beginning with the 2020 school year. The Defense Department confirmed that change to the Capital Gazette newspaper on Monday. The school in Annapolis, Maryland, currently accepts transgender students and retains midshipmen who transition to another gender.

The administration’s new policy took effect last week, stripping transgender troops of rights to serve openly and denying servicemen and women medical care if they choose to transition to another gender.

POLICE: TEXAS MAN OFFERED $200 TO BEAT TRANSGENDER WOMAN

The Obama administration had lifted restrictions on transgender service members in 2016, allowing them to serve openly, and covered gender affirmation surgery.

A current Naval Academy student, Midshipman Regan Kibby, is one of six service members suing the Trump administration over its ban.

The U.S. Coast Guard has also implemented the new policy, as of April 12, the agency states on its website.

Coast Guard Academy spokesman David Santos confirmed in an email Wednesday that the policy change applies to the school in New London, Connecticut. A lengthy explanation on the Coast Guard’s website states that past medical treatment, such as gender-reassignment surgery or hormone therapy, may disqualify future applicants from joining up.

The Trump administration’s new policy also bars future applicants who’ve been diagnosed with gender dysphoria, a condition that can apply to people who identify as another gender and experience distress. Doctors say counseling, hormone therapy or surgery can lessen the anxiety.

There are some exceptions for people who’ve been diagnosed with gender dysphoria. For instance, someone can join the Coast Guard if their doctor says they can demonstrate three years of “stability in his/her biological sex immediately before applying to serve.” The Defense Department says transgender people can serve if they remain in their “biological sex.”

The administration’s policy calls for troops diagnosed with gender dysphoria to be medically evaluated before they are discharged to see if they qualify as having a disability. Otherwise gender dysphoria can be considered a “condition that interferes with military service” like sleepwalking, bed wetting, motion sickness and personality disorders.

The American Medical Association has blasted the administration’s transgender policy for military service. It told The Associated Press last week that the new policy and its wording mischaracterize transgender people as having a “deficiency.”

The Defense Department said its use of the words “deficiencies” is military lingo for when an individual fails to meet standards to maintain a lethal force. It is not a reference to gender dysphoria, Lt. Col. Carla Gleason said.

An estimated 14,700 troops identify as transgender. An organization that represents transgender service members said several are attending each academy, although many haven’t come out.

“The policy turns off access to some of our best and brightest, and that’s not what our country needs to win future wars,” said B Fram, communications director for Service Members, Partners and Allies for Respect and Tolerance for All, or SPARTA.

The nation has five service academies. They include the U.S. Air Force Academy, the U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy.

The Air Force Academy will conform with Defense Department policy when admitting future cadets, said Lt. Col. Tracy Bunko, an academy spokeswoman.

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That means transgender people can serve “in their biological sex” if they meet Defense Department standards for that sex, she said. People who have had cross-sex hormone therapy, sex reassignment surgery or genital reconstruction surgery are disqualified.

People with a history of gender dysphoria cannot be admitted unless they meet certain conditions, including having no dysphoria in the previous three years, Bunko said.

The Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security. The Merchant Marine is part of the Maritime Administration, which is within the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Westlake Legal Group annapolis-image Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/armed-forces fnc/us fnc b09aa483-b86f-56e7-b4e7-bd01ccafa136 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group annapolis-image Military academies begin to follow military transgender ban fox-news/us/military/navy fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/armed-forces fnc/us fnc b09aa483-b86f-56e7-b4e7-bd01ccafa136 Associated Press article

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Iran’s parliament labels US troops in Mideast as terrorist

Westlake Legal Group irans-parliament-labels-us-troops-in-mideast-as-terrorist Iran's parliament labels US troops in Mideast as terrorist Tehran (Iran) fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 8bad06ac-29b7-5fdf-8a4c-79901585f29e
Westlake Legal Group og-fox-news Iran's parliament labels US troops in Mideast as terrorist Tehran (Iran) fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 8bad06ac-29b7-5fdf-8a4c-79901585f29e

Iran’s lawmakers on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved a bill labeling U.S. forces in the Middle East as terrorist, a day after the U.S. terrorism designation for Iran’s Revolutionary Guard formally took effect, state TV reported.

Defense Minister Gen. Amir Hatami introduced the bill authorizing the government to act firmly in response to “terrorist actions” by U.S. forces. It demands authorities use “legal, political and diplomatic” measures to neutralize the American move, without elaborating.

The U.S. move aims at “thwarting Iran’s influence,” and shows that America’s longstanding sanctions against Iran have become ineffective, Hatami told lawmakers.

During the debate, some hard-liner lawmakers had demanded listing the entire U.S. army and security forces as terrorist.

The TV report said 204 lawmakers approved the bill, out of 207 present at the session in the 290-seat chamber. Two lawmakers voted against the bill and one abstained.

However, it remains unclear how the bill’s passage in parliament would affect the Gourd’s activities in the Persian Gulf, where the U.S. Navy has in the past accused Iranian patrol boats of harassing American warships.

The Revolutionary Guard has forces and wields influence in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen, and is in charge of Iranian missiles that have U.S. bases in their range.

The Guard’s designation — the first-ever for an entire division of another government — adds another layer of sanctions to the powerful paramilitary force and makes it a crime under U.S. jurisdiction to provide it with material support.

Iranian media reported Tuesday that Instagram suspended accounts believed to belong to four Guard commanders, including its commander, Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari; the leader of the Guard’s foreign wing, or Quds Force, Qassem Soleimani; Chief of General Staff of Iranian Armed Forces Maj. Gen. Mohammad Hossein Bagheri, and one of his deputies, Gen. Musa Kamali.

Depending on how broadly “material support” is interpreted, the designation may complicate U.S. diplomatic and military cooperation with certain third-country officials, notably in Iraq and Lebanon, who deal with the Guard.

President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the designation with great fanfare last week.

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