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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/us/military (Page 9)

Rep. Duncan Hunter: President Trump, ‘The Biden Four’ deserve your attention

Westlake Legal Group Trump032819 Rep. Duncan Hunter: President Trump, 'The Biden Four' deserve your attention Rep. Duncan Hunter fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/politics fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3859c94b-d0c6-58b8-9efb-3b4107ed3224

Eddie Gallagher, Clint Lorance, Matt Golsteyn, Keith Barry, these are names you may know—but for all the wrong reasons.  They are all glaring examples of the unfortunate reality that our own government has become as much a threat to the American warfighter as the enemy they face in combat.

This is not hyperbole. There is a real, ongoing problem in our government right now that places political correctness and personal agendas over the legal pillars of justice and due process.  Unfortunately, there’s another name you should know—it’s a group of men I call “The Biden Four,” and for good reason.

In 2007, four decorated veterans sought employment with Blackwater USA to continue serving our country as armed guards protecting U.S. State Department officials in Iraq during the height of the insurgency.

RETIRED ARMY CAPTAIN: EDDIE GALLAGHER’S TRIAL IS A ‘DISGRACE,’ ‘CLEARLY, HE DID NOT MURDER ANYONE’

At the time, the unrelenting violence against members of our military and these contractors was rapidly increasing with regular car bombs and other secondary attacks forged daily. Terrorist insurgents were frequently disguising themselves as civilians or police officers in these attacks, sometimes even using women and children as decoys and human shields.

On September 16, 2007, a senior State Department official was meeting with Iraqi counterparts in Baghdad when a car bomb exploded near their location, prompting an emergency evacuation.

Blackwater security teams were dispatched to secure a safe passage for the convoy through Nisur Square, a known epicenter for insurgent violence where, just weeks before, an explosion left a crater the size of a football field.

As the convoy traveled back to the green “safe” zone, a white Kia vehicle broke away from stopped traffic at the checkpoint, driving aggressively towards the approaching convoy, ignoring commands to stop.

Just days before, a notification had been issued at a briefing warning of a similar car used in other attacks. This, coupled with the surrounding violence and the recent car explosions, is why the security team had every reason to believe that the Kia would attack the checkpoint or even the U.S. diplomat’s convoy.

Utilizing weapons provided to them by the State Department, the security team fired at the Kia to disable the clear and present threat, killing its occupants.

Immediately the security team came under small arms fire from insurgents and, after returning fire, witnesses saw military-aged men flee the scene, abandoning weapons and Iraqi police uniforms over embankments as they ran.

The U.S. diplomat passed through Nisur Square safely and returned to the “Green Zone” unharmed due to the direct actions of the Blackwater security team.

Joe Biden sided with Iraqi politicians over America’s own. This is why I am calling these veterans “The Biden Four.”

Unbeknownst to anyone, the Kia was not a car bomb and, following an investigation led by an Iraqi official with known ties to two insurgent groups, these Blackwater contractors became low-hanging fruit in a political correctness battle led by the same government they had served and protected.

During the investigation, the security team was compelled to provide statements about the incident under threat of termination, these statements that were specifically prohibited for use in any criminal prosecution.  The Department of Justice (DOJ) then unconstitutionally used these statements to charge and indict these men on manslaughter and weapons offenses designed specifically to control and punish gang violence and armed drug dealers, not military veterans.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) then unconstitutionally used these statements to charge and indict the men on manslaughter and weapons offenses designed specifically to control and punish gang violence and armed drug dealers, not military veterans.

Fortunately, the original presiding judge in this case recognized the prosecutorial misconduct and dismissed the charges due to “reckless” violations by the DOJ that had “compromised the constitutional rights of the accused.”

But their ordeal was not over. Enter external pressure from the politically correct left.

In an effort by the Obama administration and a State Department run by Hillary Clinton to appease Iraqi government officials, Vice President Joe Biden announced at a joint press conference with Iraqi President Jalal Talabani in Baghdad that the U.S. federal judge got the decision wrong and that the U.S. government was committed to ensuring that these men be sent to jail for the incident.

Joe Biden sided with Iraqi politicians over America’s own. This is why I am calling these veterans “The Biden Four.”

With the full backing of the Obama administration, the DOJ appealed the original dismissal of charges and prosecuted these men again, this time offering testimony from perjuring witnesses and withholding exculpatory evidence about the attack.

After refusing a plea deal, three of the four men had weapons charges reintroduced.  You are reading this correctly, decorated veterans were punished by their own government for using weapons provided to them by that same government as if they were drug dealers and gang members, paving the way for an unjust conviction.

If anyone should be able to count on our justice system to protect them, it should certainly be those who have defended our nation with their lives. But our justice system has not protected The Biden Four. Three of them were convicted and given a sentence of 30 years and the fourth was retried and given a life sentence.

Four American veterans were convicted by a jury of civilians — none of whom had ever seen combat.

The Biden Four have already served over four years in prison. They are political pawns who now sit in jail.

They are still there even after the Iraqi politicians got their reelection and President Obama, Secretary Clinton and Vice President Biden scored points with a liberal media that vilifies our veterans as heartless mercenaries playing soldier.

The fact remains, these brave men were sent to prison for doing their jobs, jobs that require split decision-making with real lives hanging in the balance.

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President Trump is currently reviewing other cases in which he may exercise his authority as commander in chief to issue a pardon. The Biden Four should be given full consideration for this action.

Our warfighters deserve better. It’s time to have their backs.

Westlake Legal Group Trump032819 Rep. Duncan Hunter: President Trump, 'The Biden Four' deserve your attention Rep. Duncan Hunter fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/politics fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3859c94b-d0c6-58b8-9efb-3b4107ed3224   Westlake Legal Group Trump032819 Rep. Duncan Hunter: President Trump, 'The Biden Four' deserve your attention Rep. Duncan Hunter fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-trials fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/politics fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 3859c94b-d0c6-58b8-9efb-3b4107ed3224

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Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US

In the hours after Iran is said to have downed a $125 million U.S. surveillance drone over international waters with a surface-to-air missile, despite Tehran’s vehement denials, President Trump gave the green light to retaliatory military strikes before later ordering a halt amid the alarming spike in tensions.

The inflammatory incident – which comes on the heels of escalating rhetoric between Washington and Tehran and other apparent sabotage vessel attacks – has many U.S. lawmakers and officials still fearing that some form of a military confrontation may be inevitable. But just how capable is Iran when it comes to fighting back and what lurks inside the country’s shadowy arms arsenal and how is the Iranian military structured?

“Iran has two military institutions. First is the Artesh, or the regular armed forces – Army, Navy, Air – and then there’s the Revolutionary Guard or IRGC with its own separate chain of command and force structure. Most of the subterfuge and malicious activities in the Middle East that can be attributed to Iranian actors is the work of the IRGC,” Miguel Miranda, an expert analyst in military technology in Asia, told Fox News. “Now Iran has a colorful arsenal and much of it is obviously dated but still functional. Old CH-47 Chinook helicopters and M60 Patton tanks immediately come to mind – this is what the Artesh are stuck with.”

THE MASTER BEHIND THE MASK: WHO IS IRAN’S MOST FEARED AND POWERFUL MILITARY COMMANDER?

But, he cautioned, since the 1990’s Iran’s state-owned military-industrial sector has made steady progress in four particular areas and is now a “regional leader” alongside Israel and Turkey when it comes to unmanned systems, small arms and light weapons, artillery, and ballistic missiles and other guided munitions.

“Iran has demonstrated it can launch dozens of road-mobile short-range ballistic missiles at targets beyond its borders. Recent innovations include a cruise missile likely patterned on a Soviet design with a range exceeding 1200 miles,” Miranda continued. “Iran’s missile technology and ability to manufacture these is far more advanced than any Arab state. Iran can mass produce short, medium, and long-range anti-aircraft missiles based on-reversed engineered Chinese, Russian and U.S. models.”

Westlake Legal Group 615298bc-AP446885797862 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

A Ghader missile is launched from the area near the Iranian port of Jask port on the shore of the Gulf of Oman during an Iranian navy drill, Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013. Iran says it has tested advanced anti-ship missiles in the final day of a naval drill near the strategic Strait of Hormuz, the passageway for one-fifth of the world’s oil supply. State TV says “Ghader”, or “Capable”, a missile with a range of 200 kilometers (120 miles), was among the weapons used Tuesday. It says the weapon can destroy warships. (AP Photo/Jamejam Online, Azin Haghighi) (AP2013)

While Iran has been a party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) for almost four decades, it is not a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) nor The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation.

Since the 1979 revolution and imposition of hefty western sanctions, coupled with the devastating 1980’s war with bordering Iraq, Iran has been battling a feeble economy and tight restrictions when it comes to easily advancing its weapons cache the way most others in the region have been able to do. Thus, much of the Iranian depository is said to be locally made, with abundant government funding to spend on everything from importing tools and parts to developing factories – with a little help from the outside.

According to John Wood, analyst and author of “Russia, the Asymmetric Threat to the United States,” Iran acquires majority of its equipment and expertise from Russia and China, along with “acquiring technology through the black market, especially from Eastern Europe and North Korea, as well as through clandestine operations in Western Europe.”

While the UN conventional arms embargo has somewhat helped limit what Iran can access abroad through official channels, it expires in October 2020 – rendering an open question as to whether Iran can then purchase more state-of-the-art weaponry from a broader array of players.

Westlake Legal Group 54e1bba7-Mideast-Yemen-3 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

In this image posted on the official Twitter account of the Saudi Press agency, SPA, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2015, confiscated weapons are seen aboard an Iranian fishing boat bound for Yemen. The Saudi-led coalition battling Yemen’s Shiite rebels says it has foiled an attempt by Iran to smuggle missiles and other weapons to the rebels aboard a fishing boat. The coalition says in a statement released Wednesday that the seizure took place on Saturday some 241 kilometers (150 miles) southeast of the Omani port of Salalah. (Saudi Press Agency via AP) (The Associated Press)

Miranda underscored that Iranian drones are “another success story” and they boast having all types from handheld prop-driven spy planes to long-endurance models that carry bombs on their wings to the notorious Saeqeh that comes with a “jet-powered UAV able to launch munitions.”

And then there is a covert action routinely employed to mimic the inventions of its enemies – in particular, Miranda surmised, is that the losses of U.S drones throughout the protracted war in Afghanistan have aided Iran in the way of acquiring the damaged models and enable them to analyze them for reverse engineering.

“Iran will use militias, cells, and spies, in Shia communities throughout the region to conduct sabotage, especially of the energy complex, kidnapping of Westerners and attacks on the US and its allies,” Wood told Fox News, via email. “Over the decades, Iran has developed an extensive and robust military-industrial complex – they also have chemical and biological weapons.”

Yet the breadth and condition of its chemical and biological capabilities – despite having ratified the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) in 1973 – is not completely clear.

NIGERIA’S CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY SLOWLY BEING ERASED AS MILITANTS STEP UP VICIOUS KILLINGS, KIDNAPPINGS

Moreover, Jonathan Rue, associate director of the Jewish Institute for National Security of America’s (JINSA) Gemunder Center for Defense & Strategy, concurred that while Iran lacks the modernity of neighboring countries, it has sought not to match its stockpile with big players like the United States, but has instead become particularly skilled at “using basic capabilities in sophisticated ways to target U.S. and allies’ vulnerabilities, like overwhelming naval and air defenses with lots of attack craft, missiles and drones.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0494ba6cf93a434f892437dccbf2f657 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

FILE – In this Feb. 3, 2019 file photo, an Iranian clergyman looks at domestically built surface to surface missiles displayed by the Revolutionary Guard in a military show marking the 40th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, at Imam Khomeini Grand Mosque in Tehran, Iran. On Monday, April 8, 2019, the Trump administration designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard a “foreign terrorist organization” in an unprecedented move against a national armed force. Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps went from being a domestic security force with origins in the 1979 Islamic Revolution to a transnational fighting force. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)

“Ironically as we’re seeing now, as we saw in the 1980s, Iran’s use of simple naval mines in vital shipping lanes can do a lot in terms of escalating tension with the United States,” he explained. “Decades of sanctions have forced Iran to develop a sizable domestic arms industry. These are not latest-generation capabilities, and they wouldn’t defeat the U.S. in a major head-on conflict. But they are good enough, and Iran has enough of them to make it difficult for the U.S. and allied forces.”

Last year, Trump controversially pulled out of the 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran, re-imposing grueling economic sanctions and applying what experts have coined a “maximum pressure” campaign on Tehran’s regime.

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Meanwhile, Iran has for weeks warned it will ignite a treacherous chapter in its dispute with the West next week, threatening to dump aspects of the fragile nuclear deal and resume stockpiling unless European signatories to the deal can get around the crippling U.S. sanctions.

“Iran has significant manpower and a network of proxies and partners around the region that could be activated to deter direct attacks on Iranian soil,” added Ali Vaez, Director of the Iran Project, via email. “It would be a mistake to think that an escalation between Iran and the U.S. will be a quick, cheap or easy military operation. It could well lead to a major confrontation involving major losses in blood and treasure on both sides, and even a wider regional war involving their respective allies.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0494ba6cf93a434f892437dccbf2f657 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-0494ba6cf93a434f892437dccbf2f657 Inside Iran’s deadly armory and its capabilities to fight the US Hollie McKay fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/pentagon fox-news/tech/technologies fox news fnc/tech fnc article 35651e1e-9726-541f-8ad6-aea5088d39c3

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US squadron of F-15E fighters arrive in UAE amid Iran tensions

A squadron of American F-15E Strike Eagles arrived in United Arab Emirates on Thursday as part of reinforcements against the Iranian threat as announced last month by the Pentagon.

President Trump announced the additional military presence in the Middle East last month, saying additional 1,500 troops will be sent together with a squadron of U.S. Air Force jets.

The arrival of the U.S. jets on Thursday coincided with an attack on oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz, an attack that the U.S. says was perpetrated by the Iranian regime.

Westlake Legal Group ADAB-2 US squadron of F-15E fighters arrive in UAE amid Iran tensions Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/world fnc article 84af6ae3-7ddf-598f-bedd-679d4a1c1e3d

An F-15E Strike Eagle deployed from the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, lands at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, June 14, 2019. F-15E’s are designed to perform in air-to-air and air-to ground operations in any environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chris Thornbury)

GEN. JACK KEANE: TRUMP SANCTIONS ‘CRIPPLING’ IRAN, TRYING TO CURB ‘AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR’

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Iran was responsible for the “blatant assault” on oil tankers, an assessment he based on “intelligence, the weapons used, the level of expertise needed to execute the operation, recent similar Iranian attacks on shipping, and the fact that no proxy group operating in the area has the resources and proficiency to act with such a high degree of sophistication.”

President Trump, meanwhile, told “Fox and Friends” Friday that the attack had “Iran written all over it.’

“Iran did do it and you know they did it because you saw the boat,” he said, before pointing to the video showing the Iranians removing the unexploded mine. “They’re a nation of terror and they’ve changed a lot since I’ve been president, I can tell you,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group ADAB-1 US squadron of F-15E fighters arrive in UAE amid Iran tensions Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/world fnc article 84af6ae3-7ddf-598f-bedd-679d4a1c1e3d

Two F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron, 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina taxi the runway at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, June 13, 2019. The F-15E’s joined ADABs inventory of other fighters to include F-15C Eagles and F-35A Lightning IIs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chris Thornbury)

PENTAGON APPROVES SENDING 1,000 MORE TROOPS TO MIDEAST AS US RELEASES NEW PHOTOS OF TANKER ATTACK LINKED TO IRAN

U.S. officials also released a video on Friday supposedly showing Iran’s Revolutionary Guard removing an unexploded limpet mine from one of the vessels.

The black-and-white footage, as well as still photos released by the U.S. military’s Central Command on Friday, appeared to show the limpet mine on the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous, before a Revolutionary Guard patrol boat pulled alongside the ship and removed the mine, Central Command spokesman Capt. Bill Urban said.

Westlake Legal Group ADAB-3 US squadron of F-15E fighters arrive in UAE amid Iran tensions Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/world fnc article 84af6ae3-7ddf-598f-bedd-679d4a1c1e3d

F-15E Strike Eagle aircrew hold up their 336th Fighter Squadron flag, June 13, 2019, at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates. The 336th FS deployed from the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina, bringing additional air power to Team ADAB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chris Thornbury))

U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) released additional images Monday showing the aftermath of mine attacks against the oil tankers, including some images purporting to show Iranian forces removing an unexploded device from the hull of one of the vessels.

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Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said he had also approved a request from CENTCOM to send approximately 1,000 additional troops to the Middle East “to address air, naval, and ground-based threats” in the region.

None of the announced 1,000 troops are U.S. Army or Marine Corps infantry or U.S. Special Operations Forces, according to U.S. officials. All the additional troops are support troops for the fighter squadrons currently deployed, the Patriot anti-aircraft missile batteries and engineers.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ADAB-1 US squadron of F-15E fighters arrive in UAE amid Iran tensions Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/world fnc article 84af6ae3-7ddf-598f-bedd-679d4a1c1e3d   Westlake Legal Group ADAB-1 US squadron of F-15E fighters arrive in UAE amid Iran tensions Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense fox news fnc/world fnc article 84af6ae3-7ddf-598f-bedd-679d4a1c1e3d

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Nuclear changes, more troops heighten US-Iran tensions

The U.S. and Iran edged toward a flashpoint Monday as Tehran announced it was breaking compliance with the accord that keeps it from making nuclear weapons and the Trump administration followed by ordering 1,000 more troops to the Middle East.

The Pentagon said the deployment includes security forces and troops for additional surveillance and intelligence gathering in the region. While the number is small, it represents an escalation of U.S. military might aimed at deterring Iran and calming allies worried that transit through key shipping lanes could be in jeopardy.

Tehran’s announcement earlier Monday means it could soon start to enrich uranium to just a step away from weapons-grade levels, challenging President Donald Trump’s assurances to allies that the U.S. withdrawal from the deal last year made the world a safer place.

The developments are bound to inflame tensions in the Middle East and pose a test of resolve and credibility for both adversaries.

Iran said it would break a limit on uranium stockpiles established by the 2015 agreement with world powers that was intended to restrict the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program in exchange for an easing of international sanctions.

After Trump withdrew from the agreement, signed by his predecessor, he reinstated punishing economic sanctions, leaving the European and other partners in the accord struggling to keep Iran on board.

On Monday, the U.S. administration found itself in the awkward position of demanding that Iran comply with a nuclear accord that the president derided as the worst deal in history.

“We continue to call on the Iranian regime not to obtain a nuclear weapon, to abide by their commitments to the international community,” State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus told reporters.

The move comes as Washington accuses Iran of attacking two tankers near the Persian Gulf and the Iranians deny responsibility. With details murky and no one owning up to the attacks, the Pentagon released new photos intended to bolster its case that Iran carried out the attacks.

The State Department spokeswoman said Iran’s uranium announcement amounted to “extortion” and a “challenge to international norms,” as well as to the 2015 agreement known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

“It’s unfortunate that they have made this announcement today,” Ortagus said. “It doesn’t surprise anybody and this is why the president has often said that the JCPOA needs to be replaced with a better deal.”

Trump appeared to say the deal should not be violated in a tweet: “Iran to defy Uranium Stockpile Limits.”

In announcing the new deployment, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said the forces are “for defensive purposes to address air, naval, and ground-based threats in the Middle East.”

“The United States does not seek conflict with Iran,” Shanahan said. “The action today is being taken to ensure the safety and welfare of our military personnel working throughout the region and to protect our national interests.” He added that the U.S. will continue to adjust troop levels as needed.

On the unravelling of the multinational nuclear deal, some of its supporters blamed the Trump administration for Iran’s provocative announcements, saying they were predictable given the renewed U.S. pressure.

“While Iran’s frustration with Trump’s reckless and irresponsible pressure campaign is understandable, we strongly urge Iran to remain in compliance with the nuclear deal,” the Arms Control Association said in a statement. “It remains in Iran’s interests to abide by the limits of the agreement and to fully cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s more intrusive monitoring and verification.”

Iran has shown no willingness to negotiate another deal and vowed not enter into talks with the United States while the administration maintains its “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions.

Administration officials found themselves Monday grappling with whether to press the remaining parties to the deal, including Britain, France and Germany, to demand that Iran stay in compliance. They must also consider if such a stance would essentially concede that the restrictions imposed during the Obama administration, while short of ideal, are better than none.

Under the deal, Iran can keep a stockpile of no more than 660 pounds (300 kilograms) of low-enriched uranium. Behrouz Kamalvandi, spokesman for Iran’s atomic agency, said it would pass that limit June 27.

A senior U.S. official said the administration is most concerned about any violation of the deal that would reduce the breakout time that Iran would need to produce a nuclear weapon. The deal aimed to keep the breakout time at one year.

The official said certain violations, while they should be not accepted, would not necessarily reduce that time. But other violations, such as enriching uranium to 20%, should be addressed immediately if they occur, the official said. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official said it would be up to the Europeans to decide if Iran was in violation of the deal and whether to initiate a dispute resolution mechanism that could bring the Iranians back into compliance. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expected to meet this week with E.U. foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, a leading deal proponent, at which this issue is likely to be raised.

Pompeo, who was a leading critic of the deal while he was in Congress, has said in the past that Iranian compliance is not really an issue as the administration sees the agreement as fundamentally flawed because over time it eases many limits on Iran’s nuclear activities.

Yet, just last week, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N.’s nuclear watchdog accused Iran of violating a provision of the deal that relates to advanced centrifuges and called on the Europeans to ensure that Iran remains in compliance.

Westlake Legal Group c0776dac-ContentBroker_contentid-6d371c278e804742948276b704916c7c Nuclear changes, more troops heighten US-Iran tensions MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69   Westlake Legal Group c0776dac-ContentBroker_contentid-6d371c278e804742948276b704916c7c Nuclear changes, more troops heighten US-Iran tensions MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69

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US-Iran move closer to a flashpoint as tensions spike

The U.S. and Iran edged toward a flashpoint Monday as Tehran announced it was breaking compliance with the accord that keeps it from making nuclear weapons and the Trump administration followed by ordering 1,000 more troops to the Middle East.

The Pentagon said the deployment includes security forces and troops for additional surveillance and intelligence gathering in the region. While the number is small, it represents an escalation of U.S. military might aimed at deterring Iran and calming allies worried that transit through key shipping lanes could be in jeopardy.

Tehran’s announcement earlier Monday means it could soon start to enrich uranium to just a step away from weapons-grade levels, challenging President Donald Trump’s assurances to allies that the U.S. withdrawal from the deal last year made the world a safer place.

The developments are bound to inflame tensions in the Middle East and pose a test of resolve and credibility for both adversaries.

Iran said it would break a limit on uranium stockpiles established by the 2015 agreement with world powers that was intended to restrict the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program in exchange for an easing of international sanctions.

After Trump withdrew from the agreement, signed by his predecessor, he reinstated punishing economic sanctions, leaving the European and other partners in the accord struggling to keep Iran on board.

On Monday, the U.S. administration found itself in the awkward position of demanding that Iran comply with a nuclear accord that the president derided as the worst deal in history.

“We continue to call on the Iranian regime not to obtain a nuclear weapon, to abide by their commitments to the international community,” State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus told reporters.

The move comes as Washington accuses Iran of attacking two tankers near the Persian Gulf and the Iranians deny responsibility. With details murky and no one owning up to the attacks, the Pentagon released new photos intended to bolster its case that Iran carried out the attacks.

The State Department spokeswoman said Iran’s uranium announcement amounted to “extortion” and a “challenge to international norms,” as well as to the 2015 agreement known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

“It’s unfortunate that they have made this announcement today,” Ortagus said. “It doesn’t surprise anybody and this is why the president has often said that the JCPOA needs to be replaced with a better deal.”

Trump appeared to say the deal should not be violated in a tweet: “Iran to defy Uranium Stockpile Limits.”

In announcing the new deployment, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said the forces are “for defensive purposes to address air, naval, and ground-based threats in the Middle East.”

“The United States does not seek conflict with Iran,” Shanahan said. “The action today is being taken to ensure the safety and welfare of our military personnel working throughout the region and to protect our national interests.” He added that the U.S. will continue to adjust troop levels as needed.

On the unravelling of the multinational nuclear deal, some of its supporters blamed the Trump administration for Iran’s provocative announcements, saying they were predictable given the renewed U.S. pressure.

“While Iran’s frustration with Trump’s reckless and irresponsible pressure campaign is understandable, we strongly urge Iran to remain in compliance with the nuclear deal,” the Arms Control Association said in a statement. “It remains in Iran’s interests to abide by the limits of the agreement and to fully cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s more intrusive monitoring and verification.”

Iran has shown no willingness to negotiate another deal and vowed not enter into talks with the United States while the administration maintains its “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions.

Administration officials found themselves Monday grappling with whether to press the remaining parties to the deal, including Britain, France and Germany, to demand that Iran stay in compliance. They must also consider if such a stance would essentially concede that the restrictions imposed during the Obama administration, while short of ideal, are better than none.

Under the deal, Iran can keep a stockpile of no more than 660 pounds (300 kilograms) of low-enriched uranium. Behrouz Kamalvandi, spokesman for Iran’s atomic agency, said it would pass that limit June 27.

A senior U.S. official said the administration is most concerned about any violation of the deal that would reduce the breakout time that Iran would need to produce a nuclear weapon. The deal aimed to keep the breakout time at one year.

The official said certain violations, while they should be not accepted, would not necessarily reduce that time. But other violations, such as enriching uranium to 20%, should be addressed immediately if they occur, the official said. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official said it would be up to the Europeans to decide if Iran was in violation of the deal and whether to initiate a dispute resolution mechanism that could bring the Iranians back into compliance. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expected to meet this week with E.U. foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, a leading deal proponent, at which this issue is likely to be raised.

Pompeo, who was a leading critic of the deal while he was in Congress, has said in the past that Iranian compliance is not really an issue as the administration sees the agreement as fundamentally flawed because over time it eases many limits on Iran’s nuclear activities.

Yet, just last week, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N.’s nuclear watchdog accused Iran of violating a provision of the deal that relates to advanced centrifuges and called on the Europeans to ensure that Iran remains in compliance.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-33774f4db3d640d4a0c8e38d55e23d91 US-Iran move closer to a flashpoint as tensions spike MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-33774f4db3d640d4a0c8e38d55e23d91 US-Iran move closer to a flashpoint as tensions spike MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69

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US sending more troops to Middle East as Iran tensions mount

The Pentagon on Monday ordered another 1,000 American troops to the Middle East, moving to bolster security in a region reeling from hostile attacks on commercial ships that the U.S. has blamed on Iran.

Officials said the deployment includes security forces and troops for additional surveillance and intelligence gathering in the region. And while the number is small, it represents an escalation of U.S. military might aimed at deterring Iran and calming allies worried that transit through key shipping lanes could be in jeopardy.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan issued a statement saying the forces are “for defensive purposes to address air, naval, and ground-based threats in the Middle East.”

The forces are part of a broader military package of options that were initially laid out to U.S. leaders late last month, totaling as much as 10,000 forces, Patriot missile batteries, aircraft and ships. The decision to send 1,000 troops signals a measured approached by President Donald Trump, who campaigned against the Mideast entanglements of his predecessors and has struggled to bring troops home, despite ongoing threats.

“The United States does not seek conflict with Iran,” Shanahan said. “The action today is being taken to ensure the safety and welfare of our military personnel working throughout the region and to protect our national interests.” He added that the U.S. will continue to adjust troop levels as needed.

The troop decision comes as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other top officials reached out to leaders in Asia and Europe to convince them that Iran was behind the alleged attacks on ships in the Middle East. The Pentagon released new photos intended to bolster its case that Iran was to blame.

The images, many taken from a Navy helicopter, show what the Pentagon said were Iranian forces removing an unexploded mine from the side of the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous oil tanker in the Gulf of Oman.

Officials last week said the move appeared to be an attempt to remove forensic evidence from the scene of the attack. But it’s not clear if examination of the mine would have made it definitively clear that the device was planted by the IRGC.

The Trump administration also finds itself in the awkward position of demanding that Iran comply with a nuclear accord that the president has derided as the worst deal in history.

Iran announced Monday it would break a limit on uranium stockpiles established by a 2015 agreement with world powers that was intended to restrict the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program in exchange for an easing of international sanctions.

Trump withdrew from the agreement, signed by his predecessor, and reinstated punishing economic sanctions, resulting in sharply rising tensions that deteriorated further with Iran’s warning that it could soon start to enrich uranium to just a step away from weapons-grade levels.

That put the State Department in the position of defending the limits set by the 2015 deal that was so maligned by Trump and his national security team.

“We continue to call on the Iranian regime not to obtain a nuclear weapon, to abide by their commitments to the international community,” State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus told reporters.

Ortagus said Iran’s uranium announcement amounted to “extortion” and a “challenge to international norms,” as well as to the 2015 agreement known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

“It’s unfortunate that they have made this announcement today,” Ortagus said. “It doesn’t surprise anybody and this is why the president has often said that the JCPOA needs to be replaced with a better deal.”

Supporters of the deal blamed the Trump administration for Iran’s provocative announcements, saying they were entirely predictable given the renewed U.S. pressure.

“While Iran’s frustration with Trump’s reckless and irresponsible pressure campaign is understandable, we strongly urge Iran to remain in compliance with the nuclear deal,” the Arms Control Association said in a statement. “It remains in Iran’s interests to abide by the limits of the agreement and to fully cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s more intrusive monitoring and verification.”

Iran has shown no willingness to negotiate another deal and vowed not enter into talks with the United States while the administration maintains its “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions.

Administration officials are grappling with whether to press the remaining parties to the deal, including Britain, France and Germany, to demand that Iran stay in compliance. They must also consider if such a stance would essentially concede that the restrictions imposed during the Obama administration, while short of ideal, are better than none.

Under the deal, Iran can keep a stockpile of no more than 660 pounds (300 kilograms) of low-enriched uranium. Behrouz Kamalvandi, spokesman for Iran’s atomic agency, said it would pass that limit June 27.

A senior U.S. official said the administration is most concerned about any violation of the deal that would reduce the breakout time Iran would need to produce a nuclear weapon. The deal aimed to keep the breakout time at one year.

The official said certain violations, while they should be not accepted, would not necessarily reduce that time. But other violations, such as enriching uranium to 20%, should be addressed immediately if they occur, the official said. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official said it would be up to the Europeans to decide if Iran was in violation of the deal and whether to initiate a dispute resolution mechanism that could bring the Iranians back into compliance. Pompeo is expected to meet this week with E.U. foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, a leading deal proponent, and this issue is likely to be raised.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-9143e7e508b449a69f8ce8d0909b75d9 US sending more troops to Middle East as Iran tensions mount LOLITA C. BALDOR and MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-9143e7e508b449a69f8ce8d0909b75d9 US sending more troops to Middle East as Iran tensions mount LOLITA C. BALDOR and MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69

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US: Iran should still comply with nuke deal Trump derided

The Trump administration found itself in the awkward position Monday of demanding that Iran comply with a nuclear accord that the president has derided as the worst deal in history.

Iran announced Monday it would break a limit on uranium stockpiles established by a 2015 agreement with world powers that was intended to restrict the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program in exchange for an easing of international sanctions.

President Donald Trump withdrew from the agreement, signed by his predecessor, and reinstated punishing economic sanctions, resulting in sharply rising tensions that deteriorated further with the Iranian warning that it could soon start to enrich uranium to just a step away from weapons-grade levels.

That put the State Department in the position of defending the limits set by the 2015 deal that was so maligned by Trump and his national security team.

“We continue to call on the Iranian regime not to obtain a nuclear weapon, to abide by their commitments to the international community,” State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus told reporters.

The Iranian announcement seemed likely to further inflame Mideast tensions as the U.S. was working with allies on a response to attacks on two oil tankers near the Persian Gulf that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said was carried out by Iranian forces.

The State Department spokeswoman said Iran’s uranium announcement amounted to “extortion” and a “challenge to international norms,” as well as to the 2015 agreement known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

“It’s unfortunate that they have made this announcement today,” Ortagus said. “It doesn’t surprise anybody and this is why the president has often said that the JCPOA needs to be replaced with a better deal.”

Trump appeared to say the JCPOA should not be violated in a tweet that said “Iran to defy Uranium Stockpile Limits.”

Supporters of the deal, meanwhile, blamed the administration for Iran’s provocative announcements, saying they were entirely predictable given the renewed U.S. pressure.

“While Iran’s frustration with Trump’s reckless and irresponsible pressure campaign is understandable, we strongly urge Iran to remain in compliance with the nuclear deal,” the Arms Control Association said in a statement. “It remains in Iran’s interests to abide by the limits of the agreement and to fully cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s more intrusive monitoring and verification.”

Iran has shown no willingness to negotiate another deal and vowed not enter into talks while the United States while the administration maintains its “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions.

Administration officials found themselves Monday grappling with whether to urge the remaining parties to the deal, including Britain, France and Germany, to demand that Iran stay in compliance. They must also consider if such a stance would essentially concede that the restrictions imposed during the Obama administration, while short of ideal, are better than none.

Under the deal, Iran can keep a stockpile of no more than 660 pounds (300 kilograms) of low-enriched uranium. Behrouz Kamalvandi, the spokesman for Iran’s atomic agency said it would pass that limit on Thursday, June 27.

A senior U.S. official said the administration is most concerned about any violation of the deal that would reduce the breakout time that Iran would need to produce a nuclear weapon. The deal aimed to keep the breakout time at one year.

The official said certain violations, while they should be not accepted, would not necessarily reduce that time. But other violations, including enriching uranium to 20% should be addressed immediately if they occur, the official said. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official said it would be up to the Europeans to decide if Iran was in violation of the deal and whether to initiate a dispute resolution mechanism that could bring the Iranians back into compliance. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expected to meet this week with E.U. foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, a leading deal proponent, at which this issue is likely to be raised.

Pompeo, who was a leading critic of the deal while he was in Congress, has said in the past that Iranian compliance is not really an issue as the administration sees the agreement as fundamentally flawed because over time it eases many limits on Iran’s nuclear activities.

Yet, just last week, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N.’s nuclear watchdog accused Iran of violating a provision of the deal that relates to advanced centrifuges and called on the Europeans to ensure that Iran remains in compliance.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-33774f4db3d640d4a0c8e38d55e23d91 US: Iran should still comply with nuke deal Trump derided MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-33774f4db3d640d4a0c8e38d55e23d91 US: Iran should still comply with nuke deal Trump derided MATTHEW LEE fox-news/us/military fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 7d907bc4-c69c-5588-bea3-30cf57e01b69

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Lawmakers mark D-Day anniversary with Normandy parachute jump

Two military veterans who now serve in Congress joined together for a bipartisan parachute jump in Normandy on Sunday to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

“It was deeply moving,” Florida Republican Rep. Michael Waltz, a Green Beret who served in Afghanistan, said in a statement to Fox News. “It was an unforgettable experience to make the same jump so many brave men made to defend Europe and the world during World War II.”

TRUMP, OTHER LEADERS MARK D-DAY’S 75TH ANNIVERSARY IN NORMANDY, FRANCE

“Honored to have the opportunity to jump into Normandy to remember the soldiers who did the same jump 75 years ago during the Allied invasion,” said Colorado Democratic Rep. Jason Crow, an Army Ranger who served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Waltz posted video of his jump – which was intended to recreate the jumps by Allied troops in Normandy during World War II.

Waltz landed a few miles away and walked through a small French town, where he was stopped by people asking to take photos with him, a spokesman said.

“The response of the French people all over Normandy was just overwhelming,” Waltz said. “Thousands of people came out to see and celebrate the jumps. Most of them were waving American and French flags, clapping, posing for pictures and treating every American soldier like a rock star. There was such a heartfelt appreciation and gratitude for the sacrifices of our forefathers for their freedom.”

Crow tweeted that both units he served with — the 82nd Airborne and 75th Rangers — were part of D-Day.

“Proud to carry on their stories today,” Crow said.

Waltz and Crow were the only two U.S. lawmakers of the 1,000 people who parachuted on Sunday. Crow told the Colorado Sun that he and Waltz were hoping to “show some unity and a common bond.”

President Trump was among the American officials who traveled to Normandy last week to commemorate the anniversary of the invasion, which eventually led to the liberation of France and Allied victory over Germany during World War II.

Westlake Legal Group Waltz-Crow Lawmakers mark D-Day anniversary with Normandy parachute jump fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc cf2951c7-d02c-51c1-99f8-39c203f2b758 article Alex Pappas   Westlake Legal Group Waltz-Crow Lawmakers mark D-Day anniversary with Normandy parachute jump fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc cf2951c7-d02c-51c1-99f8-39c203f2b758 article Alex Pappas

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US military vehicle hit by roadside bomb in Niger, officials say

A roadside bomb exploded damaging a U.S. military vehicle struck in the West African country of Niger, but no one was killed, U.S. Africa Command told Fox News on Sunday.

U.S. officials confirmed a tactical vehicle was damaged in Saturday’s explosion but said the cause was “undetermined at this time.”

U.S. Africa Command told Fox News: “A U.S. Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle (MAT-V) activated an improvised explosive device (IED) while entering a firing range in the vicinity of Ouallam, Niger.”

Westlake Legal Group Map-Ouallam US military vehicle hit by roadside bomb in Niger, officials say Frank Miles fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc article 3cab2f37-7380-5c5e-9b38-80ab34498bc2

A roadside bomb struck a U.S. military vehicle struck in Niger but nobody was killed, officials said. (US Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Kyle McNally/Google Maps)

NIGER AMBUSH RESULTED FROM MULTIPLE FAILURES, PENTAGON SAYS

Its statement added: “U.S. and Nigerien partner forces were conducting a training exercise when the explosion occurred.”

Ouallam, in western Niger, is not far from where four U.S. soldiers died during an October 2017 ambush. The attack by Islamic militants also killed four Nigerien soldiers in the joint patrol force.

The ambush drew attention to the U.S. military’s role in training troops in Niger.

The Pentagon said in November that it planned to reduce its counterterrorism forces in Africa over the next several years.

The move would be in line with the Trump administration’s belief that the main challenge to U.S. security and prosperity is strategic competition with China and Russia rather than threats from extremist groups like the Islamic State group.

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U.S. Africa Command told Fox News: “Niger is a vital partner in the fight against violent extremist organizations. U.S. forces are in Niger to work by, with, and through Nigerien partners to promote stability and security while enabling them to address their security threats.”

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Map-Ouallam US military vehicle hit by roadside bomb in Niger, officials say Frank Miles fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc article 3cab2f37-7380-5c5e-9b38-80ab34498bc2   Westlake Legal Group Map-Ouallam US military vehicle hit by roadside bomb in Niger, officials say Frank Miles fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/world fnc article 3cab2f37-7380-5c5e-9b38-80ab34498bc2

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West Point cadet killed in vehicle accident identified as exemplary wrestler from New Jersey studying law

The 22-year-old West Point cadet killed on Thursday morning after a multi-vehicle accident near the U.S. Military Academy was identified on Friday as Christopher J. Morgan of West Orange, New Jersey.

The cadet died at the scene after a 5-ton truck with 20 cadets and some U.S. Army soldiers aboard overturned during summer training near the Camp Natural Bridge facility in upstate New York.

1 DEAD IN ACCIDENT NEAR WEST POINT CADET TRAINING FACILITY, OFFICIALS SAY

Nineteen other cadets and two soldiers operating the vehicle sustained non-life-threatening injuries. All had been treated and released by Friday.

“Cadet Morgan was a valued member of the Corps of Cadets and will be missed by all. The entire community is ensuring that our cadets are being cared for physically, emotionally, and spiritually,” Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams, West Point superintendent, said in a statement on Friday. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the Morgan family.”

It remains unclear what caused the crash. The investigation will include a probe by the Army’s Criminal Investigation Division, a review by a safety team from Alabama’s Fort Rucker. The New York State Police will help to re-create the scene.

“Cadet Morgan was a valued member of the Corps of Cadets and will be missed by all. The entire community is ensuring that our cadets are being cared for physically, emotionally, and spiritually.”

— Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams

FORMER WEST POINT CADET SENTENCED TO 21 YEARS IN CLASSMATE RAPE CASE CAN RETURN TO ACADEMY AFTER CONVICTION OVERTURNED

Morgan was an exemplary wrestler who studied law in the class of 2020. His father called him a hero and “an inspiration to me and my family.”

“He was my first son. He was an inspiration to me and my family. He was my hero,” Christopher C. Morgan told the New York Post. “I miss talking to him, I miss his smile, I miss hearing about what he’s doing. No father should have to bury their child.”

His wrestling coach Kevin Ward said in a statement that Morgan was “a talented, hardworking, and determined athlete who loved his sport.”

“Chris had an infectious personality with a smile big enough to fill any room, and a heart big enough to love everyone around him. He made everyone around him better and he will be greatly missed,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group 2000-23 West Point cadet killed in vehicle accident identified as exemplary wrestler from New Jersey studying law Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc cbbb0b7c-a46f-50b6-897d-837ec2ee9e33 article

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Military Academy West Point shows Cadet Christopher J. Morgan, Class of 2020, from West Orange, NJ, who died Thursday June 6, 2019 when a vehicle loaded with West Point cadets on summer training overturned in rough, wooded terrain. (U.S. Military Academy West Point via AP)

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Morgan always wanted to serve the country, saying back in 2015, when he was part of the school’s Air Force ROTC, that although he planned to wrestle at West Point, he was more interested in academics.

“I’m interested in political science, foreign affairs, and global economy,” Morgan told online news site TAPinto West Orange. “Whether or not I remain in the Army as a career officer, I want to work in Homeland Security.”

A memorial ceremony and private funeral service will be held at the academy 50 miles north of New York City next week.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 2000-22 West Point cadet killed in vehicle accident identified as exemplary wrestler from New Jersey studying law Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc cbbb0b7c-a46f-50b6-897d-837ec2ee9e33 article   Westlake Legal Group 2000-22 West Point cadet killed in vehicle accident identified as exemplary wrestler from New Jersey studying law Lukas Mikelionis fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc cbbb0b7c-a46f-50b6-897d-837ec2ee9e33 article

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