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Westlake Legal Group > fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea

‘America’s Newsroom’ says goodbye to Bill Hemmer: ‘This is a show you built’

Bill Hemmer signed off of “America’s Newsroom” on Friday, after 12 years co-hosting the morning show on Fox News Channel.

Hemmer, who joined Fox News in 2005, will anchor “Bill Hemmer Reports” weekdays starting Monday at 3 p.m. EST. Hemmer will be replaced by Ed Henry, who will co-anchor “America’s Newsroom” alongside Sandra Smith.

The veteran journalist will lead all breaking news coverage in addition to hosting the straight-news program from the network’s Fox News Deck.

“I want to say this,” Hemmer told “America’s Newsroom” viewers, also addressing co-host Sandra Smith. “I think what people on the outside of Fox don’t understand about the people who work at Fox is that I consider you a friend, also.”

FOX NEWS’ BILL HEMMER MOVES TO AFTERNOONS, WILL LEAD BREAKING NEWS DIVISION

“And, Ben, I consider you a friend,” he said, gesturing to his stage manager. “And, everyone else around here on staff. And, that brings a certain unity to the process that we do every day and I think that’s really special and I consider it really important — a really important part about what we do.”

“We’re in it together in a significant way every day,” Hemmer continued. “So, [I’m] not going far.”

“Can I just add to that?” asked Smith. “There is not a person in this building – inside or out – that you mention Bill Hemmer’s name and they don’t say, ‘That’s a great guy.’ Because he is. And, he’s a great journalist.”

“Well, we’re going to get on the breaking news of the day, just like we do every day. We will get newsmakers, too, to bring that in,” Hemmer said of his next step.

“And, I know you have a great guy coming in here, too. Ed Henry has been trying to take me out at the knees for five years,” he joked. “So, now he gets his shot.”

“Thank you for the handoff, Bill. We look forward on building on the success of a show you built,” Smith replied.

Westlake Legal Group 532afc70-072016_bill-hemmer_martha-maccallum_rnc_cleveland_oh_13 'America's Newsroom' says goodbye to Bill Hemmer: 'This is a show you built' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/personalities/vladimir-putin fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/us/terror/bombings fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/boston fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 592a633f-b2b7-5893-a490-f2485de10bb2

July 20, 2016: Fox News anchors Bill Hemmer and Martha MacCallum on set at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Fox News)

Most recently, Hemmer conducted an exclusive interview with Attorney General William Barr from El Salvador, reported live from the U.S. summit with North Korea in Vietnam and was on the ground for President Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin from Helsinki, Finland.

He has interviewed everyone from Mother Teresa to former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, playing a key role in FNC’s political coverage in the process.

Hemmer has contributed to all of the network’s special election coverage since 2008, often covering conventions and reporting live from the campaign trail. Hemmer’s signature “Bill-Board” helps viewers understand election night results.

Additionally, the Cincinnati native has covered major news events, including the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting and Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.

“On to greater things. On to another chapter. And, it’s just that — it’s another chapter,” Hemmer concluded. “So please come along for the ride.”

Fox News’ Brian Flood contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124386621001_6124387913001-vs 'America's Newsroom' says goodbye to Bill Hemmer: 'This is a show you built' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/personalities/vladimir-putin fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/us/terror/bombings fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/boston fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 592a633f-b2b7-5893-a490-f2485de10bb2   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124386621001_6124387913001-vs 'America's Newsroom' says goodbye to Bill Hemmer: 'This is a show you built' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/personalities/vladimir-putin fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/us/terror/bombings fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/boston fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/william-barr fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 592a633f-b2b7-5893-a490-f2485de10bb2

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US ambassador ‘surprised’ North Korea didn’t send threatened ‘Christmas gift’ as nuclear deadline closed

The U.S. ambassador to South Korea said Thursday he was “surprised” and “glad” that North Korea failed to deliver its threatened “Christmas gift” to the U.S. after Kim Jong Un’s end-of-year deadline to settle nuclear negotiations with the Trump administration passed without a compromise.

“You can say that I personally was surprised. But I’m glad also … there was no Christmas gift,” Ambassador Harry Harris told reporters in Seoul. “Washington was ready for any eventuality, and we were all glad that there was no ICBM test or nuclear test.”

TRUMP URGED TO ‘LOWER THE BOOM’ ON NORTH KOREA AMID NEW THREATS

Kim’s regime wanted sanctions eased by the end of the year and warned that its “Christmas gift” to the U.S. would depend on what action Washington took in the talks.

The warning was seen as a vague threat of a potential year-end provocation that prompted speculation of a new missile test, possibly of an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of delivering a nuclear warhead.

Pyongyang hasn’t conducted any new weapons tests despite the U.S. not meeting the Kim-imposed deadline to make concessions.

Westlake Legal Group U.S.-Ambassador-to-Seoul-Harry-Harris US ambassador ‘surprised’ North Korea didn’t send threatened ‘Christmas gift’ as nuclear deadline closed Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/nuclear-proliferation fox news fnc/world fnc article 8d91c525-d080-515e-ad56-a4a3f8966e82

Harris said he was surprised and pleased that North Korea did not give the U.S. an unwelcome “Christmas gift” because of stalled nuclear disarmament talks, and that President Donald Trump is still confident it will denuclearize. (Heo Ran/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Harris said Trump believes Kim will live up to the Singapore pledge made during the leaders’ first summit in 2018 to complete total denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and build a lasting peace between the nations.

KIM JONG UN THREATENS TO RENEW TESTING NUCLEAR WEAPONS, LONG-RANGE MISSILES

“President Trump … is still confident that Kim Jong Un will meet the commitment that they both made together in Singapore,” Harris said. “We should focus on President Trump’s view that there is room for discussion here.”

The two subsequent summits and other low-level meetings, however, have not progressed the agreements and prospects for a restart of diplomacy are unclear.

Harris said both Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in “are keeping the door open to negotiations and hoping Kim Jong Un will walk through that door.”

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“So the ball is in his court,” he said.

Kim began the new year with a warning, threatening that if the U.S. maintained its “hostile policy” toward North Korea, “the world will witness a new strategic weapon.”

Fox News’ Judson Berger and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118336337001_6118331488001-vs US ambassador ‘surprised’ North Korea didn’t send threatened ‘Christmas gift’ as nuclear deadline closed Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/nuclear-proliferation fox news fnc/world fnc article 8d91c525-d080-515e-ad56-a4a3f8966e82   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118336337001_6118331488001-vs US ambassador ‘surprised’ North Korea didn’t send threatened ‘Christmas gift’ as nuclear deadline closed Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/south-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/nuclear-proliferation fox news fnc/world fnc article 8d91c525-d080-515e-ad56-a4a3f8966e82

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Trump administration makes new effort to ‘reach out to the North Koreans,’ report says

The Trump administration has “reached out to the North Koreans” to ask them to resume diplomacy since the two sides broke off talks last October, White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien told Axios Sunday.

“We’ve reached out to the North Koreans and let them know that we would like to continue the negotiations in Stockholm that were last undertaken in early October,” he told the news service.

“We’ve been letting them know, through various channels, that we would like to get those [negotiations] back on track and to implement Chairman Kim’s commitment to denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” O’Brien added.

NORTH KOREA SAYS TRUMP BIRTHDAY GREETING NOT ENOUGH TO RESTART TALKS

O’Brien expressed cautious optimism North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un hasn’t yet delivered his promised “Christmas gift” — something many analysts expected would be a nuclear weapons test, Axios reported.

President Trump is hoping to build on inroads he’s made to restart the talks and reach an agreement with the North, the report said. Trump recently sent a birthday message to Kim, but the North Koreans have already said Trump’s courtship will not change their policy.

To date, Trump’s diplomacy has yielded little results besides giving Kim more time to expand his nuclear arsenal, according to analysts tracking North Korea’s supply of nuclear warheads.

Westlake Legal Group robertobrien-cropped-1253am Trump administration makes new effort to 'reach out to the North Koreans,' report says Jack Durschlag fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/us fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/nuclear-proliferation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 79387b97-580f-5049-bb2d-6eb0d6955012

US President Donald Trump(L)speaks next to new national security advisor Robert O’Brien on September 18, 2019 at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP via Getty Images)

John Bolton, O’Brien’s predecessor as national security adviser, recently told Axios the administration is bluffing about stopping North Korea’s nuclear ambitions and should prepare to make a public admission its policy failed badly.

O’Brien said he remains hopeful about Kim’s decision — so far — to refrain from launching a nuclear test during the Christmas and New Year timeframe.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Kim “promised to send a Christmas present. The president suggested he send him a vase. We didn’t get a vase or any other sort of Christmas gift. That appears to be positive,” O’Brien told Axios.

“All we know is we were told we were going to get a Christmas gift and the Christmas gift didn’t come. And so I think that was an encouraging sign. But, again, that doesn’t mean we won’t see some sort of test in the future,” O’Brien added.

Westlake Legal Group trump-kim-handshake Trump administration makes new effort to 'reach out to the North Koreans,' report says Jack Durschlag fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/us fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/nuclear-proliferation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 79387b97-580f-5049-bb2d-6eb0d6955012   Westlake Legal Group trump-kim-handshake Trump administration makes new effort to 'reach out to the North Koreans,' report says Jack Durschlag fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world fox-news/us fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/nuclear-proliferation fox news fnc/politics fnc article 79387b97-580f-5049-bb2d-6eb0d6955012

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Chris Wallace on Soleimani strike: Trump administration must now decide ‘how far we want to take this’

Westlake Legal Group CHRIS Chris Wallace on Soleimani strike: Trump administration must now decide 'how far we want to take this' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox-news/shows/fox-news-sunday fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/rand-paul fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/columns/capitol-attitude fox news fnc/media fnc dcf8089d-b60e-5934-820f-848db4cf9db6 article

The question for the Trump administration is how far the United States wants to take the escalating conflict with the Iranian regime, “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace said Friday.

Appearing on “America’s Newsroom” with host Sandra Smith, Wallace said that while nobody would “shed a tear” about the death of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani — the Ayatollah’s righthand man — what comes next “concerns some people.”

Wallace told Smith that both President Barack Obama and President George W. Bush had the options, at various points, to “take out” Soleimani and that “they decided — as much as they hated him — not to do so because they were worried how the Iranians would respond to that.

“And, that’s the concern,” Wallace explained. “They talked about harsh retaliation: what form will that take?”

SOLEIMANI’S TAKEDOWN FUELS NEW PARTISAN WARFARE ON CAPITOL HILL

“Will there be military strikes? Will there be terror attacks? Iran has a very sophisticated cyber capability. Could there be cyber-attacks on the U.S. homeland?” he continued further.

“So, if this is the kind of strike that finally gets Tehran’s attention, and they pulled back, well then that’s a great masterstroke for the U.S. On the other hand, if they simply escalate — respond to our escalation with another one of their own — then people are going to have to decide how far we want to take this.”

Officials told Fox News on Friday that 3,000 more U.S. troops would be deploying to the Middle East in the wake of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s threat to respond to the airstrike with “harsh retaliation.”

The 82nd Airborne Division’s brigade — put on alert Friday — will be deploying to Kuwait and a battalion of some 750 paratroops were deployed this week.

LINDSEY GRAHAM: QASSEM SOLEIMANI IS DEAD BECAUSE HE ‘MISCALCULATED’ PRESIDENT TRUMP

Meanwhile, members of Congress remain divided on the issue — with Republicans cheering the airstrike and Democrats rebuking the president’s actions, saying they were unauthorized.

“All steps must now be taken to protect our forces against the almost inevitable escalation and increased risk,” Rep. Adam Schiff. D-Calif., tweeted Thursday.

Republican South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said on “Fox & Friends” Friday that the attack was justified.

“This was a pre-emptive attack to let everyone know from North Korea, just anyone else, that if you come after Americans on President Trump’s watch — you do so at your peril,” Graham said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

But, at least one Republican, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., sympathized with some of the concerns expressed by Democrats.

“If we are to go to war w/ Iran the Constitution dictates that we declare war. A war without a Congressional declaration is a recipe for feckless intermittent eruptions of violence w/ no clear mission for our soldiers,” he wrote. “Our young men and women in the armed services deserve better.”

Westlake Legal Group CHRIS Chris Wallace on Soleimani strike: Trump administration must now decide 'how far we want to take this' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox-news/shows/fox-news-sunday fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/rand-paul fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/columns/capitol-attitude fox news fnc/media fnc dcf8089d-b60e-5934-820f-848db4cf9db6 article   Westlake Legal Group CHRIS Chris Wallace on Soleimani strike: Trump administration must now decide 'how far we want to take this' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fox-news/shows/fox-news-sunday fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/rand-paul fox-news/person/lindsey-graham fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/columns/capitol-attitude fox news fnc/media fnc dcf8089d-b60e-5934-820f-848db4cf9db6 article

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John Bolton: After Kim Jong Un claim, US should resume South Korea military exercises

Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-john-bolton-AP John Bolton: After Kim Jong Un claim, US should resume South Korea military exercises Nick Givas fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/politics fnc f3c5cd2f-ed5d-56d4-9965-17608d4be18b article

Former Trump national security adviser John Bolton called on U.S. armed forces to resume military exercises with South Korea, and ascertain the state of American troops in the region, following Kim Jong Un’s recent statement on testing nuclear weapons.

Kim’s cryptic remarks about the United States receiving a “Christmas gift” from North Korea had already stirred speculation, about the rogue nation planning to test the viability of an intercontinental ballistic missile, which could have the potential to deliver a nuclear warhead.

He then stoked fears of conflict on Tuesday when he spoke to party leaders, claiming he is no longer obligated to comply with a previously self-imposed moratorium on testing nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Bolton voiced his concerns publicly on Twitter Wednesday and suggested resuming canceled military drills and holding congressional hearings.

TRUMP URGED TO ‘LOWER THE BOOM’ ON NORTH KOREA AND NEW THREATS

“How to respond to Kim Jong Un’s threatening New Year’s remarks? The U.S. should fully resume all canceled or down-sized military exercises in South Korea,” he tweeted. “Hold Congressional hearings on whether US troops are truly ready to “fight tonight.”

Kim also warned of a “new strategic weapon” on Tuesday, and accused the U.S. of making “gangster-like demands.”

“The world will witness a new strategic weapon to be possessed by the DPRK in the near future,” he said,

President Donald Trump told reporters at Mar-a-Lago in Florida on Tuesday that he has a good relationship with Kim and expects the North Korean leader to stand by his word.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“He likes me, I like him. We get along. He’s representing his country, I’m representing my country. We have to do what we have to do,” Trump said.

“But he did sign a contract,” the president added. “He did sign an agreement talking about denuclearization. And that was signed. … I think he’s a man of his word.”

In June, Trump made history by becoming the first sitting U.S. president to set foot in North Korea when he met with Kim face-to-face.

Fox News’ Robert Gearty contributed to this piece 

Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-john-bolton-AP John Bolton: After Kim Jong Un claim, US should resume South Korea military exercises Nick Givas fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/politics fnc f3c5cd2f-ed5d-56d4-9965-17608d4be18b article   Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-john-bolton-AP John Bolton: After Kim Jong Un claim, US should resume South Korea military exercises Nick Givas fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/politics fnc f3c5cd2f-ed5d-56d4-9965-17608d4be18b article

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Kim Jong Un threatens to renew testing nuclear weapons, long-range missiles

Dictator Kim Jong Un said North Korea was no longer obligated to comply with a self-imposed moratorium on testing nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles.

In remarks Tuesday to party leaders– and shared on state media Wednesday– Kim also warned of introducing a “new strategic weapon” in the near future.

Kim’s audience also heard him accuse the United States of making “gangster-like demands,” according to Reuters.

At times smiling or slapping the podium, Kim charged the U.S. with maintaining a “hostile policy” that included holding continued joint military drills with South Korea, adopting cutting edge weapons and imposing sanctions,

KIM JONG UN SAYS NORTH KOREA NEEDS TO TAKE ‘OFFENSIVE MEASURES’ TO PROTECT COUNTRY’S SECURITY

Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-AP Kim Jong Un threatens to renew testing nuclear weapons, long-range missiles Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc dbd8972e-169f-50fe-b081-0ec0f64fc9e9 article

In this undated photo taken during the period of Dec. 28 – Dec. 31, 2019 provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un attends a Workers’ Party meeting in Pyongyang, North Korea. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

“The world will witness a new strategic weapon to be possessed by the DPRK in the near future,” Kim said, using the initials for North Korea’s official name–the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, according to Reuters.

While saying he no longer felt bound to honor a moratorium, the rogue leader gave no clear indication that a resumption of such tests was impending. He also appeared to leave the door open for eventual negotiations with the U.S.

Kim has used the diplomatic stalemate to expand his military capabilities by intensifying tests of shorter-range weapons. His arsenal is now estimated to include 40 to 50 nuclear bombs and various delivery systems, including solid-fuel missiles designed to beat missile-defense systems and developmental ICBMs potentially capable of reaching the U.S. mainland.

Kim has also strengthened his negotiating position, moving the diplomacy closer to an arms reduction negotiation between nuclear states rather than talks that would culminate in a unilateral surrender of the weapons he sees as his strongest guarantee of survival.

HARRY KAZIANIS: NORTH KOREA’S KIM HAS THIS GOAL IN MIND (NO, HE’S NOT CRAZY). HERE’S HOW TRUMP SHOULD RESPOND

Lee Sang-min, a spokesman for South Korea’s Unification Ministry, said North Korea carrying out its threat to showcase a new strategic weapon would be unhelpful for diplomacy.

Kim’s comments published in state media Wednesday were made at a key, four-day meeting of the ruling Workers’ Party’s Central Committee as talks between Washington and Pyongyang have faltered over disagreements on disarmament steps and the removal of sanctions.

President Donald Trump said he had a good relationship with Kim and thought the North Korean leader would keep his word, Reuters reported.

“He likes me, I like him. We get along. He’s representing his country, I’m representing my country. We have to do what we have to do.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“But he did sign a contract, he did sign an agreement talking about denuclearization,” Trump told reporters at his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-AP Kim Jong Un threatens to renew testing nuclear weapons, long-range missiles Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc dbd8972e-169f-50fe-b081-0ec0f64fc9e9 article   Westlake Legal Group kim-jong-un-AP Kim Jong Un threatens to renew testing nuclear weapons, long-range missiles Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc dbd8972e-169f-50fe-b081-0ec0f64fc9e9 article

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Harry Kazianis: North Korea’s Kim has THIS goal in mind (no, he’s not crazy). Here’s how Trump should respond

Westlake Legal Group kim-3way-split-332am Harry Kazianis: North Korea's Kim has THIS goal in mind (no, he's not crazy). Here's how Trump should respond Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 2b8be887-7a2f-58c2-9615-43dd5b7aefd5

With a threat to test a “new strategic weapon” in “the near future” North Korea has, in effect, put an ICBM to President Donald Trump’s head in order to gain the two concessions it wants most: sanctions relief and some sort of security guarantee.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is now playing a dangerous game of geopolitical chicken, telegraphing to the world that he most likely will test a new long-range missile that could kill millions of Americans if it landed in a heavily populated area – but would be guaranteed to provoke a devastating U.S retaliatory attack on the North.

Trump needs to play his cards right now and base his strategy on an understanding of why North Korea continues to build and test missiles and why it refuses to abandon its nuclear weapons.

KIM JONG UN SAYS NORTH KOREA NEEDS TO TAKE ‘OFFENSIVE MEASURES’ TO PROTECT COUNTRY’S SECURITY

If he succeeds, the president can minimize any potential nuclear challenge coming for the communist regime and even bring Kim back to the negotiating table.

Of course, any good strategy to take on the North Korean threat must be based on facts on the ground and must be rooted in historical perspective and an understanding of what the hermit kingdom is trying to achieve and what motivates Kim’s actions.

Let’s get one thing straight. Kim is not crazy nor is he suicidal. His goal is not to start a nuclear war that will spark a massive U.S. retaliation that would destroy his country and could result in his own death. His goal is to get relief from U.S. and international economic sanctions without giving up his nukes.

All it would take is the nuclear weapons aboard just one U.S. Navy ballistic submarine – carrying an astounding 192 nuclear warheads – to wipe out North Korea in roughly 20 minutes. Its population of 25 million people would be killed – all from just one submarine lurking below the surface in the Pacific Ocean – and Kim knows that. That’s some real “fire and fury.”

The North Korean dictator – who follows his grandfather and father in leading his nation like a communist hereditary monarch – has a clearly established goal we can all relate to: survival.

Let’s get one thing straight. Kim is not crazy nor is he suicidal. His goal is not to start a nuclear war that will spark a massive U.S. retaliation that would destroy his country and could result in his own death. His goal is to get relief from U.S. and international economic sanctions without giving up his nukes.

Kim believes that his nuclear weapons are the ultimate insurance policy against an attack by the U.S., South Korea or any other nation aiming to overthrow his regime.

Kim knows that U.S. and United Nations forces attacked his country in the Korean War, and is well aware that American forces have waged long wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq in the years since. He doesn’t want any foreign forces seeking regime change in a second Korean War with either a conventional or a nuclear attack – and knows his nukes can act as a deterrent to prevent that.

North Korea has made huge sacrifices to build up its small but very dangerous arsenal of nuclear weapons and missiles. Although the nation has an economy smaller than the state of Montana and can barely feed its own people, it has beaten the odds to join the nuclear club.

But because the North has spent huge sums of money and endured years of international economic sanctions to go nuclear, it’s not realistic to expect to Kim to simply hand over all his nuclear bombs and missiles to the U.S. anytime soon.

Demanding such a full denuclearization in return for eventual sanctions relief – something that would take years – is not a policy at all, but a recipe for disaster, simply ensuring that Kim builds more and bigger nuclear weapons.

A senior White House adviser told me that he considers North Korea “a fourth-world nation that could kill 100 million people in an hour – and that’s just with nukes, never mind all those chemical and biological weapons. North Korea is a Pandora’s box that – if you open it with military force – will spark at the very least a mini Armageddon.”

From all of this, a very clear strategy can emerge for the Trump administration if it can take a more long-term approach. The administration needs to understand that for at least the short to medium term, North Korea will be unwilling to give up its nuclear arms – the regime said as much just weeks ago.

For now, Team Trump must focus on starving the regime of any resources it can get its hands on to advance its nuclear program through the tightest sanctions possible and depriving the Kim family of any technology that could advance such a cause.

And that’s just the beginning. Washington must also ensure that Pyongyang does not sell any of its nuclear or missile technology. There is clear evidence that North Korea and Iran have traded such knowledge over the years.

America must do all it can to ensure that such transfers stop and that no other nation gains from North Korea’s nuclear advances – and prevent Pyongyang from making money off them to advance its weapons of mass destruction programs.

Such a policy of what amounts to a Cold War-style containment must be matched by a willingness to continue dialogue. The history of U.S.-North Korea relations is filled with too many ups and downs – tensions and breakthroughs that are too dangerous to continue.

We must be willing to try and remove the reasons that North Korea feels it needs nuclear weapons. That can only be done by building trust. As a start, a formal peace declaration ending the Korean War should be signed. In addition, liaison offices should be set up in each nation’s capital to ensure a crisis does not end up in a shooting war.

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From there, both sides should work on small steps to remove all military threats facing the other – both nuclear and conventional. In fact, we should make the nuclear disarmament of North Korea the end goal of a long-term policy shift that could take years but lead to a more stable, less up-and-down relationship.

None of this will be easy. In fact, it would be much easier to do what every other U.S. administration has done on North Korea: confront the regime when it acts aggressively, punish it with sanctions and sound tough, but then move on to the next global crisis or challenge at home when missiles stop heading skyward. That would be a mistake.

Eventually, President Trump or a future president may reluctantly come to the painful conclusion that getting North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons is as impossible as trying to get Russia, China, India, Pakistan, or another member of the nuclear club to turn back the clock and give up its nukes.

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Should that day come, our fallback position should be to press for an arms control agreement to limit the North Korean nuclear force to the smallest size possible in return for normalized relations.

Past U.S. leaders weren’t happy when the Soviet Union and China went nuclear – but weren’t prepared to start a nuclear war to force their denuclearization. And in all the years since, no nation has launched a nuclear attack.  

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Westlake Legal Group kim-3way-split-332am Harry Kazianis: North Korea's Kim has THIS goal in mind (no, he's not crazy). Here's how Trump should respond Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 2b8be887-7a2f-58c2-9615-43dd5b7aefd5   Westlake Legal Group kim-3way-split-332am Harry Kazianis: North Korea's Kim has THIS goal in mind (no, he's not crazy). Here's how Trump should respond Harry J. Kazianis fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 2b8be887-7a2f-58c2-9615-43dd5b7aefd5

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Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take ‘offensive measures’ to protect country’s security

Kim Jong Un has told party leaders in a long speech that North Korea needs to take “positive and offensive measures” to protect the country’s security, according to reports.

The North Korean dictator issued the call during a seven-hour speech at a weekend gathering in Pyongyang of Workers’ Party officials that the BBC described as unusual for this time of year.

Reuters quoted state media KCNA as reporting Monday that Kim suggested action in the areas of foreign affairs, the munitions industry and armed forces, stressing the need to take “positive and offensive measures for fully ensuring the sovereignty and security of the country.”

State TV showed hundreds in attendance for the meeting.

Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-3 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649

People watch a TV screen showing a file image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump, left, during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019. The sign reads: “North Korea and the United States can’t restore confidence.” (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

JAPAN POLICE FIND HUMAN REMAINS IN ‘GHOST BOAT’ SUSPECTED FROM NORTH KOREA

“By ‘positive and offensive measures,’ they might mean highly provocative action against the United States and also South Korea,” said Yang Moo-jin, a professor at the University of North Korean studies in Seoul, according to Reuters.

Kim’s speech comes amid worries North Korea could scuttle talks with the U.S. on denuclearization and restart long-range missle tests.

Those talks have stalled over Kim’s demand for sanctions relief in exchange for disarmament.

It is expected Kim will use his annual New Year’s address to announce major changes to his economic and security policies.

Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-2 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649

In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un speaks during a Workers’ Party meeting in Pyongyang, North Korea. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

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KCNA did not report any decisions made at the party meeting or mention any specific comment by Kim toward the United States.

But it said Kim noted that the Workers’ Party is determined to enter “another arduous and protracted struggle,” possibly referring to efforts to overcome U.S.-led sanctions and pressure, before concluding his speech with calls for “dynamically opening the road” toward building a powerful socialist nation.

KCNA said the party is working to draft a resolution based on the agenda laid out by Kim and plans to discuss an unspecified “important document.”

In his New Year’s speech to begin 2019, Kim said his country would pursue an unspecified “new path” if the administration of President Trump persists with sanctions and pressure on North Korea.

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Negotiations faltered following the collapse of his second summit with Trump in February, where the Americans rejected North Korean demands for broad sanctions relief in exchange for the dismantling of an aging nuclear facility in Yongbyon, which would only represent a partial surrender of its nuclear capabilities.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-3 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649   Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-3 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649

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Rebecca Grant: US-China relations – these 2020 hot-button issues will decide who’s number one

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117993861001_6118002917001-vs Rebecca Grant: US-China relations – these 2020 hot-button issues will decide who's number one Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 95ab0cde-ef0d-58ee-a306-b41b51d3b70e /FOX NEWS/WORLD/GLOBAL ECONOMY/Trade

The U.S. and China closed out 2019 with a last-minute trade deal, but face it, the rise of China is the biggest external force shaping America’s destiny.

By 2049, China aims to be the world’s number one nation. And, with their economic power, they are well on the way. As we. begin a new decade, here are some of the hot button issues that will set the course of U.S.-China relations.

Trade deals. The U.S. and China reached a historic, enforceable trade deal on Dec. 13. China agreed to purchase an extra $200 billion of U.S. goods over the next two years. China also agreed to back off on technology transfer, financial restrictions and intellectual property coercion. However, tariffs of 25 percent remain on $250 billion of goods with 7.5 percent tariffs on an additional $120 billion – that’s still about half the U.S.-China trade. There’s a great benefit to China – and the world – if China plays fair under this deal and respects the Western rules that created the global economy. But the trade war is not over.

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Chinese whining. Nor is Chinese whining. President Trump’s tariffs left China reeling in shock for much of 2018 and 2019. China likes to blame America for all the fuss. “We did not initiate this trade war and this is not something we want,” China’s President Xi Jinping told the Bloomberg Economic Forum in Beijing on Nov. 22. The innocence act doesn’t cut it, because the Chinese Communist Party led by Xi is totally intertwined with China’s business pursuits.

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Foreign Minister Wang Yi called Trump “a troublemaker in today’s world” on Dec. 13. Not nice.

Huawei and NATO. The complaints are especially loud when it comes to Huawei, a telecom giant and maker of nifty folding phones and 5G wireless that, behind a screen of holding companies and trade unions, is owned by the Chinese government. Their slogan, “Building a fully connected, intelligent world,” sends shivers through the U.S. national security community. Turns out China’s campaign to cut 5G wireless deals with many NATO allies is also a serious threat to alliance military operations because China could intrude on critical national security communications. The U.S. and China will fight over Huawei all through 2020.

Hong Kong. Spurning the citizens of Hong Kong is an affront to the world. China has a complex agreement on how to treat Hong Kong. Xi Jinping would be wise to show restraint, but he is deathly afraid of dissent in Hong Kong spilling over to mainland Chinese. The risks remain high.

North Korea. Sadly, Xi Jinping may have Kim Jong Un dancing on a short leash. In 2017, China warned North Korea to cool it. Then in 2018 came the first U.S. tariffs, which stunned China’s leaders. Possibly China has told North Korea to drag out de-nuking, which will aggravate Trump and keep all of China’s bargaining chips on the table in the bigger trade war.

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China-Russia military combo. China and Russia have a long, fraught history, but right now they are each other’s best military pals. China is still a big customer of Russian military systems, which China often modifies and improves. In 2019, Chinese and Russian forces ran showy military drills from the Pacific to the Gulf of Oman. The new year will reveal how deep this alliance goes and how much the pair threaten U.S. national security.

Latin America and Africa. China is courting Brazil, Argentina and other nations with an eye on their land and natural resources. Short-term, it’s about soybeans. Long-term, it’s about challenging the U.S. close to home.

World domination. Twenty years ago, China had zero companies on Fortune’s Global 500 list.  Then China gained status as a full world trade partner. By 2019, there were 129 Chinese companies on the list, and a full 82 of the Chinese firms were state-owned enterprises. In contrast, 121 American companies made the list. The U.S.-China economic competition is the core of international relations today.

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From 2020 onward, the U.S. must picture where it wants to be relative to China 30 years from now. Facing up to the economic, military and diplomatic threats calls for a long-term strategy that will take all the guile and insight America can muster.

There is a hopeful path forward, if Xi Jinping takes it. Help with North Korea, buying U.S. goods as agreed, shutting off the backdoor oil purchases from Iran – all this could improve U.S.-China relations and cost Xi Jinping very little. Can China act like a grown-up world power? Stay tuned.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117993861001_6118002917001-vs Rebecca Grant: US-China relations – these 2020 hot-button issues will decide who's number one Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 95ab0cde-ef0d-58ee-a306-b41b51d3b70e /FOX NEWS/WORLD/GLOBAL ECONOMY/Trade   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6117993861001_6118002917001-vs Rebecca Grant: US-China relations – these 2020 hot-button issues will decide who's number one Rebecca Grant fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 95ab0cde-ef0d-58ee-a306-b41b51d3b70e /FOX NEWS/WORLD/GLOBAL ECONOMY/Trade

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Japan police find human remains in ‘ghost boat’ suspected from North Korea

Westlake Legal Group North-Korea-Wood-Boat-Getty Japan police find human remains in 'ghost boat' suspected from North Korea Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox news fnc/world fnc article a22cf420-f1ee-51e0-93b6-b5cbb95e98aa

Japanese police found the remains of at least five people inside a wooden boat with Korean writing on its side after it washed ashore on the coast of one of Japan’s outlying islands.

Officials said the boat, suspected to be from North Korea, was discovered around 9:30 a.m. local time Saturday on Sado Island, which is off the coast of Japan’s northwestern prefecture of Niigata.

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Coast Guard official Kei Chinen told Reuters that police found the heads of two persons, as well as five bodies, though couldn’t confirm whether the heads belonged to the corpses or were from two other people.

Local media reported that the remains were “partially skeletonized,” suggesting the victims may have been at sea for a long time.

A police officer first spotted the badly damaged wooden boat on Friday afternoon, but officers waited until Saturday before entering it due to unstable weather, Reuters reported.

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The grisly finds come amid strained diplomatic ties between North Korea and Japan over the north’s nuclear arms program.

On Friday, Japanese public broadcaster NHK sent an incorrect news bulletin that reported North Korea had launched a missile that fell into waters east of the Japanese archipelago. It issued an apology, claiming it was a media training alert.

Westlake Legal Group North-Korea-Wood-Boat-Getty Japan police find human remains in 'ghost boat' suspected from North Korea Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox news fnc/world fnc article a22cf420-f1ee-51e0-93b6-b5cbb95e98aa   Westlake Legal Group North-Korea-Wood-Boat-Getty Japan police find human remains in 'ghost boat' suspected from North Korea Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox news fnc/world fnc article a22cf420-f1ee-51e0-93b6-b5cbb95e98aa

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