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Westlake Legal Group > fox news (Page 5)

Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil

Police in Brazil this week busted a counterfeit supercar ring that was building “Fauxrraris” and “Scamborghinis” and selling them at cut-rate prices.

Westlake Legal Group sham-1 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a

The father and son accused of running the illicit operation were arrested, and eight cars in various states of assembly were seized from their garage in the state of Santa Catarina after the automakers filed complaints with local authorities.

Westlake Legal Group sham-3 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a

Among the vehicles discovered were replicas of the Lamborghini Gallardo and Huracan, and a Ferrari 430 lookalike. The tooling and materials used to build them were confiscated in the raid, along with phony brand badges and seats embroidered with the companies’ logos.

Westlake Legal Group sham-2 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a
Westlake Legal Group sham-4 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a

According to O Globo, the copycat cars were being marketed on social media and built to order for around $50,000 each, which is a tenth of what the real models sell for new in the country. Investigators are trying to determine how many other cars had already been delivered and will be calling on additional workers who were involved to testify.

Westlake Legal Group sham-5 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a

The crackdown occurred just a few weeks after Ferrari won a court case against an Italian company that was offering replicas of the 1960s-era 250 GTO, authentic examples of which are worth tens of millions of dollars.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group sham-1 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a   Westlake Legal Group sham-1 Cops shut down fake Ferrari and sham Lamborghini business in Brazil Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/lamborghini fox-news/auto/make/ferrari fox-news/auto/attributes/performance fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fox news fnc/auto fnc article 1b5ab045-3e3e-5194-960d-d87bd375232a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins recalls drinking coffee during ‘lonely’ Moon landing orbit

Michael Collins may not be a household name like his fellow Apollo 11 crewmembers Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, but he played a pivotal role in the success of the epic mission.

When Armstrong and Aldrin were taking their famous first steps on the Moon on July 20, 1969, Collins was orbiting 60 miles above them in the mission’s command module.

Each time the Columbia Command Module orbited the Moon, he would lose contact with Mission Control in Houston for more than 40 minutes at a time. As a result, he has often been described as “the loneliest person in the universe.”

APOLLO 11 ASTRONAUT MICHAEL COLLINS RECALLS EPIC LAUNCH: ‘WE FELT THE WEIGHT OF THE WORLD ON OUR SHOULDERS’

This, however, could not be further from the truth, he explained during an interview with Bob Cabana, the director of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday. “I was always asked ‘wasn’t I the loneliest person?’” he said. “The answer was ‘no, I felt fine’.”

Westlake Legal Group 1-Neil-Armstrong-a Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins recalls drinking coffee during 'lonely' Moon landing orbit James Rogers fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 36af7154-a12e-5745-810a-bcdce94f2e46

1. Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11, 1969: The crew of the Apollo 11 mission — from left Neil Armstrong, Mission Commander, Michael Collins, Lt. Col. USAF, and Edwin Eugene Aldrin, also known as Buzz Aldrin, USAF Lunar Module pilot. In all, 12 Americans walked on the moon from 1969 to 1972. (NASA)

Collins, a former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot and experimental test pilot had spent a lot of time flying airplanes by himself. Additionally, the extensive training undertaken by the Apollo 11 astronauts meant that he was extremely familiar with the Command Module. “I trusted my surroundings,” he said.

“It was perfectly enjoyable, I had hot coffee, I had music if I wanted it,” Collins added. “I was not one iota lonely … it was 40-something minutes of peace and quiet.”

APOLLO 11’S MICHAEL COLLINS REFLECTS ON HISTORIC MOON LANDING: ‘WE WERE JUST REGULAR ASTRONAUTS’

After spending a total of 21 hours and 36 minutes on the Moon, Armstrong and Aldrin’s lunar module lifted off and docked with Collins’ Command Module almost four hours later.

Westlake Legal Group MichaelCollinsSimulatorGetty1969 Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins recalls drinking coffee during 'lonely' Moon landing orbit James Rogers fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 36af7154-a12e-5745-810a-bcdce94f2e46

File photo – Photograph of the pilot Michael Collins at Apollo 11 Command Module, practicing docking hatch removal from CM simulator at NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, June 28, 1969. Image courtesy National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Fifty years after the incredible events of Apollo 11, Collins paid tribute to Armstrong, who died in 2012. “The Neil that I usually think about is not Neil flying to the Moon and back, although he did a superb job as the mission commander.”

Rather, Collins recalls Armstrong’s incredible ability to share the experiences of Apollo 11 following the crew’s return to Earth. Although something of an introvert, Armstrong wowed audiences during the “Giant Leap” global goodwill tour undertaken by the Apollo 11 astronauts and their wives from Sept. 29 to Nov. 5, 1969.

APOLLO 11 FLIGHT DIRECTOR REMEMBERS HISTORIC MISSION TO THE MOON

“He was a masterful speaker,” he said. “He would have the audience feeling they had almost climbed aboard Columbia with us by the time he had finished his speech.”

Collins, who had been the pilot of the Gemini 10 mission in 1966, explained that he turned down an opportunity to be the commander of Apollo 17.

“That would be another three years of living in dingy hotels,” he said, noting that he did not want to be separated from his “wonderful” wife and young children.

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The interview at Kennedy Space Center’s launch pad 39A commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch on July 16, 1969.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6055905219001_6055912240001-vs Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins recalls drinking coffee during 'lonely' Moon landing orbit James Rogers fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 36af7154-a12e-5745-810a-bcdce94f2e46   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6055905219001_6055912240001-vs Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins recalls drinking coffee during 'lonely' Moon landing orbit James Rogers fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc article 36af7154-a12e-5745-810a-bcdce94f2e46

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Celebrate National Hot Dog Day with 5 fascinating frankfurter facts

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5485767507001_5485765821001-vs Celebrate National Hot Dog Day with 5 fascinating frankfurter facts fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 5f6d8f0c-3e6a-5dd4-af02-9a8f24be2062

The hot dog is one of the most relished foods in all of American cuisine, so it makes perfect sense that citizens would want to savor the mildly spiced sausages on National Hot Dog Day, our nation’s most delicious of holidays.

According to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (yes, it’s a real organization), “peak hot dog season” begins on Memorial Day and goes through Labor Day, with Americans typically consuming around seven billion hot dogs during that time.

We’ve collected five pieces of frankfurter trivia to tide you over until your next salty, savory bite:

1. Don’t call a hot dog a “sandwich.”

In a 2015 press release, the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council decreed that the hot dog is not a sandwich, despite it having many of the same components as most sandwiches. “Limiting the hot dog’s significance by saying it’s ‘just a sandwich’ category is like calling the Dalai Lama ‘just a guy,’” stated NHDSC president Janet Rikey, aka the “Queen of Wien.”

The USDA’s guidelines, however, seem to suggest that hot dogs are indeed sandwiches, as they consist of “two slices of bread or the top and bottom sections of a bun that enclose meat or poultry.”

Even Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ruled the hot dog to be a sandwich based on that definition.

OSCAR MAYER ASKS FANS TO HELP WITH IMPORTANT DECISION

But as the NHDSC countered in their press release, “terminology changes” with the times, and hot dogs no longer fit as snugly into the “sandwich” category as they do a split-top bun.

“While we thank the USDA for their careful regulation and inspection of our products, regulatory brevity is not their strength,” the NHDSC said.

Oscar Mayer, meanwhile, is still dead-set on categorizing hot dogs as sandwiches.

2. Several people actually purchased the “world’s most expensive hot dog.”

The now-closed Tokyo Dog foot cart in Seattle holds the Guinness World Record for offering the world’s most expensive commercially available hot dog back in 2014.

The frank — or the “Juuni Ban,” as it was called — cost $169, and consisted of a foot-long smoked cheese bratwurst topped with Maitake mushrooms, Wagyu beef, foie gras, shaved black truffles, $250-per-ounce caviar, Japanese mayo, Teriyaki grilled onions and a brioche bun.

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According to Tokyo Dog’s old press page, the cart sold six of the record-breaking Juuni Ban dogs in total, with all of the proceeds going to the American Red Cross.

3. Most of us will never get the chance to drive the Weinermobile.

The job of driving the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile used to be reserved for graduating college seniors, preferably with a bachelor’s degree in marketing, public relations, advertising, journalism or communications, although that particular stipulation no longer seems to be a requirement. (Oscar Mayer says candidates should still have a BA or BS, “preferably in public relations, journalism, communications, advertising or marketing.”) Furthermore, the position only lasts for one year, from June to June, before drivers (aka “Hotdoggers”) are replaced with a new batch of drivers.

Oscar Mayer didn’t specify how many Hotdoggers it was be hiring in its latest job posting, though the company does say on its website that there are currently only six Wienermobiles traveling the country “at any given time.”

Each driver is also required to undergo about 40 hours of training before getting behind the wheel of the 27-foot vehicle, though that hasn’t prevented one driver from accidentally accelerating into a house and crashing the Wienermobile into a stranger’s deck and garage.

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4. William “The Refrigerator” Perry isn’t as good at eating hot dogs as he looks.

It’s well-known that competitors at the annual Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest in Coney Island consume an unseemly amount of hot dogs — the current record-holder, Joey Chestnut, ate 74 in just 10 minutes in 2018 — but rarely do any of them make news for how little they manage to eat.

The lone exception, arguably, is William “The Refrigerator” Perry, who competed in 2003 as a “celebrity contestant.” Despite eating 12 hot dogs in 12 minutes during the qualifying rounds, Perry only managed to eat four hot dogs, and quit after just five minutes. The Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest hasn’t held a “celebrity contestant” since.

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5. Nobody knows for sure how hot dogs got their name.

The etymology of the term “hot dog” is unclear, but the Oxford English Dictionary posits that the name was “probably influenced by a popular belief that the sausages contained dog meat.” The Online Etymology Dictionary even adds that these beliefs were “occasionally justified” — a statement bolstered by early 20th-century reports by the New York Times and the United States Department of Commerce on the consumption of such meats.

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Bruce Kraig, a “hot dog historian” and professor at Roosevelt University in Illinois, also offered an alternate theory, telling the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council that the German immigrants who popularized frankfurters in North America were also responsible for popularizing dachshunds, and the name “probably began as a joke about the Germans’ small, long, thin dogs.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5485767507001_5485765821001-vs Celebrate National Hot Dog Day with 5 fascinating frankfurter facts fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 5f6d8f0c-3e6a-5dd4-af02-9a8f24be2062   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5485767507001_5485765821001-vs Celebrate National Hot Dog Day with 5 fascinating frankfurter facts fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 5f6d8f0c-3e6a-5dd4-af02-9a8f24be2062

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’

Kathleen Hughes, who said she was an ugly duckling while growing up, couldn’t have predicted she would later become a Hollywood blonde bombshell.

The now-90-year-old actress is best known for starring as June in 1953’s sci-fi cult classic “It Came from Outer Space,” but she has also worked alongside Frank Sinatra, witnessed a young Marilyn Monroe become a star and married the great love of her life along the way.

‘THE WALTONS’ STAR TELLS ALL

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-3171054 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

British actress Ida Lupino in 1940’s “They Drive By Night.” (Getty)

Most recently, Hughes attended The Hollywood Museum to commemorate the life of Ida Lupino, her former co-star in 1948’s “Road House.”

Hughes spoke to Fox News about being discovered, becoming a sought-after screen siren and what life is like for her today.

Fox News: How did you feel about being recognized as a blonde bombshell in Hollywood?
Kathleen Hughes: I loved it because I was an ugly duckling. When I was a little girl, my mother used to read to me all these lovely fairy stories about an ugly duckling. I just thought, “Oh, if only I could grow up to be a swan.” I didn’t like being an ugly duckling. I had buck teeth. I was very tall. I just felt ugly. I guess I did finally turn into a swan. It made me very, very happy because it was so unexpected.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-515550120 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes around the time she starred in “Dawn At Socorro.”  — Getty

Fox News: How were you discovered? 
Hughes: I always wanted to be an actress. I was in a play and studying acting while I was in college. A talent scout from Fox was in the audience to see this play. But as the curtain came down, I passed out. I think it was because I had spent most of the play standing in one spot. For some reason, I just collapsed on the floor. After I woke up, I met the talent scout. He said, “I think you should be under contract to 20th Century Fox.” I said, “Oh, that would be wonderful! I would love that.” By coincidence, my uncle F. Hugh Herbert was under contract to 20th Century Fox. When I told him that this talent scout thought I should be under contract, he said, “Wonderful — let’s do your screen test.”

TINKER BELL MODEL TELLS ALL

There were all kinds of screen tests. Some were interviews where you would just be sitting in a chair and they would ask you questions. It was pretty boring. But my uncle was very, very creative. He made a test that consisted of me sitting at a dressing table as he asked questions.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-499106573 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes and Frank Worth in Los Angeles, Calif. (Photo by Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

While we talked, I kept staring at this thing on the dressing table, this picture. I would pick it up, I would look at it adoringly, blow kisses to it and put it back on the table. Finally, he said, “Enough of this! I need to see what you’re looking at.” So I picked this thing up, turned it to the camera, and it was a picture of [studio executive] Darryl Zanuck *laughs*. Needless to say, I got a contract instantly! A seven-year contract at Fox. It only lasted three years, but that was still pretty good. Then I went on from Fox to Universal.

Fox News: How did you get the role of June in “It Came from Outer Space”?
Hughes: Well, I was under contract at the studio. When you’re under contract, they just put you in one film after another. They just decided that was a good part for me *laughs*. And it was fine by me. I certainly enjoyed it.

Fox News: Where did the idea for that famous scared pose come from?
Hughes: The one where I have my hands up in the air and I’m screaming? I had just finished working on that film. I went to the still gallery and as I walked in, the cameraman who was taking stills said to me, “Put your hands up in the air and scream.” And I did *laughs*. It was an instant success. They loved it and the film just lives forever with that photo.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-180264295 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes screaming in a promotional portrait for in ‘It Came From Outer Space’, directed by Jack Arnold in 1953. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

RUTA LEE TELLS ALL

Fox News: How surprised are you that the film has become a cult classic?
Hughes: I never really thought about that. I’m just happy that it is!

Fox News: It’s been said you’re most proud of your 1956 film “Three Bad Sisters”. Why?
Hughes: I just loved the scene where I horsewhipped my sister and sent her sobbing and bleeding into the night where she got into a car and drove off a cliff. For some reason, it just struck me that it’s very funny. I don’t know why. But it was fun to do a part like that where you’re whipping somebody. It’s something where I could never manage myself doing. Actually, I was whipping a pillow. *laughs*. It was fun and I liked everybody who was in the film. I loved everything about it.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-524518907 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Frank Sinatra at the Sands Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, in 1965. (Photo by John Dominis/Time

Fox News: How was it working alongside Frank Sinatra? 
Hughes: That was the thrill of my life. I was probably the biggest Sinatra fan that ever lived. I just worshipped the ground he walked on. I still love his songs and play them today. He had a weekly show at CBS. I would get called for jobs all the time. So I went. I was in a sketch with Sinatra. I think I was playing a sexy nurse in a psychiatrist office… I hate to say this, but I think he didn’t like me at all. He was icy cold towards me. Just icy cold. I don’t know why. It was disappointing. But I have a still of me with Sinatra and we look like a very, very happy couple *laughs*. I enjoy looking at that still. I’m just so thrilled I had the opportunity to not only meet him but to be photographed with him.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-607405796 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

A pre-famous Marilyn Monroe. (Getty)

Fox News: What was your impression of Marilyn Monroe?
Hughes: My cousin Diana Herbert was taking acting lessons when I was already under contract. She was in a show at the studio club. Every studio in those days had a studio club and it consisted of all the people behind the scenes – the mailroom people, the secretaries – everybody but the actors. They would put on a show every year. My cousin was going to be in one of these shows.

‘LEAVE IT TO BEAVER’ STAR TELLS ALL

The day before the show, she said, “They took my song number away from me and they gave it to a girl named Marilyn Monroe who had been under contract at the studio for six months — they had just dropped her! But now they’re giving her the song. I’m still in the show and you still have to come and see me.” Well, I went to see it and Diana did her number. She was very, very good. But then Marilyn came on. Oh my God, she was fantastic. She did a song called “I Never Took a Lesson in My Life.” She was wearing this slinky black dress. I just couldn’t believe they dropped her.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-3208116 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Marilyn Monroe is all smiles as she poses with fans in front of the Wilshire Beauty Shop at the premiere of director Jean Negulesco’s film “How to Marry a Millionaire” in 1953. (Getty)

She was incredible. She was just a star. I just thought if anyone from the studio saw the show, they would realize they made a terrible mistake and sign her back again. A short time later, the casting office called me and they said, “Can you dance?” They got me with this poor, patient man of a dance director. He tried hour after hour after hour to teach me one simple step. Years later I was able to pick it up, but I could not learn this step at the time. At the end of the day, as it was getting dark, he said, “Forget it! We’ll get someone else.” That someone else was Marilyn.

Fox News: What was the secret behind your lasting marriage to screenwriter Stanley Rubin?
Hughes: We were just good for each other. And I was determined not to get married until I found someone I would be happy to live with forever. So I made every effort to be a good wife. It was a very, very happy marriage.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-499116201 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes dances with Stanley Rubin during a dinner party in Los Angeles, Calif., circa 1954. (Photo by Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Fox News: How did it feel to honor Ida Lupino at The Hollywood Museum?
Hughes: Absolutely wonderful. I always thought she was absolutely fabulous and fantastic. I just loved every minute of being with her in a film.

LUCILLE BALL’S GRANDDAUGHTER TELLS ALL

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-526867884 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Ida Lupino with Humphrey Bogart. (Getty)

Fox News: What’s one memory of Ida that still sticks out to you today?
Hughes: I remember watching the director film a scene. But he wanted her out of the scene even though she was written in. He said to her, “You need to leave the scene so I can focus.” She said, “Where am I going?” He said, “I don’t care! I don’t care where you’re going. You’re going to the bathroom. Just get out of the scene.” And she took it so well! I thought that was just amazing. She found a way to walk out of the scene and that scene went on without her. I really admired her for that.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-136476297 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of “Footprints” at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on April 13, 2011, in Hollywood, Calif.  (Photo by Amanda Edwards/FilmMagic)

Fox News: What is life like for you today?
Hughes: A little bit boring *laughs*. Life was a lot more fun when my husband was alive and when I was working a lot. But I’m still active. I have a personal trainer… I have lots of movie screenings at my house and I’m invited to lots of screenings as well. I love movies. I would be happy to see a movie every day.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-515550120_main ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-515550120_main ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

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‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’

Kathleen Hughes, who said she was an ugly duckling while growing up, couldn’t have predicted she would later become a Hollywood blonde bombshell.

The now-90-year-old actress is best known for starring as June in 1953’s sci-fi cult classic “It Came from Outer Space,” but she has also worked alongside Frank Sinatra, witnessed a young Marilyn Monroe become a star and married the great love of her life along the way.

‘THE WALTONS’ STAR TELLS ALL

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-3171054 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

British actress Ida Lupino in 1940’s “They Drive By Night.” (Getty)

Most recently, Hughes attended The Hollywood Museum to commemorate the life of Ida Lupino, her former co-star in 1948’s “Road House.”

Hughes spoke to Fox News about being discovered, becoming a sought-after screen siren and what life is like for her today.

Fox News: How did you feel about being recognized as a blonde bombshell in Hollywood?
Kathleen Hughes: I loved it because I was an ugly duckling. When I was a little girl, my mother used to read to me all these lovely fairy stories about an ugly duckling. I just thought, “Oh, if only I could grow up to be a swan.” I didn’t like being an ugly duckling. I had buck teeth. I was very tall. I just felt ugly. I guess I did finally turn into a swan. It made me very, very happy because it was so unexpected.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-515550120 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes around the time she starred in “Dawn At Socorro.”  — Getty

Fox News: How were you discovered? 
Hughes: I always wanted to be an actress. I was in a play and studying acting while I was in college. A talent scout from Fox was in the audience to see this play. But as the curtain came down, I passed out. I think it was because I had spent most of the play standing in one spot. For some reason, I just collapsed on the floor. After I woke up, I met the talent scout. He said, “I think you should be under contract to 20th Century Fox.” I said, “Oh, that would be wonderful! I would love that.” By coincidence, my uncle F. Hugh Herbert was under contract to 20th Century Fox. When I told him that this talent scout thought I should be under contract, he said, “Wonderful — let’s do your screen test.”

TINKER BELL MODEL TELLS ALL

There were all kinds of screen tests. Some were interviews where you would just be sitting in a chair and they would ask you questions. It was pretty boring. But my uncle was very, very creative. He made a test that consisted of me sitting at a dressing table as he asked questions.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-499106573 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes and Frank Worth in Los Angeles, Calif. (Photo by Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

While we talked, I kept staring at this thing on the dressing table, this picture. I would pick it up, I would look at it adoringly, blow kisses to it and put it back on the table. Finally, he said, “Enough of this! I need to see what you’re looking at.” So I picked this thing up, turned it to the camera, and it was a picture of [studio executive] Darryl Zanuck *laughs*. Needless to say, I got a contract instantly! A seven-year contract at Fox. It only lasted three years, but that was still pretty good. Then I went on from Fox to Universal.

Fox News: How did you get the role of June in “It Came from Outer Space”?
Hughes: Well, I was under contract at the studio. When you’re under contract, they just put you in one film after another. They just decided that was a good part for me *laughs*. And it was fine by me. I certainly enjoyed it.

Fox News: Where did the idea for that famous scared pose come from?
Hughes: The one where I have my hands up in the air and I’m screaming? I had just finished working on that film. I went to the still gallery and as I walked in, the cameraman who was taking stills said to me, “Put your hands up in the air and scream.” And I did *laughs*. It was an instant success. They loved it and the film just lives forever with that photo.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-180264295 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes screaming in a promotional portrait for in ‘It Came From Outer Space’, directed by Jack Arnold in 1953. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

RUTA LEE TELLS ALL

Fox News: How surprised are you that the film has become a cult classic?
Hughes: I never really thought about that. I’m just happy that it is!

Fox News: It’s been said you’re most proud of your 1956 film “Three Bad Sisters”. Why?
Hughes: I just loved the scene where I horsewhipped my sister and sent her sobbing and bleeding into the night where she got into a car and drove off a cliff. For some reason, it just struck me that it’s very funny. I don’t know why. But it was fun to do a part like that where you’re whipping somebody. It’s something where I could never manage myself doing. Actually, I was whipping a pillow. *laughs*. It was fun and I liked everybody who was in the film. I loved everything about it.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-524518907 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Frank Sinatra at the Sands Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, in 1965. (Photo by John Dominis/Time

Fox News: How was it working alongside Frank Sinatra? 
Hughes: That was the thrill of my life. I was probably the biggest Sinatra fan that ever lived. I just worshipped the ground he walked on. I still love his songs and play them today. He had a weekly show at CBS. I would get called for jobs all the time. So I went. I was in a sketch with Sinatra. I think I was playing a sexy nurse in a psychiatrist office… I hate to say this, but I think he didn’t like me at all. He was icy cold towards me. Just icy cold. I don’t know why. It was disappointing. But I have a still of me with Sinatra and we look like a very, very happy couple *laughs*. I enjoy looking at that still. I’m just so thrilled I had the opportunity to not only meet him but to be photographed with him.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-607405796 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

A pre-famous Marilyn Monroe. (Getty)

Fox News: What was your impression of Marilyn Monroe?
Hughes: My cousin Diana Herbert was taking acting lessons when I was already under contract. She was in a show at the studio club. Every studio in those days had a studio club and it consisted of all the people behind the scenes – the mailroom people, the secretaries – everybody but the actors. They would put on a show every year. My cousin was going to be in one of these shows.

‘LEAVE IT TO BEAVER’ STAR TELLS ALL

The day before the show, she said, “They took my song number away from me and they gave it to a girl named Marilyn Monroe who had been under contract at the studio for six months — they had just dropped her! But now they’re giving her the song. I’m still in the show and you still have to come and see me.” Well, I went to see it and Diana did her number. She was very, very good. But then Marilyn came on. Oh my God, she was fantastic. She did a song called “I Never Took a Lesson in My Life.” She was wearing this slinky black dress. I just couldn’t believe they dropped her.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-3208116 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Marilyn Monroe is all smiles as she poses with fans in front of the Wilshire Beauty Shop at the premiere of director Jean Negulesco’s film “How to Marry a Millionaire” in 1953. (Getty)

She was incredible. She was just a star. I just thought if anyone from the studio saw the show, they would realize they made a terrible mistake and sign her back again. A short time later, the casting office called me and they said, “Can you dance?” They got me with this poor, patient man of a dance director. He tried hour after hour after hour to teach me one simple step. Years later I was able to pick it up, but I could not learn this step at the time. At the end of the day, as it was getting dark, he said, “Forget it! We’ll get someone else.” That someone else was Marilyn.

Fox News: What was the secret behind your lasting marriage to screenwriter Stanley Rubin?
Hughes: We were just good for each other. And I was determined not to get married until I found someone I would be happy to live with forever. So I made every effort to be a good wife. It was a very, very happy marriage.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-499116201 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes dances with Stanley Rubin during a dinner party in Los Angeles, Calif., circa 1954. (Photo by Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Fox News: How did it feel to honor Ida Lupino at The Hollywood Museum?
Hughes: Absolutely wonderful. I always thought she was absolutely fabulous and fantastic. I just loved every minute of being with her in a film.

LUCILLE BALL’S GRANDDAUGHTER TELLS ALL

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-526867884 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Ida Lupino with Humphrey Bogart. (Getty)

Fox News: What’s one memory of Ida that still sticks out to you today?
Hughes: I remember watching the director film a scene. But he wanted her out of the scene even though she was written in. He said to her, “You need to leave the scene so I can focus.” She said, “Where am I going?” He said, “I don’t care! I don’t care where you’re going. You’re going to the bathroom. Just get out of the scene.” And she took it so well! I thought that was just amazing. She found a way to walk out of the scene and that scene went on without her. I really admired her for that.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-136476297 ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

Kathleen Hughes arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of “Footprints” at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on April 13, 2011, in Hollywood, Calif.  (Photo by Amanda Edwards/FilmMagic)

Fox News: What is life like for you today?
Hughes: A little bit boring *laughs*. Life was a lot more fun when my husband was alive and when I was working a lot. But I’m still active. I have a personal trainer… I have lots of movie screenings at my house and I’m invited to lots of screenings as well. I love movies. I would be happy to see a movie every day.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-515550120_main ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-515550120_main ‘50s actress Kathleen Hughes recalls working with Frank Sinatra, becoming a pinup: ‘It was so unexpected’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/topic/old-hollywood fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/classics fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3e03acca-37f1-5ccb-91ee-466753931a32

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Meltdown on House floor before resolution condemning Trump comments passes; AOC has new 2020 challenger

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your day…

Dem-led House formally condemns Trump’s ‘racist’ remarks after floor battle involving Pelosi erupts
The Democrat-controlled House of Representatives passed a resolution Tuesday evening condemning President Trump’s “racist” remarks against the “squad” of progressive freshman Democratic lawmakers this past weekend. However, the formal condemnation of Trump was arguably overshadowed by a floor fight earlier in the day that ended with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ruled out of order for a breach of decorum for calling tube president a racist on the House floor. The unexpected mayhem in Congress, which briefly resulted in the revocation of Pelosi’s speaking privileges on the House floor, left commentators and lawmakers stunned. (Click on the video below to watch the dramatic floor fight involving Pelosi.)

The final resolution passed by a vote of 240-187. All Democrats voted yea, with a handful of Republicans joining them: Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick, Will Hurd, Fred Upton and Susan Brooks. Michigan Rep. Justin Amash, who recently left the Republican Party after calling for Trump’s impeachment, also voted yes. The rest of the Republicans voted no. Trump’s remarks initially appeared to have united the Democratic Party when it was struggling with a public feud between Pelosi and the “squad” – Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, and Ayanna Pressley. But a CBS News interview with the four congresswomen suggested that hard feelings still remain.

Westlake Legal Group ff370650-Scherie_Murray Meltdown on House floor before resolution condemning Trump comments passes; AOC has new 2020 challenger fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 54c7dd8a-1362-52c1-86b4-7549591cdbbf

Republican Scherie Murray is launching a campaign Wednesday for the New York congressional seat held by Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. ((Courtesy of Murray campaign))

EXCLUSIVE: A look at Ocasio-Cortez’s new challenger in 2020
Scherie Murray, a New York businesswoman who immigrated from Jamaica as a child and is active in state Republican politics, is launching a campaign Wednesday for the congressional seat held by Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Fox News has learned. In a phone interview, Murray, 38, confirmed her intention to run for the New York congressional seat as a Republican. “There is a crisis in Queens, and it’s called AOC,” Murray told Fox News. “And instead of focusing on us, she’s focusing on being famous. Mainly rolling back progress and authoring the job-killing Green New Deal and killing the Amazon New York deal.” Murray takes jabs at AOC in an introductory video that launches her campaign.

Remembering Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens – A ‘judge’s judge’
“Independent-minded” may best describe the life and judicial career of Justice John Paul Stevens, nominated by a Republican President to sit on the Supreme Court, but who in his three-plus decades on the bench staked out generally liberal views on the law and Constitution. Stevens died Tuesday in Florida after a brief illness. He was 99, and earlier this year released a memoir of his years on the bench. The oldest member of the Court before he retired in 2010, Stevens had been a difficult justice to peg, almost from the day he was first nominated 35 years earlier. On the bench, Stevens is remembered for taking out of a case only what was presented to him, refusing to issue sweeping pronouncements on judicial philosophy. This minimalist approach earned him both praise and criticism, but colleagues say he never swayed.

Westlake Legal Group Leana-Wen-GettyImages-1051944394 Meltdown on House floor before resolution condemning Trump comments passes; AOC has new 2020 challenger fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 54c7dd8a-1362-52c1-86b4-7549591cdbbf

BALTIMORE, MD OCTOBER 01: Dr. Leana Wen, is the new president of Planned Parenthood. She is photographed at the Baltimore City Health Department on Monday, October 01, 2018 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President of Planned Parenthood ousted
The president of Planned Parenthood, the largest abortion provider in the U.S., was removed from her position Tuesday after just eight months. Dr. Leana Wen tweeted that Planned Parenthood’s board had “ended my employment at a secret meeting. We were engaged in good faith negotiations about my departure based on philosophical differences over the direction and future of Planned Parenthood.” She later posted a copy of a letter to Planned Parenthood officials in which she said that she was “leaving the organization sooner than I’d hoped …”

‘El Chapo’ faces sentencing 
 Will “El Chapo,” Mexico’s most notorious drug lord, go quietly when he gets the last word in a New York courtroom? That’s one of the biggest questions when Joaquin Guzman is sentenced in New York City on Wednesday. The highly-anticipated hearing could be his last chance to speak publicly before spending the rest of his life behind bars at a maximum security U.S. prison. Guzman, 62, was convicted in February on multiple conspiracy counts in an epic drug-trafficking case. The guilty verdict at an 11-week trial triggered what the government says is a well-justified mandatory sentence of life without parole.

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TODAY’S MUST-READS
Ben Shapiro: America ‘less ambitious’ about space travel in 50 years since Apollo 11 launch.
Google VP grilled in hearing over alleged bias against conservatives, as slain reporter’s father calls for regulation. 
‘Bachelorette’ star sends contestant home after sex before marriage spat, feud spills into Twitter.

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
Amazon defends business practices toward third-party sellers at antitrust hearing.
IKEA closing its only US factory, will move operations to Europe: report.
Why homeownership rates among Hispanics, African Americans differ substantially.

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.

SOME PARTING WORDS

Sean Hannity wants to take up former Vice President Joe Biden on his pushup to President Trump, saying the president is “too busy cleaning up the mess you left” in the eight years of the Obama presidency. He also blasts Biden for “sucking up” to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

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Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for joining us! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing Thursday morning.

Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_disorder_in_the_house Meltdown on House floor before resolution condemning Trump comments passes; AOC has new 2020 challenger fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 54c7dd8a-1362-52c1-86b4-7549591cdbbf   Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_disorder_in_the_house Meltdown on House floor before resolution condemning Trump comments passes; AOC has new 2020 challenger fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 54c7dd8a-1362-52c1-86b4-7549591cdbbf

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Today on Fox News, July 17, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Guests include: U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo.; Eric Trump, son of President Trump and Executive Vice President of Development and Acquisitions of the Trump Organization.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m, ET: Guests include: Fred Fleitz, former chief of staff and Executive Secretary of the National Security Council under President Trump; Wilbur Ross, U.S. Secretary of Commerce; U.S. Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga.; Bob Nardelli, former Home Depot CEO.

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: U.S. Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla.

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “Biden: “If You Like Your Health Care Plan … You Can Keep It” – Former Vice President Joe Biden has unveiled his health care plan and like former President Obama, he promised people could keep their health care plan. Tom Bevan, co-founder and president of RealClearPolitics, weighs in. For months, millions have taken to the streets in Hong Kong to protest an extradition bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial. Jimmy Lai, a Hong Kong entrepreneur and democracy advocate, met with Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo about the ongoing demonstrations. He joins the podcast to discuss . Plus, commentary by former California Congresswoman Jane Harmon.

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The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Matthew Continetti, co-founder and editor in chief of the Washington Free Beacon, on the House floor fight over Nancy Pelosi’s language in seeking a resolution against Trump; Tom Dupree, former deputy assistant attorney general under President George W. Bush, on former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s upcoming testimony; Martha MacCallum, host of “The Story with Martha MacCallum”; Tim Samuels on his new book, ““Future Man: How to Evolve and Thrive in the Age of Trump, Mansplaining, and #MeToo”

The Todd Starnes Show, Noon ET: Todd speaks with candidate for Senate and former Auburn coach Tommy Tuberville about the direction of Republican Party and U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo., about the reaction to a Mexican flag being raised at an ICE facility.

The Guy Benson Show, 6 p.m. ET: Guests include: U.S. Rep. Mike Gallagher, R-Wis.; U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo.; Mercedes Schlapp, Trump campaign spokeswoman; Charles Hurt,Washington Times opinion editor, on his new book “Still Winning: Why America Went All In on Donald Trump and Why We Must Do It Again.”

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House orders Pentagon to reveal whether it turned ticks into biological weapons

House lawmakers passed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) last week that ordered the Pentagon to reveal whether the U.S. military made ticks into biological weapons.

The amendment, proposed by Rep. Chris Smith, R-N.J., requires the Pentagon to examine “whether the Department of Defense experimented with ticks and other insects regarding its use as a biological weapon between the years of 1950 and 1975.”

Westlake Legal Group tick120418 House orders Pentagon to reveal whether it turned ticks into biological weapons fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc f543ddf0-137b-5b11-b48c-0625dc48cdfe Bradford Betz article

House lawmakers passed a bill last week that ordered to Pentagon to review whether it turned ticks into biological weapons.  (hub.jhu.edu)

Smith said on the House floor Friday that his amendment tasks the DOD’s inspector general “to ask the hard questions and report back.”

“If true, what were the parameters of the program? Who ordered it?” Smith said during a debate for the amendment. “Was there any accidental release anywhere or at any time of any of the diseased ticks?”

He said he was inspired to add the amendment after reading material that suggested: “significant research had been done at U.S. government facilities including Fort Detrick, Maryland and Plum Island, New York to turn ticks and other insects into bioweapons.”

FLORIDA WILDLIFE OFFICER WITH LYME DISEASE OPENS UP ABOUT LIVING WITH TICK-BORNE ILLNESS

Smith, a long-time advocate for raising awareness about Lyme disease, is also the co-chair of the House Lyme Disease Caucus. Earlier this year, he introduced a bill that would authorize $180 million in funding for Lyme disease research, prevention and treatment programs.

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The House will meet with the Senate soon to reconcile two versions of defense spending bills.

Westlake Legal Group tick120418 House orders Pentagon to reveal whether it turned ticks into biological weapons fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc f543ddf0-137b-5b11-b48c-0625dc48cdfe Bradford Betz article   Westlake Legal Group tick120418 House orders Pentagon to reveal whether it turned ticks into biological weapons fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics fox news fnc/politics fnc f543ddf0-137b-5b11-b48c-0625dc48cdfe Bradford Betz article

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This Day in History: July 17

On this day, July 17 …

1996: TWA Flight 800, a Europe-bound Boeing 747, explodes and crashes off Long Island, N.Y., shortly after departing John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 230 people on board.

Also on this day:

1945: Following Nazi Germany’s surrender, President Harry S. Truman, Soviet leader Josef Stalin and British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill begin meeting at Potsdam in the final Allied summit of World War II.

1954: The two-day inaugural Newport Jazz Festival, billed as “The First American Jazz Festival,” opens in Rhode Island.

1955: Disneyland had its opening day in Anaheim, Calif.

1975: An Apollo spaceship docks with a Soyuz spacecraft in orbit in the first superpower link-up of its kind.

1997: Woolworth Corp. announces it is closing its 400 remaining five-and-dime stores across the country, ending 117 years in business.

Westlake Legal Group waltercrop This Day in History: July 17 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f1778c2-8971-545b-abe2-0d502c2c33bb

FILE – This undated file photo provided by CBS shows Walter Cronkite. A private funeral for Cronkite, who died Friday, July 17, 2009, will held Thursday afternoon, July 23 at St. Bartholomew’s Church in midtown Manhattan, where the CBS newsman’s family worshipped for decades. (AP Photo/CBS, file) NO SALES

2009: Former CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite dies in New York at 92.

2014: All 298 passengers and crew aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 are killed when the Boeing 777 is shot down over rebel-held eastern Ukraine.

2014: Eric Garner, an unarmed black man accused of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes, dies shortly after being wrestled to the ground by New York City police officers: a video of the takedown shows Garner repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe.” (Garner’s family would receive $5.9 million from the city in 2015 to settle a wrongful death claim.)

Westlake Legal Group TWAFlight800AP This Day in History: July 17 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f1778c2-8971-545b-abe2-0d502c2c33bb   Westlake Legal Group TWAFlight800AP This Day in History: July 17 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 6f1778c2-8971-545b-abe2-0d502c2c33bb

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Trump’s harsh attacks produce the debate he wants, on Socialist Democrats

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059973938001_6059973559001-vs Trump’s harsh attacks produce the debate he wants, on Socialist Democrats Frank Miles fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/politics fnc article 54a924af-cf16-5b31-9253-afd134d586a4

Since I’ve been tough on President Trump’s attacks on the Democratic freshmen, and since the media outrage has been deafening, and since all House Democrats (and four Republicans) voted for a resolution condemning his tweets, I’ll begin by giving the floor to the president’s supporters.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said yesterday he does not believe the Trump attacks are racist. “I believe this is about ideology. … This is all about politics,” he said.

Newt Gingrich said Trump believes “the more he can get the country to look at the so-called squad, the more he can get them to realize how radical they are, and how fundamentally anti-American their views are; in the long run, the better off he is.”

Maryland GOP congressman Andy Harris said the tweets are “obviously not racist,” but “when anyone disagrees with someone now, the default is you call them a racist and this is no exception.”

He said Trump “could’ve meant go back to the district that they came from or the neighborhood they came from,” though the president has specifically talked about Ilhan Omar and Somalia.

Fox News’ Jesse Watters said while his mother views the tweets as racist, “Mom’s not going to scare me off. These were not racist. This was about patriotism. When did ‘Love it or leave it?’ become racist? Not only leave it, hey, come back and help us fix our problems.”

And the president himself tweeted yesterday that “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!”, adding: “The Democrat Congresswomen have been spewing some of the most vile, hateful, and disgusting things ever said by a politician in the House or Senate, & yet they get a free pass and a big embrace from the Democrat Party. … Why isn’t the House voting to rebuke the filthy and hate laced things they have said?”

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What the Republican Party now wants—or is forced to want, since most members believe it’s political suicide to take on Trump—is to blur the debate.

In this view, it’s not about Trump saying the women should “go back” to where they came from before returning, it’s about the left-wing extremism of AOC, Omar, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib.

This, I believe, was Trump’s strategy all along, to create enough of a firestorm that they become the face of the Democratic Party and his own initial attacks become beside the point.

That’s what Lindsey Graham did in mildly suggesting that his golfing buddy “aim higher” while trashing the freshmen: “We all know that AOC and this crowd are a bunch of communists. They hate Israel, they hate our own country.”

(His former House colleague Joe Scarborough accused him of “McCarthyism.”)

A relative handful of Republicans, meanwhile, spoke out against the president’s attacks on the four women:

Mitt Romney: “Destructive, demeaning and disunifying.” Lisa Murkowski: “There is no excuse for the president’s spiteful comments–they were absolutely unacceptable and this needs to stop.” Tim Scott, the only black Republican in the Senate, chided Trump for “unacceptable personal attacks and racially charged language.”

There are big challenges here for the media as well. I said yesterday on “America’s Newsroom” that news outlets should be cautious about branding Trump’s attacks as racist, as if it were an undisputed fact. CNN, CBS, ABC and, after an internal debate, the Washington Post are among those who have done so in straight news stories and segments.

My view is that readers and viewers are smart, especially when the president uses language that closely mirrors the historic “go back to Africa” taunts against blacks.

Cover the story aggressively, lay things out, and they can make up their own minds. Don’t act like the opposition party.

A larger question is whether the media are playing into the president’s hands. A New York Times editorial accused Trump of the politics of distraction:

“His comments elicited precisely the sort of media coverage and public outcry that he thrives on. So he did what he usually does: He went a step further…

“Mr. Trump’s aim of stoking an endless culture war puts his political critics in a bind. They can take his bait and fight back, participating in the divisive distraction he’s designed to energize his supporters, or they can ignore his outbursts and risk normalizing his terrible behavior.”

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The fact is that a president can command media attention any time he wants, and that was true in the pre-Twitter age as well. And when a president makes divisive accusations of this magnitude, and the other party explodes in outrage, which is a very big story that can’t be minimized or ignored.

To do otherwise is to try to stage-manage the news for political reasons. And besides, it never works.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059973938001_6059973559001-vs Trump’s harsh attacks produce the debate he wants, on Socialist Democrats Frank Miles fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/politics fnc article 54a924af-cf16-5b31-9253-afd134d586a4   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059973938001_6059973559001-vs Trump’s harsh attacks produce the debate he wants, on Socialist Democrats Frank Miles fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/politics fnc article 54a924af-cf16-5b31-9253-afd134d586a4

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