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Westlake Legal Group > Guatemala

Guatemala’s high court probably just killed Trump’s Safe Third Country deal

Westlake Legal Group JimmyMorales Guatemala’s high court probably just killed Trump’s Safe Third Country deal The Blog safe third country Jimmy Morales Guatemala

Over the weekend we talked about the President’s announcement that he was close to inking a Safe Third Country deal with Guatemala, following discussions with President Jimmy Morales. There are certainly questions to be answered and issues to be addressed before identifying that nation as an official Safe Third Country in terms of migration, but at this point, it may not matter. Guatemala’s Constitutional Court ruled yesterday that no Safe Third Country agreement can be entered into without their congress first approving it. (From Prensa Libre. Original is in Spanish and the translation has been cleaned up a bit for clarity.)

The Constitutional Court (CC) granted provisional protection to three appeals that were raised against the possible decision of the Government to allow Guatemala to become a safe third country for migrants seeking asylum in the United States. With this decision, the agreement between the governments of Guatemala and the United States (United States) must be submitted to the Congress of the Republic.

The CC resolved that for President Jimmy Morales to make the decision to sign an agreement that makes Guatemala a safe third country, it must have knowledge and approval of Congress.

“The President of the Republic of Guatemala is warned that, in order to take the decision, on behalf of the State of Guatemala, to constitute the national territory as a safe third country, it must comply with the mechanism established in paragraph l) of article 171 of the Political Constitution of the Republic, “says the resolution of the CC.

You can read the full decision here at the court’s website. It’s in Spanish, of course, but most browsers will adequately translate it for you.

Even if this ruling doesn’t kill the deal entirely, it complicates it far more than simply asking for a vote on it. Guatemala held its national elections last month so the current Congress is in lame duck territory and may not want to tackle such a significant and controversial subject. Further, President Morales is a lame duck until he leaves in January. (He’s constitutionally barred from seeking another term.)

Further muddying the waters is the fact that we don’t even know who Morales’ replacement will be. There’s going to be a runoff election in August because none of the candidates received a majority of the votes. It’s been noted by some observers that Morales has ignored the rulings of the court in the past, so he might consider trying to ram this through, but it would seriously throw the legitimacy of any agreement he signed with Donald Trump into question.

The way things are looking right now, President Trump’s announcement last week looks to be a non-starter until at least January. At that point, he could try to restart the negotiations with whoever the next Guatemalan leader winds up being. But by then we’ll be well into the midst of the 2020 elections, so it’s possible that this deal isn’t going to happen at all unless Trump wins a second term and handles it in 2021.

The post Guatemala’s high court probably just killed Trump’s Safe Third Country deal appeared first on Hot Air.

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Are we getting a safe third country deal with Guatemala?

Westlake Legal Group CaravanG Are we getting a safe third country deal with Guatemala? The Blog safe third country migrant caravan Illegal Immigration Guatemala

We’ve heard at least half a dozen announcements about this over the past couple of months, but now it looks as if it will become official this week. The President is preparing to finalize a Safe Third Country agreement with Guatemalan President Morales. This is a complicated situation with plenty of moving parts, but if they’ve worked most of the obvious bugs out of the equation it might at least do something to slow the flow of migrant caravans heading for our borders. (ABC News)

President Trump and Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales are expected to sign an agreement Monday that would require asylum seekers who transit through Guatemala to claim asylum in that country instead of the U.S., according to three sources briefed on negotiations.

The “safe third country agreement” is one of the ways in which Trump hopes to stem the flow of migrants from Central America to the U.S., but critics say Guatemala neither is safe enough for asylum seekers to stay there nor has the capability to process asylum claims.

The two leaders will meet at the White House on Monday and “will discuss ways to create a more robust relationship focused on addressing migration and security priorities,” White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement Friday.

Guatemala was an obvious choice in terms of picking a spot to make a stand against illegal immigration. It covers the majority of Mexico’s southern border and basically blocks the isthmus at that point. Of course, deciding to serve as a Safe Third Country doesn’t affect migrants coming from Guatemala (or Mexico for that matter), but it would apply to anyone traveling north from Honduras, El Salvador and points further south.

We would be remiss in not noting the problematic aspects of any such agreement with Guatemala, and that’s why we’ll need to wait and see the details of what’s been worked out. For starters, calling Guatemala a “safe” country in any context is a bit of a stretch. The country is rife with poverty and crime, with street gangs and drug cartels controlling a lot of territory, not to mention the government being rather prone to corruption (to put it mildly). Telling migrants to seek asylum there if they don’t have any local ties or security is going to be a challenge.

There’s also the question of whether or not the Guatemalan government really has the capacity to enforce this, or even intends to. They would obviously like to strike a deal with the United States involving a lot more foreign aid, but if they can’t deliver the results we need this might not be the most productive deal in history.

So what would President Trump be offering them? There’s been talk of a program where we (and possibly Mexico) could provide, money, food and other humanitarian relief resources for arriving migrants, as well as job development programs to allow them to make a life for themselves. But without additional law enforcement and security measures, turning Guatemala into an actual “safe” third country is going to be a major challenge to say the least.

The post Are we getting a safe third country deal with Guatemala? appeared first on Hot Air.

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Photojournalist detained by ICE, Amtrak raid in Montana

Westlake Legal Group ICE Photojournalist detained by ICE, Amtrak raid in Montana visas The Blog Montana Illegal Immigration Ibrahim Ramades Cetindemir Cordon Guatemala daca amtrak

A 28-year-old photojournalist and DACA recipient was detained in Montana Monday by border patrol officers as he was traveling from Seattle to Williston, North Dakota on Amtrak. Despite the fact that he has an outstanding deportation order, ICE decided to let him go.

Wait. I thought that all ICE agents are monsters who live for the opportunity to deport illegal aliens. That’s the narrative from our moral betters in the Democrat Party. Ibrahim Ramades Cetindemir Cordon inadvertently turned that canard around. After spending some time at a detention center, he was released Wednesday morning.

Cetindemir was detained under the Immigration and Nationality Act 212, inadmissible aliens, and 237, deportable aliens, for an outstanding deportation order for Cetindemir from 2014. The order was from overstaying his visa in 2014 before he was granted DACA status, Cetindemir told the Billings Gazette. Since then he has renewed his DACA status in 2016 and in 2018.

In his case, Cetindemir entered the United States at the age of 13 with his mother and younger sister in 2012 after traveling from Guatemala. His visa expired and a deportation order was issued. Before that order was carried out, though, Cetindemir was granted DACA status. Currently, his DACA status is set to expire in 2020. He has no criminal record. He works as a freelance photographer based in North Dakota. His work has appeared in Outdoor Magazine, Matador Network, Patagonia, REI and other outlets.

Cetindemir was first questioned by border patrol during a routine Amtrak stop in Havre, Montana. The train had to remain on schedule and continued on to the town of Malta. At the Malta stop border patrol again entered the train and questioned Cetindemir. He showed the officers both his driver’s license and his work permit. He told them he is a DACA recipient. The border patrol officers arrested him and held him in Malta.

He thought his DACA status was his get out of jail free card. Until the final decision was made, though, he was told he would be deported.

Once in custody he said border patrol told him he would be deported and that he wouldn’t be able to speak to a lawyer or judge. It wasn’t until he was booked into jail that his situation started to sink in.

He was transferred Tuesday afternoon to Cascade County Detention Center in Great Falls. He arrived just after 3 p.m., and the jail had him under an “immigration hold,” according to Cascade County Cpl. Freiling and the ICE detainee database. (The corporal refused to give his first name).

“It was a bit nerve-wracking walking into jail because I didn’t know what to expect,” Cetindemir said. “Jail was not a pleasant place, (but) it wasn’t a really negative experience. If anything I learned from it.”

So, it looks like to me that after being questioned at the first stop in Havre the border patrol officers probably checked him out and found the deportation order. They arranged for Cetindemir to be picked up in Malta and let ICE figure out if he’d be deported or not. In his case, ICE decided to release him, probably because of his clean record and employment status.

There was a social media campaign going on during the time he was detained. A friend in Seattle let him know of the support he was receiving after he published a Reddit post with a plea for help. A YouTube video taken by a fellow train passenger was published, too. (There is always a video.) A Facebook group conducted an organized effort of phone calls to border patrol, immigration lawyers, and local organizations who might be able to help Cetindemir.

This young man’s story is a good example of why the dehumanization of border patrol officers and ICE agents is so wrong. Cetindemir has been allowed to remain in America because of President Obama’s amnesty program for young illegal aliens. Other nations would not allow such a policy to go into effect. He is living the American Dream though he cut in line to illegally enter our country. Now a valid deportation order is being ignored. How is any of this proof that those working to secure our borders are abusing those they detain? He’s fortunate he was detained in Montana instead of Texas or Arizona. The southern border is overwhelmed with those trying to do the same thing he did as a 13-year-old. Remember Centindemir’s story the next time you hear the far left demand that ICE be abolished. Most of all, his story points to the legitimacy of the anger felt towards illegal aliens by the immigrants who did it the legal way.

The post Photojournalist detained by ICE, Amtrak raid in Montana appeared first on Hot Air.

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Major Move: Mexico Deploys 15,000 Troops to the U.S. Border in Order to Stop Illegal Immigration

Westlake Legal Group dangerous-1282330_1280-620x413 Major Move: Mexico Deploys 15,000 Troops to the U.S. Border in Order to Stop Illegal Immigration Uncategorized Tariffs Politics nick valencia national guard Mexico luis sandoval International Affairs Illegal Immigration Guatemala Front Page Stories Featured Story donald trump democrats Border Wall Funding border security belize

 

 

On Monday, Mexican Secretary of Defense Luis Sandoval declared the deployment of 15,000 soldiers to the border in order to stave off the enormous amount of illegal immigration into the U.S.

CNN reporter Nick Valencia tweeted:

“Mexico has deployed almost 15,000 troops to the US-Mexico border to curve migration flow. An additional ~2,000 National Guard elements have also been deployed across the country’s southern border with Guatemala & Belize.: MX Secretary of Defense Luis Sandoval.”

As per CNN, the announcement was made in Cancun.

The 2,000 National Guard members serve to bolster the 4,500 troops already at the Central American border.

The news comes at the end of a long line of efforts by the Trump White House (here) to engage Mexico’s assistance in quelling America’s border crisis (here and here).

Of course, Trump hasn’t just been fighting our neighbors to the south in order to secure America; he’s been battling Democratic congresspeople elected by Americans to secure America in order to…secure…America (here).

As for Mexico, most recently, The Donald laid a 5% tariff on ’em:

But that was called off:

So what’s next? It remains to be seen. For now, presumably, the 15,000 soldiers will help reduce the influx of those coming into the U.S illegally. But there’s still certainly a whole lot more work to do and changes to make.

And the promised wall is yet to stand.

What are your thoughts on all this? Do you believe the deployment will help? Let us all know in the Comments section.

-ALEX

 

 

Relevant RedState links in this article: hereherehere, and here.

See 3 more pieces from me:

Trump Authorizes Use Of Lethal Force At The Border

Dear Women In Entertainment: You’re Not Strong For Getting Naked

WATCH: YouTube And Teen Vogue Attack Thanksgiving (And You)

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Mexico’s Crackdown at Its Southern Border, Prompted by Trump, Scares Migrants From Crossing

NENTÓN, Guatemala — The Aguilar family had been preparing since February to migrate north. They borrowed $2,600, made a down payment to a smuggler and set off from their home in northern Guatemala last week.

But at Guatemala’s border with Mexico, their smuggler had some bad news: Crossing into Mexico was too risky. A June 7 deal between the Mexican authorities and the United States to reduce migration had brought extra security forces to the border.

Mexico’s mobilization of its security forces has been halting, and for most of the past two weeks it seemed to fall short of the dramatic show of force that the government had promised.

Still, the deployment has already disrupted the usual flow of people and commerce passing over this historically porous border, and sown fear among migrants and their smugglers alike.

“We don’t know anything, whether this is a definitive change, or just for some time,” said Juan Alberto Aguilar, 27, who was traveling with his wife and their 3-year-old daughter. The family sat dejectedly in the central square of Nentón, a village near the Guatemala-Mexico border, waiting for the van that would take them home.

The deployment plan is part of a deal between the administration of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador of Mexico and the American government to thwart President Trump’s threats of potentially crippling tariffs.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156687870_a3960cc1-7663-4347-a2f6-bf00ffc109f1-articleLarge Mexico’s Crackdown at Its Southern Border, Prompted by Trump, Scares Migrants From Crossing United States International Relations Trump, Donald J smuggling Politics and Government Nicaragua Mexico Lopez Obrador, Andres Manuel Immigration and Emigration Illegal Immigration Guatemala Defense and Military Forces Central America

Soldiers working with Mexico’s National Guard standing at an immigration checkpoint in the state of Chiapas this month.CreditLuis Antonio Rojas for The New York Times

On Thursday, President Trump praised the Mexican president for his early efforts.

“The flow has very substantially slowed down,” Mr. Trump said. “It’s already had a big impact.”

In Ciudad Hidalgo, a bustling market town in Mexico near the southwestern end of the border, vendors say they have seen a significant falloff in business in the past two weeks. Most of their clients are Guatemalans who avoid paying duty on their purchases by returning illegally to Guatemala on rafts that ply the Suchiate River, which demarcates that section of the border.

“The people are scared to come because they fear that the government will come and take their merchandise,” said Mary, a vendor in Ciudad Hidalgo who asked that her last name be withheld for fear of government persecution. “We live from that commerce, eat from that commerce.”

Across the border, in Nentón, Guatemala, Silvia Avaja, 30, the owner of a general store, said she usually traveled to Mexico once every three months to buy products such as soap, deodorant and toothpaste. But the new security measures in Mexico had spooked her.

She, too, had heard that the Mexican authorities were seizing shoppers’ black market goods.

“I’m thinking of not going over there anymore,” she said.

But the effect of the deployment has been felt most significantly among undocumented migrants, who now see a more impenetrable Mexico.

Merchants crossing the Guatemala-Mexico border at La Mesilla, Guatemala.CreditLuis Antonio Rojas for The New York Times

Jonathan, 28, a Nicaraguan seminary student, said he fled his home after being subjected to government persecution and death threats following his participation in antigovernment protests last year. He first tried to settle in Costa Rica but, facing more death threats there, he flew to Guatemala and traveled by land to the border with Mexico.

He made it to Frontera Comalapa, 25 miles into Mexico, before the new migration-control measures brought his trip to a grinding halt.

“I never thought it would be like this,” he said, sitting in a soup kitchen one afternoon last week and considering the possibility that this was as far north as he was going to get.

Three Nicaraguan friends who had also made it to Frontera Comalapa had already returned to Central America to wait for a better moment to try to reach the United States.

But returning to Nicaragua, Jonathan said, was not an option for him. His goal was still to reach the United States, which promised a far better livelihood.

“I’m going to fight,” he continued, requesting partial anonymity because of his legal status in Mexico. “I’m going to do everything possible to get there.”

Guatemalan merchants resting by a border marker in Guatemala.CreditLuis Antonio Rojas for The New York Times

For now, however, he is weighing the possibility of applying for asylum in Mexico. Migrants’ advocates say many more Central Americans and others are opting to do this, as it is one of the few options left amid the crackdown.

Elsewhere along the border, entrepreneurs who make their living offering services to migrants have seen a drop in demand.

“Before there were even entire families crossing,” said Israel López Ordoñez, 52, a veteran raftsman on the Suchiate River in Ciudad Hidalgo. “Now, no.”

In the Guatemalan border town of La Mesilla, near Frontera Comalapa, Carmelo, 50, a money changer, said that several people he knows — including friends and family — have aborted plans to migrate north in the past two weeks.

“It’s not good,” he said of the new measures. “If a Guatemalan travels to the States, a lot of people here can live from that Guatemalan.”

Even migrant smugglers — responsible for ferrying many, if not most, migrants to the southwest border of the United States — are delaying or canceling trips north.

Soldiers working with Mexico’s National Guard waiting at an immigration checkpoint in southern Mexico this month.CreditLuis Antonio Rojas for The New York Times

Like the Aguilar family, Ottoniel López, 19, a Guatemalan migrant, found himself just shy of the Mexican border when his smuggler told him to turn around and go home.

He said he had set off on his trip, bound for the United States, knowing he might face a range of potential hazards, like fatigue, hunger and possible violence. But the Mexican government’s crackdown had not been part of his calculus.

“You always know that it’s going to be difficult,” he said here in Nentón, leaning out of the van that would take him part of the way to his home in southwestern Guatemala. “But now they said we could not pass because of all the blockades.”

The agreement with the Trump administration gave President López Obrador 45 days to prove that Mexico could reduce the number of migrants crossing into the United States. Mexican officials initially said they would send 6,000 members of a newly created National Guard force to southern Mexico to impede the northbound flow of undocumented migrants.

But the deployment has been uneven.

First, it kept getting pushed back. Then, Mexican officials backed off their initial promise to mobilize 6,000 National Guard members to the south, and instead said that the force would also include members of the armed forces.

Maximiliano Reyes Zúñiga, an assistant foreign secretary, said last week that only 40 percent of the total deployment would occur in the southern border states of Mexico.

Migrants climbing up the embankment stairs toward Ciudad Hidalgo, in Chiapas, Mexico, after arriving by raft from Guatemala.CreditLuis Antonio Rojas for The New York Times

But on Monday, Gen. Luis Cresencio Sandoval González, Mexico’s defense minister, said that the government had mobilized some 6,500 security forces in the southern states, including about 2,000 National Guard members. More than 14,000 additional security forces were deployed in Mexico’s north to help control migration, he said.

Officials in Chiapas also acknowledged that curbing illegal migration through the state, which shares a long border with Guatemala, would be extremely hard, if not impossible.

The mountainous region is crisscrossed by back roads and footpaths. And residents and others speculated that entrenched corruption among government officials who have abetted smugglers and migrants would not be eliminated anytime soon.

But the number of government roadblocks along some main highways in southern Mexico has increased, local residents say, and the migration authorities and security forces working with them seem to be more thorough in checking passing vehicles for undocumented migrants.

The authorities have also started the more ambitious work of combating the smuggling operations that are responsible for escorting many, if not most, migrants north.

Migrants’ advocates have warned that the crackdown could invite human rights violations, concerns that were underscored by the recent shooting death of a 19-year-old Salvadoran migrant who was riding in a truck bound for the United States border. Witnesses told investigators that men dressed in police uniforms and driving a police vehicle opened fire on the truck after it passed through a migration checkpoint in the state of Veracruz and sped away.

While National Guard members are still scarce in the southern border region, military forces, some of them outfitted with National Guard arm bands, have been newly mandated to conduct night patrols, and to question the occupants of passing vehicles and inspect their cargo.

Immigrants’ advocates anticipated that the increasing presence of security forces would continue to drive down the number of people trying to migrate north, but they expected that in time, the flows would rebound, perhaps through more remote and dangerous migratory pathways.

“It’s going to be like when Trump became president, and the rate of migration went down for several months, but then went back up again,” said David Tobasura, a Chiapas-based immigration consultant for the American Friends Service Committee. “This is not going to stop migration. Surely in a few weeks or months, it will go back up. It’ll be the same as it was before.”

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Mexico to send National Guard to southern border

Westlake Legal Group fa364373-fc11-46e7-b758-4250b1fd06cc1 Mexico to send National Guard to southern border The Blog Mexico Guatemala AMLO

Mexico is going to send its National Guard to their border with Guatemala. Mexico Ambassador to the U.S Martha Bárcena Coqui told CBS’ Face the Nation their own National Guard will deploy Monday to stop illegal immigration.

I want to explain that this deployment will take place now because until two weeks ago, we were still discussing the laws to implement the National Guard. So the deployment throughout the country has been- has already begun and it will increase next Monday. So we will see how the results of the deployment of the National Guard which by the way, is not similar to the National Guard of the US. It is not like the National Guard of the US it is a- it is a police force based on the models of the European military police like the Carabinieri, like the Gendarmerie, like the Guardia- Guardia Civil Española. So we have to understand that when people talk about deployment of troops, they are wrong. What we are deploying is a police force, and we are deploying it to put order in the borders.

Bárceni Coqui declined to release the number of military police headed to the Guatemalan border, although Reuters reported on Friday there could be 6000 officers headed to the area.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador aka AMLO is hedging his bets massively on why they’re going. Via Economiahoy.mx with a little help from Google Translate.

The deployment of 6,000 elements of the National Guard on the southern border of Mexico is part of a security program and is not part of the negotiations with the United States on the subject of tariffs ; Its members will be able to support migratory tasks, said President Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a press conference.

In that sense, he rejected that said deployment announced yesterday by the Secretary of Foreign Affairs, Marcelo Ebrard, forms part of the agreements with the United States in the framework of the negotiation with authorities of that country for the possible imposition of tariffs on Mexican products.

“It does not mean that we are not complying with the migratory laws of the country, we are acting,” said the federal president, who endorsed what was said by Ebrard Casaubon, “if we have a Guard to help accompany migrants in their return, without violation of human rights.”

It’s entirely possible AMLO is spinning at home to make sure the press (and people) aren’t seeing him as some sort of lapdog of President Donald Trump. He is a politician, after all, and focused on maintaining power.

It’s also possible AMLO is hedging because the National Guard is still being put together. It was formally approved by the Mexican legislature in February with retiring Brigadier General Luis Rodríguez Bucio named the first leader in April. Via Conciencia in Mexico (with Google Translate’s help).

The enormous encomienda that Luis Rodríguez Bucio has in the National Guard has an extra challenge: not only is commanding the new corporation, but building it from scratch, with the great challenge of guaranteeing peace and security in the country.

“I think you are trying something different, build a new organization, that more certainty, that is always present, perhaps our previous projects was to go with a large number of people, police or military, where there was an event that required presence by short weather. Now, what is intended is permanent, will be throughout the national territory.

In the middle of his appointment, came the debate whether the guard was military or civilian, to which Luis Rodríguez Bucio said that he must have discipline in any armed force, with a military vision, he does not imagine it in any other way.

The New York Times reported in February the National Guard is expected to consist of 18K Federal Police, 35K military police, and several thousand naval police. However, the military – which was the group principally attempting to keep the peace in Mexico – is going to stay part of the equation for at least five years. This means the “deployment” of the National Guard may not be as large as the politicians are claiming.

There should be a heavy amount of skepticism on whether this ‘framework’ will actually solve the things the politicians claim they’ll solve.

The post Mexico to send National Guard to southern border appeared first on Hot Air.

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Defying the Hysterics, Mexico Starts Caving to Trump’s Tariff Threats

Westlake Legal Group mexican-police-caravan-620x413 Defying the Hysterics, Mexico Starts Caving to Trump’s Tariff Threats United States threats Tariffs Politics Migrant Flows Mexico Mexican National Guard Illegal Immigration Guatemala Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story donald trump democrats deal Caving border enforcement

Mexican federal police in riot gear receive instructions at the border crossing between Guatemala and Mexico, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. Members of a 3,000-strong migrant caravan have massed in this Guatemalan border town across the muddy Suchiate River from Mexico, as U.S. President Donald Trump threatens retaliation if they continue toward the United States. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

I’ve been critical of Trump’s trade policies at times. My instinct is to oppose tariffs, especially if they are targeted to benefit certain industries at the expense of consumers and other workers. For example, I don’t think Pennsylvania residents are inherently more entitled to steel manufacturing jobs than any other American. Trump’s messaging can often be confusing and that’s been part of the issue. Tariffs as leverage are good. Tariffs as a means to their own end are inevitably harmful.

Despite my prior concerns, at some point I made the decision that I was done reacting rashly toward the President’s trade policy. I found much of the hysteria on the right over every new rumor of a tariff to be tedious and an overreaction. The economy is not going to crash because your Chipotle burrito might cost $0.05 more and even dealing with the bigger items, we were actually talking small fractions of the overall price being affected. One could certainly argue that even small increases are worthy of disapproval and harmful, but the constant preaching of Armageddon is all just a bit much.

I say all that to say that when President Trump announced new tariff threats toward Mexico in order to get them to help with illegal immigration, I took a wait and see approach. It was clear to me that this was a leverage play and that Mexico had far more to lose than we did. I opined at the time that I doubted they’d ever even go into effect.

I may end up being right because Mexico is currently in the process of caving to Trump’s demands.

This follows reports that Mexico is already beefing up its southern border.

Mexican soldiers, armed police and migration officials blocked hundreds of migrants after they crossed the border from Guatemala in a caravan into southern Mexico on Wednesday, and detained dozens of them, a witness from a migrant aid group and an official said.

The Mexican response in the border town of Metapa, which included dozens of soldiers, marked a toughening of the government’s efforts to curb the flow of mainly Central American migrants, said Salva Cruz, a coordinator with Fray Matias de Cordova.

“That many sailors and military police, yes, it’s new,” Cruz said, by WhatsApp, from Metapa, in the southern border state of Chiapas, where the vast majority of migrants cross into Mexico.

Things are moving quickly and there’s still a lot up in the air but what’s clear is that Mexico got the message.

They have no desire to take the hit when they so heavily rely on exports to the U.S. for their economic stability. In the past, the Mexicans have rebuffed signing a “safe 3rd country” agreement with us. We have such an agreement with Canada already. What it essentially does is say that migrants (they aren’t technically illegal aliens yet) must make their asylum claims in the first country they arrive in that isn’t their own. Guatemalans must do so in Mexico while Hondurans would do so in Guatemala, etc.

This helps stem the flow of “asylum shopping,” where migrants pass up perfectly safe offers of asylum in order to get to the U.S. for economic reasons. Asylum is not an ticket to try to find the best situation possible. It’s there to mitigate life threatening situations.

Now, Mexico and Guatemala are working with us to setup proper asylum procedures, where they aren’t making a dangerous 2,000 mile trip when asylum is being offered to them where they are in Mexico.

The news has some conservatives changing their tune on the whole ordeal.

Good for Shapiro. One of the reasons I enjoy his material is that he does his best to be an honest broker. He’s willing to admit he was wrong here when a lot of other “conservative” voices wouldn’t.

If I’m Donald Trump, I take this deal or something close to it. There’s only so much Mexico can do and these latest terms seem like a max effort to me. It’s unrealistic to think they can actually stop all migrant flows to the the U.S. but if they are willing to help us enforce logical asylum policies and send thousands of troops to their southern border, that’s a big win for the President.

Even if a deal is struck in the next few days, one thing is certain. Democrats will oppose it because the goal for them has never been to stop illegal immigration or secure the border. They want these people making the inhuman journey at the behest of the cartels because they see these people as political leverage. No doubt some liberal judge will attempt to get involved here as well.

Regardless, it appears that Trump’s leverage play has worked and perhaps that’ll earn him a little more benefit of the doubt next time. Ah, who am I kidding?

————————————————-

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The post Defying the Hysterics, Mexico Starts Caving to Trump’s Tariff Threats appeared first on RedState.

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Something big just happened on Mexico’s southern border

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While the President is overseas honoring D-Day, the cable news talking heads back home have been busy critiquing his recently announced plan to impose an increasing series of tariffs on Mexico unless that nation stops the flood of migrants passing through their country toward the United States. The plan has been described in the press with a variety of terms ranging from reckless to impossible. After all, even if Mexico was willing to consider such a deal, how could they possibly stop the human tide from flowing across their own southern border?

Well, the tariffs must have gotten their attention. I don’t know if they can shut down their border entirely, but as of this morning, they seem to be giving it the good old college try. (Reuters)

Mexican soldiers, armed police and migration officials blocked hundreds of migrants after they crossed the border from Guatemala in a caravan into southern Mexico on Wednesday, and detained dozens of them, a witness from a migrant aid group and an official said.

The Mexican response in the border town of Metapa, which included dozens of soldiers, marked a toughening of the government’s efforts to curb the flow of mainly Central American migrants, said Salva Cruz, a coordinator with Fray Matias de Cordova.

“That many sailors and military police, yes, it’s new,” Cruz said, by WhatsApp, from Metapa, in the southern border state of Chiapas, where the vast majority of migrants cross into Mexico.

To call this a “shift in policy” is something of an understatement. Federal police, members of the military and other enforcement officials are staging along some common crossing points from Guatemala turning people back unless their documentation is in order. This is a definite switch from their recent policy of attempting to process everyone seeking to make asylum claims and allowing other groups to travel north.

But that’s not all that’s going on by a long shot. An official with the National Migration Institute in Mexico City said that migrants already in the country were now being approached and being asked to show their citizenship status. Up to 400 were detained yesterday with many presumably being scheduled for deportation back to their home countries.

In a perhaps even more stunning move, yesterday afternoon saw the detention of Irineo Mujica, the director of Pueblo Sin Fronteras, a migrant rights group that has been coordinating with American groups in San Francisco to organize and assist the caravans. Another migrant rights activist named Cristobal Sanchez was also detained.

The new Mexican president has signaled on several occasions that he was ready to play ball with Donald Trump if it was to the mutual benefit of our nations. I haven’t seen any official statement from AMLO yet, but this certainly sounds like he’s willing to bring down the hammer in the interest of avoiding those tariffs. The Vice President is currently in discussions with Mexican officials, so we’ll see if these most recent changes move the ball.

The post Something big just happened on Mexico’s southern border appeared first on Hot Air.

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Mexico Starts Negotiating After Trump Slaps Them With Tariffs Over Illegal Immigration

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A group of immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally are loaded on to a van, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, in Granjeno, Texas. At least six local, state and federal law enforcement agencies patrol the five mile zone which is illegal immigration’s busiest corridor. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Last week, President Trump set off a firestorm by saying he was going to apply tariffs of 5%, escalating to 25%, on Mexico for their failures on the border. Most reactions were negative, with countless media op-eds being churned out amid Republican and Democratic cries that it was taxation of Americans to punish Mexico.

I found some arguments persuasive, others not so much. If we are speaking about tariffs in a vacuum, they are indeed a negative impact on U.S. consumers. Sometimes absorbing a little pain can lead to long term betterment though. Using tariffs as a tool of leverage holds more value than trying to use them as a means unto themselves. Admittedly, Donald Trump has been an incredibly bad messenger on this point, constantly shifting between saying tariffs are to ensure betters deals and saying the tariffs themselves are great for America. It doesn’t work both ways. If the tariffs are great, you don’t need need a new deal, but if the purpose is to bring people to the table, then that’s more palatable.

It appears the latest threat was for the latter, as Mexico is now sending a delegation to Washington a week before the new tariffs hit their economy.

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Fighting to stave off punitive tariffs announced by U.S. President Donald Trump, a senior Mexican delegation was set to begin high level talks on Monday in Washington, where it will be pushed to do more to hold back Central American migrants.

Here’s a preview of what some of our demands will be.

The U.S.-Mexican talks begin on Monday with a meeting between Mexican Economy Secretary Graciela Marquez and U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. On Wednesday, Ebrard meets U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Trump on Sunday called Mexico an “abuser” of the United States and said he wanted action, not talk. Mexico has signaled it would retaliate to the tariffs, with targets likely to include farm products on Trump supporting states.

In a possible sign of U.S. priorities in the talks, which are due to run through at least Wednesday, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan said on Sunday that Mexico should deploy more personnel to interdict illegal migrants along a 150 mile (241.4 km) stretch of border with Guatemala.

Mexico simply doesn’t have the leverage to retaliate on the needed scale. They are heavily reliant on U.S. exports and their economy has already retracted in the 1st quarter of this year.

I suspect some kind of deal will be reached and announced. Whether it’ll have much teeth, I don’t know. Mexico has the ability to police it’s 150 mile border with Guatemala in a much heavier fashion. By contract to the U.S. border, it’s a tiny fraction of the size. Currently, U.S. DHS agents are already down there in advisory roles. That border will be the key to stemming the flow. If hundreds of thousands of people continue to make it to the expansive U.S.-Mexico border, no amount of enforcement will be viable to stop what’s happening.

There is something to be said about the different schools of thought here. When I first saw these new tariffs announced, my first thought was that some kind of deal would be reached before they even become a factor. If that happens, Trump comes out looking like a winner. If it doesn’t, the economic impact could ultimately harm his re-election. He’s in a game of chicken right now and Mexico looks like it’s willing to blink first.

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WATCH: Fox News Interview With Border Patrol Agent Interrupted by Illegal Aliens Crossing Border

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Well, this is awkward, at least for CNN’s Jim Acosta.

This morning, Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo was conducting a live interview from the southern border in El Paso, TX. As a Border Patrol agent was explaining how illegal aliens normally run across and turn themselves in, they were interrupted by a group doing just that.

This is what happened, per Townhall.

Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo conducted a special episode of “Sunday Morning Features” at the United States-Mexico border in El Paso, Texas. During her interview, Bartiromo spoke with Border Patrol officers to talk about the crisis taking place on America’s southern border. While speaking with a few of the agents about the dried up Rio Grande River, multiple illegal aliens crossed the ravine and stepped right into the United States.

According to the Border Patrol agent, those crossing the border like this look for an agent and willingly turn themselves in. The reason? They’re giving a piece of paper and are sent northbound further into the United States.

This is the idiocy of saying a wall won’t help. If there was a wall here, these people would have never been able to run across and turn themselves in, which is a tactic being used to abuse the asylum process. Given that each CBP agent can’t legally adjudicate each case (for obvious reasons) as they come across, they are given paperwork and disappear into the interior. It’s a system that’s being knowingly gamed every day. With a barrier, word would get out that it’s no longer possible to do that and the number of migrants would dwindle.

If there was a barrier, it would help deter from making the journey in the first place. Instead, they know they can simply run across the border and once across they can, usually falsely, claim asylum. People are trained in countries like Honduras, Guatemala, etc. on exactly what to say and do. Meanwhile, the drug cartels are making billions of dollars trafficking these people to the border.

It’s a dangerous, immoral situation where people, including children, routinely get sick and even die along the way simply to enrich drug lords. Sexual assault is through the roof as well all because the United States does nothing to stop the draw that’s currently bringing them. Barriers, faster processing, and asylum reform would actually save lives in the end but our politicians are too cowardly or too invested illegal immigration to act.

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The post WATCH: Fox News Interview With Border Patrol Agent Interrupted by Illegal Aliens Crossing Border appeared first on RedState.

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