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Westlake Legal Group > Hong Kong

Hong Kong Says It Will Begin Evacuating Residents From Wuhan

Westlake Legal Group 24hongkong01-facebookJumbo Hong Kong Says It Will Begin Evacuating Residents From Wuhan Wuhan (China) Quarantines Lunar New Year Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Evacuations and Evacuees Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

HONG KONG — The Hong Kong government, which has faced growing demands to evacuate its residents from mainland China after one died of the coronavirus, said on Monday that it would begin bringing people back from Hubei Province, the center of the outbreak.

Thousands of Hong Kong residents have been unable to return after much of Hubei was put on lockdown last month. Their worries were heightened when officials said on Sunday that a 77-year-old Hong Kong man who was infected with the coronavirus had died in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei.

Hong Kong lawmakers had demanded to know why some Hong Kong residents in Japan were whisked home on chartered flights last week, while others remained stuck in mainland China.

“We know that it was not only a decision for the Hong Kong government,” said Ivan Choy, a political science lecturer at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. “It was also the decision of the Japanese and the mainland governments.”

More than a dozen countries have evacuated citizens from Wuhan. But Beijing complained that the United States’ moves to get its citizens and diplomats out of the city had created a panic. It showed little interest in letting people from Hong Kong join the exodus.

Hong Kong is part of China but operates under a model of “one country, two systems,” with its own local government, courts and border controls. Despite the city’s autonomy, its inability to evacuate residents earlier was a sharp reminder of Beijing’s ultimate authority.

The Hong Kong government said that it had received more than 1,400 requests for help from Hubei, involving 2,700 people in more than three dozen cities across the province. Many of them traveled to the area ahead of the Lunar New Year, only to be marooned when Wuhan and other cities were put under lockdown a month ago.

James To, a pro-democracy legislator in Hong Kong who has been helping more than a dozen residents stranded in Hubei, said that many were angry that foreigners had been able to leave the area while they could not.

“They thought, other countries have evacuated their citizens, and they’ve all left, but why is the Hong Kong government like this?” Mr. To said. Some were also anxious about what might happen the longer they stayed, including fears of being detained as a suspected case and placed under isolation at local facilities, where they could then become infected.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

One Hong Kong resident trapped in Wuhan is 36 weeks pregnant. Her 3-year-old son has heart disease and is due for a scan in Hong Kong next month.

Her husband said in a voice message shared by Mr. To’s office that the family had not been able to return to Hong Kong after Wuhan closed its roads, and had not ventured outdoors for more than a month.

“What worries us is that the birth wouldn’t go smoothly and we wouldn’t be able to receive the treatment needed,” said the husband, who would only disclose his family name, Chan. “We hope that the government takes us back as quickly as possible.”

The evacuation will start in Wuhan before taking people from other cities in Hubei, and the process will give priority to pregnant women, students and those with chronic diseases, officials said on Monday.

Ten Hong Kong residents in Hubei have been confirmed to have coronavirus infections, including one person in critical condition and one who has been discharged.

The Hong Kong government said that it considered arranging the return of residents from Hubei a matter of “great importance.” But it admitted that there were logistical challenges, with some people located in remote cities.

“It may take up to eight to 10 hours’ drive from these cities to Wuhan,” the government said in an emailed statement. “This situation is unique as citizens of other countries have mostly stayed in Wuhan or nearby areas.”

Carrie Lam, the chief executive of Hong Kong, said the city had made a priority of helping residents in places hit by the coronavirus, regardless of whether they were in mainland China or overseas.

“There are different circumstances, and the whole Hubei Province is now still in a very critical stage of dealing with this epidemic,” she said last week. “All the public transport has been stopped and it would be very difficult to arrange local transport and so on. But we are not giving up at all.”

The government also said that it needed to make sure there were enough berths at the city’s quarantine sites — a sensitive subject in Hong Kong. Hong Kong residents who were on the contaminated Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan were expected to take up much of the currently available space.

Of the 352 Hong Kong residents who had been on the ship, more than 200 returned to the city last week and were under quarantine. Another 68 Hong Kong passengers were among the 634 confirmed cases on the ship, and were being treated in Japan.

Hong Kong has 79 confirmed cases of coronavirus infections, including three people who were passengers on the Diamond Princess, officials said on Monday. Two people in Hong Kong have died of Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus.

After protests and a strike by medical workers, Hong Kong closed several of its border crossings with mainland China. It now requires travelers from the mainland to undergo a 14-day quarantine, which has drastically cut arrivals.

John Lee, the Hong Kong security secretary, announced further restrictions on Monday. Non-Hong Kong residents traveling from South Korea, or who have traveled to South Korea within the past two weeks, will be denied entry to Hong Kong starting on Tuesday, he said.

Mr. To, the pro-democracy legislator, said that most of the Hong Kong residents in Hubei who he had spoken with were visiting their relatives and in-laws during the Lunar New Year. Most wanted to be repatriated as soon as possible, he said, except for rare cases including a Hong Kong man who felt safer in a small village of 1,000 people that had cut off contact with the outside world.

The most urgent case he dealt with involved a man who needed his daily medications after undergoing angioplasty, he added. Following prescription rules, the Hong Kong Department of Health had initially declined to send him his medication for the first few weeks. The authorities inside Hubei had told him to try to get his prescriptions locally — an impossible task in the locked-down region, Mr. To said. The Hong Kong Health Department eventually dispatched the drugs to him.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Impact of the Coronavirus Ripples Across Asia: ‘It Has Been Quiet, Like a Cemetery’

Westlake Legal Group merlin_169279005_babb628a-f182-4f74-9510-6a5ef1212b3e-facebookJumbo Impact of the Coronavirus Ripples Across Asia: ‘It Has Been Quiet, Like a Cemetery’ Vietnam Travel Warnings Travel and Vacations Thailand Southeast Asia Japan Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China Cambodia

HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam — The Arashiyama Bamboo Forest, one of the most visited sites in Kyoto, Japan, was quiet enough to hear the bamboo creaking in the wind.

The Ngong Ping 360 cable cars in Hong Kong, which hover over Lantau Island and take passengers to a famous Buddha statue, hung motionless and empty.

The crush of flag-following tour groups that usually cram the Lantern Bridge in Hoi An’s ancient town in central Vietnam had disappeared.

And in Siem Reap, home to the ancient ruins of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, the usually busy Sala Lodges hadn’t had a new booking in three weeks.

The coronavirus epidemic is taking its toll on global tourism, which according to the World Travel & Tourism Council contributed $8.8 trillion to the world economy in 2018. Some economists say the epidemic could be the biggest drag on global economic growth since the financial crisis, with airlines alone expected to lose some $29 billion in revenues this year.

The Asian countries closest to China, which is the epicenter of the outbreak and the world’s leading source of international travelers and tourism spending, are feeling the brunt of the crisis, but the effects are spreading. On Sunday, Venice cut short its annual carnival celebration, and the Italian government shut down travel to 10 towns in the Lombardy region after a surge in new cases there.

In recent years, countries in Southeast Asia invested heavily in resorts and casinos to capture the swelling ranks of Chinese tourists. Now airlines, hotels and tour operators are suffering from a rush of cancellations and a drop in future bookings, primarily from mainland China, but also from Western travelers spooked by the spread of the virus in the region.

The economic toll is mounting: Countries that have relied heavily on Chinese tourism, including Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia and Singapore, are each expected to lose at least $3 billion in tourism-related revenues, according to an analysis by Animesh Kumar, a travel and tourism director at GlobalData, a research and consulting firm based in London.

The steep losses are mostly because of the absence of Chinese tourists, but also because some “tourists from other countries are apprehensive about traveling anywhere close to China,” he wrote in his report.

A report last week from Hopper, the flight and hotel booking app, showed a decline in searches by Americans in the past several weeks for flights to Asian countries, especially China. Its analysis of billions of airfare quotes from across the internet showed a roughly 20 percent drop in demand to Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam. The company said it was seeing a shift in Americans searching for domestic destinations over international locales.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Chinese travelers racked up an unprecedented 150 million trips abroad and spent more than $277 billion on international travel in 2018. But the juggernaut last year sputtered in the wake of slower economic growth and the trade war with the United States. It effectively came to a halt as the coronavirus epidemic led the government to bar groups of tourists from traveling abroad, and dozens of international carriers like American Airlines and United Airlines suspended flights to mainland China.

As the virus continues to spread, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Saturday issued Level 2 alerts for Japan and South Korea, advising older adults and those with chronic conditions to “consider postponing nonessential travel.” On Wednesday, Hong Kong received a Level 1 watch advising travelers to take precautions like washing hands and avoiding sick people.

Jenni Honkanen and Tobias Solvefjord, both 39, of Skovde, Sweden, were on a half-full jet from Hong Kong to Ho Chi Minh City on Wednesday morning, wondering if sites would be closed or travel restricted. Still, the couple were not overly concerned.

They were aware that Vietnam had reported only a small number of cases (16 compared with more than 77,000 in China) and joked that it wouldn’t be bad being quarantined in the tropics instead of suffering through the bleak winter in Skovde.

“We’ll be fine,” Ms. Honkanen said. “Vietnam should still be fine, hopefully.”

In one of the country’s most popular destinations, Hoi An, the scene last weekend was as if the former port city had returned to the days before package tours and fleets of tour buses clogged the streets, said resident Patricia Clegg, 64, a native of France whose parents are from Vietnam.

China and South Korea have been the biggest sources of tourists for the town in the past few years as sprawling resorts filled the coast between the town and Danang, about 20 miles north.

“All the Asian tourism has mostly disappeared,” said Ms. Clegg, a consultant for the town’s oldest tailor shop catering to tourists, Yaly. “It’s mostly Western tourists now.”

At Reaching Out handicraft shop in Hoi An’s ancient town, business is down 65 percent since the coronavirus hit the news and by 45 percent at its teahouse, said the owner, Le Nguyen Binh, 56. One-third of the staff is on leave and collecting unemployment until sales pick up. The 40 remaining staff members have their temperatures taken when they arrive to work and don masks, which are also offered to customers, along with hand sanitizer, Mr. Binh said.

In the midst of Japan’s historic tourism boom, February in Kyoto would normally see streets and parks filled with tourists — largely Chinese nationals visiting as part of tour groups — taking in the first plum blossoms in the former ancient capital. Chinese visitors supplied one-quarter of Japan’s record 32 million arrivals in 2018. Instead, the popular Chion and Nison temples were nearly void of sightseers. Katsunobu Kato, Japan’s health minister, has urged the public to “avoid nonurgent, nonessential gatherings.”

In Hong Kong, the Tourism Board chief, Dane Cheng, said tourism would take a bigger hit than it did during the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, that struck the territory and mainland China 17 years ago. In the first two weeks of February, only 3,000 tourists a day visited Hong Kong, he said. In January, the city averaged about 65,000 tourists a day, a number that was already down because of months of political protests and a shrinking economy.

“It’s a huge drop,” Mr. Cheng said. “This time it’s not just Hong Kong, but all or most parts of Asia.”

In Hong Kong, where 68 cases of the new disease, formally known as Covid-19, have been confirmed, government-run tourism sites like the harbor-front Hong Kong Museum of Art, the marine-life theme park Ocean Park and the Ngong Ping 360 cable cars have been closed. Events like Art Basel Hong Kong have also been canceled.

Tim Cheung, who was handing out fliers on Thursday evening for his restaurant in Lan Kwai Fong, Hong Kong’s popular night life district, said businesses there had already taken a hit during the protests and were worse off now, with business dropping 70 to 80 percent since the Chinese New Year.

“Basically we don’t know what will happen tomorrow,” he said. “I may be out of a job. I’ll work another day for as long as I can. Many Hong Kongers are like this now.”

Singapore, which has reported 89 coronavirus cases, announced a fiscal boost of several billion dollars to help households and sectors like aviation and tourism that are most affected by the outbreak.

Jewel, a nature-themed complex at the Changi Airport, reflected the malaise. At the Rain Vortex indoor waterfall, usually crowded with people jostling to take selfies, there was plenty of space to take a photo alone. Apple Store employees in their dark blue T-shirts outnumbered shoppers two to one.

Jeanne Liu, the owner of Rich & Good Cake Shop, which has an outpost at Jewel, said that business was down by half. “The general mood in the country is depressed, and people aren’t going to places they perceive as crowded,” she said.

Robert and Jane Murray, 73 and 70, who live in Australia, were sitting in a mostly empty Terminal 3, waiting for their flight to Jaipur, India, to attend a wedding after spending three days in Singapore.

“We booked the trip before all the hype, and it made us want to cancel,” Mr. Murray said. “But we contacted our doctor, who said ‘It’s just like the flu,’ so we just take precautions, wash hands and we’re fine.”

In Cambodia’s usual tourist hot spot, Siem Reap, the airport was hauntingly empty and check-in and security lines were minimal.

Arne Lugeon, 56, the French-born owner and general manager of the Sala Lodges, said that as of mid-Feburary, its 11 traditional wooden houses had not had a new booking in three weeks, even though February is high season for tourism. “I can only hope this virus is contained and then ends soon,” he said.

Fabien Martial, 46, co-owner of the 35-room Viroth’s Hotel, said: “During the Chinese New Year, 70 percent of our clients are from China, but this year they all canceled. The hotel was nearly completely empty for a few days.”

“I’ve been a hotelier here through SARS, avian flu and political unrest,” Mr. Martial added. “I’ve learned to be patient and to endure. Business and tourism will be back.”

In Thailand, which receives, by far, the most Chinese tourists in Southeast Asia, with more than 10 million in 2018, the Platinum Mall in Bangkok is typically bustling this time of year, said Siriwan Saensuwan, 65, who has been selling clothes there for a decade. But for the past couple of weeks, she said, “it has been quiet, like a cemetery.”

“Look for yourself,” she said, “no one is walking around.”


Reporting was contributed by Elaine Yu from Hong Kong; Adam H. Graham and Allan Richarz from Tokyo and Kyoto, Japan; David Farley from Siem Reap, Cambodia; Sanjay Surana from Singapore; and Muktita Suhartono from Bangkok.

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Benedict Rogers: If we mean what we say about ‘global Britain’, we must stand up to China

Benedict Rogers is a human rights activist and writer, and a former parliamentary candidate. He is East Asia Team Leader of the international human rights organisation CSW, co-founder and Chair of Hong Kong Watch and co-founder and Deputy Chair of the Conservative Party Human Rights Commission.

Iain Duncan Smith was right when he said that “for the past two decades, we have cosied up to China in a way that is becoming an embarrassment”. He argued that “the UK needs to stand shoulder to shoulder with its allies. China is not an ally.”

What he didn’t say is that there are also two myths about China. The first is that it is the forthcoming superpower, a strong and stable force in the world. The second is that in order to trade with China, we need to kowtow.

The coronavirus has not only exposed millions of people to a public health crisis, it has exposed the fragility of the Chinese Communist Party. A strong, secure government would not hide the truth about a new virus, it would act immediately to prevent its spread. Yet when Dr Li Wenliang first warned about the outbreak, the response of the authorities was to silence and threaten him. He was forced to sign a confession, apologising for spreading rumours and disturbing public order.

Only when the virus was so obvious did the authorities take some steps to deal with it – but too late. At least 2,000 people in China alone have died, and it has become a global emergency – caused in large part by a regime based on lies and fear. Even now, citizen bloggers reporting the truth disappear.

A self-confident government does not expel Wall Street Journal reporters because of a headline. A self-confident government does not incarcerate at least a million Uyghur Muslims, just because they have beards, wear veils, or surf the Internet. A self-confident government doesn’t destroy thousands of crosses and dynamite churches.

A self-confident government does not deny foreign activists, academics, and journalists entry to Hong Kong, branded “Asia’s world city”. In October 2017 I was one of the first westerners refused entry on Beijing’s orders, exposing the erosion of the much-vaunted “one country, two systems” principle. My incident became a diplomatic one, with the Foreign Secretary at the time – Boris Johnson – issuing a statement, the Foreign Office summoning the Chinese ambassador, and questions being raised in both Houses of Parliament. Since my case, others have faced a similar fate, including the Victor Mallet, the Financial Times’ Asia Editor; Dan Garrett, an academic; and Michael Yon, a journalist.

A self-confident government would not invest so much effort in trying to silence western critics. Over the past two years I have received numerous anonymous letters posted to my home address, my neighbours, and even my mother. More recently I have received daily emails either harassing me or, using fake email addresses in my name, impersonating me to others in an attempt to discredit me. And I am not alone.

Furthermore, a self-confident government would not lobby parliamentarians about a British activist. Yet I know several who have been asked by the Chinese Embassy to shut me up, and at least two who, in meetings with the Chinese Ambassador about global issues like trade or climate change, have faced as the first agenda item a specific request to silence Benedict Rogers. A self-confident government would have better things to do.

So stop thinking that the Chinese Communist Party is this confident power that we should not cross. It exhibits all the characteristics of a bully, and bullies are by definition insecure, fearful and weak. They may show aggression, but their aggression only works if we kow-tow to it.

That leads to the second myth: that we can’t afford economically to lose China, and thus we must do deals whatever the cost.

The record shows that, though it may huff and puff, the regime in China will still sell goods and purchase products based on demand, not politics. Germany’s Angela Merkel has, among western leaders, been one of the most consistently outspoken about human rights in China, yet Germany remains China’s largest trading partner in Europe.

When Xi Jinping visited the UK in 2015 an American businessman in Shanghai, James Macgregor, told the BBC: “If you act like a panting puppy, the object of your attention is going to think they’ve got you on a leash. China does not respect people who suck up to them.” The Chinese regime might not like it when you stand up for values, but they are more likely to respect you than if you kowtow.

But how important is China, really? As Chris Patten, the last governor of Hong Kong, put it in his recent Paddy Ashdown Memorial Lecture on the city:

“The truth is that behaving in a way that corresponds with our traditional values does not threaten economic catastrophe. The idea that you can only do business with China if you say and do what Beijing wants has always been nonsense … Whatever became of the cornucopia that was supposed to come with the “golden era” of Britain’s dealings with China? This is the usual self-serving guff.”

In our post-Brexit era, we must carve out a role for global Britain. But that means what it says. Global. What about India? Brazil? What about the democracies of Asia – Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia – who, however imperfectly, are far closer to our values than Xi’s China? And what about our allies in Hong Kong, who share our values and are, as a new report by Hong Kong Watch launched next week shows, trying to save the world’s third most significant financial centre and the UK’s third largest trading partner in Asia?

To sign a cheap deal that allows a corporation, Huawei, which is closely aligned with the Chinese regime and is complicit with grave human rights violations into our national telecommunications infrastructure, potentially undermining our closest relationships with allies who share our values and intelligence, is madness. To allow the perception to prevail among those who struggle courageously to preserve the rule of law and basic freedoms in Hong Kong that Britain, despite its obligations under the Sino-British Joint Declaration, has abandoned them, is tragic.

And for the Chinese ambassador in London to be declaring, unchallenged, that the Prime Minister wants to “work with China [and] … elevate the relationship to a new level” when that regime stands accused of crimes against humanity, cultural genocide, the most severe crackdown on human rights since the Tiananmen massacre, an increasing breach of its promises to the people of Hong Kong, the worst repression of religion since the Cultural Revolution, an increasingly grave threat to our own freedoms and security and – despite its charade of confidence – an increasingly unstable regime, seems unhinged.

The UK’s China policy needs a wholesale review. We didn’t “take back control” from Brussels only to surrender it to Beijing.

I am deeply pro-China, as a country and a people. I have spent much of my adult life in China. I want China to take its rightful place on the world stage. But I want it to do so as a friend not an enemy, a force for good and not a threat. It can only do so if it is free of a deceitful, repressive and insecure regime. And that requires us to have the courage to stand up to that regime which the British barrister Sir Geoffrey Nice QC, who chaired the independent China Tribunal on forced organ harvesting, describes as “a criminal state”.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Why the Coronavirus Seems to Hit Men Harder Than Women

Westlake Legal Group 19VIRUS-MEN-facebookJumbo Why the Coronavirus Seems to Hit Men Harder Than Women your-feed-science Yale University Wuhan (China) Women and Girls Viruses Vaccination and Immunization University of Iowa testosterone Smoking and Tobacco SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Research Reproduction (Biological) Paris (France) national institutes of health Middle East Mice MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Men and Boys Medicine and Health Immune System Hong Kong Harvard University Estrogen Epidemics Deaths (Fatalities) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Clayton, Janine Austin Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Blood Pressure Annals of Internal Medicine

The coronavirus that originated in China has spread fear and anxiety around the world. But while the novel virus has largely spared one vulnerable group — children — it appears to pose a particular threat to middle-aged and older adults, particularly men.

This week, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention published the largest analysis of coronavirus cases to date. Although men and women have been infected in roughly equal numbers, researchers found, the death rate among men was 2.8 percent, compared with 1.7 percent among women.

Men also were disproportionately affected during the SARS and MERS outbreaks, which were caused by coronaviruses. More women than men were infected by SARS in Hong Kong in 2003, but the death rate among men was 50 percent higher, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Some 32 percent of men infected with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome died, compared with 25.8 percent of women. Young adult men also died at higher rates than female peers during the influenza epidemic of 1918.

A number of factors may be working against men in the current epidemic, scientists say, including some that are biological, and some that are rooted in lifestyle.

When it comes to mounting an immune response against infections, men are the weaker sex.

“This is a pattern we’ve seen with many viral infections of the respiratory tract — men can have worse outcomes,” said Sabra Klein, a scientist who studies sex differences in viral infections and vaccination responses at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“We’ve seen this with other viruses. Women fight them off better,” she added.

Women also produce stronger immune responses after vaccinations, and have enhanced memory immune responses, which protect adults from pathogens they were exposed to as children.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

“There’s something about the immune system in females that is more exuberant,” said Dr. Janine Clayton, director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health.

But there’s a high price, she added: Women are far more susceptible to autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, in which the immune system shifts into overdrive and attacks the body’s own organs and tissues.

Nearly 80 percent of those with autoimmune diseases are women, Dr. Clayton noted.

The reasons women have stronger immune responses aren’t entirely clear, and the research is still at an early stage, experts caution.

One hypothesis is that women’s stronger immune systems confer a survival advantage to their offspring, who imbibe antibodies from mothers’ breast milk that help ward off disease while the infants’ immune systems are still developing.

A stew of biological factors may be responsible, including the female sex hormone estrogen, which appears to play a role in immunity, and the fact that women carry two X chromosomes, which contain immune-related genes. Men, of course, carry only one.

Experiments in which mice were exposed to the SARS coronavirus found that the males were more susceptible to infection than the females, a disparity that increased with age.

The male mice developed SARS at lower viral exposures, had a lower immune response and were slower to clear the virus from their bodies. They suffered more lung damage, and died at higher rates, said Dr. Stanley Perlman, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa who was the senior author of the study.

When researchers blocked estrogen in the infected females or removed their ovaries, they were more likely to die, but blocking testosterone in male mice made no difference, indicating that estrogen may play a protective role.

“It’s an exaggerated model of what happens in humans,” Dr. Perlman said. “The differences between men and women are subtle — in mice, it’s not so subtle.”

Health behaviors that differ by sex in some societies may also play a role in disparate responses to infections.

China has the largest population of smokers in the world — 316 million people — accounting for nearly one-third of the world’s smokers and 40 percent of tobacco consumption worldwide. But just over 2 percent of Chinese women smoke, compared with more than half of all men.

Chinese men also have higher rates of Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure than women, both of which increase the risk of complications following infection with the coronavirus. Rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are almost twice as high among Chinese men as among women.

In the United States, women are more proactive about seeking health care than men, and some small studies have found the generalization applies to Chinese students at universities in the United States, as well.

In unpublished studies, Chinese researchers have emphasized that patients whose diagnoses were delayed, or who had severe pneumonia when they were first diagnosed, were at greatest risk of dying.

One study of 4,021 patients with the coronavirus emphasized the importance of early detection, particularly in older men. And men have been turning up in hospitals with more advanced disease.

But in areas of China outside Hubei Province, the disease’s epicenter and where the majority of those affected are concentrated, the patterns are different: The disease appears to have dramatically lower mortality rates, and men are being infected at much higher rates than women, according to the Chinese C.D.C. analysis.

[Like the Science Times page on Facebook. | Sign up for the Science Times newsletter.]

Men may have a “false sense of security” when it comes to the coronavirus, said Akiko Iwasaki, a professor of immunology at Yale University who studies why some viruses affect women more severely.

Gathering and analyzing data about the new virus by sex is important both for the scientists studying it and for the general public, experts said.

Since the start of the outbreak, for example, public health officials have emphasized the importance of washing hands well and often, to prevent infection. But several studies have found that men — even health care workers — are less likely to wash their hands or to use soap than women, Dr. Klein said.

“We make these broad sweeping assumptions that men and women are the same behaviorally, in terms of comorbidities, biology and our immune system, and we just are not,” Dr. Klein said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

HSBC Plans to Cut 35,000 Jobs as Challenges Mount in Asia

Westlake Legal Group 18hsbc-facebookJumbo HSBC Plans to Cut 35,000 Jobs as Challenges Mount in Asia Layoffs and Job Reductions HSBC Holdings PLC. Hong Kong Economic Conditions and Trends Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

HONG KONG — HSBC plans to cut 35,000 jobs over the next three years as the global bank struggles to revive a business that has come to depend increasingly on China for growth.

The London-based bank said on Tuesday that it aimed to cut $4.5 billion in costs as it faces headwinds that include the coronavirus outbreak in China and months of political strife in Hong Kong, one of its most important bases.

The coronavirus is causing economic disruptions in Hong Kong and mainland China that could have a negative impact on performance this year, the bank warned. The bank lowered expectations for growth across Asia for this year but added that it expected to see some improvement once the virus was contained. Nearly half of the bank’s revenue comes from Asia.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

HSBC shares trading in Hong Kong slumped by more than 3 percent.

It is the latest company to shed light on the impact of a fast-moving virus that has gripped China over recent weeks and led to a near nationwide economic standstill. While parts of the country are getting back to work, the reopening of business operations for many companies has been slow.

On Monday, Apple cut its sales expectations for the quarter and warned of the impact on the global supply chain.

“Parts of our business are not delivering acceptable returns,” said Noel Quinn, HSBC’s chief executive.

The bank reported a 33 percent fall in profit before taxes last year compared with the previous year, in part due to a so-called goodwill impairment of $7.3 billion. Mr. Quinn took the helm after the surprise resignation of the former chief executive, John Flint, in August.

The bank has already begun an overhaul that involves cutting back operations in the United States and Europe, Mr. Quinn said.

Months of pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong “weighed on the local economy and caused significant disruption,” Mr. Quinn said. The protests have pushed Hong Kong’s economy into recession as businesses that once thrived from mainland tourism have taken a hit.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Live Updates: Quarantine Ordered as Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168759570_b1663fe2-2971-46a4-a805-0ca92f18cd1a-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: Quarantine Ordered as Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

A photograph distributed on Tuesday by the state-owned China News Service showed a device that sprays disinfectant at an entrance to a residential compound in Tianjin, China.Credit…China News Service, via Reuters

Nearly a third of the confirmed coronavirus cases in Tianjin, a city of more than 15 million about 70 miles southeast of Beijing, have been linked to one department store, adding to fears about rapid transmission in tightly clustered communities.

Of 102 confirmed cases in the city, at least 33 patients worked or shopped at a department store in the Baodi district, or had close contact with employees or customers, according to the Tianjin health authorities. Many of them had no history of travel to Wuhan, the city where the outbreak emerged.

Officials estimated that 11,700 customers had visited the shopping complex during a period in late January. The authorities said that those customers would be quarantined, and that the store itself, which they did not identify, had been sealed and disinfected.

It was not immediately clear how the authorities had tracked the shoppers, but health officials in the city have put out alerts on social media and on state news outlets urging residents to contact the government if they visited the store recently. News reports also said residents had been asked at various checkpoints in the city if they had been there.

In addition, emergency measures were imposed over sections of Baodi — home to nearly one million people — with all but two entrances and exits for certain residential areas sealed off and security personnel on round-the-clock patrols. Some residents were allowed to leave their homes only once every two days.

Hong Kong officials have put into quarantine dozens of residents of one apartment building after two people who live on different floors of the building were found to be infected with the coronavirus, the authorities said on Tuesday.

The two cases appeared to suggest that the virus had spread through the building, perhaps through a pipe, raising new fears about how the virus spreads. In all, quarantines were ordered for residents of more than 30 units of the Hong Mei House, which is part of the Cheung Hong Estate, a public housing block in the New Territories area of the city.

Officials from the city’s Center for Health Protection said the quarantine decision was made after an unsealed pipe was found in the apartment of a newly confirmed patient, a 62-year-old woman. She lives 10 floors below a resident who was earlier found to be infected.

Five more people living in different units displayed symptoms of the coronavirus, but all tested negative, officials said.

At a government-organized news briefing on Tuesday, Yuen Kwok-yung, a microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong, said that the exact route of transmission had not been confirmed, but that a pipe in one infected household appeared not to be sealed.

There are now 49 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in Hong Kong, health officials said, including three extended family members of the 62-year-old woman living in the building.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v21 Coronavirus Live Updates: Quarantine Ordered as Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 43,100 people in China and 24 other countries.

A senior Chinese official warned on Tuesday that three populous provinces could be vulnerable to the spread of the coronavirus as migrant workers return to their jobs after the Lunar New Year break.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

The official, He Qinghua, said that the provinces of Zhejiang, Guangdong and Henan could see a rise in new cases, even as the rate of new infections declined outside Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak.

The remarks highlight the looming possibility that more people could become infected as they resume their normal routines. Government officials extended China’s official Lunar New Year holiday by three days to keep people home. Major business hubs, like the cities of Beijing and Shanghai and the provinces of Guangdong and Shandong, then further extended holidays until Monday.

On Monday the China representative for the World Health Organization said that his agency had found the numbers of cases slowly rising in 10 provinces. The representative, Guaden Galea, said that it was too soon to say the epidemic had peaked.

A British businessman believed to be the source of a cluster of coronavirus cases in Britain and in France came forward on Tuesday, saying that he had fully recovered but would remain in isolation as a precaution.

The businessman, Steve Walsh, from Hove, in southern England, contracted the virus while at a conference in Singapore last month, according to his representatives, before traveling on to a chalet in the French Alpine resort of Les Contamines-Montjoie. Five more of Britain’s eight known coronavirus cases are linked to Mr. Walsh or the chalet, as are those of five British people in France.

Mr. Walsh thanked his doctors in a statement released by a public relations firm representing him and his employer. “Whilst I have fully recovered, my thoughts are with others who have contracted coronavirus,” he added.

On Monday evening, British public health officials said that two of the cases in the cluster were health care workers and that they had been advised to isolate themselves.

“We are now working urgently to identify all patients and other health care workers who may have come into close contact, and at this stage we believe this to be a relatively small number,” Prof. Yvonne Doyle, the medical director of Public Health England, said in a statement.

The death toll from the coronavirus epidemic is continuing to climb, Chinese officials said on Tuesday. By the end of Monday, the government said, 1,016 people had officially died from the coronavirus — an increase of 108 from the previous day. Most of the deaths occurred in Hubei Province.

The number of confirmed infections in China also grew, to at least 42,638 from about 40,000 a day earlier. Most of the infections are in Hubei, though the daily tally of new cases there fell compared to previous days.

Hubei recorded 2,097 new infections on Monday, compared to 2,618 a day earlier.

“With 99 percent of cases in China, this remains very much an emergency for that country, but one that holds a very grave threat for the rest of the world,” the director general of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said on Tuesday.

One of the people evacuated to the United States from Wuhan last week is infected with the coronavirus, U.C. San Diego Health said in a statement. The Centers for Disease Control shared the diagnosis on Monday, the hospital said; the patient had previously been discharged after testing negative.

The patient, one of 167 passengers on a State Department-arranged flight, has since returned to the hospital near Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego.

It is the 13th confirmed case in the United States, and the seventh in California.

Other government-arranged evacuation flights from China in the past two weeks have taken passengers — more than 500 in all — to other bases in California as well as to Nebraska and Texas.

Those evacuated are expected to be quarantined for 14 days, with frequent checks from medical personnel to determine whether they have developed fevers, coughs or other symptoms.

A man accused of imitating a coronavirus victim by collapsing on a subway train in central Moscow this month was arrested and will face up to five years in prison if found guilty, law enforcement officials have said.

In a video of the prank, a man is seen collapsing in the middle of a subway car. After other passengers try to assist him, he begins convulsing.

Others, believed to be accomplices, shout, “Coronavirus here, move out quickly!” The yelling prompts a panic in the car, with passengers scrambling for the exits.

The suspect was identified as Karomatullo Dzhabarov, a Moscow district court said on Monday. Two people suspected of being accomplices in the Feb. 2 prank were also held and their homes searched, the police said.

An Instagram account apparently belonging to Mr. Dzhabarov said, “Friends, we have not touched anybody, we have filmed this video for people to get serious about coronavirus.”

At least two coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Russia.

A Holland America cruise ship with more than 2,200 people aboard was denied entry to Thailand on Tuesday over fears that passengers may be carrying the new coronavirus, bringing the total number of ports from which it has been turned away to at least five.

The ship, the Westerdam, which left Hong Kong on Feb. 1, had already been turned away in at least five places, including the United States territory of Guam, the Philippines and Japan.

Thailand, which has reported more than 30 cases of the virus, had agreed to let the ship dock in Bangkok, but then reversed course.

The country’s prime minister, Prayuth Chan-ocha, defended the decision to deny the ship entry on Tuesday and said the government would provide the vessel with humanitarian aid.

Holland America has said that no one onboard has come down with the virus.

“The ship is not in quarantine and we have no reason to believe there are any cases of coronavirus on board despite media reports,” Holland America said in a statement.

Westlake Legal Group china-coronavirus-contain-promo-1580431440996-articleLarge-v7 Coronavirus Live Updates: Quarantine Ordered as Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

How Bad Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Get? Here Are 6 Key Factors

Here’s what early research says about how the pathogen behaves and the factors that will determine whether it can be contained.

The ship, said to have 1,445 passengers and 802 crew on board, was originally bound for Yokohama, Japan.

It was unclear where the ship would head next. A country may be more willing to accept the ship once it has been afloat for the standard 14-day quarantine period and has no reported cases of the virus.

A different ship, the Diamond Princess, has been docked for more than a week in Yokohama, Japan, where it was put under quarantine after cases of infection were confirmed. The total number of cases on board is about 135, including at least 10 crew members. More than 1,000 crew members will receive two months of paid leave after the end of the ship’s isolation period, Princess Cruises said Tuesday.

A Chinese law professor who blamed China’s top leader, Xi Jinping, for failing to contain the coronavirus outbreak has been confined to his home, according to one of his friends.

The professor, Xu Zhangrun, had published an essay in Chinese, “When Fury Overcomes Fear,” which circulated widely on overseas Chinese-language websites last week. The essay was translated into English and published on ChinaFile, a website that covers China, on Monday. It argues that Mr. Xi and his government have banned the free flow of information and that officials neglected their responsibilities as the outbreak worsened.

Mr. Xu, a law professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing, wrote that the coronavirus epidemic “has revealed the rotten core of Chinese governance.”

“It is true: the level of popular fury is volcanic and a people thus enraged may, in the end, also cast aside their fear,” he added.

After publishing the essay, Mr. Xu was ordered by the Chinese authorities not to leave his home, according to the friend, Rong Jian.

The Chinese Communist Party has dismissed two health officials in Hubei, the province at the center of the epidemic, state-run news outlets reported on Tuesday. They were the first senior officials to be punished for the government’s handling of the outbreak.

The officials were replaced by a deputy head of the National Health Commission, Wang Hesheng, whom Beijing dispatched to the region three days ago to take over the provincial government’s response to the crisis, according to state media.

Mr. Wang will take over the duties of both officials: Zhang Jin, the Communist Party secretary for Hubei’s health commission, and Liu Yingzi, the health commission’s director. Mr. Wang previously held a variety of positions overseeing public health and family planning in the city of Tianjin, and on the national level beginning in 2016.

It was not immediately clear whether the dismissals were the beginning of a broader political shake-up in the provincial government, whose response to the outbreak has been widely criticized. The party secretary and the mayor of Wuhan both offered to resign but have so far remained in their posts.

Until now, only two others have been dismissed in connection with the outbreak: two officials from Huajiahe were ousted after a disabled teenager died when his father, his sole caregiver, was put into quarantine.

Reporting and research was contributed by Austin Ramzy, Vivian Wang, Steven Lee Myers, Russell Goldman, Elaine Yu, Richard C. Paddock, Ben Dooley, Motoko Rich, Amber Wang, Zoe Mou, Albee Zhang, Yiwei Wang, Claire Fu, Amy Qin, Sui-Lee Wee, Chris Buckley, Megan Specia and Ivan Nechepurenko.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Updates: Quarantine Ordered As Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168759570_b1663fe2-2971-46a4-a805-0ca92f18cd1a-articleLarge Coronavirus Updates: Quarantine Ordered As Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Passing through a device that sprays disinfectant at an entrance to a residential compound in Tianjin, China, on Tuesday.Credit…China News Service, via Reuters

Nearly a third of the confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in Tianjin, a city of more than 15 million people about 70 miles southeast of Beijing, have been linked to one department store, adding to fears about rapid transmission among tightly clustered communities.

Of the 102 cases confirmed in the city, at least 33 of the patients worked or shopped at a department store in the city’s Baodi district, or had close contact with employees or customers, according to the city’s health authorities. Officials estimated that 11,700 customers had visited the shopping complex, which they did not identify, during a period in late January. The authorities said that those customers would be quarantined, and that the store itself was sealed and disinfected.

In addition, emergency measures were imposed over sections of the district — home to nearly one million people — with all but two entrances and exits sealed off in certain residential areas and security personnel on round-the-clock patrols. Residents in some areas were allowed to leave their homes to buy supplies only once every two days.

Several of the department store patients, including the latest announced on Tuesday, a 31-year-old woman, had no history of travel to Wuhan, the city where the outbreak emerged.

Mao Jinsong, the district head of Baodi, compared the department store to a seafood market in Wuhan where the outbreak is widely considered to have started.

“Do not let Baodi’s department store become Wuhan’s seafood market,” he said at a news conference.

Hong Kong officials evacuated and quarantined dozens of residents of an apartment building after two people living on different floors were found to be infected with the coronavirus, the authorities said on Tuesday.

The two cases appeared to suggest that the virus had spread through the building, perhaps through a pipe, raising new fears about the virus’s ability to spread.

Officials from the city’s Center for Health Protection said the decision to partially evacuate the building was made after the discovery of a unsealed bathroom pipe in the apartment of a newly confirmed patient, a 62-year-old woman. She lives 10 floors below a resident who was earlier found to be infected.

In addition to the infected residents, four other people living in three different units displayed symptoms of the coronavirus, according to Sophia Chan, Hong Kong’s health secretary.

In all, quarantines were ordered for the residents of 23 units of the Hong Mei House, a building on the Cheung Hong Estate, a public housing block in the New Territories section of the city.

The local outbreak prompted comparisons to an incident in 2003 when 329 residents of a housing estate in Hong Kong became infected with SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. The virus was later found to have spread through defective piping. Forty-two of the infected residents died.

“Our initial understanding is that the relevant household may have done some self-remodeling work,” Frank Chan, Hong Kong’s secretary for transport and housing, said of the outbreak on Tuesday.

Mr. Chan denied that the recent cases were comparable to the 2003 outbreak because of the location of the pipes. In the earlier case, the pipes were outside the building and the SARS virus was spread through the air.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

At a government-organized news briefing on Tuesday, Professor Yuen Kwok-yung, a microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong, said the situation this time appeared to be different. But he said the authorities were not ruling out the possibility of airborne transmission of the virus.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said determining what happened at the housing complex was of “great importance” and ordered an investigation.

When Terry Law, 20, learned from late night news reports that the new coronavirus was believed to be spreading from one resident to another in the complex, he raced to the building.

Mr. Law’s 80-year-old grandfather has lived in the building for two decades. And while he is not in the same area where the two cases were found, his family did not want to take chances.

“Even though he’s in a different wing, they share the same lift and the same lobby,” said Mr. Law. “There’s lots of chances for people to meet.”

On Tuesday afternoon police had blocked off the building, only allowing in residents who showed identification. A street cleaning vehicle sprayed down the road outside, even as a light rain fell.

As a group of journalists watched outside the police line, a small bus drove out with a handful a masked residents. The driver was wearing protective coveralls, a mask and goggles.

Most of the residents of Hong Mei House are 60 or older, said Mr. Law. His grandfather is in good health, but he is worried.

“My grandfather is that old, so I want to take him home,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v21 Coronavirus Updates: Quarantine Ordered As Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 43,100 people in China and 24 other countries.

A senior Chinese official warned on Tuesday that three populous provinces could be vulnerable to the spread of the coronavirus as migrant workers return to their jobs after the Lunar New Year break.

The official, He Qinghua, said that the provinces of Zhejiang, Guangdong and Henan could see a rise in new cases, even as the number of confirmed cases outside Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak, has been declining.

The remarks highlight the looming possibility that more people could become infected as they resume their normal routines. Government officials had extended China’s official Lunar New Year holiday by three days to Feb. 3 to keep people home. Major business hubs, like the cities of Beijing and Shanghai and the provinces of Guangdong and Shandong, then further extended holidays until Monday.

Mr. He, who spoke at a news briefing in Beijing, was responding to comments made by Gauden Galea, the China representative for the World Health Organization. Mr. Galea told Bloomberg TV on Monday that the organization had found the numbers of cases slowly rising in 10 provinces. He said that it was too soon to say the epidemic had peaked.

The death toll from the coronavirus epidemic is continuing to climb, Chinese officials said Tuesday. By the end of Monday, the government said, 1,016 people had officially died from the coronavirus — an increase of 108 from the previous day. Hubei Province accounted for the great majority of the deaths.

The number of cases of infection in China also grew, to over 42,638 from about 40,000 a day earlier. Most of the infections are in Hubei, though the daily tally of new infections there fell compared to previous days.

On Monday, Hubei recorded 2,097 new infections, compared to 2,618 the day before.

“With 99 percent of cases in China, this remains very much an emergency for that country, but one that holds a very grave threat for the rest of the world,” the director-general of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said on Tuesday.

One of the people evacuated to the United States from Wuhan last week is infected with the coronavirus, U.C. San Diego Health said in a statement. The Centers for Disease Control shared the diagnosis on Monday morning, the hospital said; the patient had previously been discharged after testing negative.

The patient, one of 167 passengers on a State Department-arranged flight from China that mostly carried American citizens, has since returned to the hospital near Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego.

It is the 13th confirmed case in the United States, and the seventh in California.

Other government-arranged evacuation planes from China have taken passengers — more than 500 in all — to Nebraska, Texas and other bases in California in the last two weeks.

Those evacuated are expected to be quarantined for 14 days, with frequent checks from medical personnel to determine whether they have developed fevers, coughs and other early signs of the virus.

A Holland America cruise ship with more than 2,200 people aboard was denied entry to Thailand on Tuesday over fears that passengers may be carrying the dangerous coronavirus, bringing the total number of ports from which it has been turned away to at least five.

The ship, the Westerdam, which departed from Hong Kong on Feb. 1, has already been turned away at ports in at least five countries, including the United States territory of Guam, the Philippines and Japan.

Thailand, which has reported more than 30 cases of the virus, had earlier agreed to let the ship dock in Bangkok on Thursday.

But the public health minister, Anutin Charnvirakul, posted a cryptic message on Facebook on Tuesday saying, “I have issued orders. Permission to dock refused” with a cruise ship emoji.

Holland America has said that no one on board has come down with the virus.

“The ship is not in quarantine and we have no reason to believe there are any cases of coronavirus on board despite media reports,” Holland America said in a statement issued Monday.

Westlake Legal Group china-coronavirus-contain-promo-1580431440996-articleLarge-v7 Coronavirus Updates: Quarantine Ordered As Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

How Bad Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Get? Here Are 6 Key Factors

Here’s what early research says about how the pathogen behaves and the factors that will determine whether it can be contained.

The ship, said to have 1,445 passengers and 802 crew on board, was originally bound for Yokohama, Japan.

It was unclear where the ship is headed next. A country may be more willing to accept the ship once it has been afloat for the standard 14-day quarantine period and has no reported cases of the virus.

The company said that all passengers would receive a 100 percent refund and a 100 percent credit for a future trip. The ship was providing free internet and phone access to passengers, the company said.

A different ship, the Diamond Princess, has been docked for more than a week in Yokohama, Japan, where it was put under quarantine after cases of infection were confirmed.

Sixty-five more infections were confirmed on Monday, that ship’s captain told passengers, raising the total number of cases on board to 135.

At least 20 of the infected passengers are from the United States, according to a Princess Cruises spokeswoman. In all, 416 American passengers boarded the vessel, the Diamond Princess, at the start of the voyage according to the spokeswoman.

China’s Communist Party dismissed two health officials in Hubei, the province at the center of the epidemic, the state-run media reported on Tuesday. They were the first senior officials to be punished for the government’s handling of the outbreak.

They were replaced by a deputy head of the National Health Commission, Wang Hesheng, whom Beijing dispatched to the region three days ago to take over the provincial government’s response to the crisis, according to the media reports.

Mr. Wang will take over the duties of both officials: Zhang Jin, the Communist Party secretary for Hubei’s health commission, and Liu Yingzi, the health commission’s director. Mr. Wang previously held a variety of positions overseeing public health and family planning in Tianjin, near Beijing, and on the national level beginning in 2016.

It was not immediately clear whether the dismissals were the beginning of a broader political shake-up in the provincial government, whose response to the outbreak has been widely criticized. The party secretary and the mayor of Wuhan, Ma Guoqiang and Zhou Xianwang, both offered to resign but remain in their posts.

Until now, only two others have been dismissed in connection with the outbreak: two officials from Huajiahe, a township about a two-hour drive west of Wuhan. They were ousted after a disabled teenager died after his father, his sole caregiver, was quarantined.

The Royal Caribbean cruise company on Monday rescinded its ban on Chinese passport holders onboard its ships.

But the company’s reversal is little comfort to one passenger, Xiao Liu.

Ms. Liu, a 34-year-old scientist at Princeton University, arrived at Port Canaveral, Fla., on Friday with her husband and 3-year-old daughter to board a cruise ship called Mariner of the Seas. A health care worker checked their temperatures and asked whether they had been in contact with anybody from mainland China recently. Though they answered no, the worker did not allow Ms. Liu on the cruise because she carries a Chinese passport.

“This is clearly racial discrimination,” said Ms. Liu, who moved to the United States 11 years ago. “What makes me different from other passengers? My Chinese passport!”

In its statement, Royal Caribbean said it banned passengers holding passports from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau because governments around the world were enacting similar limits. “Now, governmental policies have been clarified, so we have changed this policy,” it said on Twitter.

As the coronavirus has spread — including hitting other cruise ships — Chinese people around the world have faced instances of xenophobia.

Reporting and research was contributed by Austin Ramzy, Vivian Wang, Steven Lee Myers, Russell Goldman, Elaine Yu, Richard C. Paddock, Ben Dooley, Motoko Rich, Amber Wang, Zoe Mou, Albee Zhang, Yiwei Wang, Claire Fu and Amy Qin.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Updates: Thousands Ordered to Quarantine After Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168759570_b1663fe2-2971-46a4-a805-0ca92f18cd1a-articleLarge Coronavirus Updates: Thousands Ordered to Quarantine After Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

A photo distributed by the state-owned China News Service showed a woman walking through a device that sprays disinfectant at an entrance to a residential compound in Tianjin on Tuesday.Credit…China News Service, via Reuters

Nearly a third of the confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in Tianjin, a city of more than 15 million people about 70 miles southeast of Beijing, have been linked to one department store, adding to fears about rapid transmission among tightly clustered communities.

Of the 102 cases confirmed in the city, at least 33 of the patients worked or shopped at a department store in the city’s Baodi district, or had close contact with employees or customers, according to the city’s health authorities. Officials estimated that 11,700 customers had visited the shopping complex, which they did not identify, during a period in late January. The authorities said that those customers would be quarantined, and that the store itself was sealed and disinfected.

In addition, emergency measures were imposed over sections of the district — home to nearly one million people — with all but two entrances and exits sealed off in certain residential areas and security personnel on round-the-clock patrols. Residents in some areas were allowed to leave their homes to buy supplies only once every two days.

Several of the department store patients, including the latest announced on Tuesday, a 31-year-old woman, had no history of travel to Wuhan, the city where the outbreak emerged.

Mao Jinsong, the district head of Baodi, compared the department store to a seafood market in Wuhan where the outbreak is widely considered to have started.

“Do not let Baodi’s department store become Wuhan’s seafood market,” he said at a news conference.

Hong Kong officials evacuated and quarantined dozens of residents of an apartment building after two people living on different floors were found to be infected with the coronavirus, the authorities said on Tuesday.

The two cases appeared to suggest that the virus had spread through the building, perhaps through a pipe, raising new fears about the virus’s ability to spread.

Officials from the city’s Center for Health Protection said the decision to partially evacuate the building was made after the discovery of a unsealed bathroom pipe in the apartment of a newly confirmed patient, a 62-year-old woman. She lives 10 floors below a resident who was earlier found to be infected.

In addition to the infected residents, four other people living in three different units displayed symptoms of the coronavirus, according to Sophia Chan, Hong Kong’s health secretary.

In all, quarantines were ordered for the residents of 23 units of the Hong Mei House, a building on the Cheung Hong Estate, a public housing block in the New Territories section of the city.

The local outbreak prompted comparisons to an incident in 2003 when 329 residents of a housing estate in Hong Kong became infected with SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. The virus was later found to have spread through defective piping. Forty-two of the infected residents died.

“Our initial understanding is that the relevant household may have done some self-remodeling work,” Frank Chan, Hong Kong’s secretary for transport and housing, said of the outbreak on Tuesday.

Mr. Chan denied that the recent cases were comparable to the 2003 outbreak because of the location of the pipes. In the earlier case, the pipes were outside the building and the SARS virus was spread through the air.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

At a government-organized news briefing on Tuesday, Professor Yuen Kwok-yung, a microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong, said the situation this time appeared to be different. But he said the authorities were not ruling out the possibility of airborne transmission of the virus.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said determining what happened at the housing complex was of “great importance” and ordered an investigation.

When Terry Law, 20, learned from late night news reports that the new coronavirus was believed to be spreading from one resident to another in the complex, he raced to the building.

Mr. Law’s 80-year-old grandfather has lived in the building for two decades. And while he is not in the same area where the two cases were found, his family did not want to take chances.

“Even though he’s in a different wing, they share the same lift and the same lobby,” said Mr. Law. “There’s lots of chances for people to meet.”

On Tuesday afternoon police had blocked off the building, only allowing in residents who showed identification. A street cleaning vehicle sprayed down the road outside, even as a light rain fell.

As a group of journalists watched outside the police line, a small bus drove out with a handful a masked residents. The driver was wearing protective coveralls, a mask and goggles.

Most of the residents of Hong Mei House are 60 or older, said Mr. Law. His grandfather is in good health, but he is worried.

“My grandfather is that old, so I want to take him home,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v21 Coronavirus Updates: Thousands Ordered to Quarantine After Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 43,100 people in China and 24 other countries.

A senior Chinese official warned on Tuesday that three populous provinces could be vulnerable to the spread of the coronavirus as migrant workers return to their jobs after the Lunar New Year break.

The official, He Qinghua, said that the provinces of Zhejiang, Guangdong and Henan could see a rise in new cases, even as the number of confirmed cases outside Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak, has been declining.

The remarks highlight the looming possibility that more people could become infected as they resume their normal routines. Government officials had extended China’s official Lunar New Year holiday by three days to Feb. 3 to keep people home. Major business hubs, like the cities of Beijing and Shanghai and the provinces of Guangdong and Shandong, then further extended holidays until Monday.

Mr. He, who spoke at a news briefing in Beijing, was responding to comments made by Gauden Galea, the China representative for the World Health Organization. Mr. Galea told Bloomberg TV on Monday that the organization had found the numbers of cases slowly rising in 10 provinces. He said that it was too soon to say the epidemic had peaked.

The death toll from the coronavirus epidemic is continuing to climb, Chinese officials said Tuesday. By the end of Monday, the government said, 1,016 people had officially died from the coronavirus — an increase of 108 from the previous day. Hubei Province accounted for the great majority of the deaths.

The number of cases of infection in China also grew, to over 42,638 from about 40,000 a day earlier. Most of the infections are in Hubei, though the daily tally of new infections there fell compared to previous days.

On Monday, Hubei recorded 2,097 new infections, compared to 2,618 the day before.

“With 99 percent of cases in China, this remains very much an emergency for that country, but one that holds a very grave threat for the rest of the world,” the director-general of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said on Tuesday.

One of the people evacuated to the United States from Wuhan last week is infected with the coronavirus, U.C. San Diego Health said in a statement. The Centers for Disease Control shared the diagnosis on Monday morning, the hospital said; the patient had previously been discharged after testing negative.

The patient, one of 167 passengers on a State Department-arranged flight from China that mostly carried American citizens, has since returned to the hospital near Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego.

It is the 13th confirmed case in the United States, and the seventh in California.

Other government-arranged evacuation planes from China have taken passengers — more than 500 in all — to Nebraska, Texas and other bases in California in the last two weeks.

Those evacuated are expected to be quarantined for 14 days, with frequent checks from medical personnel to determine whether they have developed fevers, coughs and other early signs of the virus.

A Holland America cruise ship with more than 2,200 people aboard was denied entry to Thailand on Tuesday over fears that passengers may be carrying the dangerous coronavirus, bringing the total number of ports from which it has been turned away to at least five.

The ship, the Westerdam, which departed from Hong Kong on Feb. 1, has already been turned away at ports in at least five countries, including the United States territory of Guam, the Philippines and Japan.

Thailand, which has reported more than 30 cases of the virus, had earlier agreed to let the ship dock in Bangkok on Thursday.

But the public health minister, Anutin Charnvirakul, posted a cryptic message on Facebook on Tuesday saying, “I have issued orders. Permission to dock refused” with a cruise ship emoji.

Holland America has said that no one on board has come down with the virus.

“The ship is not in quarantine and we have no reason to believe there are any cases of coronavirus on board despite media reports,” Holland America said in a statement issued Monday.

Westlake Legal Group china-coronavirus-contain-promo-1580431440996-articleLarge-v7 Coronavirus Updates: Thousands Ordered to Quarantine After Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

How Bad Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Get? Here Are 6 Key Factors

Here’s what early research says about how the pathogen behaves and the factors that will determine whether it can be contained.

The ship, said to have 1,445 passengers and 802 crew on board, was originally bound for Yokohama, Japan.

It was unclear where the ship is headed next. A country may be more willing to accept the ship once it has been afloat for the standard 14-day quarantine period and has no reported cases of the virus.

The company said that all passengers would receive a 100 percent refund and a 100 percent credit for a future trip. The ship was providing free internet and phone access to passengers, the company said.

A different ship, the Diamond Princess, has been docked for more than a week in Yokohama, Japan, where it was put under quarantine after cases of infection were confirmed.

Sixty-five more infections were confirmed on Monday, that ship’s captain told passengers, raising the total number of cases on board to 135.

At least 20 of the infected passengers are from the United States, according to a Princess Cruises spokeswoman. In all, 416 American passengers boarded the vessel, the Diamond Princess, at the start of the voyage according to the spokeswoman.

China’s Communist Party dismissed two health officials in Hubei, the province at the center of the epidemic, the state-run media reported on Tuesday. They were the first senior officials to be punished for the government’s handling of the outbreak.

They were replaced by a deputy head of the National Health Commission, Wang Hesheng, whom Beijing dispatched to the region three days ago to take over the provincial government’s response to the crisis, according to the media reports.

Mr. Wang will take over the duties of both officials: Zhang Jin, the Communist Party secretary for Hubei’s health commission, and Liu Yingzi, the health commission’s director. Mr. Wang previously held a variety of positions overseeing public health and family planning in Tianjin, near Beijing, and on the national level beginning in 2016.

It was not immediately clear whether the dismissals were the beginning of a broader political shake-up in the provincial government, whose response to the outbreak has been widely criticized. The party secretary and the mayor of Wuhan, Ma Guoqiang and Zhou Xianwang, both offered to resign but remain in their posts.

Until now, only two others have been dismissed in connection with the outbreak: two officials from Huajiahe, a township about a two-hour drive west of Wuhan. They were ousted after a disabled teenager died after his father, his sole caregiver, was quarantined.

The Royal Caribbean cruise company on Monday rescinded its ban on Chinese passport holders onboard its ships.

But the company’s reversal is little comfort to one passenger, Xiao Liu.

Ms. Liu, a 34-year-old scientist at Princeton University, arrived at Port Canaveral, Fla., on Friday with her husband and 3-year-old daughter to board a cruise ship called Mariner of the Seas. A health care worker checked their temperatures and asked whether they had been in contact with anybody from mainland China recently. Though they answered no, the worker did not allow Ms. Liu on the cruise because she carries a Chinese passport.

“This is clearly racial discrimination,” said Ms. Liu, who moved to the United States 11 years ago. “What makes me different from other passengers? My Chinese passport!”

In its statement, Royal Caribbean said it banned passengers holding passports from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau because governments around the world were enacting similar limits. “Now, governmental policies have been clarified, so we have changed this policy,” it said on Twitter.

As the coronavirus has spread — including hitting other cruise ships — Chinese people around the world have faced instances of xenophobia.

Reporting and research was contributed by Austin Ramzy, Vivian Wang, Steven Lee Myers, Russell Goldman, Elaine Yu, Richard C. Paddock, Ben Dooley, Motoko Rich, Amber Wang, Zoe Mou, Albee Zhang, Yiwei Wang, Claire Fu and Amy Qin.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Updates: Virus Is Said to Spread Through Apartment Building’s Pipes

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168737208_0480321c-de1f-44da-b344-51b2632e3114-articleLarge Coronavirus Updates: Virus Is Said to Spread Through Apartment Building’s Pipes Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

The authorities outside a building in Hong Kong on Tuesday where two residents were found to be infected with the coronavirus.Credit…Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Hong Kong officials evacuated and quarantined dozens of residents of an apartment building after two people living on different floors were found to be infected with the coronavirus, the authorities said on Tuesday.

The two cases appeared to suggest that the virus had spread through the building, perhaps through a pipe, raising new fears about the virus’s ability to spread.

Officials from the city’s Center for Health Protection said the decision to partially evacuate the building was made after the discovery of a unsealed bathroom pipe in the apartment of a newly confirmed patient, a 62-year-old woman. She lives 10 floors below a resident who was earlier found to be infected.

In addition to the infected residents, four other people living in three different units displayed symptoms of the coronavirus, according to Sophia Chan, Hong Kong’s health secretary.

In all, quarantines were ordered for the residents of 23 units of the Hong Mei House, a building on the Cheung Hong Estate, a public housing block in the New Territories section of the city.

The local outbreak prompted comparisons to an incident in 2003 when 329 residents of a housing estate in Hong Kong became infected with SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. The virus was later found to have spread through defective piping. Forty-two of the infected residents died.

“Our initial understanding is that the relevant household may have done some self-remodeling work,” Frank Chan, Hong Kong’s secretary for transport and housing, said of the outbreak on Tuesday.

Mr. Chan denied that the recent cases were comparable to the 2003 outbreak because of the location of the pipes. In the earlier case, the pipes were outside the building and the SARS virus was spread through the air.

At a government-organized news briefing on Tuesday, Professor Yuen Kwok-yung, a microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong, said the situation this time appeared to be different. But he said the authorities were not ruling out the possibility of airborne transmission of the virus.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said determining what happened at the housing complex was of “great importance” and ordered an investigation.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v21 Coronavirus Updates: Virus Is Said to Spread Through Apartment Building’s Pipes Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 43,100 people in China and 24 other countries.

The death toll from the coronavirus epidemic is continuing to climb, Chinese officials said Tuesday.

The government put the nationwide figure at 1,016. That was up 108 from the day before, when it was 908.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

The number of cases of infection also grew, to over 42,638. The figure for the day before was put at 40,171.

Deaths in Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak, drove the increase — there were 103 — though the number of infections reported there actually declined somewhat.

One of the people evacuated to the United States from Wuhan last week is infected with the coronavirus, U.C. San Diego Health said in a statement. The Centers for Disease Control shared the diagnosis on Monday morning, the hospital said; the patient had previously been discharged after testing negative.

The patient, one of 167 passengers on a State Department-arranged flight from China that mostly carried American citizens, has since returned to the hospital near Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego.

It is the 13th confirmed case in the United States, and the seventh in California.

Other government-arranged evacuation planes from China have taken passengers — more than 500 in all — to Nebraska, Texas and other bases in California in the last two weeks.

Those evacuated are expected to be quarantined for 14 days, with frequent checks from medical personnel to determine whether they have developed fevers, coughs and other early signs of the virus.

A Holland America cruise ship with more than 2,200 people aboard was denied entry to Thailand on Tuesday over fears that passengers may be carrying the dangerous coronavirus, bringing the total number of ports from which it has been turned away to at least five.

The ship, the Westerdam, which departed from Hong Kong on Feb. 1, has already been turned away at ports in at least five countries, including the United States territory of Guam, the Philippines and Japan.

Thailand, which has reported more than 30 cases of the virus, had earlier agreed to let the ship dock in Bangkok on Thursday.

But the public health minister, Anutin Charnvirakul, posted a cryptic message on Facebook on Tuesday saying, “I have issued orders. Permission to dock refused” with a cruise ship emoji.

Holland America has said that no one on board has come down with the virus.

“The ship is not in quarantine and we have no reason to believe there are any cases of coronavirus on board despite media reports,” Holland America said in a statement issued Monday.

Westlake Legal Group china-coronavirus-contain-promo-1580431440996-articleLarge-v7 Coronavirus Updates: Virus Is Said to Spread Through Apartment Building’s Pipes Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

How Bad Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Get? Here Are 6 Key Factors

Here’s what early research says about how the pathogen behaves and the factors that will determine whether it can be contained.

The ship, said to have 1,445 passengers and 802 crew on board, was originally bound for Yokohama, Japan.

It was unclear where the ship is headed next. A country may be more willing to accept the ship once it has been afloat for the standard 14-day quarantine period and has no reported cases of the virus.

The company said that all passengers would receive a 100 percent refund and a 100 percent credit for a future trip. The ship was providing free internet and phone access to passengers, the company said.

A different ship, the Diamond Princess, has been docked for more than a week in Yokohama, Japan, where it was put under quarantine after cases of infection were confirmed.

Sixty-five more infections were confirmed on Monday, that ship’s captain told passengers, raising the total number of cases on board to 135.

At least 20 of the infected passengers are from the United States, according to a Princess Cruises spokeswoman. In all, 416 American passengers boarded the vessel, the Diamond Princess, at the start of the voyage according to the spokeswoman.

The Royal Caribbean cruise company on Monday rescinded its ban on Chinese passport holders onboard its ships.

But the company’s reversal is little comfort to one passenger, Xiao Liu.

Ms. Liu, a 34-year-old scientist at Princeton University, arrived at Port Canaveral, Fla., on Friday with her husband and 3-year-old daughter to board a cruise ship called Mariner of the Seas. A health care worker checked their temperatures and asked whether they had been in contact with anybody from mainland China recently. Though they answered no, the worker did not allow Ms. Liu on the cruise because she carries a Chinese passport.

“This is clearly racial discrimination,” said Ms. Liu, who moved to the United States 11 years ago. “What makes me different from other passengers? My Chinese passport!”

The company’s ban comes as a ship docked in Japan has been quarantined after an coronavirus outbreak was discovered onboard.

In its statement, Royal Caribbean said it banned passengers holding passports from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau because governments around the world were enacting similar limits. “Now, governmental policies have been clarified, so we have changed this policy,” it said on Twitter.

As the coronavirus has spread — including hitting other cruise ships — Chinese people around the world have faced instances of xenophobia.

Reporting and research was contributed by Russell Goldman, Elaine Yu, Richard C. Paddock, Ben Dooley, Motoko Rich, Amber Wang, Zoe Mou, Albee Zhang, Yiwei Wang, Claire Fu, Amy Qin.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Updates: Infection May Have Spread Through Hong Kong Building’s Pipes

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168737208_0480321c-de1f-44da-b344-51b2632e3114-articleLarge Coronavirus Updates: Infection May Have Spread Through Hong Kong Building’s Pipes Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

The authorities outside a building in Hong Kong on Tuesday where two residents were found to be infected with the coronavirus.Credit…Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Hong Kong officials evacuated and quarantined dozens of residents of an apartment building after two people living on different floors were found to be infected with the coronavirus, the authorities said on Tuesday.

The two cases appeared to suggest that the virus had spread through the building, perhaps through a pipe, raising new fears about the virus’s ability to spread.

Officials from the city’s Center for Health Protection said the decision to partially evacuate the building was made after the discovery of a bathroom pipe in the apartment of a newly confirmed patient, a 62-year-old woman. She lives 10 ten floors below a resident who was earlier found to be infected.

In addition to the infected residents, four other people living in three different units displayed symptoms of the coronavirus, according to Sophia Chan, Hong Kong’s health secretary.

In all, quarantines were ordered for the residents of 23 units of the Hong Mei House, a building on the Cheung Hong Estate, a public housing block in the New Territories section of the city.

The local outbreak prompted comparisons to an incident in 2003 when 329 residents of a housing estate in Hong Kong became infected with SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. The virus was later found to have spread through defective piping. Forty-two of the infected residents died.

“Our initial understanding is that the relevant household may have done some self-remodeling work,” Frank Chan, Hong Kong’s secretary for transport and housing, said of the outbreak on Tuesday.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 10, 2020

    • What is a Coronavirus?
      It is a novel virus named for the crown-like spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people, and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.
    • How contagious is the virus?
      According to preliminary research, it seems moderately infectious, similar to SARS, and is possibly transmitted through the air. Scientists have estimated that each infected person could spread it to somewhere between 1.5 and 3.5 people without effective containment measures.
    • How worried should I be?
      While the virus is a serious public health concern, the risk to most people outside China remains very low, and seasonal flu is a more immediate threat.
    • Who is working to contain the virus?
      World Health Organization officials have praised China’s aggressive response to the virus by closing transportation, schools and markets. This week, a team of experts from the W.H.O. arrived in Beijing to offer assistance.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      The United States and Australia are temporarily denying entry to noncitizens who recently traveled to China and several airlines have canceled flights.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands frequently is the most important thing you can do, along with staying at home when you’re sick.

Mr. Chan denied that the recent cases were comparable to the 2003 outbreak because of the location of the pipes. In the earlier case, the pipes were outside the building and the SARS virus was spread through the air.

At a government-organized news briefing on Tuesday, Professor Yuen Kwok-yung, a microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong, said the situation this time appeared to be different. But he said the authorities were not ruling out the possibility of airborne transmission of the virus.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said determining what happened at the housing complex was of “great importance” and ordered an investigation.

Westlake Legal Group china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v21 Coronavirus Updates: Infection May Have Spread Through Hong Kong Building’s Pipes Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Spread of the Outbreak

The virus has sickened more than 43,100 people in China and 24 other countries.

The death toll from the coronavirus epidemic is continuing to climb, Chinese officials said Tuesday.

The government put the nationwide figure at 1,016. That was up 108 from the day before, when it was 908.

The number of cases of infection also grew, to over 42,638. The figure for the day before was put at 40,171.

Deaths in Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak, drove the increase — there were 103 — though the number of infections reported there actually declined somewhat.

A Holland America cruise ship with more than 2,200 people aboard was denied entry to Thailand on Tuesday over fears that passengers may be carrying the dangerous coronavirus, bringing the total number of ports from which it has been turned away to at least five.

The ship, the Westerdam, which departed from Hong Kong on Feb. 1, has already been turned away at ports in at least five countries, including the United States territory of Guam, the Philippines and Japan.

Thailand, which has reported more than 30 cases of the virus, had earlier agreed to let the ship dock in Bangkok on Thursday.

But the public health minister, Anutin Charnvirakul, posted a cryptic message on Facebook on Tuesday saying, “I have issued orders. Permission to dock refused” with a cruise ship emoji.

Holland America has said that no one on board has come down with the virus.

“The ship is not in quarantine and we have no reason to believe there are any cases of coronavirus on board despite media reports,” Holland America said in a statement issued Monday.

Westlake Legal Group china-coronavirus-contain-promo-1580431440996-articleLarge-v7 Coronavirus Updates: Infection May Have Spread Through Hong Kong Building’s Pipes Infections Hubei Province (China) Hong Kong Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

How Bad Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Get? Here Are 6 Key Factors

Here’s what early research says about how the pathogen behaves and the factors that will determine whether it can be contained.

The ship, said to have 1,445 passengers and 802 crew on board, was originally bound for Yokohama, Japan.

It was unclear where the ship is headed next. A country may be more willing to accept the ship once it has been afloat for the standard 14-day quarantine period and has no reported cases of the virus.

The company said that all passengers would receive a 100 percent refund and a 100 percent credit for a future trip. The ship was providing free internet and phone access to passengers, the company said.

A different ship, the Diamond Princess, has been docked for more than a week in Yokohama, Japan, where it was put under quarantine after cases of infection were confirmed.

Sixty-five more infections were confirmed on Monday, that ship’s captain told passengers, raising the total number of cases on board to 135.

At least 20 of the infected passengers are from the United States, according to a Princess Cruises spokeswoman. In all, 416 American passengers boarded the vessel, the Diamond Princess, at the start of the voyage according to the spokeswoman.

Reporting and research was contributed by Russell Goldman, Elaine Yu, Richard C. Paddock, Ben Dooley, Motoko Rich, Amber Wang, Zoe Mou, Albee Zhang, Yiwei Wang, Claire Fu, Amy Qin.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com