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Westlake Legal Group > Julian Assange

Judge: Nope. Chelsea Manning needs to pay those fines

Westlake Legal Group ChManning Judge: Nope. Chelsea Manning needs to pay those fines The Blog Julian Assange jail Fines contempt chelsea manning

As you may recall, back in March we learned that Chelsea Manning was back in jail on contempt charges for failing to answer questions before a grand jury looking into the affairs of Julian Assange, among other things. At the time, the judge decided to add a bit more “persuasion” to the equation by imposing fines for every day that Manning maintained her silence. The fines started at $500 per day and increased to $1,000 per day after one month. That was roughly five months ago, so as you could imagine, the fines have grown substantially and continue to increase by approximately $30K per month. Considering that the jury could be impaneled for as much as 18 months, the final bill could easily go well past a half million.

With this in mind, Manning’s attorneys asked for a new hearing where they would ask that the fines be dismissed. As it turns out, the judge is in no mood for any of this and has flatly rejected the request. (WaPo)

Chelsea Manning will not get a hearing to challenge steep daily penalties imposed for her refusal to testify before a grand jury investigating WikiLeaks.

In an order issued Monday, Judge Anthony J. Trenga in Alexandria federal court said there were no “reasonable grounds” to reconsider his decision to impose the fines, which started at $500 per day and have now risen to $1,000. Manning, 31, who was first jailed in March for refusing to testify, could be in jail for up to 18 months, and her attorneys estimate that the total cost will be close to half a million dollars.

Her attorney Moira Meltzer-Cohen said Manning “expects to remain” in jail for about 400 more days. She added that while they are “evaluating our legal options . . . above all right now we are all working to strategize for her long-term health and welfare.”

This stunt is getting expensive quickly. In case you’re curious, the grounds Manning’s attorneys used in asking for the dismissal of the fines was that she wouldn’t be able to pay them. Now, I’m no attorney (and I don’t even play one on television), but I’m pretty sure that’s not how it works. The defendant’s ability to pay is likely a factor taken into consideration for low-level crimes at the county courthouse, but not a grand jury considering matters of national security. Manning will have to be released when the jury is dismissed, but the fines will still remain.

The dumbfounding part of all of this is that it’s so completely unnecessary. Manning can’t be tried a second time for her original crimes against the nation and was given full immunity regarding any testimony provided before the grand jury. She has literally nothing to lose here. Her claim that she has no additional information about Assange, Wikileaks or anything else that she didn’t provide during the original trial is also irrelevant. If that’s the case, then take a seat and truthfully answer additional questions by saying you don’t know. (Unless, of course, you’re lying about that and suspect the government has evidence to prove it.) When the questioning is complete you can simply go home. If you did it soon, I’d be willing to bet the judge would at least consider dismissing or lowering the fines.

But everything is a circus with Chelsea Manning. It has to be all drama all the time so she can play the beleaguered victim fighting for social justice or something. The same could be said of her abject failure of a Senate campaign. So I suppose we’ll just stick with the status quo and Manning will continue to chill out in jail until the grand jury is dismissed. And then she can figure out where she’s going to come up with half a million dollars. Maybe Tom Steyer can front it to her.

The post Judge: Nope. Chelsea Manning needs to pay those fines appeared first on Hot Air.

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Ecuadorian probe: You bet Assange was meeting with Russians in the embassy

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And quite a few others, as it turns out. After his arrest, word got out about Julian Assange’s influence and control at Ecuador’s embassy in the UK, but a report from a probe ordered by its government shows his power at times exceeded that of the ambassadors. Surveillance reports and analysis acquired by CNN from the probe confirm some of the allegations made by US intelligence and Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election as well:

The surveillance reports also describe how Assange turned the embassy into a command center and orchestrated a series of damaging disclosures that rocked the 2016 presidential campaign in the United States.

Despite being confined to the embassy while seeking safe passage to Ecuador, Assange met with Russians and world-class hackers at critical moments, frequently for hours at a time. He also acquired powerful new computing and network hardware to facilitate data transfers just weeks before WikiLeaks received hacked materials from Russian operatives. …

The security logs noted that Assange personally managed some of the releases “directly from the embassy” where he lived for nearly seven years. After the election, the private security company prepared an assessment of Assange’s allegiances. That report, which included open-source information, concluded there was “no doubt that there is evidence” that Assange had ties to Russian intelligence agencies.

CNN notes that the authenticity of the report has been confirmed by an Ecuadorian intelligence official. If that openness seems a bit strange, a read of the article gives plenty of reasons for Ecuadorian officials to stick it to Assange now that he’s gone. Some of the stranger behavior, such as smearing feces on walls, has been alleged earlier. This report details less bizarre but unbelievably entitled behavior, thanks to his political connections to an Ecuadorian administration that was overtly hostile to the US.

Most importantly, Assange was able to operate Wikileaks without much interference from the embassy staff during his years-long stay. The Ecuadorian government allowed Assange to get visitors in and out without being identified or searched, and to edit the visitor logs as needed to operate secretly. When one ambassador attempted to revoke those privileges, Assange got on the phone with officials in Quito, who forced the ambassador to reverse the order.

However, the biggest part of the story is what connects the records to US intelligence conclusions. Assange used his pull to create this fiefdom in order to get access to some very interesting people. By June 2016, his operation had taken aim at the US election, with a little help from Assange’s friends:

Assange was busy back at the embassy. That month, members of the security team worked overtime to handle at least 75 visits to Assange, nearly double the monthly average of visits logged by the security company that year. He met Russian citizens and a hacker later flagged in the Mueller report as a potential courier for emails stolen from the Democrats.

Also in June, WikiLeaks secretly communicated with Russian hackers and Assange publicly announced plans to release new material about Clinton. The Mueller report says the Russian hackers obscured their identities by using online personas for all their communications with WikiLeaks, which included emails and direct messages to WikiLeaks’ account on Twitter.

Assange took at least seven meetings that month with Russians and others with Kremlin ties, according to the visitor logs.

Small wonder, then, that the US intelligence community made the connection. Given Assange’s role in the leaks of diplomatic cables earlier, the CIA and other agencies had to have their eye on Assange, and since he was stuck in the embassy, he would have been easy to keep that eye fixed on who was going in and out. Those observations would have been difficult to make public, in terms of protecting sources and methods. However, the Ecuadorians have little concern over that since it all took place in their embassy anyway.

This report, assuming it can be independently authenticated in a US court, might give prosecutors a good way to avoid exposing American spycraft in a trial. That assumes Assange will get extradited to face prosecutors in the first place, but it’s looking like a strong possibility. As long as the Department of Justice declines to seek the death penalty, the UK appears content to send him our way.

The post Ecuadorian probe: You bet Assange was meeting with Russians in the embassy appeared first on Hot Air.

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US submits formal extradition request with UK for Assange — just under the wire

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Will the US get to try Julian Assange? At least we’ve finally gotten in line, and not a moment too soon. As a deadline for an extradition request loomed, the Trump administration finally filed its formal paperwork with the United Kingdom to gave Assange sent here for trial:

The United States has submitted its formal request to the United Kingdom to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to a US official with knowledge of the matter.

Assange was arrested in April at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London and the US had roughly 65 days — or until mid-June — to send in full extradition papers.

Prosecutors initially charged Assange with a single count of computer intrusion, but last month added 17 new counts, including controversial charges under the Espionage Act for encouraging, receiving and publishing national defense information in concert with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning.

That indictment had to get filed before submitting the extradition request, the Washington Post explained last night. Otherwise, the treaty between the US and the UK would have prohibited any further charges from being added. That means Assange won’t have to wonder what else American prosecutors might have up their sleeves.

For instance, it appears that Assange won’t play a role in another high-profile case involving Wikileaks:

The same treaty bars the United States from prosecuting Assange for any alleged crimes beyond those outlined in the extradition request, unless those acts occur after his extradition. In an 18-count indictment filed last month, prosecutors charged Assange with violating the Espionage Act and conspiring to hack into a government computer.

The Justice Department did not pursue Assange for the 2017 exposure of Central Intelligence Agency hacking tools known as “Vault 7,” according to government officials, out of concern that doing so would do more damage to national security. Joshua Adam Schulte, a former CIA employee, is accused in New York federal court of leaking that information to WikiLeaks.

That probably won’t help Chelsea Manning in getting out of jail. Manning refuses to testify to the grand jury issued the broader indictment on Assange, but their work isn’t done yet — and neither is Manning’s:

A grand jury investigation of Assange has remained active in recent weeks. Former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning, whose interactions with Assange form the basis of the charges against him, remains in jail for refusing to testify before the grand jury. Sigurdur Thordarson, a former WikiLeaks associate who became an FBI informant, says he voluntarily met with prosecutors in Virginia late last month and was asked detailed questions about Assange’s relationships with hackers. A spokesman with the U.S. attorney’s office in Alexandria declined to comment on Thordarson’s account.

About the only thing that will help Manning at this point is the trial of Assange, at which point the grand jury will close its involvement in the case. Can we expect to see that process begin with Manning’s arrival in the US? Until last week, it appeared we’d have to compete with Sweden in the gold-medal round of the Assange Olympics. A court ruling on June 3rd may have taken the Swedes out of contention and handed us the prize by default, with judges ruling that prosecutors should not pursue extradition. The government has yet to file an appeal to that ruling, and until they do, the US extradition request would stand alone.

Even so, the demand would likely be controversial. Fortunately for the US, the Tories are in the middle of a leadership fight in which hopefuls for the prime minister position are vying to see who can give the biggest middle finger to the EU. Current foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt is one of the candidates and the person with the most influence now on any decision to fight extradition, and Hunt made it clear two Sundays ago that he carries no brief for Assange:

“Well, we would have to follow our own legal processes, just as the U.S. has to follow its own legal processes,” Hunt told “Face the Nation” Sunday. “But would I want to stand in the way of Julian Assange facing justice? No, I would not.” …

Asked about concerns raised by United Nations officials about Assange’s imprisonment and possible extradition, Hunt said what has has happened to the Wikileaks founder in recent weeks is the “right thing.”

“Julian Assange is someone who is alleged to have committed some very serious crimes, alleged to have led to people’s deaths,” he added. “And so it is absolutely right that he faces justice, and he has no more reason to escape justice than anyone else who is alleged to have committed crimes.”

In other words … pack your bags, Mr. Assange, and get ready for a long plane trip.

The post US submits formal extradition request with UK for Assange — just under the wire appeared first on Hot Air.

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Sweden makes up their mind about Assange

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Color me surprised, because events in the Julian Assange extradition saga are moving more quickly than I’d anticipated. This week we’ve already learned that most of the likely contenders to be the next British Prime Minister aren’t opposed to extraditing Assange and may allow the process to take place without intervention. (Assuming a court agrees, of course.) But when writing about that event, I pointed out that Sweden might have first dibs on collecting the Wikileaks founder and putting him on trial for rape.

I don’t know if someone from the White House has been putting a bug in the Swedes’ ears, but they are reportedly backing down on their claim now and passing on extraditing him themselves. (Associated Press)

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should not be extradited to Sweden for a revived rape investigation, but should still be questioned in the case while he is imprisoned in Britain, a Swedish court ruled Monday,

The ruling by the Uppsala District Court doesn’t mean the preliminary investigation must be abandoned, only that Assange doesn’t face extradition to Sweden any time soon.

Eva-Marie Persson, Sweden’s deputy director of public prosecutions, said she has not decided whether to appeal.

That strikes me as more than a little confusing. The prosecutors in Sweden want to reserve the right to question Assange in England, presumably in relation to the rape charges. But what benefit do they receive from questioning him if they’re ruling out bringing him back to stand trial? I suppose they could convict him in absentia and just wait to see what the United States does with him, but that’s probably not going to provide much consolation to the victim.

In any event, that’s Sweden’s business and I suppose we should leave them to handle the case as they see fit. In the meantime, their decision clears yet another major hurdle in terms of getting our hands on Assange, bringing him to Quantico and putting him on trial. That’s not a done deal, however, because a Britsh court will still have to go along with the plan and Assange will be fighting extradition every step of the way.

To complicate matters, as we’ve discussed here previously, the clock is still ticking in terms of the statute of limitations. The five-year limit for most federal crimes has already expired. But as Andrew McCarthy reported back in April, there is one exception to that rule found in Section 2332b of the penal code, that pushes the deadline out to eight years in cases of “acts of terrorism transcending national boundaries.”

Even under the eight-year standard, we’re still cutting it close. But if the Brits can manage to get things wrapped up efficiently, we might still have a shot at him. And then all of the people in the United States who are insisting Assange is a journalist and thereby protected from prosecution will start an entirely new chapter in this debate.

The post Sweden makes up their mind about Assange appeared first on Hot Air.

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Sounds like Julian Assange’s future is coming into focus

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We had some interesting news about the Julian Assange extradition case over the weekend, though it didn’t get much play on cable news. These updates may wind up proving a bit embarrassing for Alan Dershowitz, however. He was interviewed by John Catsimatidis on Sunday and the subject of Assange came up. Dershowitz made a bold prediction, saying that the Brits weren’t going to extradite the Wikileaks founder to face charges relating to the Espionage Act. (NY Post, emphasis added)

Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz predicted Wikileaks founder Julian Assange won’t be extradited to the United States to face charges under the Espionage Act.

”I think the Trump administration has overplayed its hand. So did the Justice Department,” Dershowitz told John Catsimatidis on his AM 970 show “The Cats Roundtable” in an interview that aired Sunday. “They had a very strong case for extradition when they initially accused him of trying to break into a password [protected system] and stealing materials. That’s a crime.”

“But publishing materials? That’s​ very different. That’s​ The New York Times and The Washington Post​,” he continued. “And, I think, Great Britain is going to have a lot of difficulty extraditing Assange to the U.S. to face trial for merely publishing information stolen not by him but by others.​”

So there you have it. I guess we won’t be getting our hands on Assange after all, eh? I’m sure the British government is paying close attention to whatever Dershowitz is saying. And in order to get the extradition approved, they would need to convince several officials in London, including Jeremy Hunt, the Foreign Secretary, particularly if he winds up replacing Theresa May as Prime Minister.

Speak of the devil, only hours after the Dershowitz interview, Jeremy Hunt appeared on Face the Nation and was asked the same question. His response? Hey, we’re not going to stand in the way of American Justice. (CBS News)

The U.K.’s top diplomat said he would not stand in the way of Julian Assange’s extradition to the U.S., a move the Justice Department has requested since the WikiLeaks founder was expelled from the Ecuadorian embassy in London and arrested by British authorities in April.

Pressed on the U.S. government’s extradition request for Assange, British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, one of the high-profile Conservative politicians vying to replace outgoing Prime Minister Theresa May, expressed no sympathy for Assange and said he would not block an extradition if he was chosen to lead the British government.

“Well, we would have to follow our own legal processes, just as the U.S. has to follow its own legal processes,” Hunt told “Face the Nation” Sunday. “But would I want to stand in the way of Julian Assange facing justice? No, I would not.”

So Jeremy Hunt isn’t in the mood to block extradition, but it’s far from certain that he’ll be the Prime Minister. There’s been a lot of talk about the possibility that it might be former London Mayor and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson. Perhaps Assange will find him to be more of a friendly face. Oh, wait… no, he probably won’t.

None of this provides absolute assurances, but the next PM is definitely going to be one of the Tories or their conservative allies. They haven’t been fans of Assange from the beginning. Plus, by the time the extradition hearings finish playing out, the Brits may be fully into Brexit and they’ll be working hard to arrange a solid, bilateral trade deal with the United States. That’s not the sort of situation where they’d be likely to feel like starting a fight with our State Department.

Of course, none of this will matter if the Swedes get their hands on Assange first. Hopefully, there are some discussions going on in the background to prevent that from happening, but we likely won’t find out until a bit further into the summer.

The post Sounds like Julian Assange’s future is coming into focus appeared first on Hot Air.

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Julian Assange: Torture victim?

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Has Wikileaks founder Julian Assange suffered from “prolonged exposure to psychological torture,” leaving him unfit to stand trial or be extradited? Well, that’s the opinion of one “expert” from, wait for it… the United Nations. (Of course.) As such, it’s being suggested that the Brits refuse any requests to ship him out of the country and instead let him get on with his recovery from this horrible abuse. (BBC)

Julian Assange has suffered “prolonged exposure to psychological torture”, the UN’s torture expert has said.

Nils Melzer urged Britain not to extradite the WikiLeaks founder, warning that his human rights would be violated and that he is not fit to stand trial.

He also accused “several democratic states” of a “concerted effort to break [Assange’s] will”.

The UK government said it “disagreed with a number of his observations”.

So Melzer is the UN’s “special rapporteur on torture.” I suppose you have to bring in somebody with a title like that to explain to the unwashed masses how anything that’s happened to Assange could be construed as torture. The UK is obviously disagreeing with his conclusions and stating that they don’t condone torture, but Melzer is talking to the BBC and anyone else with a microphone saying the opposite.

But what does he characterize as torture? He describes how Assange was “deliberately isolated and… persecuted by several democratic states.”

Pardon me if I call horse hockey on this one. The time Assange spent in the Ecuadorean embassy was done entirely of his own volition. They weren’t keeping him locked up in there. At any time he wanted he could have walked out the door, had a chat with the London police and gone off to face a democratic trial and spend some time in a non-torturous prison where he could have made all sorts of new friends.

And even while he was in the embassy he wasn’t in isolation. He had regular contact with the embassy staff, enjoyed regular visits with his attorneys and entertained a host of celebrity guests. These included Pamela Anderson, Lady Gaga, Nigel Farage, and Manchester United soccer star Eric Cantona. The list goes on.

He had his food delivered to him, had his phone and, until only the final few weeks, had internet access. I agree that it’s not ideal to be cooped up in the same building for years on end, but it’s not like he was breaking big rocks into little ones at Rikers Island. And, as I said above, he was there by his own choice. The doors were never locked from the inside.

This sounds like a ploy to build up public sympathy for Assange so he can avoid extradition to either Sweden or the United States. His legal team just managed to find somebody from the UN to come to bolster their cause.

The post Julian Assange: Torture victim? appeared first on Hot Air.

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It Looks Like Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange May Never Face the Charges the U.S. Levied Against Him

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Julian Assange is currently sitting in jail in the U.K. and he’s got quite the list of suitors pining for his time.

The Wikileaks founder was finally kicked out of the Ecuadorian embassy about a month ago. Given his mental state and some of the stories of his time there, there wasn’t much of a path for him to stay there anyway. Shortly after his arrest, the United States unveiled a list of charges against Assange, including conspiracy revolving around the hacking efforts of Bradley Manning.

Ironically, while the Obama administration was seeking to put Assange away for life, they were granting clemency to Manning, allowing his release just seven years into his sentence. None of it made much sense and was probably wholly driven by the fact that Manning had become a pop-culture figure on the left due to his transgenderism.

The current charges against Assange are very flimsy and seem to rely on an extremely stretched idea of what conspiracy is.

He rejected the notion that Assange could claim to be a mere journalist with free-speech protections. “WikiLeaks is more than just a repository for classified information, they’re actually out actively seeking it. And the question is whether Assange was enabling individuals like Chelsea Manning to steal classified information. That would make him a co-conspirator.”

It is not illegal to actively seek out classified material as long as you aren’t the one illegally obtaining it. If it were, The New York Times, among many others, would no longer exist. Does that make Assange a “journalist?” Not in the traditional sense, but it doesn’t really matter because the protections under the law apply to everyone, not just self-appointed mainstream reporters. The only real question is whether Assange assisted in any hacking and the evidence of that appears non-existent.

It may not matter though because it doesn’t look like Assange is headed to the U.S. anytime soon. The Swedish Government has decided to re-open the rape case against him that they had originally dropped some years ago and that puts a wrench in the situation.

Sweden will re-open its investigation into an allegation of rape against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, the country’s deputy chief prosecutor announced on Monday.

Prosecutor Eva-Marie Persson told reporters in Stockholm that the investigation into the alleged rape had been suspended in 2017 not for lack of evidence but as a result of Assange’s continued residence in Ecuador’s London embassy.

Sweden pretty much has first call on Assange. They’ve already got a court ruling from the U.K. authorizing his extradition while the U.S. would still have to fight those battles. Because of this, it’s likely any statutes of limitations will have run their course by the time the U.S. gets their shot at him.

There’s some hint that this could be gotten around by claiming an exemption in the law dealing with terrorism across international borders but that’d be ludicrous in my opinion. While Assange is clearly a bad actor and it’s perfectly acceptable to oppose his tactics, that doesn’t mean we should massage the meaning of the law to absurdity just to target him. He’s clearly not a terrorist nor has he participated in terrorist acts.

In the end, what I think this looks like is the U.S. overplaying their hand. As much as a lot of people would like to haul Assange in, I think the technicalities of the law will preclude that from happening. That leaves the real threat to Assange’s freedom residing in Sweden and I’m guessing they’ll make whatever they’ve got stick for obvious reasons.

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The post It Looks Like Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange May Never Face the Charges the U.S. Levied Against Him appeared first on RedState.

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The Assange case just hit another snag

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The last we heard from Julian Assange involved a year in jail in London on failure to appear charges and a pair of extradition hearings to determine if he could be shipped to the United States. That process was already estimated to last well into next year, but now another complication has arisen. After previously dropping rape charges against him, Sweden is reopening their case against Assange and may want to jump in line in front of us and have him extradited over there first. (CNN)

Sweden will reopen the investigation into an allegation of rape against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, the country’s deputy chief prosecutor announced on Monday.

Swedish Deputy Director of Public Prosecution Eva-Marie Persson revealed Sweden would resume proceedings at a press conference in the capital of Stockholm on Monday morning.

The Australian whistleblower was accused of sexual assault and rape by two women in Sweden after visiting the country in August 2010.

The Swedish claim is a little complicated, but they may have a better case than the United States and a reason to get their hands on Assange first. The UK Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that he could be extradited to Sweden and that hasn’t changed, despite his seven-year stay in the embassy. And while the statute of limitations on a sexual assault charge in Sweden has run out, the rape charge hasn’t, but they have to get him into a courtroom by August of 2020. When you add all of that up, Sweden has a pretty strong case and a reason for their claim to be heard before the United States’ request.

That brings us to the matching question back here in the United States. The actions Assange allegedly took while conspiring with (then Bradley) Manning occurred in 2010. Hasn’t the window closed on that one? Andrew McCarthy examined that question last month at National Review and the answer is no better than a definite maybe. The sections of the penal code that would most likely apply here (covering conspiracy and computer fraud) would normally have a five-year statute of limitations. But they contain exceptions for “acts of terrorism transcending national boundaries.”

So it’s possible that we could still get Assange in handcuffs in America, but as McCarthy points out, we’ll have to win the statute of limitations argument twice… once in London and once in Virginia. And assuming Assange has an even marginally competent legal team, that’s not going to be easy at all.

The post The Assange case just hit another snag appeared first on Hot Air.

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Chelsea Manning sprung from jail… but probably not for long

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After spending more than two months in a jail cell on contempt charges, convicted traitor Chelsea Manning was released yesterday. This was not a signal that she had finally decided to cooperate and answer questions before the grand jury. Nor was it an indication that one of her attorneys’ many motions to allow her to go free had been granted. It was just the fact that the grand jury had concluded their term and been dismissed. At that point, Manning could no longer be held in jail. (Gizmodo)

Chelsea Manning was released today from the Virginia jail where she spent 62 days for refusing to testify about her past association with WikiLeaks before a federal grand jury in the Eastern District of Virginia.

Attorneys for Manning said the release came after the grand jury’s term expired on Thursday…

“Chelsea will continue to refuse to answer questions, and will use every available legal defense to prove to District Judge Trenga that she has just cause for her refusal to give testimony,” her lawyers said.

Manning was jailed on March 8 for contempt, a process crime, for which she is not being punished; rather, her time in jail is intended to coerce her into cooperating. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a motion filed by her legal team to have her set free last month.

Manning will probably want to go enjoy a nice meal and a night in a comfortable bed because she may not be free for long. No sooner was she out of jail than she was served with a second subpoena to appear before a new grand jury that’s being impaneled one week from today. Since her attorneys are already issuing public statements saying she will continue to refuse to answer any questions before any grand jury, Manning is very likely to wind up right back in the same cell by next Friday night.

Manning’s release had been anticipated because the last grand jury had been at work for quite a while before she was called before them and there are limits as to how long you can reasonably keep the jurors on the job. But the new grand jury will be starting fresh and could have a long road ahead of them. With that in mind, Manning could conceivably wind up spending the rest of the year in jail if she continues her protest.

While everyone has the right to their own opinion, Manning’s protest here is certainly curious, to say the least. She’s not just saying that she refuses to answer any questions about Wikileaks and Julian Assange. She’s refusing to answer any questions about anything in front of a grand jury as a protest of the grand jury system itself. Somehow I don’t think the entire nation is going to abandon the grand jury system simply because of a political stunt from one former resident of Fort Leavenworth. With that in mind, she might want to prepare for another long stretch of eating jail food.

The post Chelsea Manning sprung from jail… but probably not for long appeared first on Hot Air.

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OOOPS. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept Burns Another Leaker

Westlake Legal Group ooops-glenn-greenwalds-the-intercept-burns-another-leaker OOOPS. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept Burns Another Leaker the intercept terry albury Reality Winner NGA National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Media Leak Investigations Julian Assange jeremy scahill Glenn Greenwald Front Page Stories Featured Story daniel hale Allow Media Exception

Westlake Legal Group facepalm-620x414 OOOPS. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept Burns Another Leaker the intercept terry albury Reality Winner NGA National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Media Leak Investigations Julian Assange jeremy scahill Glenn Greenwald Front Page Stories Featured Story daniel hale Allow Media Exception

A little earlier today, the US Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia announced that yet another person has been indicted for leaking classified information to a media outlet. The guy involved, Daniel Hale, is a former Air Force analyst who later worked as a contractor for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). This is from the indictment:

According to allegations in the indictment, beginning in April 2013, while enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and assigned to the NSA, Hale began communicating with a reporter. Hale met with the reporter in person on multiple occasions, and, at times, communicated with the reporter via an encrypted messaging platform. Then, in February 2014, while working as a cleared defense contractor at NGA, Hale printed six classified documents unrelated to his work at NGA and soon after exchanged a series of messages with the reporter. Each of the six documents printed were later published by the reporter’s news outlet.

According to allegations in the indictment, while employed as a cleared defense contractor for NGA, Hale printed from his Top Secret computer 36 documents, including 23 documents unrelated to his work at NGA. Of the 23 documents unrelated to his work at NGA, Hale provided at least 17 to the reporter and/or the reporter’s online news outlet, which published the documents in whole or in part. Eleven of the published documents were marked as Top Secret or Secret.

According to allegations in the indictment, in August 2014, Hale’s cell phone contact list included contact information for the reporter, and he possessed two thumb drives. One thumb drive contained a page marked “SECRET” from a classified document that Hale had printed in February 2014 and had attempted to delete from the thumb drive. The other thumb drive contained Tor software and the Tails operating system, which were recommended by the reporter’s online news outlet in an article published on its website regarding how to anonymously “leak” documents.

Met with a report, you say? You mean like this?

Westlake Legal Group scahill-and-hale-book-tour-620x455 OOOPS. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept Burns Another Leaker the intercept terry albury Reality Winner NGA National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Media Leak Investigations Julian Assange jeremy scahill Glenn Greenwald Front Page Stories Featured Story daniel hale Allow Media Exception

Screengrab from https://twitter.com/jimmysllama/status/1126501354053218304

That image is the reporter, The Intercept’s Jeremy Scahill, seated on the left, and the guy contemplating the prison shower room there on the right is Daniel Hale.

What makes this case interesting is that Hale’s home was searched by the FBI back in 2014 and he appeared in a film that used the information he leaked in 2016:

In October 2015, The Intercept published a “cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia.” The media organization said the documents were provided by a whistleblower and offered “unprecedented glimpse into Obama’s drone wars.” They were called “The Drone Papers.”

The Intercept granted “the source’s request for anonymity because the materials are classified and because the U.S. government has engaged in aggressive prosecution of whistleblowers.”

Hale also appeared in the 2016 documentary, “National Bird.” He wore a pin supporting U.S. Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning and was following CIA whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling’s prosecution. The FBI raided his home on August 8, 2014, while the film was in production. He reached out to attorney Jesselyn Radack for legal assistance.

This makes three leakers that The Intercept has burned to the ground because their staff is just too stupid to manage confidential sources. The other two are the improbably named Reality Winner and former FBI agent and current federal inmate Terry Albury.

There are two other interesting points here.

Why did it take five years to indict this guy? That’s sort of a rhetorical question. The Obama administration never cared about anti-American leaks to leftwing media, they were only concerned about leaks about Benghazi and Fast and Furious.

The second item is more interesting. Julian Assange was indicted for giving advice to the Manning creature on how to possibly acquire classified information. According to charging documents, Scahill did the same thing.

Will Justice go after him and, if not, why not?

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The post OOOPS. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept Burns Another Leaker appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group facepalm-300x200 OOOPS. Glenn Greenwald’s The Intercept Burns Another Leaker the intercept terry albury Reality Winner NGA National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Media Leak Investigations Julian Assange jeremy scahill Glenn Greenwald Front Page Stories Featured Story daniel hale Allow Media Exception   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com